11/14/2018
ULS NEWS ARTICLES

Today's News

University of Louisiana System

19 2018-08-31
Lafayette

UL-Lafayette researchers investigate drying waterways


UL Lafayette hydrologist Dr. Katie H. Costigan is on a multi-university team of researchers who secured a National Science Foundation grant to examine how drying waterways affects the creatures that call them home
In a National Science Foundation-funded study, investigators plan to examine intermittent waterways, which dry or stop flowing periodically, as well as perennial streams that flow continuously, said Dr. Katie H. Costigan.

The assistant professor in UL Lafayette’s School of Geosciences will share $1.6 million with researchers from the University of California, Berkeley; Northern Arizona University; Virginia Tech; and the University of Arizona. The University of Oklahoma received $1.4 million from NSF for the same project.
“We are trying to understand why these streams dry and why streams often behave differently even though they may be very close to one another,” Costigan said.
“The goal is to answer what happens when rivers run dry. We are looking at how rivers dry as a function of space and time, and what happens to the life in these streams when this happens.”
The funds Costigan and the stream team will share are part of a $9 million round of funding NSF awarded earlier this month. The grants went to researchers nationwide who are examining how organisms respond to environmental changes.
Dr. Daniel C. Allen, an assistant professor of biology at the University of Oklahoma, is leading the streams initiative to which Costigan is contributing. In a press release, he said researchers want “to change the way we think about streams.”

“For decades, we have studied the ecology of streams that always have flowing water, while largely ignoring those that do not, but only 40 percent of U.S. streams always flow. This project will be one of the first to study both,” Allen said.

When streams dry, invertebrates and other creatures that dwell within them are affected, so researchers will study how drying influences ecology as well.
Fieldwork will take place at 100 sites in the central, southern and western United States. Costigan will conduct field research in Mississippi and Georgia, and will collect hydrological and ecological data at each site.
Some study sites are part of the NSF-funded National Ecological Observatory Network, which uses sensors to monitor water chemistry and nutrients, and populations of invertebrates, fish and algae.

Researchers will use data taken from the monitors and collected during their fieldwork to create hydrological models that can simulate different climate scenarios.
What researchers find could hold implications for water management and flood mitigation locally, Costigan said.
Although Louisiana’s residents often think of the implications of overflowing waterways, the other side of the coin – when rivers dry – is equally important.
19 2018-08-31
Lafayette

Places and Faces: The Ragin’ Cajuns Store


UL Lafayette recently opened their new The Ragin’ Cajuns Store location next to Blackham Caliseum. News 15’s Megan Woods spent the morning exploring the store with associate director of the store, Sarah Armentor. Check it out.

19 2018-08-31
Lafayette

GEAR UP Parent Information Event


Lafayette, LA- GEAR UP is hosting a college guidance event for the 2018-19 school year, for parents of GEAR UP students. The event will be held on September 17, 2018 from 5:45pm to 6:45pm in the UL Lafayette, Student Union Ballroom.

Parents will have the chance to learn more about the opportunities for GEAR UP students this school year including: information on ACT preparation, and receiving technology access at home.

Gear up students are 10th and 11th graders at four LPSS GEAR UP high schools: Acadiana High, Carencro High, Lafayette High and North side High; GEAR UP staff will present events and opportunities for the 2018-2019 school year along with a keynote presentation by Dr. DeWayne Bowie, Vice President of Enrollment Management at UL Lafayette.
Space is limited to the first 200 parents. Sign up today at www.lpssgearup.com


19 2018-06-26
Lafayette

Here's what you need to know about a new hazing law in Louisiana


There's a new hazing law in town. Here's what it means.
The Louisiana Legislature passed House Bill 78, now known as Act 635 or the Max Gruver Act after the LSU freshman who died last fall after a night of drinking at Phi Delta Fraternity.
His death inspired several proposed bills to stop hazing, and this one puts into place harsh penalties, like jail time and fines ranging from $1,000 to $10,000.
Time behind bars can be anywhere from 30 days to five years. The degree of punishment depends on whether someone becomes seriously injured or dies.
The bill, authored by Rep. Nancy Landry, R-Lafayette, passed the House by a vote of 88-1 and was signed into law by the governor May 31.

Buy Photo
State Representative Nancy Landry introduces Keith Stutes as he prepares to announce his candidacy for the office of District Attorney in Scott, LA, Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013. Paul Kieu, The Advertiser (Photo: Paul Kieu, The Advertiser)

Now hazing is considered a felony in Louisiana as it is in at least 11 other states, according to the Associated Press.
The bill defined hazing as any intentional, knowing or reckless act directed against another when both of the following apply:
The person knew or should have known that the act endangers the physical health or safety of the other person or causes severe emotional distress.
The act was associated with pledging, being initiated into, affiliating with, participating in, holding office in, or maintaining membership in any organization.
It provides a litany of examples of hazing, ranging from physical brutality (whipping and paddling a la "Dazed and Confused") to excess alcohol consumption (like in Gruver's case) or sleep deprivation.

The latter that came into question last fall, too, through civil lawsuits filed against a University of Louisiana at Lafayette fraternity.
MORE: Regents approve med school license for ULM
The two suits allege a UL Lafayette student subjected to forced sleep-deprivation and other Kappa Sigma fraternity hazing during the 2016 homecoming weekend fell asleep at the wheel and killed another student.
Fraternities or organizations can be fined and sanctioned, too, along with their leadership for failing to report hazing. Sanctions can include losing public funds.
And it doesn't matter if the victim "voluntarily" participated. It is still considered hazing and a felony, according to the law.
The law applies to colleges, of course, as well as elementary and secondary schools.
19 2018-06-26
Lafayette

There's a new hazing law in town. Here's what it means. The Louisiana Legislature passed House Bill 78, now known as Act 635 or the Max Gruver Act aft



LAFAYETTE, La. (KLFY) - Both UL Lafayette and it student are feeling a weight lifted off their shoulders after finding out that higher education and the TOPS program will continue to be funded.
"I'm so happy that our state legislators have found it important and a priority of our state to make sure that they did fund TOPS for our students," says Dr. De Wayne Bowie, Vice President of Enrollment Management at the university.
Bowie says the outcome of the four month long budget battle is a win for a large part of the school's student body. He tells News 10 that over 90% of UL's incoming freshmen that are from Louisiana have TOPS.
He adds that because of this decision, there is a number of students who will now be able to attend college this fall, "We're actually reaching out to those other students who were kind of waiting to see what was going to happen with TOPS and the funding, to let them know that now we have some really great news for them... That they can move forward with their plans to attend college."
And Dr. Bowie tells us it's not just the students that received good news this Monday. He says knowing higher education would continue to be funded was another step in the right direction for the university.
19 2018-05-14
Lafayette

New UL-Lafayette initiative to help with regional flood control efforts in Acadiana


As policymakers, funding organizations and citizen volunteer groups grapple with trying to prevent another disaster like the 2016 flood that engulfed Acadiana and much of south Louisiana, a new phrase has taken hold: water knows no boundaries.

In other words, replacing parochial, parish-by-parish flood-control initiatives with a regional approach to watershed management is now seen as critical to sustainability.

While the Acadiana Planning Commission, the local Sierra Club chapter and others try to hammer out a new set of best practices, there has been one missing element — professional researchers who are dedicated to gathering data from Acadiana’s three major watersheds that can be used to form the basis of a regional master plan.

Enter the Louisiana Watershed Flood Center, a new initiative of the Institute for Coastal and Water Research at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette that will study how tributaries of the Vermilion River, Bayou Teche and Mermentau River interact with each other.

Elevation and flow data is available along those three major waterways, but not the coulees, streams and other channels that feed them, said Emad Habib, a UL-Lafayette civil engineering professor and director of the new center.

“Not everybody lives along the Vermilion. These are where our neighborhoods, where our cities are,” Habib said. “Without really having data at that scale, we remain limited in terms of how credible our predictions can be.”

One of the center’s projects will deploy a new type of sensor on Coulee Mine that can be placed on bridges and other places outside the water, with the help of ultrasonic and radar technologies. The new sensors are potentially more cost effective than the traditional ones in use in the major waterways, Habib said, although their accuracy is an outstanding question that researchers will study.

Collaboration with other researchers in the United States and around the world is one of the center’s objectives, to align new technologies with climates that are suitable for them.

“Most of the time the answer is not black or white. It’s somewhere in between, meaning it’s good in this situation, but not good in that situation,” Habib said. “Environmental conditions in one place are different than another.”

Watershed research is only one of the center’s bailiwicks. Another project aims to test if the abundance of rain and surface water in south Louisiana can be used to replenish the Chicot Aquifer, which is the primary source of groundwater for the region. Beyond drinking water, the aquifer also supplies agricultural and industrial users, leading to depletion.

“We wanted to kind of reverse the problem to see if that excess of surface water that causes flooding can actually be used to address some of the water and availability and sustainability issues,” Habib said.

Habib said the aquifer project is being funded with $200,000 from Louisiana Sea Grant, a federally-funded program housed at LSU that pays for coastal stewardship research and outreach.

The center has also received a $15,000 seed grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to link its regional flood forecasting to a national model that analyzes 2.7 million channels across the United States, according to a UL-Lafayette news release.

“We want to interface with all these entities,” Habib said. “This is not a one-entity solution. This will take a collective effort.”


19 2018-05-14
Lafayette

Pins a point of pride for UL Lafayette nursing graduates


When nursing graduate Mallory Landry received her diploma during Commencement ceremonies Friday, a circular pin already adorned her red graduation gown.

Landry and 61 other graduates from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s College of Nursing and Allied Health Professions received the pins Thursday during a ceremony filled with symbolism and sentiment.

In years past, nursing graduates received their pins at Commencement. Thursday’s ceremony was the first time the college held a separate pinning ceremony.

Prior to the event, graduates, faculty and administrators – all bedecked in full academic regalia – mingled outside the Student Union’s Atchafalaya Ballroom. The prelude seemed like a dress rehearsal for Commencement.

But the pinning ceremony carried its own special meaning as an initiation into the nursing profession. The round pin, which contains two red and white spheres encircling a golden UL Lafayette logo, provides a symbolic link to the University, said Dr. Lisa Broussard, head of the college’s Department of Nursing.

“It holds a lot of status and prestige. When you go to work, wear your pin,” Broussard told the graduating seniors. “There are a lot of people who are out there who look at that pin and know what it means.”

The nursing college has gained a reputation for the well-trained, and eminently employable, professionals it produces. As Broussard introduced the seniors Thursday night, she announced their post-graduation plans.

Nearly all had secured nursing jobs in Louisiana, Texas and other states.

Landry, a native of New Iberia, La., who was also the college’s Outstanding Graduate, starts work next month as an oncology nurse at Lafayette General Medical Center.

During clinical rotations, in which she and other students worked at area hospitals, Landry shadowed alumni who displayed their UL Lafayette nursing pins on their uniforms and identification badges. She plans to do the same.

“It's unbelievable for me to have this pin. I know whenever I am a nurse, I will be able to wear this pin proudly and that the nursing students who follow me will look at me the same way.”

The pins place their recipients into a long historical lineage of care. The idea of a badge to identify nurses dates to the 19th century when Queen Victoria of Great Britain presented Florence Nightingale with a bejeweled broach to honor the treatment the nurse provided soldiers during the Crimean War.

More than 750,000 soldiers and civilians died during the two-year religious conflict.

Far more would have perished had it not been for the training Nightingale provided other nurses and for her groundbreaking work in sanitation and hygiene at a time when disease was killing more soldiers than battlefield wounds.

As Nightingale navigated field hospitals during the Crimean conflict, she carried a small lantern. Soldiers and the British press dubbed her the “Lady with the Lamp.”

Today, the lamp is the official symbol of the nursing profession.

Nightingale, who historians consider the founder of the nursing profession, loomed large over Thursday’s ceremony.

After Dr. Melinda Oberleitner, the college’s dean, pinned the emblem on each senior’s gown, the soon-to-be graduates received glazed ceramic lamps of knowledge bearing the college’s insignia.

The newest nursing graduates face one more critical test before they officially begin their new profession.

Most will take the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses in the coming months. Over the past 35 years, graduates of the College of Nursing and Allied Health Professions have amassed a 95-percent first-time pass rate on the test.

It’s one of the highest pass rates in the country, Oberleitner said.

“Our December class has a 100-percent pass rate, so we are hoping this class has the same record.

“It’s incumbent upon us to make sure we educate our graduates to the highest level that we can, so they can transition very easily into practice,” Oberleitner continued. “The pins they received tonight make them easily recognizable as a UL Lafayette graduate, and that sets them apart. And we hear that over and over and over again.”
19 2018-05-14
Lafayette

PHOTOS- 2018 UL Graduation Ceremony



19 2018-05-14
Lafayette

Cajundome prepares for big week, capped off by six graduations


On May 19, thousands of graduates, their families and friends will congregate in and around the Cajundome for a full day of high school graduations.

Since 1991, commencement ceremonies for Lafayette Parish public schools have taken place at the arena. The five largest high schools — Acadiana, Carencro, Comeaux, Lafayette and Northside — graduate back-to-back-to-back-to-back-to-back starting at 8:30 a.m.

With a smaller class, David Thibodaux STEM Magnet Academy graduates the Friday night before in the Cajundome Convention Center.

This year’s schedule is:
•6:30 p.m. May 18, David Thibodaux
•8:30 a.m. May 19, Acadiana High
•11 a.m May 19, Carencro High
•1:30 p.m. May 19, Comeaux High
•4 p.m. May 19, Lafayette High
•7 p.m. May 19, Northside High

Joe Craig, the district’s chief administrative officer, said there has been “very little discussion” about having graduation elsewhere.

“There are very few venues that could accommodate the larger high schools, for either the graduates or families. An advantage of the 'Dome is that we do not have to limit the number of guests that can attend,” he said.

RELATED: Lafayette Parish graduation rate rises; see each school's results

Craig said high school football stadiums are an option, but are subject to problems with high heat or rain. With air conditioning being installed in all gyms, ceremonies could take place there, but guest seating could be limited.

“Graduations at the different schools might make it difficult for the superintendent, board members and staff to be available at all programs,” he said. “The board members like them in one location on the same day as it gives them an opportunity to be present for several schools.”


Lafayette Parish School Superintendent Donald AguillardBuy Photo
Lafayette Parish School Superintendent Donald Aguillard greets graduates during the awarding of diplomas at Acadiana High's commencement at the Cajundome Sat., May 20, 2017. (Photo: Advertiser file photo)


Graduating at the Cajundome comes with a cost for the school system. This year, the district will pay an estimated $50,303 for the ceremonies. That price includes:
•$6,750 for the arena facility rental
•$1,160 for rental of the Mardi Gras ballroom
•$3,375 for HVAC during rehearsals
•$23,242 for staffing, including security, emergency personnel, ushers and parking attendants
•$1,360 for rigging
•$2,800 for production technicians
•$3,500 for production set-up and tear-down
•$4,200 for maintenance set-up and tear-down
•$2,000 for post-event cleanup
•$1,916 for other miscellaneous costs

Putting on a series of successful graduations takes a lot of manpower, said Pamela Deville, the Cajundome’s assistant director. This year, about 190 part-time employees will be on hand to work as ushers, production staff, security, emergency responders, maintenance workers, receptionists, concession workers and more.






Story From USAA

See How Much You Can Save by Bundling Your Auto and Home Insurance: Get a Quote Today

See more →



“We’ve been doing it since 1991, so the backbone of it is the same. We know the time periods when graduations are going to happen. We know the set-up,” Deville said. “But every year there is a nuance and something a little bit different.”

One major difference this year is that the Cajun Heartland State Fair will not take place on graduation weekend, which is expected to free up parking space and perhaps ease congestion around the arena.

RELATED: 30 projects tackled in major Cajundome renovation

It’s still going to be a big week for the Cajundome, though.

On May 15, The Daily Advertiser hosts the annual Sports Awards there. On May 17, there’s a concert headlined by country star Thomas Rhett. The five largest graduations start less than 48 hours after the concert ends.

“With the help of a lot of great part-time workers, we are able to pull it off,” Deville said. “We have groups that will be working literally 24/7 to make it all happen.”


This map shows designated parking areas around the
This map shows designated parking areas around the Cajundome for high school graduations. (Photo: Submitted photo)


Deville said there are steps guests can take to make the graduation experience smoother. She encouraged people to leave bags at home, or bring only small bags, because they are searched upon entrance. Wear comfortable shoes, because you might have to walk a long distance, especially if you must park further away.

“The key is that if you get there too early, the other school is still graduating, so you have to park further away," she said. “There are going to be a lot of police officers out there directing traffic, trying to get people in and out, so that’s a big help. We would tell people to leave their house about 30 to 45 minutes before the graduation. That will give the other groups time to clear out so you don’t have to park so far away.”

People who are handicapped or have mobility issues can be dropped off and picked up near the Cajundome box office. Staff will be available to help people if they need assistance to get to their seats. For those who are worried about making it through the day, every graduation ceremony is broadcast live online at cajundome.com.


Graduates line up to receive diplomas during the commencementBuy Photo
Graduates line up to receive diplomas during the commencement of Lafayette High at the Cajundome Sat., May 20, 2017. (Photo: Advertiser file photo)


Craig said the district is already looking at how to handle ceremonies once Southside High has a senior class.

“The plan is to keep graduation in a central location and on a common date,” he said. “The basic plan for now is that the schools with the two smallest graduation classes would graduate on the Friday and the remaining five on Saturday.”

19 2018-05-14
Lafayette

Photos: ULL graduates fill the Cajundome for spring commencement



19 2017-10-20
Lafayette

UL softball players allege Title IX violations


One day after it was revealed their head coach is on leave, a group of University of Louisiana at Lafayette softball players have legal representation and are accusing the university of violating Title IX.

"...They feel very disrespected and mistreated and unappreciated by the athletic administration," wrote their attorney, L. Clayton Burgess, in a letter sent to the media Thursday afternoon.

"These are very serious issues that not only go to the core of gender equity but also involve discrimination because they are female athletes and even unfair treatment and retaliation by present ULL athletic administrators," Burgess wrote.

Title IX is the federal law that requires educational facilities, such as universities, to refrain from gender-based discrimination against students. It's most notably used by plaintiffs in lawsuits to force universities to provide equitable sports opportunities to female students.

Coach Loteif's attorney tells KATC he was placed on administrative leave after a "passionate conversation about gender equity" with university personnel. Loteif claims he raised concerns about issues like getting the grass cut, making sure students have an athletic trainer at practice, making sure the assistant coaches get paid, and ensuring female athletes get a functional assessment before doing weight training.

A university spokesman declined to comment on the background of Loteif's leave, citing personnel matters.

Wednesday, KATC requested a formal statement of the university's position on Title IX. We were provided with this statement:

"As its Title IX policy states, the University is committed to creating and maintaining a campus environment in which all individuals are treated with respect and dignity. The University of Louisiana at Lafayette complies with the mandate of Title IX and is committed to maintaining an environment of equal opportunity for both genders in all areas of university life."

We've reached out to UL for comment on the news that some softball players now have legal representation. So far we've not heard back.


19 2017-10-20
Lafayette

Flood victim receives “Modeste” house designed by UL architecture students


A dedication ceremony was held yesterday for the “Modeste” house, an innovate 216-square foot tiny house designed by UL architecture students.

The home, which was donated to Habitat for Humanity, has a ton of futuristic features and energy-efficient heating and cooling. It will become home to a New Iberia resident who lost his home in the August 2016 floods.

It’s very sustainable with solar panels, highly insulated walls, and very efficient appliances. It’s a huge thing for our department.” said UL Architecture Professor W. Geoff Gjertson. “It’s wonderful to be able to serve the community, but most important it is a great as an educational tool for the students.”
19 2017-08-17
Lafayette

UL taking time to 'get it right' with Cajuns mascot


With a new school year fast-approaching, UL plans to form a committee to decide whom — or what — the Ragin’ Cajuns’ future mascot will be.

Will it be Cayenne, the longtime UL spirit leader who in recent seasons has been living in exile?

Will it be a revival of some former school mascot, a list that includes Mr. Ragin’ Cajun and the Fabulous Cajun Chicken?

Or will it be a new creation?

Those are questions for the larger university community to answer, UL athletic director Bryan Maggard — new to the job this year — suggests.

But don’t expect that decision to come anytime soon.

Maggard said he believes that in “12-to-24 months … we should have some type of direction that we’re going on that.”

“The timeframe there — I think the institution, rightfully so, wants to get it right, do it the right way,” he said.

More: Cayenne caper

Cayenne has been missing for a few seasons, with no new mascot or spirit leader entertaining fans in its place.

Amid suspicion it’s all part of a plan to introduce someone — or something — new, UL has cited the cost of buying new costumes for the character as one reason.

Some are convinced the larger-than-life hot pepper is gone for good.

Others aren’t so sure.

Either way the absence is not known by everyone outside of Louisiana, and even still not known by some within the campus community, evidenced by just how much attention Cayenne continues to receive.





Tim Buckley and Kevin Foote discuss the upcoming UL Ragin' Cajuns football season. They take a look at the defense and what fans should expect. David D'Aquin

Earlier this month, Sports Illustrated listed Cayenne No. 1 nationally in a story headlined “The Top 10 Mascots in College Football, Ranked by Someone Terrified of Mascots.”

Also this month, the website SBNation/Mid-Major Madness included Cayenne in its 64-team, bracket-style “Mascot Melee.”

Related: UL running back Hoggins loses teeth, breaks jaw in cellphone fall

Cayenne remains a contender in that mid-major tournament’s Sweet 16 round after knocking off a No. 1 seed, Alabama-Birmingham’s “Blaze.”

The UL spirit leader has been ranked in such internet lists — good and bad — for several years since its inception sometime around 2000.

But whether Cayenne lives to fight another season remains to be seen.

That’s a decision that will be made only after input from both inside and outside the UL athletic department.

“That will be more of an institutional decision that I think (the athletic department) will have a seat at the table at,” Maggard said. “Athletics will not drive it. It will be a campus decision.”
19 2017-06-29
Lafayette

UL: Documentary to chronicle weightlifting team’s glory days


By JAMES SAVAGE
Communications and Marketing, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

The University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s weightlifting team was among the best in the nation, bar none.

Between 1957 and 1971, the squad won eight national championships – including five consecutive titles – and established itself as one of the nation’s most-successful collegiate lifting programs.

Research and interviews are underway for a documentary about the squad’s achievements, which filmmaker Nicholas Campbell characterized as improbable.

He’s tentatively titled the film “The Ragin’ 13,” a reference to the number of first- and second-place finishes the team collected in national championship matches.

“It’s an underdog story. They excel on every level, beating universities that had a lot of support and a lot of money behind them,” said Campbell, who holds bachelor’s degrees in history and media art from UL Lafayette. The Lafayette native also earned a master of fine arts degree from the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California.

Competitive weightlifting requires speed, skill and strength. In the 1950s through the 1970s, judges scored lifters on how quickly they hoisted bars loaded with weighted iron plates in three competitions: the snatch, the clean and jerk, and the clean and press.

Weightlifting at UL Lafayette, then known as Southwestern Louisiana Institute, began in 1955 at an off-campus gym owned by student Mike Stansbury. Among the students Stansbury introduced to the sport was Walter Imahara.

Imahara is a legendary figure in Ragin’ Cajuns athletic history. As a weightlifter at SLI, in the U.S. Army, and after his discharge, Imahara amassed nearly 70 regional, national and international titles.

In 1955, Imahara enrolled at SLI and met Stansbury, whose gym on Jefferson Boulevard in Lafayette was a gathering place for students who wanted to lift. By 1956, a group of them felt confident enough in their skills to represent the school at the National Collegiate Weightlifting Championship. The team placed second.

The following year, the team took the crown decisively, more than doubling the score of its nearest opponent, the University of Hawaii. It was the first national championship in any sport in UL Lafayette’s history.

Seven more titles followed – in 1963, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1970 and 1971, the streak of consecutive wins broken only when a lack of sponsorship resulted in the competition’s cancellation in 1969.

The team’s record, which included undefeated seasons and innumerable regional titles, drew attention from national weightlifting publications and newspaper sportswriters.

The story enticed Campbell as well. Warren Perrin, who was a member of the 1966, 1967 and 1968 championship teams, approached the filmmaker earlier this year with the idea for the documentary.

“We all came from unique backgrounds,” Perrin said of his teammates in a recent interview, “but we all helped each other gain a positive attitude, that through hard work, you win – and gain pride.

“It was a shared passion for the sport – man against iron – that forged the team and its successes.”

Perrin, an attorney and Acadian activist, worked with Campbell on one of the filmmaker’s previous projects, Forked Island, a fictional story of a Cajun family grappling with cultural changes wrought by the oil industry and the pressure to assimilate in 1950s Vermilion Parish.

Perrin said he envisions the documentary as “an inspiring story of the (UL Lafayette) student-athletes from the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s – from diverse backgrounds – who came together, without a coach, to organize a weightlifting team that won an amazing eight national championships. Their determination and camaraderie remain to this day.”

Weightlifting at the University of Southwestern Louisiana – the school’s name changed from SLI in 1960 – ended after the 1972 season, when the squad’s last two members graduated.

Recreating the 17-year period the sport existed at the University requires scores of primary sources. Training diaries and scrapbooks of photographs and newspaper clippings kept by the competitors are particularly valuable. They’ll supplement filmed interviews, and corroborate memories of events that took place, in some instances, more than six decades ago.

"Walter (Imahara) has an old notebook. It’s yellowed and brownish from age, but it’s got every single competition he ever took part in – every single one,” Campbell said.

“Warren (Perrin) did the same exact thing,” he continued. “Every competition they were ever a part of, how much they lifted, what they felt they could have done at that moment to do better. All the guys who were really successful kept one.

“You can't ask for any better primary sources than that.”
19 2017-05-26
Lafayette

Students help state park in jeopardy of closing


The phrase "college students on spring break" might bring to mind images of partying in Cancun. It probably doesn't make you think of students driving two and a half hours to spend a week doing yard work for free.

But that's exactly what a group of students from University of Louisiana at Lafayette and Nicholls State did. They spent the week at Hodges Gardens State Park — camping and canoeing when they weren’t trimming azalea bushes and picking up leaves.

Members of the student organization Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship at both schools chose to serve at the Sabine Parish park that is said to be in danger of closing.

The Friends of Hodges Gardens State Park group and the nearby town of Many hosted a meeting in March to help "keep Hodges Gardens State Park from closing," anticipating that the park would not be funded adequately for the upcoming fiscal year beginning July 1.

"We're not looking at any closures (of state parks) at the time," Louisiana Office of State Parks Public Information Officer Sharon Broussard said in April. "Operations will depend on our budget, which will be settled during the upcoming (legislative) session."

The student organization chose the park after Chi Alpha Director Eric Treuil and his wife had visited Hodges Gardens and recognized a need.

RELATED: What will happen to Hodges Gardens? | Are state parks closing? | The future of treasured state park is in jeopardy

Students in the Chi Alpha Christian student organization
Students in the Chi Alpha Christian student organization at University of Louisiana at Lafayette and Nicholls State trim azalea bushes at Hodges Gardens State Park in Florien during spring break. (Photo: Courtesy of UL Lafayette Chi Alpha)
Between what he saw and news that the park was in jeopardy, it was clear the park could use some extra free help.

"So we went up there honestly just to serve," said Cole Lusby, a campus minister with Chi Alpha at UL Lafayette.

About 15 people went on the trip, including four Chi Alpha staff members and two international students. Many had been on local mission trips, but this was some students' first trip to a state park.

Although Niya Davis, 19, loves nature, she had never been camping. She helped pick up the trimmings that fell as others cut back azalea bushes — "a lot of azalea bushes," Jerrell Prier, 22, said.

"We work well together," said Davis, a geology major from Lafayette.

As first-timers, the two learned a lot on the trip.

"I learned how beautiful and interesting those types of parks are," Prier said.

Prier had never heard of Hodges Gardens, which is far from Lafayette and his hometown of Mansura.

He and the other students received something in return.

"It was good to go for spring break where it was really peaceful and get away from the hectic (school life)," said Prier, a computer engineering major.

READ MORE: Unique hobby helps student pay for school, see the world

A student trims azalea bushes at Hodges Gardens State
A student trims azalea bushes at Hodges Gardens State Park in Florien during spring break. (Photo: Courtesy of UL Lafayette Chi Alpha)
Davis said the week before finals was the perfect time for such a trip.

"It was hectic," she said. "I just needed to detach myself and focus. I like to volunteer and I like Christ, so I was able to do that and get my mind right."

After being exposed to the beauty and tranquility of the park, Prier hopes more take the opportunity to experience it for themselves and visit Hodges Gardens.

"It definitely serves a purpose," he said. "Who wouldn't want to go over there? I wanted to stay. It definitely served a purpose for me."

Lusby encourages more missions groups to visit the park and pitch in.

"They've got a lot to offer out there," he said. "It's an incredible campus."

He expect the Chi Alpha group to go back and would like to involve other schools.

"It's important that students ultimately live in community with one another," Lusby said. "And serving shows their heart, who they are. ... The body of Christ is diverse, from different geographic backgrounds. Ultimately we want to connect students and communities."

Those interested can contact the UL Lafayette chapter of Chi Alpha at 337-261-0028.
19 2017-05-11
Associated Press

Father, Daughter Set to Graduate Together From La-Lafayette




LAFAYETTE, La. (AP) — A Lafayette father and daughter are sharing a milestone on Friday.

KATC-TV (http://bit.ly/2pxoXDJ ) reports 46-year-old Deron Santiny and his 23-year-old daughter, Haley Fox, each is graduating from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Santiny and Fox will each earn a bachelor's degree from the school's College of General Studies during ceremonies at the Cajundome.

Santiny began college in 1992, but left to take a job in law enforcement and later, the military, serving during operation Iraqi Freedom. He was injured during a roadside bombing in 2005 and received a purple heart for his valor.

Santiny returned to Louisiana-Lafayette in 2015 to finish what he started.

Fox enrolled in 2012 after completing an associate's degree but took several breaks before deciding to complete her degree.
19 2017-05-11
Lafayette

Newly approved online MBA at UL Lafayette expands Moody College’s reach


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s B.I. Moody III College of Business Administration will offer an online MBA program beginning in the fall.

The Louisiana Board of Regents approved the delivery of UL Lafayette’s existing MBA program in an accelerated online format in April.

The online delivery complements professional and executive MBA programs the University already offers in a traditional classroom setting, said Dr. Gwen Fontenot, interim dean of the B.I. Moody III College of Business Administration.

“The online MBA program will provide an opportunity for people outside the Acadiana area or those with other constraints to obtain the same quality education as our professional students who complete the program here at UL Lafayette,” Fontenot said.

The program will emphasize nine areas – health care administration, human resources, finance, project management, global management, entrepreneurship, sales leadership, general business and hospitality management.

The college selected these concentrations after an 11-month market analysis of a six-state region revealed a steadily growing need among employers for professionals whose business skills align with these areas. The study concluded that an online, accelerated MBA program would satisfy that demand while meeting the needs of professionals who want to pursue an advanced degree but who have to balance work and personal obligations.

“Market research indicated growth in a number of vacant positions requiring an MBA,” said Dr. Luke Dowden, director of the UL Lafayette Office of Distance Learning, which sponsored the study. “The online MBA positions the University to be competitive in the online learning market while supporting economic and workforce development.”

The program’s courses will be offered in five, eight-week terms; a traditional semester lasts 16 weeks. Students can enter the program at the start of any of the five terms and can take up to two courses per term.

All students will complete a set of core business courses that include topics such as accounting, economics and finance. Additional topics will be customized for each concentration.

For more information, call (877) 588-2429 or visit www.degree.louisiana.edu. Prospective students will be able to apply for admission starting May 10.

The new online degree program comes at the end of a busy academic year for the Moody College.

In April, it announced a $2.5 million gift from Lafayette businessman Michael P. Maraist to establish the Maraist Financial Services Lab. The new lab will add a 1,000-square-foot, high-tech learning environment in F.G. Mouton Hall.

CEO Magazine cited the MBA program among the top 68 in North America, the second year in a row the college made the international business publication’s list. The MBA program also was included in the 2016 edition of Princeton Review’s “Best 295 Business Schools.”

In April, University President Dr. E. Joseph Savoie announced the appointment of Dr. J. Bret Becton as the college’s new dean. Becton is associate dean for operations and accreditation for the University of Southern Mississippi’s College of Business. His appointment is effective July 1.

“This is an exciting time for the college,” Fontenot said. “With the new online MBA program, we are poised to provide high-quality graduate education at an affordable price that will help a large number of professionals elevate their careers.”
19 2017-05-04
Lafayette

UL chef named one of the best in Louisiana


Recently, Chef Wesley Turnage, 38-year-old Executive Chef Three of Campus Dining Services at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, was recognized as one of the “Best Chefs of Louisiana 2017” by the American Culinary Federation of New Orleans.
Turnage won the award for his “A Celebration of Louisiana” recipe, which featured bayou rum-brined, pan-seared bone in pork chop with sides of Louisiana sweet potatoes, wilted local arugula, crispy leek and fresh herb salad and quick green tomato pepper-jelly glaze.

He was also recognized for his service to the community, including a fundraiser in which he took part, hosted by the ACFNO and We Hear Veterans to raise funds for culinary scholarships for chefs and to support local veterans.

While Turnage was honored to receive the award, it was only one milestone in the whirlwind of events in the chef’s life over the past year.

After accepting a position as Executive Chef at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette last year, Turnage’s home in Denham Springs was flooded.

4 of Louisiana's coolest spots for sno-balls
After taking several weeks off to make repairs and recover, Turnage and his family spent the next year living in a trailer and later in a camper at the KOA in Scott.

Within the past month, they have finally settled into a new home in Youngsville, and while getting settled in Cajun Country is certainly a relief, the role of executive chef is nothing new to Turnage.

In the past, Turnage has held roles as an executive chef at a private dining club, as a culinary instructor, as a chef in the hotel and private club business and he even briefly owned his own French bistro restaurant, Petit Milletten in Oxford, Mississippi, for two years.

Wesley Turnage
Wesley Turnage (Photo: COURTESY OF CLAIRE SALINAS)
During his time on the job over the past year, Turnage has worked to transition the campus toward using more fresh and local products.

Turnage said, “We switched to all fresh vegetables and we use local Louisiana ground beef, local bread from Langlanais, fresh catfish from Henderson and seafood from across Southern Louisiana. We’ve tried to incorporate local products and ingredients into our menu.”

Early on in his career, Turnage spent time doing an internship at Le Brea Bakery in Los Angeles, California, which gave him a love for baking that has persisted throughout his career.

Recently, Turnage has been able to feed his love through his involvement with a new concept on campus, called the Acadiana Bagel Company, which makes fresh bagels every morning.

Turnage said, “I’m very adept in classical French cuisine because I was trained by two French master chefs and worked with some French pastry chefs. I love bread and the process of making it and working with your hands. Eventually I’d like to have a full-scale bakery on campus.”

Over the past year, Turnage has also worked to provide more consistent service in the Cypress Lake Dining Room and introduced several new concepts, including a Chinese concept called Wok It Out.

Since his time at the university, Turnage has been able to interact with students by leading the Hospitality Club in serving lunch to the University Lunch Club and giving a cooking class to resident assistants.

For Turnage, his passion comes from connecting with people through food.

Turnage said, “I like the process of creating something, serving it to people and seeing the enjoyment on their face as they partake in what we’ve created.”
19 2017-05-01
Lafayette

Students say college policies violate their right to free speech


With the rise of safe spaces and trigger warnings at some U.S. campuses, a group of Louisiana college students is pushing to remove limits to free speech in what they call "unconstitutional" school policies.

Members of the Young Americans for Liberty chapter at University of Louisiana at Lafayette want to work with school administration to make changes to the student handbook and increase students' ability to speak freely on campus, chapter president and UL Lafayette junior Joe Shamp said.

"I'm a big believer in free speech. It's tantamount to thinking freely," the 22-year-old economics major said. "... This is how society discovers truth."

Also a Speak Freely advocate for Louisiana, Shamp founded the UL Lafayette chapter of Young Americans for Liberty last year.

His is one of more than 900 chapters across the country. With 308,900-plus "youth activists," Young Americans for Liberty describes itself as "the largest, most active and fastest-growing pro-liberty organization on America's college campuses."

READ MORE: Here's how much Louisiana college leaders get paid | How much does your professor make?

In Louisiana, there are chapters at Louisiana State University, Southeastern Louisiana University, UL Lafayette and Tulane University, according to the YAL site.

But others are listed among chapters that are forming — Louisiana Tech University, University of Louisiana at Monroe, Centenary College of Louisiana, LSU of Alexandria and South Louisiana Community College.

"It's important that everyone is allowed to express his or her opinions, whether I agree with them or not," said Chris Maples, 19, a sophomore from Shreveport and president of Centenary's chapter.

"I believe it is important to hear not only ideas you agree with but also ones you disagree with," Maples continued. "On Centenary's campus, I saw that conservatives and libertarians needed a place to come together to share our views on current issues and get more people engaged in fighting for the issues important to us."

The UL Lafayette chapter now has 25 members, and they're starting work on the student handbook.

"Our student handbook states you can't say anything distasteful or offensive," the junior from Opelousas said. "Yeah, that sounds good, but those words are vague and unhelpful. They have no real legal meaning."

And harassment already is strictly prohibited, Shamp pointed out. So these extra prohibitions are unconstitutional, he said.

"We would like to see the unconstitutional codes removed," he said.

The Lafayette group enlisted the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) to review its student speech codes. The organization rates such policies like a stop light — green, yellow or red lights. Red is the worst rating.

FIRE reviewed five UL Lafayette student codes, rating one red and three yellow and giving the campus an overall red light. No Louisiana campuses received an overall green light, according to the group's most recent report.

READ MORE: Catholic higher ed expanding to Acadiana | Search for next NSU president down to 2

The group offered recommendations to improve each of the free speech policies. The first is to remove a sentence in the school's computer and network policy that prohibits "distasteful or offensive displays, messages and printouts," which FIRE states earned the university its overall red light rating.

FIRE calls this "a vague, broad standard that includes a great deal of constitutionally protected speech." Removing the phrase would limit the policy's prohibitions to speech and conduct that is not protected by the First Amendment, like harassment and threats.

The codes that earned yellow lights refer to public profanity, prohibited sexual conduct, bullying and cyberbullying, and harassment.

The group recommends eliminating the profanity section entirely because profane words are constitutionally protected, the group states, citing 1971 Supreme Court case Cohen v. California.

Other recommendations are to add language to better define sexual harassment and bullying.

Shamp and his group want to work with university administration to see these changes implemented. He met with Vice President of Student Affairs Pat Cottonham in February and went over the FIRE recommendations.

"She was very receptive," he said.

READ: Higher ed increasingly turning to part-time faculty

Little has happened since their meeting. Shamp said he expects change to be a slow process, but he wants to ensure it continues by getting the word out.

"I think mostly we need to get the wheels turning," he said. "I know the administration is not against us. But I don't know who's going to have her job in 25 years. We want to get these codes off the books."

The Young Americans for Liberty club has been raising awareness on campus with a "free speech ball." It's a 9-foot beach ball on which students can write anything, Shamp explained.

It starts a conversation about free speech on campus and gives students the chance to sign a petition to remove the codes from the student handbook. It has nearly 500 signatures, Shamp said.

A Speak Freely advocate with the group Students for Liberty, Shamp said there are similar campaigns at LSU, Louisiana Tech, McNeese State, University of New Orleans and Tulane.

This is not a partisan issue, he said.

"It's not just political correctness (on one side). The right and the left are terrified of offending each other," he said.
19 2017-05-01
Lafayette

Class project encourages seniors to pursue UL communication degree


LAFAYETTE, La. -
University of Louisiana at Lafayette (UL) Department of Communication students are recruiting seniors at Acadiana High School as part of the student's final project.

The communication students were tasked to run a PSA campaign to recruit the high schoolers to join the communications department at UL.

As part of the project, the college students had to gain as much public exposure as possible by reaching out to various radio and news organizations across Lafayette.

"We're gonna be presenting about the broadcasting program, why you should go to UL, all the facilities we have, and we're giving out promotional bags to promote the school," said Kaitelynn Sprague, UL Communications major.
19 2017-04-27
Lafayette

Update: Archbishop's visit to UL postponed


UPDATE

Cardinal Timothy Dolan, who is serving as the Archbishop of New York, has postponed his visit to our Lady of Wisdom Church due to an illness.

According to the Diocese of Lafayette, Dolan will visit the church as soon as his health and his schedule permit, and the fundraiser for Our Lady of Wisdom's Capital Campaign has been postponed until he is able to visit.

Bishop Douglas Deshotel will celebrate Noon Mass for students today, and the luncheon will still be held as planned.


ORIGINAL STORY

Cardinal Timothy Dolan, who is serving as the Archbishop of New York, will concelebrate noon Mass at Our Lady of Wisdom Church with Bishop Douglas Deshotel today.

According to a press release from the Roman Catholic Diocese of Lafayette, Dolan is a former spiritual adviser and longtime friend of Our Lady of Wisdom Pastor, Father Bryce Sibley, who also serves as Chaplain of the UL Catholic Student Center.

Due to limited seating, capacity for seating in the Church has been reached, but the Mass will be broadcast for the public from 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. via a live feed on the Diocese of Lafayette website, www.diolaf.org, or by listening to Catholic Radio for Acadiana, 90.5 FM.



ADVERTISING

Cardinal Dolan is the former President of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) and is a passionate teacher of the faith and a champion for youth. He hosts a weekly radio show, Conversations with Cardinal Dolan, which airs on Sirius XM Channel 129 and has authored several books, including Praying in Rome and Priests for the Third Millennium.
19 2017-04-27
Lafayette

Hudspeth, Maggard respond to 13 UL football players' felony charges


UL football coach Mark Hudspeth and athletic director Bryan Maggard both apologized Wednesday for 13 football players at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette who were charged with criminal conspiracy to commit felony theft, as new details emerged in the case:

Among the items allegedly stolen from another student's Huger Hall dorm room, according to a property list report obtained from the ULPD, were: One Xbox game system, the Xbox games “Grand Theft Auto V” and “Metal Gear,” an LG-brand TV, a gold chain, an Aeropostale-brand watch, three pairs of Jordan shoes, two pairs of Adidas shoes, a Nike backpack, four pairs of boxers, eight-and-a-half pairs of socks, three coats, three dollar bills, a Ragin’ Cajuns hat, one ski cap, one pair of jeans, one belt, a training speed ladder, a toenail clipper and one bottle of hair lotion.
UL police Lt. Billy Abrams on Wednesday squashed a circulating rumor that the incident was a prank. “Based on our investigation,” he said, “this was not a prank.”
“On behalf of our football program," Hudspeth said, "I would like to apologize to Cajun Nation and the university. We do not condone the behavior that was represented and we expect higher standards of our student-athletes.

"We work diligently every day to guide, educate and develop these young men, so it is disappointing when we do not meet those standards."

Hudspeth's statement, released Wednesday morning by UL's sports information department, ended by saying "we will be respectful of the legal process as it runs its course."

Maggard, new to the job this year, also was apologetic and reiterated that such behavior is not condoned.

"We recognize that all of our coaches work very hard to try to educate and guide and mentor our student-athletes," Maggard said in a phone interview Wednesday afternoon, "and it's obviously disappointing when conduct that's not appropriate to what we stand for occurs.

"But we will absolutely get through it. We'll move forward. We will respect the legal process, and know it will play its way out, and we'll go from there."

MORE:Several starters among those charged

RELATED: LSU backup offensive lineman suspended after arrest

Maggard declined to comment on any of the details regarding the case. But he did address the UL athletic department's view of the matter.

"Certainly we're disappointed in the behavior and the choices of our young men," he said, "but we will work through this."

The athletic department and Hudspeth announced Tuesday night that the 13 players were suspended indefinitely "for a violation of team rules," according to a release from the school's sports information department.

According to a separate release from the UL Lafayette Police Department, several students conspired to enter a dorm room in Huger Hall on April 5 to take the personal belongings of one of the occupants.

Thirteen students entered the room and took "several items belonging to the victim totaling approximately $2,400," the ULPD release states.

Video surveillance was obtained during the investigation and led to the identification of the 13 suspects, all of whom are on UL's current football roster:

Matthew Aaron Barnes, 22;
Joseph J. Dillon, 20;
Robert G. Handy-Hunt, 20;
Denarius D. Howard, 22;
Jarvis D. Jeffries, 20;
Ladarrius Tyquan Kidd, 21;
Terik Miller, 20;
Damar'ren Cordaier Mitchell, 20;
Trey Paul Ragas, 20;
Simeon G. Thomas, 23;
Levarious Varnado, 20;
D'Aquin J. Withrow, 23;
Jordan E. Wright, 21.
Story continues after photo gallery.

Facebook
Twitter
Google+
LinkedIn
UL football players charged with conspiracy to commit theft
Fullscreen
Ladarrius Kidd
Ladarrius Kidd Lafayette Parish Sheriff's Office
Fullscreen
Ladarrius Kidd1 of 13
Matthew Barnes
Levarious Vernado
Dillon Joseph
Jarvis Jeffries
Jordan Wright
D'Aquin Withrow
Denarius Howard
Simeon Thomas
Damar'ren Mitchell
Trey Ragas
Robert Handy-Hunt
Terik Miller
Next Slide
13 Photos
UL football players charged with conspiracy to commit theft
After consultation with the district attorney's office, arrest warrants were obtained and the students were charged with criminal conspiracy to commit felony theft.

The 13 students turned themselves in to the Lafayette Parish Correctional Center and cooperated throughout the investigation, according to ULPD.

All stolen items were recovered by UL police, the ULPD release states.
19 2017-04-26
Lafayette

UL oceanographer heading into uncharted depths


An upcoming voyage by a University of Louisiana at Lafayette oceanographer will take him where no person has gone before — and the public is invited along for the ride.

According to a press release fro UL, Dr. Scott France will direct a three-week expedition to document what lies beneath the surface of a remote section of the Pacific Ocean. His trip aboard the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer will take him from American Samoa to Hawaii, some 2,550 nautical miles away.

The scientists will take a look at geological formations and ecosystems in undocumented sections of the Pacific Ocean. They'll be using sonar mapping technology and a remotely operated vehicle, named the Deep Discoverer. Images from the exploration will be sent back to the Internet in real time.

ADVERTISING

“This is real exploration,” said France, a professor of biology. “It’s so remote. We are going to places nobody on Earth has ever been before. We will literally be seeing it for the first time, and sharing that on the internet with anyone who wants to tune in.”

MORE NEWS TODAY: One killed in shooting on Pinhook | No, you're not crazy. It smells weird outside | Could the death penalty be abolished in Louisiana?


The Deep Discoverer can descend 20,000 feet, or 3.7 miles, the press release. It’s tethered to the Okeanos Explorer by a fiber-optic cable that transmits images, captured by its nine cameras, to the ship and to anyone watching the feed online. Interactive features allow viewers — scientists, students or the public — to send requests to the ship via phone or an online chatroom.

As the mission’s science lead, France’s job will be to relay those requests. It’s a role he likened to that of an air-traffic controller, regulating how the mission plays out.

France said scientists remain in a “level of infancy” in understanding life and geography in the deep sea.

“These expeditions are frustratingly tantalizing because we get just the barest taste and picture of what’s going on,” he said. “We are just getting this one little picture. In fact, in a day, it’s unlikely that the ROV will travel more than 900 meters — that’s basically three football fields. That’s what we get to see.

“Imagine you are exploring somewhere in the Rockies and that’s the amount of distance (you cover). Do you think you know everything about that mountain from that one little trip? Of course you don’t. But that's better than nothing."

France and the Okeanos Explorer will depart Pago Pago, the capital of American Samoa, a territory of the United States, on Thursday. He will arrive in Honolulu, Hawaii, on May 19.

Viewers can find more information and follow the journey at http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/okeanos/explorations/ex1705/welcome.html
19 2017-04-26
Lafayette

Coussan's bill to transfer LITE to UL wins unanimous House approval


Rep. Jean-Paul Coussan's bill to dissolve the LITE Commission and transfer ownership and control of the facility to UL Lafayette cleared the House in a 100-0 vote on Monday and now heads to the Senate.

HB299 was introduced at the request of the LITE commission, which currently runs the center, Coussan tells The Independent. The facility has struggled to find niche as a public-private partnership as originally envisioned by proponents when it was funded just over a decade ago.

Coussan's bill puts the facility under the direct control of the university and dissolves the commission. The hope is that the university's research focus can more effectively find uses for the facility. LITE's distinctive cocoon was created to enable businesses and researchers to literally walk inside visualizations of their data created by the super computer that is part of the facility.

Virtual reality technology has transferred the experience down from room-size to headsets, thus marginalizing facilities like the LITE's cocoon.

Coussan's bill will now be placed on the Senate calendar and then be assigned to a Senate committee for hearing.
19 2017-04-26
Lafayette

KATC: UL-Lafayette suspends 13 football players accused after dorm theft caught on video


Thirteen UL football players have been suspended indefinitely after being arrested on criminal conspiracy to commit felony theft.

The players are Matthew Barnes, Joe Dillon, Robert Hunt, Denarius Howard, Jarvis Jeffries, LaDarrius Kidd, Terik Miller, Damar’ren Mitchell, Trey Ragas, Simeon Thomas, Levarious Varnado, D’Aquin Withrow and Jordan Wright.

See the full KATC story here.


19 2017-04-25
Houma/Thibodaux

Our opinion: Louisiana’s colleges don’t need to market alcohol


LSU President King Alexander and state Rep. Cedric Glover, D-Shreveport, are in the midst of a public battle.

And at issue is LSU’s right to name an official beer.


Glover has put forth a bill that would prohibit Louisiana’s colleges and universities from allowing beer companies to use them to market their official beers.

Both LSU and the University of Louisiana-Lafayette have such marketing agreements in place.

King argues that beer companies for years have used the school’s colors to market their products and that the agreements allow the schools to cash in on their connection.

While LSU and other schools are understandably looking everywhere they can for additional revenue these days, these institutions of higher learning don’t need to be marketing alcohol.

While marketing agreements like this might be the norm in the private sector, colleges should stay out of the beer business — particularly when so many of their students aren’t old enough to take a legal drink.

In responding to Alexander’s criticisms of Glover’s bill, Glover made the connection that if LSU wants to cash in on its association with beer companies, it should fight for its athletes’ ability to share in the profits.

“LSU and other colleges have been and continue to rake in billions of dollars from the blood, sweat, broken bones and dreams of youngsters who are not even old enough to legally buy beer,” he said in a letter to the editor of The Advocate newspaper in Baton Rouge.

MORE VIDEO:
Rebowe's comments after Nicholls Spring Game

That is a fair point that is worthy of debate; however, that issue might cloud the waters here.

The question of whether our state universities should sell their names to beer companies is separate from the issue of college student-athletes’ compensation.

And Glover is actually confusing what should be a simple point.

The connection between alcohol and so many of our society’s persistent problems is clear.

From alcohol-related car crashes to the health challenges that hit Louisiana so hard, alcohol is a contributing factor in many of the ills that affect us.

The last thing any of our colleges should be doing is encouraging more young people and others — the people who are fans of these colleges’ sports teams — to drink alcohol.

LSU and the other schools have marketing possibilities that allow them to trade on their popular names. But let’s leave the marketing of alcohol to the private sector.

-- Editorials represent the opinion of the newspaper, not of any individual.
19 2017-04-24
Lafayette

New UL business dean named


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette announced Thursday that J. Bret Becton, Ph.D., will serve as the next dean of the B.I. Moody III College of Business Administration. His appointment is effective July 1, pending approval of the UL System Board of Supervisors.

“Dr. Becton has an accomplished career and we are looking forward to his strategic leadership of the Moody College of Business,” said University President E. Joseph Savoie in a news release. “He brings a record of collaborating with the business community and an unwavering commitment to excellence in teaching and applied research.”

Becton is associate dean for operations and accreditation for the University of Southern Mississippi’s College of Business. He manages that college’s budgeting, assessment, academic affairs and accreditation.

He earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Southern Mississippi, a master’s degree in industrial/organizational psychology from the University of Tulsa and a doctorate in management from Auburn University.

STORY FROM OUR LADY OF LOURDES
Local trucker puts cancer in the rear-view mirror


“Our business students and faculty are doing great things, and Dr. Becton’s leadership will further augment their opportunities,” said Savoie.

Last week, the college announced a $2.5 million gift from Lafayette businessman and 1971 graduate Michael P. Maraist to establish the Maraist Financial Services Lab. The new lab will add a 1,000-square-foot, high-tech learning environment in F.G. Mouton Hall.

MORE: New business lab coming to UL

At the start of the fall 2016 semester, CEO Magazine reported the college has one of the top 71 MBA programs in North America. The college also was included in the 2016 edition of Princeton Review’s “Best 295 Business Schools.”

Dr. Gwen Fontenot has served as interim dean since January 2015, following the resignation of Joby John as dean in December 2014. Prior to her appointment as interim dean, she was head of the University’s Marketing and Hospitality Department.
19 2017-04-19
Lafayette

Coussan's LITE bill advances




Rep. Jean Paul Coussan’s HB299 won unanimous approval from the House Commerce Committee on Monday. The bill would dissolve Louisiana Immersive Technologies Enterprise’s governing commission and hand ownership and operating responsibilities to UL Lafayette.

Coussan introduced the bill at the request of the LITE Commission. “They asked for the bill,” Coussan told The Independent in a telephone interview on Tuesday morning. “Because the center operated as a separate political entity, it created inefficiencies in the way it operated. LEDA, LED and the university agreed that putting the center under the sole control of UL would make it operate more efficiently.”
Coussan’s bill transfers all assets of the commission to UL Lafayette and allows UL’s president to negotiate lease agreements without having to advertise for bids on those leases.
Coussan said LITE will continue to pursue its stated mission of promoting the development of immersive technologies in Lafayette and to recruit companies related to that industry here.
LITE has a super computer linked to the building’s distinctive “cocoon” shell which enables users to walk in visualizations of their data. The center has struggled to find its footing as a public private partnership, having gone through a number of leaders in the 11 years its been in existence.
Coussan calls HB299 “non-controversial” and expects it to move forward fairly quickly.
“We could have a vote on the bill in the House by next week,” Coussan said, noting that the schedule for bills is set by Speaker Barras.
19 2017-04-19
Lafayette

UL project to find lost Acadian burial ground enters national contest




Student and faculty researchers excavate in 2015 for signs of a lost Acadian burial ground, said to be located around Loreauville.
Photo courtesy Projet Nouvelle Acadie
Anthropologists and archeologists with UL Lafayette are turning to a USA Today network contest for help funding the ongoing search for the original Acadian encampments, said to be obscured by time and legend around Loreauville since the exiles' landing in 1765.
Called Projet Nouvelle Acadie, the UL-led effort, supported by the Acadian Heritage and Culture Foundation, is vying for a top award of $100,000 in grant money via USA Today’s “A Community Thrives” contest.

The hook for the project is the potential discovery of a lost Acadian colony and burial ground along the Bayou Teche. Despite extensive scholarship and romanticization of the Acadian plight, the discovery has eluded researchers and cultural historians. Projet Nouvelle Acadie has been at it for more than three years, according to the video.

“[Discovery of the landing site] would shed all sorts of light on the history of a people who became the Cajuns in South Louisiana,” says UL archeology professor Mark Rees in a video produced for the contest.

Supporters can vote for the Nouvelle Acadian Project via USA Today’s site here. Monies earned would also go toward the purchase of an Acadian Odyssey monument, which project members say would be a tremendous boon to Loreauville’s economy, drawing lovers of Acadian lore and history to the sleepy Iberia Parish town.

“It’s important for the cultural economy in an area that has had relatively little development of cultural tourism for the cultural economy,” adds Rees.

Voters can cast one vote per day until contest’s closing on May 12. Winners will be chosen, from the top 10 vote getters, by a panel of judges.
19 2017-04-19
Lafayette

Mardi Gras math: UL Lafayette researchers tally parade crowd size


A team of researchers from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette who attended the city’s recent Mardi Gras King’s Parade wasn’t interested in catching beads or doubloons.

It was after data.

The group of four, which included students and postdoctoral researchers, fanned out along the parade route. The floats rolled from near the intersection of Jefferson, Surrey and Simcoe streets, and ended near Cajun Field. The researchers walked along the entire 4-mile route.

Their assignment was to estimate crowd size at the request of the Lafayette Police Department. The project will assist law enforcement with crowd management, officer allocation, and emergency response plans for future parades and other events.

Marina Ledet, a senior from Abbeville, La., majoring in mathematics, didn’t mind the assignment. “I actually don’t like parades, but I enjoyed this one because I got to do math,” she said.

Before the researchers hit the parade route, they used software to generate a sampling scheme. It included a predetermined number of steps they would take before stopping to count parade attendees.

At each 100-step interval, they counted spectators standing behind corresponding barricades lining both sides of the parade route. They recorded the numbers in small notebooks, except for sections of large numbers of people. For those, they snapped photos and viewed them later to tally spectators.

After determining a mean number of people behind each barricade, that average was multiplied by the total number of barricades.

Ngan Hoang Nguyen Thuy, a graduate student from Vietnam pursuing her doctoral degree in math, said compiling figures at a noisy, festive parade was easy. Explaining to some spectators why their photos were being taken was harder.

“Families with small children often felt a little bit uncomfortable, until I explained the purpose of the study, which will benefit the community,” she said.

Suntaree Unhapipat, a postdoctoral statistics researcher from Thailand, said team members used two statistical models to find possible ranges for the number of spectators on each side of the route. “We came up with almost identical results each time,” she said.

The researchers estimated the total crowd size for the event at 47,234 people.

That averages out to nearly 12,000 people per mile, or nearly 1,000 per standard city block.

The team, which also included Phontita Thiuthad, a postdoctoral statistics researcher from Thailand, presented the results to LPD representatives, said Dr. Nabendu Pal, a professor of statistics who led the project.

“Worldwide, crowd size is becoming an increasing public safety concern,” Pal explained, referring to recent terrorist attacks in Nice, Berlin, and London. “There are other implications as well. Knowing how many people attended a large gathering compared to how many, for example, needed medical attention can help paramedics marshal resources.”

LPD Corporal Karl Ratcliff said law enforcement efforts to collect similar data can be hindered by officers’ duties, or an incident that diverts their focus.

“We can do the estimates ourselves, but we are often consumed with ensuring safety. It’s good to have eyes from the outside and to be able to put some science behind it,” Ratcliff said.

“It’s a great service to the community, especially at this time of year when we experience large crowds and attract people from around the world at events like Mardi Gras and festivals. We want to do everything we can to be proactive.”

Photo: Doug Dugas/University of Louisiana at Lafayette
19 2017-04-19
Lafayette

Mardi Gras math: UL Lafayette researchers tally parade crowd size


A team of researchers from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette who attended the city’s recent Mardi Gras King’s Parade wasn’t interested in catching beads or doubloons.

It was after data.

The group of four, which included students and postdoctoral researchers, fanned out along the parade route. The floats rolled from near the intersection of Jefferson, Surrey and Simcoe streets, and ended near Cajun Field. The researchers walked along the entire 4-mile route.

Their assignment was to estimate crowd size at the request of the Lafayette Police Department. The project will assist law enforcement with crowd management, officer allocation, and emergency response plans for future parades and other events.

Marina Ledet, a senior from Abbeville, La., majoring in mathematics, didn’t mind the assignment. “I actually don’t like parades, but I enjoyed this one because I got to do math,” she said.

Before the researchers hit the parade route, they used software to generate a sampling scheme. It included a predetermined number of steps they would take before stopping to count parade attendees.

At each 100-step interval, they counted spectators standing behind corresponding barricades lining both sides of the parade route. They recorded the numbers in small notebooks, except for sections of large numbers of people. For those, they snapped photos and viewed them later to tally spectators.

After determining a mean number of people behind each barricade, that average was multiplied by the total number of barricades.

Ngan Hoang Nguyen Thuy, a graduate student from Vietnam pursuing her doctoral degree in math, said compiling figures at a noisy, festive parade was easy. Explaining to some spectators why their photos were being taken was harder.

“Families with small children often felt a little bit uncomfortable, until I explained the purpose of the study, which will benefit the community,” she said.

Suntaree Unhapipat, a postdoctoral statistics researcher from Thailand, said team members used two statistical models to find possible ranges for the number of spectators on each side of the route. “We came up with almost identical results each time,” she said.

The researchers estimated the total crowd size for the event at 47,234 people.

That averages out to nearly 12,000 people per mile, or nearly 1,000 per standard city block.

The team, which also included Phontita Thiuthad, a postdoctoral statistics researcher from Thailand, presented the results to LPD representatives, said Dr. Nabendu Pal, a professor of statistics who led the project.

“Worldwide, crowd size is becoming an increasing public safety concern,” Pal explained, referring to recent terrorist attacks in Nice, Berlin, and London. “There are other implications as well. Knowing how many people attended a large gathering compared to how many, for example, needed medical attention can help paramedics marshal resources.”

LPD Corporal Karl Ratcliff said law enforcement efforts to collect similar data can be hindered by officers’ duties, or an incident that diverts their focus.

“We can do the estimates ourselves, but we are often consumed with ensuring safety. It’s good to have eyes from the outside and to be able to put some science behind it,” Ratcliff said.

“It’s a great service to the community, especially at this time of year when we experience large crowds and attract people from around the world at events like Mardi Gras and festivals. We want to do everything we can to be proactive.”

Photo: Doug Dugas/University of Louisiana at Lafayette
19 2017-04-19
Regional/National

Louisiana Lawmaker Opposes University Beers


Controversy is brewing in Louisiana after a state legislator took exception to public universities designating “official” beers.
Now, Democratic Representative Cedric Glover has introduced legislation that would prevent public universities in the state from licensing official alcoholic beverages. His bill would also ban the two universities that prompted his action, Louisiana State University and the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, from renewing current contracts they have with local breweries when those contracts expire.
LSU has a deal for Bayou Bengal Lager, made by Tin Roof Brewing Co., located about a mile away from its campus in Baton Rouge. UL Lafayette has one for Ragin’ Cajuns Genuine Louisiana Ale, produced by Bayou Teche Brewing in Arnaudville, which is located about 20 miles to the north of its campus.
The practice of colleges and universities officially licensing alcoholic beverages is controversial, given that binge drinking and underage drinking are major issues on college campuses, where many students are below the legal drinking age of 21. But supporters of licensing adult beverages contend that it allows colleges and universities to tap a valuable revenue source at a time when state governments are pulling back from public funding -- Louisiana officials are considering cutting LSU’s state appropriation for the 17th time in nine years. Some have also argued that the beers licensed to Louisiana’s universities have flavor profiles that appeal to older drinkers instead of college students.
Glover is stout in his stance against the licensing practice.
“Deep in my heart, I just know it’s wrong for us as a state to allow a public university to put our official stamp of approval on an alcoholic beverage,” Glover told The Advocate of Baton Rouge.
But LSU President King Alexander said the university licenses many products. He said they should be able to include a beer from a local business that started in the university’s business incubator and now pays the university 15 percent of the proceeds from a licensed product it sells.
“It’s nonsense. Glover likes to throw stones,” Alexander said, according to The Advocate. “He’s never been a fan of LSU.”
19 2017-04-17
Lafayette

UL students present Living Stations of the Cross


LAFAYETTE, La. (KLFY) – Today, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette students presented the Living Stations of the Cross and attracted hundreds of observers

The first station began on the Plaza at Our Lady of Wisdom Church at the corner of St. Mary Boulevard and McKinley Street.

The stations continued through Girard Park. The students acted out the passion and suffering of Jesus Christ.

Our Lady of Wisdom’s Pastor Fr. Bryce Sibley says the event is a powerful tool for devotion and evangelization.

We spoke with Jackie Tonglet. Her son plays Barrabas. She says this is the most important day in the Catholic Church.

“It’s the day that Jesus died for us. (I) think it’s great that these kids, at their age, want to remember this.”

Since 2003, the students from the Ragin’ Cajun Catholics student ministry at Our Lady of Wisdom Church and Catholic Student Center on UL’s campus have participated in the living Stations of the Cross.
19 2017-04-17
Lafayette

New business lab coming to UL


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette broke ground Wednesday on a new facility that will aim to help students gain real-world business experience.

The initial construction costs for the Maraist Financial Services Lab at F.G. Mouton Hall will be covered by a $2.5 million gift from Lafayette businessman and 1971 alumnus Michael P. Maraist.

According to a press release from UL, the lab will allow students in the the B.I. Moody III College of Business Administration to have hands-on experience in portfolio management, financial strategy and analysis. Inside the lab, tickers will deliver up-to-the-second reports from Wall Street. Digital displays will flash breaking business news headlines. Students will learn, in real time, how financial markets work by utilizing state-of-the-art equipment to undertake projects similar to those that business professionals confront every day.

The addition of the Maraist Financial Services Lab will mark the first significant alteration to F.G. Mouton Hall in more than a decade.

“We are very proud to assist in the creation of this innovative new project,” Maraist said in an issued statement. “Our goal is to see a facility that teaches students leadership, service and dedication as well as providing them with an excellent education.”

Construction of the lab, which includes renovating and and adding 1,000 square feet of space at F.G. Mouton Hall, is expected to take a year to complete.

“The Maraist Financial Services Lab is a testament to the dedication and generosity of the Maraist family,” said Dr. Gwen Fontenot, the college's interim dean. “Those who know Mike know that he invests not only money but his own time to help people develop to their fullest potential. We are elated that he chose to invest in the future of our students and our commitment to continuous improvement.”
19 2017-04-11
Lafayette

Researchers led by UL Lafayette professor conclude less Arctic sea ice means planet will get more rain


Dr. Brian Schubert and an international team of other geoscientists spent a couple of recent summers digging in Siberian sediments, unearthing fossilized wood that’s millions of years old.

Their research has prompted them to predict that variability in rainfall will increase in the Arctic due to climate change.

Schubert, an assistant professor in the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s School of Geosciences, and A. Hope Jahren of the University of Oslo, Norway; Sergei P. Davydov of the Russian Academy of Sciences; and Sophie Warny of LSU plucked fossils from the sides of Russian riverbanks. Water had carved away layers of sediment and exposed fossils that were deposited between 5.3 to 11.6 millions years ago.

The team studied chemical changes in the growth rings of trees and plants from the period, which is known as the Miocene Epoch. Small changes in the ratio of two carbon isotopes in the growth rings of fossil wood shed light on rainfall patterns.

“This ratio is affected by the amount of precipitation the plant receives and reflects an effort by the plant to conserve water that would otherwise be lost to the atmosphere,” Schubert explained.

Ascertaining rainfall during the time period is important because global temperatures and changing sea ice cover at the time were similar to conditions of today, only in reverse.

“An interesting aspect of the late Miocene is that temperatures and carbon dioxide levels were getting lower and ice started to form. By studying this time period, we wanted to see if this change in sea ice drove any changes across the climate,” Schubert said.

The scientists compared their findings from the Miocene to modern samples they collected and data compiled from the region over the last several decades. They concluded the Arctic will likely experience more rain in ensuing years as a result of global warming.

“Arctic sea ice decline results in an increase in evaporation. Since areas that used to be covered in ice are now open water, it means there is more evaporation into the atmosphere and more precipitation across the Arctic,” Schubert said.

The findings are detailed in a recent Geology article. Schubert was the lead author. The journal is published by the Geological Society of America, which was founded in 1888. Its journal is the most widely read in the field of earth science, according to the society’s website.
19 2017-04-07
Lafayette

UL Lafayette Communication Department Creates Wedlock Scholarship


Help keep Brad’s memory alive by donating to the Brad Wedlock Endowed Scholarship Fund

Following the tragic death of Brad Wedlock, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette Department of Communication faculty members created an endowed student scholarship to honor his memory. Wedlock earned a broadcast bachelor’s degree and public relations master’s degree from the Department of Communication. He was pursuing his doctorate in Education when he died.

“Brad found his love for teaching as a graduate assistant in our department while instructing the introductory communication course. He became a scholar who enjoyed research as a lifelong learner, himself. We want to honor his legacy with the establishment of this scholarship and make it possible for a future student to follow in his footsteps,” said Dr. Lucian Dinu, who chairs the Communication Department.

Donations to support the Brad Wedlock Scholarship Fund are being accepted by the UL Lafayette Foundation, and can be made either online at ullafayettefoundation.org/giving, or mailed to P.O. Box 44290 Lafayette, LA. 70504. Donors must specify that their donation go towards the Brad Wedlock Endowed Scholarship Fund.

Wedlock died in an auto accident Monday, April 3 on W. Congress Blvd. His funeral was held today (Wednesday, April 5) in his hometown of Ville Platte.
19 2017-04-06
Lafayette

UL Lafayette Communications Dept. creates Brad Wedlock Scholarship


LAFAYETTE, LA. – Following the tragic death of Brad Wedlock, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette Department of Communication faculty members created an endowed student scholarship to honor his memory.

Wedlock earned a broadcast bachelor’s degree and public relations master’s degree from the Department of Communication. He was pursuing his doctorate in Education when he died.

“Brad found his love for teaching as a graduate assistant in our department while instructing the introductory communication course.

He became a scholar who enjoyed research as a lifelong learner, himself. We want to honor his legacy with the establishment of this scholarship and make it possible for a future student to follow in his footsteps,” said Dr. Lucian Dinu, who chairs the Communication Department.

Donations to support the Brad Wedlock Scholarship Fund are being accepted by the UL Lafayette Foundation, and can be made either online at ullafayettefoundation.org/giving, or mailed to P.O. Box 44290 Lafayette, LA. 70504.

Donors must specify that their donation go towards the Brad Wedlock Endowed Scholarship Fund.

Wedlock died in an auto accident Monday, April 3 on W. Congress Blvd.
19 2017-04-06
Lafayette

Vigil set for victim of fatal crash on West Congress Street


A candlelight vigil will be held in remembrance of Brad Wedlock on Thursday, April 6, at 6 p.m. at the UL Lafayette Picard Center.

He was laid to rest today in Evangeline Parish after being killed in a crash on West Congress Street Monday.

Wedlock was a doctoral student at UL who was scheduled to graduate in May with his PhD in education. He already had earned his Master's in Communication. He was a native of Chataignier, a graduate of Pine Prairie High School and a black belt in karate.

Following his tragic death, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette Department of Communication faculty members created an endowed student scholarship to honor his memory.

"Brad found his love for teaching as a graduate assistant in our department while instructing the introductory communication course. He became a scholar who enjoyed research as a lifelong learner, himself. We want to honor his legacy with the establishment of this scholarship and make it possible for a future student to follow in his footsteps," said Dr. Lucian Dinu, who chairs the Department of Communication.

Donations to support the Brad Wedlock Scholarship Fund are being accepted by the UL Lafayette Foundation, and can be made either online at ullafayettefoundation.org/giving, or mailed to P.O. Box 44290 Lafayette, LA. 70504. Donors must specify that their donation go towards the Brad Wedlock Endowed Scholarship Fund.

To read his obituary, click here.
19 2017-04-05
Lafayette

Beloved UL professor Alice Voorhies dies


Family, friends and the University of Louisiana at Lafayette community are mourning the loss of Alice Voorhies, 77, a special education professor at the university for more than 35 years.

A visitation is scheduled from 4 to 8 p.m. Friday at Martin & Castille Funeral Home in Lafayette with a rosary at 7:30 p.m. Funeral services will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday at Our Lady of Wisdom Chapel on the UL campus, followed by a reception in the church hall celebrating Voorhies’ life.

Alice Voorhies
Alice Voorhies (Photo: Mary Davis)
Voorhies was a native of New Iberia who spent her life working as a professor, author and professional counselor in Lafayette and Acadiana.

ADVERTISING

Voorhies was one of seven children. Her family said she lived her life practicing what she taught others in her career.

“She was an adviser and counselor and a listener,” said her sister Mary Davis. “She was a support for everyone that she met. She chose the right profession because that is what she was about.”


Davis said her sister loved fishing and the water, so the family will celebrate her life with a visit to some of her favorite places.

“We will take her (ashes) on a final boat ride on the water out at Cypremort,” Davis said, “and then for her last picnic at Avery Island, before she goes to final resting place which has yet to be determined.”

Alice Voorhies
Alice Voorhies (Photo: Mary Davis)
Marlene Beard is a senior instructor at UL's college of education. She was a friend and colleague of Voorhies for 20 years. The two started teaching at UL together and became life long friends.

Beard said Voorhies was a favorite among her students and inspired many of them to get their teaching certification and continue on a path to a career in education. Beard also remembered that Voorhies a competitive force both in and out of the classroom.

Alice Voorhies
Alice Voorhies (Photo: Mary Davis)
"The students that had her, loved her," Beard said. "She touched many peoples' lives and hearts. But I'm also going to miss her as my fishing partner. She was very competitive. If I caught a the first fish, she'd congratulate me. If I caught the second fish, she wasn't happy. When I caught the third fish, she wanted to push me off the boat."

Voorhies will also be remembered for her story-telling abilities that entertained friends and family. She authored two books: "The Promise" and "Once Upon a Time in New Iberia."

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in her memory to the UL Lafayette Foundation, designated to the Alice J. Voorhies Endowed Scholarship Fund.
19 2017-04-04
Lafayette

Bus loop eyed to connect UL-Lafayette and downtown


The Acadiana Planning Commission and Lafayette Mayor-President Joel Robideaux are exploring transportation options for a free-to-ride bus loop connecting University of Louisiana at Lafayette students to downtown, Freetown-Port Rico and the Oil Center.

Robideaux said he is weighing transportation options for the loop, such as a trolley car or an electric vehicle that a younger generation would feel comfortable utilizing. The route would leave from campus and go through Freetown and circle downtown to avoid traffic on University Avenue and Johnston Street.

The long-term goal, Robideaux said, is to spark increased foot traffic downtown.

“We’re still open to look at options, but we just want it to be something that riders will actually feel good about getting on,” he said.

Robideaux said he has held informal meetings with Kate Durio, director of marketing and events for the Downtown Development Authority, and UL-Lafayette parking and transportation services.

Durio said although students and residents can access downtown Lafayette on foot, a gap still exists between the university and the city’s main street.

“A lot of students and even residents who are out of school feel like downtown’s so far from the university, but really, it’s a quarter of a mile,” she said. “Efforts like the loop could help to close that gap and make it seem as close as it is.”

The loop’s cost depends on the type of vehicle city-parish government chooses. The Metropolitan Planning Organization is looking to move $2 million set aside for improvements on Ambassador Caffery Parkway and Johnston Street that members told the Independent are no longer needed.

Ashley Moran, manager for the MPO, said the board is expected to consider moving funds at its May meeting. She said the board is also debating what to call the project.

The loop, once funded, would be up and running in 12-18 months.

The bus loop is the latest project to offer city bus services to students. In 2014, a proposal to allow UL-Lafayette students and faculty to ride city buses for free was struck down by city-parish government. The service was included in an agreement initially posed between the university and city-parish government that allowed the university to lease eight buses. In return, UL Lafayette would buy fuel for natural-gas powered buses in the city.

The loop’s stops and number of vehicles utilized would shift depending on its popularity among students and residents.

“My hope is that from day one, (riders are) engaged so that I have to look at either adding another vehicle or getting one that has more capacity on the vehicle,” Robideaux said.

Durio said the plan might bolster city transportation services in the long run.

“With more riders, you get an improved system, and you have choice riders instead of riders that don’t have another transportation option,” Durio said. “This is the best way to build a robust transportation system that’s going to help us out.”

The proposed bus loop coincides with DDA’s Downtown Action Plan, a comprehensive approach to transforming downtown from a space only utilized for night life and business on the strip into a mixed-use hub.

Durio said creating residential areas around downtown where students can live, as well as creating more parking amenities around downtown could further the DDA’s, university’s and city’s improvement goals, as well as allay traffic issues on arterial roads.

“The only way to really fix traffic … is actually taking cars off the road,” she said. “If you can create more of a cultural shift with people who don’t need to drive single-occupancy vehicles, then you’ll have less cars on the road and less traffic.”

Olivia Chatman, a sophomore anthropology major at UL Lafayette who works downtown, said she would like to see more of her peers utilize downtown outside of Friday and Saturday evenings.

“There’s not a lot of people here all of the time, and I wish more people would do their stuff downtown,” she said. “They put out little parklets, but there’s never anyone there.”

Chatman said she parks across the street from her workplace; however, parking operates on a first-come, first-served basis. She said the bus loop would allow her to park in her paid space at UL-Lafayette.

Stuart Glaeser, director of transportation services for UL-Lafayette, said in an email that although he did not have any specific information regarding the loop, he views the concept as beneficial.

“If this will give our campus community additional options for daily commuting to campus, I see this as a positive outcome for everyone involved,” he wrote.

“It’s a lot to work out, but ultimately, I think it’s something we can do that’s really positive,” Robideaux said.
19 2017-04-04
Lafayette

UL nabs nine journalism awards


KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — The University of Louisiana at Lafayette received nine Mark of Excellence Awards at the Society of Professional Journalists Region 12 Conference here Saturday.

Six of the recipients were winners, and three were finalists, according to a press release from the school. Each category has one winner and two finalists.

The Vermilion, the UL student weekly, was the winner in the best affiliated website category.

ADVERTISING

Kailey Broussard, a junior journalism major from Lafayette, was the winner in both general news photography and online news reporting for The Vermilion.

Dan Boudreaux, a December 2016 journalism graduate from Opelousas now with the Houma Courier, was the winner in breaking news reporting and a finalist in general news reporting, for two of his articles published during his internship with the Acadiana Advocate.

Garrett Ohlmeyer, a December 2016 sports information graduate from Lafayette now with the Houma Courier, was the winner in online sports reporting for his work on Ragin’ Wire, a website run by students enrolled in UL's multimedia journalism course.


Karley Nugent, a senior journalism major from New Orleans; Heather Osbourne, a May 2016 journalism graduate from New Orleans; and Chelsea Yaeger, a senior journalism major from Brooklyn, New York, were co-winners in the online feature reporting category for a story they produced and published on Ragin’ Wire. Nugent also was a finalist in online news reporting for her work on Ragin’ Wire.

Holly Duchmann, a May 2016 journalism graduate from Pearl River now with the Houma Courier, was a finalist in general news reporting for her work as an intern with The Acadiana Advocate.

Region 12 is composed of Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee.

The awards were for articles published during the 2016 calendar year. Winners in each category will advance to the national Mark of Excellence competition.

More news today
19 2017-04-02
Lafayette

New UL athletic director Maggard: 'He likes people'


Very funny. Good sense of humor. Always the jokester.

That’s three athletic administrators from across the country, all commenting on the personal side of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s new athletic director.

Aside from his wise ways, the serious side, a focus on the student-athlete, a common theme emerges: The guy likes to laugh.

But to really get to know Bryan Maggard, one should start with the roots.

Dexter, Kansas.

Where is it?

“I’m surprised you don’t know,” Maggard said on the day of his Feb. 1 introduction as Scott Farmer’s successor at UL.

But unless you’re a scientist — helium was first detected in natural gas there in the early 1900s — or a native Kansan, you probably don’t.

It’s a map-dot community in south-central Kansas, for the record, not far from the Oklahoma border.

How small?

“Small. Intimate,” Maggard, who officially started on the job in early March, said with a smile. “That’s why you never married from the same town, because you’re just too close.”

Population in 2015, for the record and according to the United States Census Bureau: 275.

“No stoplights,” Maggard said.

Stop signs?

“A couple, maybe. Bent over.”

Related:UL decides Maggard is right fit as athletic director

His late mother, Helen, raised Bryan Scott Maggard in Dexter, and on the day he talked about taking the UL job the 47-year-old said he knew “she would be very proud.”

“My mom,” he said, “instilled in me the values of faith, respect, love, hard work and dependability.”

According to those worked closely with Maggard in athletic administration during his two-plus decades at the University of Missouri, Helen taught well.

“Family man. A man of faith,” said Missouri executive athletic director Tim Hickman, who worked with Maggard throughout the new UL athletic director’s stay at Mizzou. “Somebody you can count on.”

When he worked with Maggard at Missouri, current Virginia Tech athletic director Whit Babcock said he knew “if Bryan told you something, you could take it to the bank.”

“He’s one of the best ‘people’ I’ve met in terms of being just a good person,” said Appalachian State athletic director Doug Gillin, who also worked alongside Maggard at Mizzou. “Honest. High integrity. And smart.”

Very smart.

The small-town Kansas kid from Dexter High — “You are looking at one of 14 graduates from my graduating class,” he said — holds a PhD from Missouri in Education, School & Counseling Psychology.

EQUIPMENT GUY

At Dexter High, Maggard said, “you knew everybody K through 12.”

He played various sports there, but admits that “on my very best day, I was an average athlete.”

From Dexter it was on to Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kansas, a college town whose nickname is “The Little Apple.”

The population there is roughly 55,000 these days, but not much more than that.

Still, Maggard said, “I thought that was a metropolis. … To me, it was The Big Apple.”

There were stop signs, standing tall, and stoplights. Red, yellow, green, go. Crazy.

Related:New UL athletic director addresses Sun Belt future

At Kansas State, Maggard didn’t play football or any other collegiate sport. But he did take a bite at what now is at the core of his professional career.

It came during his sophomore, junior and senior years, working as a student equipment manager for the Wildcat football team.

In the mid-to-late 1980s, K-State wasn’t very good.

The Wildcats won one game in 1985, two in 1986, none with one tie in ’87, none in ’88 and one in ’89, their first season under the man now in his second stint at the school, Bill Snyder.

“Kansas State back in those days could not buy a win,” Maggard said. “K-State, as part of the Big Eight (Conference), always played for last place.”

The team really was lousy.

But the inspiration was awesome.

Maggard’s undergraduate degree is in journalism, with an emphasis in advertising.

“About my senior year,” he said, “I realized I didn’t want to do that.”

Exposure to Big Eight football, however, made Maggard think.

Related:Football scheduling: New UL AD weighs fan, coach needs

“That experience did whet my appetite,” he said, “and that’s how I got turned on to working in the athletic industry — thinking I wanted to maybe work in professional sports, a front-office position.”

Maggard served an internship around that time with the NFL’s Washington Redskins, during one of their preseason camps.

He used the opportunity to talk with those in the business.

“The No. 1 advice everyone gave me was ‘Go back and get your masters,’ ” Maggard said.

So he did.

Maggard worked on a Kansas State master’s in Health & Physical Education from 1990-92.

But a graduate degree wasn’t all he pursued. He and wife Kerry starting dating around then.

“It will be 26 years in June since I tricked her into marrying me,” Maggard said.

With Kerry in front of him at his introductory Ragin’ Cajun address, an emotional Maggard spoke to the couple’s three children — Dalton, Aubrey and Kaylin, the older two graduate students at Mizzou, the youngest a high school senior back in Columbia, Missouri — as they sat by their mother’s side.

“In short, you guys are my reason for being on this earth,” he told them, “and it’s a great honor to be your dad.

“Nobody knows better than these three my shortcomings — times of impatience, times of anger and sometimes times of absence.”

Athletic administration can be time-consuming.

“But you guys know why you’re awesome,” he said.

Some of the serious showing, some of the humor seemingly sneaking out too, it’s mostly, he said to smiles and perhaps a tear or two, “because you have a mom.”

New UL athletic director Bryan Maggard introduces himselfBuy Photo
New UL athletic director Bryan Maggard introduces himself after taking the job. (Photo: SCOTT CLAUSE/THE ADVERTISER)
'TWO SEDATED CATS'

Master’s degree in hand, and experience working as an academic counselor for the Wildcats football team in the bag, Maggard and his young family left Kansas State for Florida State in 1993.

Maggard recalls loading up the minivan and taking off for Tallahassee with two basset hounds and “two sedated cats” when son Dalton was two weeks old.

After two years and a month working as assistant director for academic services with the Seminoles football team, he drove back to Big Eight territory — this time settling in for nearly 22 years spent in a variety positions in Missouri’s athletic department, most recently as executive associate athletic director for a program with a $90-plus-million budget.

That can buy a lot of stop signs in Dexter.

“We all start out as some type of expert,” Maggard said.

“My expertise coming in was on the student-service side. But then as I was to rise … at Missouri I was given the opportunity to oversee our external units, I’ve overseen some of internal units, I’ve overseen facilities and operations, I’ve overseen masterplanning (and) capital projects.”

Farmer resigns as UL's athletic director
From facility improvements to program administration, and strategic planning to crisis communication, Maggard wore many hats at Missouri.

“I think that will benefit him a ton (at UL),” Hickman said.

Another benefit, good-friend Hickman feels, is Maggard’s management style.

“Very thorough, very thoughtful,” said Hickman, who got a phone call from Maggard about 15 minutes after Savoie offered him the job.

“He likes to gather information and facts, and know all the information as he works with staff that report to him or work with him. He’s a champion for their cause, but he’s also fair and always has the best interest of the institution in mind.”

Conscientious. Passionate. Compassionate.

Those are attributes Appalachian State’s Gillin uses to describe Maggard as an administrator after they overlapped twice at Missouri, most recently from 2012-15.

“He’s somebody I can always bounce ideas off of, whether personal or professional,” Gillin said, “and he would have really good, thoughtful advice.”

Maggard, Hickman said, is “not a stuffy academic-type, and somebody who sits in his office.”

“He likes people,” Hickman said. “He gets out and engages with people.”

Related:New UL boss eager to get to know coaches

THE LIGHT SIDE

Whether watching UL’s men’s and women’s basketball teams play at the Sun Belt Conference basketball tournament in New Orleans, throwing out the first pitch at a Cajun baseball game, taking in a softball game or popping in at a track meet, Maggard seems to have shown up everywhere during his first few weeks on the job.

He’s taken time to shake hands and visit with patrons and program supporters at a coffee house in Crowley, and plans to visit every Acadiana-area parish soon.

From boiled crawfish and etouffee to poboys and burgers, he’s made sure to experience the local cuisine too.

From the sound of it, he already likes a good boudin ball as much as he likes a good joke.

And Maggard does loves the jokes.

UL's Maggard: A native Kansan in Cajun country
In one breath, Babcock speaks of his ex-colleague’s integrity and academic drive.

“But what I enjoy about Bryan as well is that he has a sense of humor, and can laugh at himself from time-to-time.” he said.

“I don’t want to give (the impression) he’s not serious about his job. He is. But just that light-heartedness — to be able to laugh at ourselves — he was very good at that.”

Gillin remembers it well, something he got to experience when the two would travel together to different Missouri sporting events.

“He’s got a really good sense of humor,” the Appalachian State athletic director said, “and he knows how to use it.

“When you need levity in a situation, Bryan can remind us all that sometimes — as stressful as you might get — that there’s other things going on too.

“He is the consummate jokester,” Hickman said. “He likes to needle people and have fun, and I think that’s a big part of his personality.

“He’s always a fun guy to be around, and you’ve kind of got to watch your back sometimes, because he’ll get at you if you’re not careful and don’t get to him first. Sometimes that’s the key: get to him first.”
19 2017-04-02
Lafayette

UL students celebrate the end of Diversity Week


LAFAYETTE, La. -
To celebrate the end of Diversity Week at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, the International Student Council is hosting Diversity Night.

The event is open to all UL students and will honor several cultures with an array of delicacies.

The main attraction--performances that highlight the different cultures that make up the student body.
19 2017-04-02
Lafayette

UL-Lafayette architecture students hope for big impact with tiny home project


Senior architecture and design students at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette are collaborating to build a tiny house that will have a big impact on the community, hopefully for years to come.

Thirteen students are constructing a tiny house — just 200 square feet of living space — behind Fletcher Hall for a design-build elective course. When finished, the house will be donated to Habitat for Humanity and given to a person who lost their RV or trailer home in the August floods.

“The people we are trying to help are people that have already lived in a small house and want a small footprint or maybe the mobility of tiny house,” said architecture professor Geoff Gjertson, who is heading the project.

Gjertson said a tiny house project was originally slated to begin in the fall, but those plans fell through. Because he is on the board of directors for Habitat for Humanity, he was able to pitch the idea for the spring and have it adopted.

Students from different disciplines, including architecture, industrial design and interior design, have come together to create the home.

“It’s a really good feeling just to know we’re putting all this time and energy into it and it’s actually going to be built,” said Monique Moliere, 23, an interior design major.

Justin Segura, 25, an industrial design major, said working in a team with others majoring in related architectural and design fields is a rare opportunity and gives students the kind of real world experience they wouldn’t be able to get in a classroom.

“It feels like an accomplishment that I think all of us have been wanting to experience from the beginning,” said Francisco Farrera, 22, an architecture major.

Farrera said construction will not be completed by the end of the semester, but the class will be offered in the summer for other students to contribute.

Moliere also appreciates the chance to put what she's learned in class into practice.

“I really like that it’s real hands-on and we’re actually building something,” Moliere said. “A lot of our classes are hands-on but only to model size, so it’s really interesting to see all the real-world experience with this project.”

Gjertson said schematics for the tiny house have been compiled from architecture students’ past projects, such as the Beausoleil solar home built in 2009.

He said the students are using structurally insulated panels on the walls of the 200-square-foot house. They also plan to install solar panels on the roof to keep the future resident’s utility bill tiny, as well.

“It’s pretty neat that they’re so into it and so dedicated to it,” Gjertson said of his students enthusiasm for the project.

Although this project involves the construction aspect, some senior architecture students are also helping to design tiny houses for a new Arnaudville-based company, Tee Tiny Houses.

Cherie Hebert, a founder of the tiny house company and CEO and partner at BBR Creative in Lafayette, said she reached out to UL-Lafayette when she had one-dimensional plans on paper but wanted them redone digitally for marketing purposes.

“I knew that UL students are trained in 3-D rendering, and they know how to use the latest technology,” Hebert said.

Gjertson put her in touch with a few interested students, including Farrera. She also decided she’d like to name the models after the student who designs them, starting with “the Francisco.”

“This type of architecture actually leaves a physical mark in the world,” Farrera said. “You actually built something that now exists because you helped create it.”

Hebert said she has offered to share her construction space with UL-Lafayette and Habitat for Humanity so everyone involved can work together to make as many homes as possible.

“I really like the idea of students being out there and my team and their team having the opportunity to learn from one another,” Hebert said. “I really do want to support the public-private, nonprofit collaborative kind of thing as part of the business.”
19 2017-03-30
Lafayette

UL launches fundraising campaign for Russo Park


UL officials are launching a public campaign to raise the remaining amount needed to complete the second phase of renovations at Russo Park at M.L. "Tigue" More Field.

University officials announced today that 75 percent of the $16.8 million project had been raised from individual and corporate donations. A public campaign to raise the remaining funds will launch on Friday.

According to a media release, the stadium project is being done in three phases, with work now being down on the second phase. Athletic department officials say that work includes a raised grandstand, open concession areas, a fan shop, a new club room and suites, and a larger press box.

The first phase of the project, completed in 2016, was the installation of new stadium lighting.

The third phase is expected to add a new clubhouse with locker rooms and offices, but project specifications and dates have not been finalized.

“We’re still meeting with supporters about investing in this project through larger gifts, and we’ll start a campaign at the end of this week to encourage greater participation from donors at all levels,” said Jim Harris, executive director of the Ragin' Cajuns Athletic Foundation.
19 2017-03-29
Lafayette

CAJUNCODEFEST HEADS INTO FIFTH YEAR IN LAFAYETTE


CajunCodeFest kicks off its fifth annual year tomorrow as the Lafayette-area coding competition looking for the next innovative idea using open data and select datasets from Lafayette Consolidated Government and the Lafayette Parish Assessor.

The competition is organized by the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s Center for Business & Information Technologies (CBIT). They are also adding the Inaugural Smart Community Summit to the lineup on Thursday, March 30 as a special session of the CajunCodeFest Smart Community Coding Challenge.

“CajunCodeFest taps Acadiana’s entrepreneurial spirit and allows Lafayette to be the testbed in the use of networked technologies and gigabit innovations as a Smart Community,” said Matthew Delcambre, Director of CBIT.

Throughout the competition, participants will work more than 24 hours to create unique ways for local residents to access, display and interpret civic data.

“Pursuing Smart City solutions in order to transform how LCG serves and interacts with citizens and businesses is critical to economic growth in Lafayette,” said Joel Robideaux, Mayor-President, LCG. “Integrating our information systems and enabling open data initiatives will foster our economy, improve government services and increase citizen engagement.”

Lafayette was designated as a chater Smart Gigabit Community by US Ignite because of its LUS Fiber infrastructure. For more information, visit cajuncodefest.org.
19 2017-03-28
Lafayette

Five UL Press books nominated for awards


Five titles published by the University of Louisiana at Lafayette Press have been named finalists in the 19th annual Foreward Reviews Book of the Year Awards.

“Ghost of Good Times: South Louisiana Dance Halls Past and Present,” by The Daily Advertiser music and entertainment reporter Herman Fuselier and Philip Gould, in the Photography category, examines vanishing venues and the modern dance hall scene.
“The Land South of the Clouds,” by Genaro Kỳ Lý Smith, in the General category, is a novel that explores the childhood of a half-black, half-Vietnamese, 10-year-old in Los Angeles in years after the Vietnam War.
“A Legacy Preserved: Contemporary Louisiana Decoy Carvers,” by Harvey J. Lewis, in the Crafts and Hobbies category, documents the artistry and skill of Louisiana’s wildfowl decoy carvers.
“Madame Grand Doigt,” by Yvette Landry, with illustrations by Cullen Bernard, in the Children’s category, is a spine-chilling tale that is steeped in Cajun tradition.
“Martha Wright Ambrose (1914-2000): The Rediscovery of a Southern Regional Artist,” by Roulhac Toledano and Scott Veazey, in the Art category, details the artist’s life and work, and the discovery of a trove of forgotten paintings.
Librarians and booksellers will determine winners in 65 categories.

Winners in each genre — along with Editor’s Choice winners, and Foreword’s INDIE Publisher of the Year — will be announced on June 24 during the American Library Association annual conference in Chicago.

“Choosing finalists for the INDIES is always the highlight of our year, but the choice was more difficult this time around due to the high quality of submissions,” stated Victoria Sutherland, publisher of Foreword Reviews, in a press release.

Foreword Reviews is the only review magazine solely dedicated to reviewing titles by small, independent and university presses. The complete list of the finalists can be found at: https://awards.forewordreviews.com/finalists/2016/

UL Press is part of the University's Center for Louisiana Studies. Learn more about the press at http://cls.louisiana.edu/ul-press
19 2017-03-23
Lafayette

UL has 'goosebumps' for 'Sweeney Todd'


In his four decades as a college professor, William Hochkeppel has had few opportunities to use “monster” and “masterpiece” in the same sentence. But Hochkeppel has been fast and loose with praise for this weekend’s production of the musical thriller “Sweeney Todd” at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

Since November, Hochkeppel has labored through the conductor’s 1,000-page score and 31 student musicians, a staff that’s the same size as the original Broadway production. But he has enjoyed every minute.

“This is some of the most beautiful music I’ve ever done — and I’ve been conducting for 40 years,” said Hochkeppel, UL’s director of bands. “At times, I’ve got lumps in my throat from just the sheer beauty.

“At other times, I have goosebumps from the intensity. It will really run the gamut of the emotions. This is going to be pretty spectacular.”

The high praise is for a rare, local presentation of Stephen Sondheim’s “Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street” Friday through Sunday at Angelle Hall. UL Lafayette Opera Theatre, Wind Ensemble and Performing Arts Department unite for this production.

The Tony Award-winning musical tells the story of a barber bent on revenge against the corrupt judge who exiled him. Todd’s barber chair becomes an instrument of mass murder with his victims becoming fresh meat in the pies of a baker, Mrs. Lovett.

Comedy event celebrates, focuses on the future
The play’s horror and humor has been challenging for Shawn Roy, who stars as Todd and directs the musical. Beth Brooks plays his accomplice.

Roy and Brooks sing and act with a band that is on stage, instead of the usual orchestra pit. Roy has been adjusting to the in-your-face music, but finds his demonic role far more challenging.

“He’s very dark and becomes a mass murderer in the show and kills eight people,” said Roy, director of UL’s Opera for 15 years. “So it’s going to that dark spot because I’m basically a pretty cheery person. With any theater, that’s always a challenge, taking yourself to a different place.

Songs overflow for David Egan tribute
“But this one is extremely intense and dark. Finding that darkness and bringing it to your vocalism isn’t the best thing for your voice.”

But like Hochkoppel, Roy is thrilled to be in a musical making its Lafayette debut.

“It’s a dream piece. It’s truly a master work. It’s an honor to be able to perform it.

“It’s incredibly difficult, so it’s hugely challenging at the same time. But it’s worth the challenge.”

Want to go?

What: "Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street"

When: 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday

Where: Angelle Hall, 601 E. St. Mary Blvd.

Admission: $20, $10 for alumni, seniors and ages 18 and younger, free for UL students and faculty

Information: 337-482-5939
19 2017-03-16
Lafayette

STDs on the rise in young people, UL takes action


A recent study shows a spike in sexually transmitted diseases in Louisiana.

The study, conducted by the Department of Health, shows that Louisiana is ranked as one of the highest states with STDs among young people.

The number of babies born with diseases and infections are also on the rise. The University of Louisiana at Lafayette is doing something about it.

Regional Medical Director Dr. Tina Stefanski said, "The population where we see the largest number of new diagnoses is in 15 to 24-year-olds, which really shocks people. So, this is really something that's important for young people to know about."

The Department of Health is teaming up with the School of Nursing and university wellness center to offer free testing.

Kai Cotton, a student, said, "I'm really happy about it because I think it's a really good thing that we are providing those free testing for students. I think there are many people that may be walking around campus and may have a sexually transmitted disease. They may not even know about it. The fact that it's free because we're college students, and we don't have that much money."

Katharine Shepherd, a nursing student, said, "I think a lot of students are afraid to find out where they can go get tested. I think a lot of people don't say anything because they don't know where to go, they're not really sure of the signs and symptoms, and it just has a bad stigma."

Students surprisingly seized the opportunity for free STD screenings.

Dr. Stefanski said, "The students have been really receptive. I think the nursing students have been really reaching their peers with this information."

Other clinics that offer free testing include: Acadiana Concern for AIDS Relief Education and Support, Southwest Louisiana Center for Health Services Lafayette Clinic,
19 2017-03-15
Lafayette

Check out Festival of the Arts before it's over


Art in many mediums helps make up our cherished culture in Lafayette and preparing, nurturing and celebrating our next generation of working artists is crucial to the continuation of our culture. Throughout March, we get to enjoy three weeks of arts programming, performances and events through the University of Louisiana at Lafayette College of the Arts and the Festival of the Arts, a three-week celebration of the innovative, creative work by faculty, students, and community partners at UL and in the local community.

The festival began on March 5 and continues through March 26 throughout Lafayette, featuring a diverse collection of programming including a fashion runway show, live music performances, theater, public lectures and much more.

Throughout the full festival, you can find two shows daily from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. on campus. The “Small Works” Art Exhibit is an exhibition featuring “small works” from Department of Visual Arts Faculty at the Dean’s Gallery. There’s also a solo art exhibition featuring new works by artist and former professor Herman Mhire at the Fletcher Hall Gallery called, “Beauty and the Beast." But don’t worry about parking on campus, ride your bike to events on campus or experience the festival at the many events held out in the community, such as the central event of the festival is ArTech Fusion happening this Friday at Acadiana Center for the Arts at 6:30 p.m.
19 2017-03-10
Lafayette

UL Lafayette Foundation selects new board officers, trustees


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette Foundation has selected five local leaders with expertise in accounting, business and law to serve positions on the board of trustees.

D. Wayne Elmore has been elected chairman of the foundation's board, and Joseph Giglio Jr. has been elected vice chairman. Donald Washington was elected secretary/treasurer.

“We will continue to grow and protect the assets of the Foundation as we continue to support all goals and objectives of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette,” Elmore said in a statement.

ADVERTISING

STORY FROM OUR LADY OF LOURDES
Local farmer gets his life back after heart surgery


A UL alumnus, Elmore owns Mello Joy Coffee. He has served as chairman of the Ragin’ Cajuns Athletic Foundation and as co-chair of its capital campaign. Giglio is a member of the business practice group at the law office of Liskow & Lewis. Washington is a partner in the law firm of Jones Walker LLP.

Jeanne Billeaud and F. Stan Hardee Jr. have been elected to serve three-year terms on the board. Billeaud is a certified public accountant. Hardee owns Hardee Lumber Co. in Kaplan.

Julie Bolton Falgout, president and CEO of the foundation, said dedicated board members who serve as volunteers, and support from UL donors, contribute to the success of the foundation and the university.

“We are excited to have a strong board of community leaders, and we look forward to the insight and support they will bring to the Foundation as we work to assist with continued growth of the University,” she said in a statement.

The foundation manages investments and serves as trustee of endowed funds and other private assets contributed for the benefit of the University.


19 2017-03-10
Lafayette

Students enrich UL music showcase


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette is one of 25 colleges in the United States that offers a degree in traditional music. The Dr. Tommy Comeaux Endowed Chair in Traditional Music at UL has had many students enter the program as seasoned veterans.

Case in point is current UL freshman Gracie Babineaux. A member of the Babineaux Sisters Band, Gracie has performed at festivals and venues across the United States and Europe for years.

Program director Mark DeWitt said that student experience further enriches the program.

ADVERTISING

“Gracie plays fiddle as well as accordion,” said DeWitt. “They’re doing some three-fiddle numbers. She’s helping them find the harmonies in some of the songs.

“Thinking back, Sarah Jayde Williams played with us one semester. That was after her grandfather (Hadley Castille) passed away. I got the sense that she just wanted to give back somehow.”

Babineaux is among the students performing in UL’s Traditional Music Showcase at 7:30 p.m. Sunday in Angelle Hall. Admission is free to this concert that features student ensembles playing Cajun music, zydeco, bluegrass and blues.

Babineaux is a member of the Angelle Aces, who will perform Cajun French dance music and ballads in an acoustic format. Roddie Romero, a three-time, Grammy nominee with his Hub City All-Stars, has served as their instructor.

Mailman led a musical life
UL graduate Nathan Williams Jr., from Lil Nate and the Zydeco Big Timers, leads the Zydeco Ragin’ Steppers, students who play zydeco, ranging from Clifton Chenier classics to today’s hits. Bluegrass, from Bill Monroe to the Duhks, is the specialty of Vermilion Express, which includes Lakeyn Schultz (guitar, vocals), Celebrindal Roberts (fiddle), Ben Richey (banjo, mandolin) and Alex Goodrich (bass).

The Ragin’ Blues Band, the newest ensemble, which started last spring, features singer Kayla Dugas, daughter of Mamou Playboys drummer Kevin Dugas. DeWitt said Sunday’s public performance is key in the musicians’ education. The show is also important outreach to other students.

“When you’re not used to playing with other people, that’s a whole new skill to learn,” said DeWitt. “That’s why we have the ensemble classes.

Brewery bringing back the ‘fais do-do'
“You’ve been working on songs together and you’ve got to deliver them in a professional manner. You’re learning stage presentation skills.

“The whole mission of the program is to share the culture with the public — and with the students on campus. If we can do this concert on campus and get students to come to this show, they can see other students playing the music. They’re seem them learning the music and that it can be done at UL.”

Want to go?

What: UL Lafayette presents Traditional Music Showcase

When: 7:30 p.m., Sunday

Where: Angelle Hall, 601 E. St. Mary Blvd.

Admission: Free

Information: 337-482-1020
19 2017-03-08
Lafayette

$10,000 Pay It Forward Scholarship Application Deadline Extended


High school students planning to attend the University of Louisiana at Lafayette are invited and encouraged to apply for the Glenn Armentor $10,000 Pay-It-Forward Scholarship.
Applications are downloadable at http://glennarmentor.com/Pay-It-Forward Scholarship.

The deadline for scholarship application has been extended to March 17. UL Lafayette’s Scholarship department will review all applications and narrow it down to the top 15 – 20 students who will be interviewed by a committee of local community leaders who will then choose four deserving recipients.

The chosen students may use the $10,000 to pursue any major offered at UL Lafayette. The $10,000 Pay-It-Forward Scholarship Program of Excellence was established in 2010. These scholarships are given annually to at-risk young men or women who display the spirit, work ethic and character that is deserving of a chance for a better future. The scholarships are awarded by an independent panel of community leaders based on a combination of attributes including: student performance, drive, ability, need and desire to seek a college degree.

###
Glenn Armentor serves as a personal injury and malpractice attorney, providing legal aid to the seriously injured. His law firm, the Glenn Armentor Law Corporation is established as one of the preeminent plaintiffs’ litigation firms in Louisiana. Founded in 1977, the firm has represented thousands of clients and amassed a phenomenal success rate. The Glenn Armentor Law Corporation was voted “Best of Acadiana” by public vote by the Times of Acadiana for the past nine years. It is located at 300 Stewart Street, Lafayette, LA.
19 2017-03-08
Lafayette

Deadline approaching to apply for Armentor scholarship


High school students planning to attend the University of Louisiana at Lafayette are invited to apply for the Glenn Armentor $10,000 Pay-It-Forward Scholarship.

Applications are available online at glennarmentor.com/Pay-It-Forward-Scholarship.

The application deadline is March 17.

ADVERTISING

UL’s scholarship department will review all applications and narrow it to the top 15 to 20 students. These students will then be interviewed by a committee of local community leaders.

Four scholarship recipients will be chosen. They may use the $10,000 to pursue any major offered at UL.

The scholarship program was established in 2010. They are given each year to at-risk students who display strong spirit, work ethic and character. Committee members award the scholarships based on several factors, including student performance, drive, ability, need and desire to seek a college degree.
19 2017-03-06
Lafayette

New UL-Lafayette scholarship program aimed at out-of-state students with Louisiana ties


Hoping to lure more out-of state students, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette plans to implement a new scholarship program next school year that will give a tuition break to students whose parents attended any Louisiana college or university.

UL-Lafayette has previously allowed students living in other states with alumni parents to take advantage of in-state tuition rates.

The discount is substantial. Tuition and fees for Louisiana residents costs about $9,300, compared to more than $23,000 for out-of-state students.

“Our goal is mainly to bring as many kids home, who want to go to UL, (as we can),” said DeWayne Bowie, Ph.D., vice president for enrollment management.

Bowie explained the idea to expand the scholarship came from speaking with alumni and representatives of other universities while recruiting in states like Texas, Mississippi and Florida. He said UL-Lafayette has become a “nationwide brand” and university officials wanted to cater more to out-of-state students.

After speaking with alumni and other recruiters, Bowie said the goal became making UL-Lafayette a cost-competitive university. Cutting costs for out-of-state students with Louisiana ties would further that goal.

This scholarship, unlike others, is being processed through the Registrar’s Office. Mickey Diez, the university registrar, explained this is because the Registrar’s Office handles residency procedures for all students.

“The decision was made to have this scholarship, as far as the processing goes, come through the same office just for consistency’s sake,” Diez said.

Students with questions are welcome to call the university now, but staff won’t begin processing applications until the summer. The scholarship is not just for freshmen — current students can also apply.

In the fall 2016 semester, 1,442 out-of-state students attended UL-Lafayette, according to the school website. It wasn't immediately clear how many would qualify for the tuition discount.

In an effort to accommodate as many students as possible, there is no limit on how many of these "Legacy scholarships" the university will award.

“At this time it’s just based on eligibility,” Diez said. “So if a student applies, they submit all of the required documentation to us proving they’re eligible, then we will go ahead and award that (scholarship) to the student.”

Students will be required to submit three documents related to the scholarship. They need a letter from their parent’s alma mater verifying his or her graduation, a copy of their birth certificate to prove relation and a cover letter with their name, phone number and student identification number.

Bowie said he won’t set any specific goals this year because he’s waiting to see how many students are interested.

“We just want to put it out there and see what kind of attention we get,” he said.

Diez added the feedback his office has been receiving from students is “very encouraging.”
19 2017-03-03
Lafayette

University of Louisiana at Lafayette business students competing in international X-Culture program



19 2017-03-01
Lafayette

http://www.theadvertiser.com/story/entertainment/events/mardigras/2017/02/27/ul-alums-friends-since-7th-grade-now-ready-reign-zulu-royalty/98476554/


This year’s King and Queen Zulu have been dear friends since they first met in the 7th grade at Francis W. Gregory Junior High School.

“And we won’t say how many years that is,” joked Queen Zulu, Donna Marie Glapion.

For Glapion and King Zulu, Adonis Expose’, the friendship continued as they both entered McDonogh 35 and then college at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. But neither ever dreamed they’d be riding at the front of a parade on Fat Tuesday as Zulu royalty.

“It’s just overwhelming. I didn’t imagine that one day I would be sitting here as King Zulu 2017,” said Expose’. He has memories of watching the Zulu parade since childhood, but the dream of becoming King was up until now just that – a dream.

“As a kid my mom and dad would wake me up and say, ‘Come on we’re going to the Zulu parade,’ at 5 or 6 in the morning. I was just so excited as a kid seeing the Zulu parade then. I never thought I would be here today.”

MEET THE LAFAYETTE ROYALTY: Gabriel LXXVIII Thomas Stuart Chance born to be king | Meet Queen Evangeline LXXVIII Christine Elizabeth Beaullieu | Meet King Toussaint L'Ouverture LIX | Meet Queen Suzanne Simonne’ LIX

He selected his longtime friend as his queen. Her family has been involved in leadership roles in the city for many years. Her mother is former Orleans Parish School Board President and YWCA leader Gail Glapion. Expose’, who has been a member of Zulu for 14 years, said there was never any doubt he would choose his friend to be his queen.

“We always had this joke where if she would make me mad, I’d say ‘You’re in the top three but I may not select you,’” he laughed. “But she’s been behind me from day one, helping out with our events and there was no other choice I could have made.”

Facebook
Twitter
Google+
LinkedIn
Krewe of Triton Mardi Gras ball 2017
Fullscreen
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
Buy Photo
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball in the Cajundome Saturday night Feb. 25, 2017. John Rowland/Special to the Advertiser
Fullscreen
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball1 of 57
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
The Krewe of Triton celebrates Mardi Gras with a ball
Next Slide
57 Photos
Krewe of Triton Mardi Gras ball 2017
In addition to being former classmates and friends, the two are also business partners, with a company called Funkshuns, LLC, which is an event consulting firm.

Expose’ is a native of New Orleans, the youngest son of Mrs. Marion Brown Expose’ and the late Frank L. Expose’. He is a proud product of New Orleans Public Schools. He attended Valena C. Jones Elementary, Francis W. Gregory Junior High and was a 1986 graduate of McDonogh 35 Senior High College Preparatory School where he participated in the school choir and many other clubs and organizations. He was voted “Most Popular” by his graduating classmates. One of those was Donna Glapion.

Like Glapion, he graduated from the University of Southwestern Louisiana (now UL). Among his many extracurricular activities, he was involved in student government and waged a successful campaign to be elected the first African-American student to hold the position of treasurer to UL’s Student Government Association.

MORE ON MARDI GRAS: Calendar: Here comes Mardi Gras 2017! | 8 realistic expectations for giving up alcohol for Lent | Fat Tuesday? How about Fit Tuesday?

After two years of working in local broadcasting, Expose’ decided to continue his post graduate studies at Southern University Agricultural and Mechanical College. In 1995, he earned a Master of Public Administration degree.

He began his professional career at the Housing Authority of New Orleans (HANO) where he served as a strategic planning analyst. He was later promoted to the Director of Communications for the agency which he was responsible for disseminating information to the public especially during Hurricane Katrina where he was responsible was getting all information out to public housing residents throughout the country in efforts to bring them back home to New Orleans.

After leaving HANO, Expose worked in the private sector as consultant. He is currently employed by the Regional Transit Authority (RTA) in the Office of Procurement and Contracts.

Expose’ has been a member of the Zulu organization since 2002 and has actively participated on every level in various leadership capacities. In 2008, he represented the Zulu organization as “Mayor of Zululand.” He has also had the honor of serving as an officer of the Zulu Social Aid and Pleasure Club, Inc. as the parliamentarian for six years, and is currently the chairman of Zulu’s annual Christmas party.

Facebook
Twitter
Google+
LinkedIn
PHOTOS- Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball
Fullscreen
Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball at the Cajundome Convention
Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball at the Cajundome Convention Center. Friday, Feb. 24, 2017. SCOTT CLAUSE / USATODAY Network
Fullscreen
Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball at the Cajundome Convention1 of 20
Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball at the Cajundome Convention
Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball at the Cajundome Convention
Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball at the Cajundome Convention
Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball at the Cajundome Convention
Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball at the Cajundome Convention
Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball at the Cajundome Convention
Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball at the Cajundome Convention
Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball at the Cajundome Convention
Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball at the Cajundome Convention
Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball at the Cajundome Convention
Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball at the Cajundome Convention
Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball at the Cajundome Convention
Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball at the Cajundome Convention
Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball at the Cajundome Convention
Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball at the Cajundome Convention
Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball at the Cajundome Convention
Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball at the Cajundome Convention
Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball at the Cajundome Convention
Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball at the Cajundome Convention
Next Slide
20 Photos
PHOTOS- Xanadu Mardi Gras Ball
He ran for Zulu king and was elected over the Memorial Day weekend 2016. His election was particularly since his mother would pass away a few months later. “Every event we had she was always there. The last thing we did was the picnic and she was there and she passed away in October so I was so happy that she was here to see me elected as King Zulu.”

Expose’s community involvement includes serving the boards of Young Audiences, Boys & Girls Clubs of Southeast Louisiana and Heart N Hands, Inc. He has been a member of the Pines Village Neighborhood Association, Mayor’s Office Task Force Committee for Blighted Housing and an alumnus of the Committee for a Better New Orleans Metropolitan Area Committee. His community work with young people includes being a role model with Forever Our Children, Inc. and the Young Leadership Council. He is a member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc., Phi Iota Iota Chapter, where he has served as the Editor of the Oracle and Activities Chairman. His chapter voted him Omega Man of the Year. He is a member of Franklin Avenue Baptist Church, as is Glapion.

Queen Zulu 2017, Donna Marie Glapion, is a native of New Orleans. She is the daughter of former school board leader Gail Moore Glapion and the late John M. Glapion. A graduate of New Orleans Public Schools and UL, like her king, in 1989, Glapion became an administrative assistant in the office of the late Dorothy Mae Taylor, City Councilwoman at-large on the New Orleans City Council.

Following five years in the public sector and world of politics, Glapion entered the private sector, as the Operations Manager in the Corporate Real Estate/Facilities Management Department for Whitney National Bank. In 2001, she joined a research team at Tulane University School of Medicine, as the Section Administrator of the Hematology/Oncology Department.

In 2009, Glapion was employed by the James Singleton Charter School as Operations Manager. Through her leadership and using grant funding, academic scholarships were awarded to deserving students, and band instruments and uniforms were purchased for local middle schools. Currently, Glapion serves as the Operations Manager at William J. Fischer Elementary School.

For many years Glapion has worked with Zulu’s Toys for Tots campaign. Most recently, she said one of the highlights of her creative career was the experience of serving as co-modiste, assisting in the presentation of the Zulu maids from 2012 to 2014.

Over the past year, as King and Queen Zulu, Expose’ and Glapion have visited more than two dozen schools, stressing the value of education and hard work. The message of this year’s Zulu parade is also meant to inspire and speak about an important issue facing New Orleans: “Stop the violence.”

“If the students see positive role models, that helps. So that’s one reason we go to schools and spread a positive message to try to encourage them and turn them away from violence too,” Expose’ said.
19 2017-02-27
Lafayette

UL's Krewe de Roux celebrates Mardi Gras with annual event


Students of UL are getting ready for Mardi Gras weekend.

The Krewe of Roux kicked off the weekend with a parade this afternoon and a Mardi Gras ball that will be going on until 11 p.m.

The parade began on Rex Street and ended on Boucher Drive.

The parade is a little different from a traditional Mardi Gras parade because there aren't any floats; instead, cars, trucks, and bicycles are welcome.

The Krewe of Roux Mardi Gras Ball is going on now at the Cajundome Convention Center. This year's theme is "Cajun Cabaret."
19 2017-02-24
Lafayette

Lab school concept approved for University of Louisiana at Lafayette


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette is moving forward with plans for a new laboratory school, where teachers in training can get experience with model education methods and area kids will benefit from the most up-to-date research on learning.

The University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors on Thursday approved UL-Lafayette's proposal for the school, which would be similar to lab schools associated with LSU, Louisiana Tech and Southern University.

Planning for UL-Lafayette's proposed lab school is still in the early stages. Yet to be determined is where the school would be located and when it might open, but UL-Lafayette College of Education Dean Nathan Roberts said area school districts and the community have embraced the concept.

"As soon as we mention it to anybody, they say, 'How can we get involved,'" Roberts said.

The idea is to create a school to showcase model teaching methods and emerging educational research for UL-Lafayette students preparing for a career in teaching.

"We need to have model classrooms for demonstration so teachers can see what it should look like," Roberts said. "We can't get the (College of Education) students the experience they need."

Kids enrolled at the school would benefit from a learning environment shaped by best practices in the teaching field and would get an early introduction to higher education, he said.

"Those kids are going to get such great exposure of what the university has to offer," Roberts said. "... There won't be a question that they're going to college, because they will feel like they're already in college."

The proposal approved by the UL System Board on Thursday calls for the school starting with K-3 students and adding additional grades each year, possibly through high school.

"We want to bring it, at the very minimum, up to K-5," Roberts said.

UL-Lafayette has proposed supporting the new school through a combination of state money and a sliding scale tuition of up to $4,500 a year. Financial aid would be offered to up to 40 percent of the student population, according to the proposal.

Roberts said the goal is draw a diverse student population that mirrors that of conventional school districts, so area educators can have faith the teaching methods modeled at the lab school are effective in their own classrooms.

"You don't want to create something that people can't replicate or don't feel like they can replicate," he said.

There is no timeline for when the school might open, but Roberts said the approval by the UL System Board on Thursday sets the stage for serious discussions on site selection, the design of the school, and the details of admissions and funding.

"We want to go as fast as we can," he said.
19 2017-02-24
Lafayette

UL Lafayette wants new degree for French immersion teachers


LAFAYETTE, La. (AP) - The University of Louisiana at Lafayette hopes to start a summer program for people who want to teach elementary French immersion classes.

It would grant a master's degree in elementary education with a concentration in elementary French immersion.

The Advertiser reports that the proposal goes before a university system Board of Supervisors committee Thursday. It would need approval by the system, the Board of Regents and the Louisiana Department of Education.

A Lafayette Parish school official says 54 immigrants in Louisiana on visas teach French immersion classes in the parish.

Louisiana-Lafayette's master of arts in teaching program is designed for people without any teaching certification. It currently offers two concentrations in special education for students with mild to moderate disability: One for grades 1-5, and one for grades 6-12.
19 2017-02-22
Lafayette

Want to teach French immersion? Here's a new way


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette is looking to streamline the route to teach French immersion with a new master's degree and concentration.

The approval process begins this week with a letter of intent to offer a new degree program — Master of Arts in Teaching in elementary education — with two concentrations — elementary ed and elementary French immersion. The letter goes before a committee of the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors on Thursday.

The school's Master of Arts in Teaching program, which is designed for individuals who do not hold any teaching certification, currently offers two concentration areas — elementary and special education mild/moderate grades 1-5, and secondary and special education mild/moderate grades 6-12.

Read more: Unique hobby helps student pay for school, see the world | UL Lafayette weighs online MBA degree

This file photo shows Kirby Jambon, a fifth-grade FrenchBuy Photo
This file photo shows Kirby Jambon, a fifth-grade French immersion teacher, helping Victoria LeGros, 10, with a classroom assignment at Prairie Elementary in Lafayette. The University of Louisiana at Lafayette is seeking to add a new Master of Arts in Teaching degree with a concentration in elementary French immersion. (Photo: The Advertiser file photo)
If approved, the letter of intent will be submitted to the Board of Regents for consideration, which also includes review by the Louisiana Department of Education because the program will lead to teacher certification, a Regents spokesperson said.

The new degree program was designed as a summer intensive program that "ideally" would begin in 2017 should it receive all approvals in time, said Peter Sheppard, professor and head of the UL Department of Educational Curriculum and Instruction.

The current route to teaching French immersion requires teacher candidates to have either a degree in French and an alternate certification in education or have a degree in education and demonstrate a proficiency in French.

The new concentration would streamline that path by offering both the teaching and language elements in one program and would maintain the quality of such "thriving" programs as those in Lafayette Parish schools, Sheppard said.

French immersion is in at least seven Acadiana schools and 30 public and private schools across the state, serving more than 4,000 students, according to the Louisiana Department of Education.

Sheppard emphasized the importance of French immersion to students and the state as a whole.

"The chief importance of (elementary French immersion) is it helps to preserve the historical French culture of this state," he said. "... There's a high demand from a staffing perspective and from a historical perspective," Sheppard said.
19 2017-02-21
Lafayette

UL weighs online MBA degree


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette has been moving ahead with plans for an online master’s of business administration degree, one that would perhaps be available as early as autumn.

Marisa Collins, spokeswoman for B.I. Moody III College of Business and interim Dean Gwen Fontenot, confirmed Monday an online MBA has been “in development” but has not been advertised or marketed.

“We’ve been looking at it awhile,” said Associate Dean P. Robert Viguerie Jr., who directs the college's Executive MBA program. He said the program still needs “internal approvals” from campus leadership as well as approval at the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors level.

READ MORE: EMBA offers high-level experience

READ MORE: Fontenot takes reins at UL business school

ADVERTISING

READ MORE: B.I. Moody College earns reacreditation

The UL System Board of Supervisors listed an item for its finance committee meeting Thursday regarding the proposed UL program’s “special pricing for the online Master’s of Business Administration degree program.”

UL’s B.I. Moody III College of Business Administration does not currently list an online MBA, although the college offers a part-time EMBA program in the afternoon and evenings. About 80 percent of the students in that program work full time, the college’s web site says. The EMBA program will continue even if the online program is eventually approved.

Viguerie said special pricing for the online program is necessary because courses are offered on a different schedule than the semester system. Other online MBA programs also offer pricing specific to their online schedules.

He said business school leaders have been considering the online option for about a year. He said UL cannot offer altogether new programs, but can offer existing programs online. But he cautioned that there are many approvals needed before the program is firmly in place.

UL offers an online, 15-credit-hour, post-bachelor’s certificate in business administration that provides a foundation for entering the master’s program. That program is tailored for prospective MBA students who have earned a “non-business undergraduate degree.”

“We do see a market out there, a demand,” Viguerie said.

He said specific academic emphases within the MBA have not been determined. He said tracks in health care, finance and sales leadership may be among those considered. Fall enrollment would depend on rapid approval at several stages, he said, which is not guaranteed.
19 2017-02-16
Lafayette

UL actors present 'The North Plan'


Actors at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette are presenting a play that could have been ripped from today’s headlines. There’s a seizure of power in Washington, D.C., a bureaucrat on the run, a top-secret enemies list and more government chaos.

The story was actually taken from a book written four years ago. Carl Granieri, the play’s director, said performing arts faculty at UL selected the play more than a year ago.

But the piece couldn’t be more timely.

“We picked this play, not last Christmas, but the Christmas before,” said Grainieri. “It’s been interesting because the play is about political tumult. None of us knew what was going to be happening in the world this spring.

“Sometimes art is funny that way. We feel very fortunate that it’s brought a lot of attention to the play. But art has a providence of its own sometimes. So it felt like this was exactly the play we should be doing at this moment, unbeknownst to us when we picked it.”

ADVERTISING

The theatre program at UL’s School of Music and Performing Arts presents Jason Wells’ black comedy, “The North Plan,” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday through Sunday at Burke-Hawthorne Hall. A preview performance is set for 7:30 p.m. Wednesday with matinee shows at 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

From left, Jasmine Moore, Duncan Thistlewaite, Christian
From left, Jasmine Moore, Duncan Thistlewaite, Christian Mouisett star in "The North Plan." (Photo: Melissa Gilbert)
“The North Plan” follows Carlton Berg, a State Department bureaucrat on the run following a criminal overthrow in Washington. With the new government’s secret kill list in hand, Carlton lands in jail in the Ozarks, surrounded by people who don’t believe his story. But a pair of government agents are on their way to silence him.

Christian Mouisset plays Carlton with lead actress Emily Daigle. Community actors Aren Chaisson and Duncan Thistlethwaite are also part of the production.

“It’s a strange play for strange times,” said Granieri. “The circumstances are very dark, but the characters that inhabit them are very funny.

“Their relationships are very funny. It yanks you back and forth. There are times when the play is very scary. Then suddenly, it gets very grim.

“Then there are other times when it’s slapstick and farce. It all hangs together. It’s a locomotive. It doesn’t stop.”

Landry, GIVERS await Festival International
Granieri said the cast has handled the challenge of dark comedy well.

“Dark comedies are very tough because they ride the line between things being funny and things being scary or unfunny. Comedy is always about tension and relief.

“Comedies are harder that tragedies. They’re tough. But these students have done a phenomenal job. I think it’ll be an exciting night of theater.”

Want to go?

What: UL Performing Arts presents "The North Plan"

When: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday through Friday, 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday

Where: Burke-Hawthorne Hall, 240 Hebrard Blvd.


NEWS NOT NOISE
As low as
$19.99/YEAR
UNLOCK UNLIMITED ACCESS

Tickets: $10, free for UL faculty, staff and students

Information: ulpfar.org
19 2017-02-16
Lafayette

UL expands legacy scholarship program


UL Lafayette is now offering in-state tuition to children of people who graduated from Louisiana universities.

The Louisiana Legacy Scholarship already offered in-state tuition to children of people who graduated from UL; now the program will offer in-state tuition to children of at least one parent who received an associate's degree or higher from any private or public accredited college or university.

“We’ve broadened it to include students whose parents have graduated from any public or private college or university in Louisiana, as long as the institution is regionally accredited,” said Dr. DeWayne Bowie, the University’s vice president for Enrollment Management.

The new program is available to students who have met admissions requirements and have enrolled at UL Lafayette.

It is designed to attract students with familial ties to Louisiana back to the state, Bowie said.

“We’re seeing a lot of children of graduates from Louisiana institutions who live elsewhere, but want to come back home," he said. "This is our way of trying to help them do that.”

The annual difference between in-state and out-of-state tuition is $13,728.

To be eligible, students who have enrolled at UL Lafayette must provide a copy of their birth certificate—and verification of their parent’s Louisiana college degree—to the Registrar’s Office.

“Along with the student’s birth certificate, a transcript of the parent’s, or a verification of degree letter from the parent’s alma mater, is required. A diploma won’t be sufficient,” Bowie said.

The name of the parent who graduated from a Louisiana college or university must appear on the student’s birth certificate.

Student applicants should submit a cover letter, the documents, their name, ULID, and cell phone number to the University’s Office of the Registrar.

The information can be faxed, emailed, mailed, or delivered in person.

Visit registrar.louisiana.edu for more information.
19 2017-02-15
Associated Press

Univ. offers in-state tuition if parents attended La. school


LAFAYETTE, La. (AP) - The University of Louisiana at Lafayette says it's now offering in-state tuition to anyone with a parent who has at least an associate's degree from any public or private college or university in the state.

Until now, the "Louisiana Legacy Scholarship" has applied to anyone who lives out of state but has a parent who graduated from Louisiana-Lafayette. It's worth $13,728 a year.

Vice president for enrollment management DeWayne Bowie says the school hopes to attract students with family ties to Louisiana.

Students who have enrolled at Louisiana-Lafayette must provide a copy of their birth certificate and verification of their parent's Louisiana college degree to the Registrar's Office. Bowie says a diploma won't work - it has to be a transcript or verification letter from the school.

Online: http://registrar.louisiana.edu/

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
19 2017-02-15
Lafayette

UL expands its Louisiana Legacy Scholarship


UL Lafayette is expanding its Louisiana Legacy Scholarship, a longstanding program that offers in-state tuition rates to students from other states with a parent who graduated from UL.

Now, out-of-state students with at least one parent who received an associate's degree or higher from other colleges and universities in Louisiana can have the non-resident fee waived.

"We've broadened it to include students whose parents have graduated from any public or private college or university in Louisiana, as long as the institution is regionally accredited," said Dr. DeWayne Bowie, the University's vice president for Enrollment Management.

The new program is available to students who have met admissions requirements and have enrolled at UL.

It is designed to attract students with familial ties to Louisiana back to the state, Bowie said. "We're seeing a lot of children of graduates from Louisiana institutions who live elsewhere, but want to come back home. This is our way of trying to help them do that."

The Louisiana Legacy Scholarship has an annual value of $13,728.

To be eligible, students who have enrolled at UL Lafayette must provide a copy of their birth certificate-and verification of their parent's Louisiana college degree-to the Registrar's Office.

"Along with the student's birth certificate, a transcript of the parent's, or a verification of degree letter from the parent's alma mater, is required. A diploma won't be sufficient," Bowie said.

The name of the parent who graduated from a Louisiana college or university must appear on the student's birth certificate.

Student applicants should submit a cover letter, the documents, their name, ULID, and cell phone number to the University's Office of the Registrar.

The information can be faxed, emailed, mailed, or delivered in person.
19 2017-02-14
Lafayette

New app helps UL students track its bus system


University of Louisiana at Lafayette students can keep track of the university's bus locations thanks to a new app.

Users can view real-time shuttle location via GPS tracking, as well as estimated arrival times for each of the campus' three bus stops. According to a press release from UL, the app is provided by Ride Systems, a company based in Morgan, Utah.

The app also has a shuttle tracker feature that enables users to view a map that displays bus routes, with icons to show the progress of buses as they travel the routes. Additionally, the Office of Transportation Services will be able to post information about schedule changes or other events that could affect parking through the app.

The app is available for Android and iPhone. For more information, visit park.louisiana.edu.
19 2017-02-10
Lafayette

UL Hold career fair


VIDEO
19 2017-02-10
Lafayette

New scholarships available from local law firm and hospital


The Opelousas General Health System Foundation and the Morrow, Morrow, Ryan, Bassett and Haik Law Firm are both now accepting scholarship applications for the 2017-2018 school year awards.

The OGHS Foundation scholarships are open to students looking to pursue a higher education in medical fields such as nursing, respiratory therapy, medical technology, medical records, medical office assistant, patient care technician and other health care-related fields as approved by the scholarship committee.

Scholarship amounts may include partial or full payment of tuition at approved health care programs, which include: Louisiana State University at Alexandria, Louisiana State University at Eunice, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Southern University or South Louisiana Community College T.H. Harris Campus or Lafayette Campus.

The OGHS Foundation scholarships will be awarded based on academic background, probability of graduation, maturity, financial status, availability of resources and the needs of Opelousas General Health System. The amount of scholarships will vary with each recipient and will be based on the number of total applicants, the amount of funds available and the applicants' chosen fields.

The law firm of Morrow, Morrow, Ryan, Bassett and Haik is offering scholarships for students in St. Landry and Evangeline Parishes to encourage students to seek employment within the two parishes. The MMRBH scholarship award is for $2,500.

For full qualification details about each of the scholarship opportunities, including copies of applications, visit opelousasgeneral.com or call 337-594-3499. The deadline for applications is April 3, and all documents, including application, should be postmarked no later than April 3.

Applications need to be mailed to the following address: OGHS Foundation, P.O. Box 1389, Opelousas, Louisiana, 70571.

All applications will be considered by the scholarship committee, and the top candidates for each award will be called for interviews by the committee. All scholarships will be awarded in May.
19 2017-02-09
Lafayette

Allons dancer, chanter, viver with new A&E section


After a fall semester and winter intercession of thinking of words that best describe University of Louisiana at Lafayette (and surrounding city) life, the upper echelons of Vermilion editorial staff conceived one word that best sums up life as we know it in the epicenter of our boot-shaped, bayou-bordered state: Allons.

The French word for “let us go” came a little after Leah Cavalier, our managing editor, reminded us that “not everybody speaks French,” to which we nodded our heads in agreement. The five-letter word, pronounced “al-ONH” normally and “al-ONS” by Yanks (as well as Devin Cochran, our editor in chief), is a vague name that replaces “Tout le Reste.” Although the title was endearing, the connotation with a phrase that means “all the rest” in English does not properly convey the vibrant personalities and events that go on along Johnston and Jefferson Streets.

So instead, and without one more week’s delay, may I introduce to you “Allons.” This section is your stop for feature-length personality profiles, place features and student opinions, as well as about everything you need to know if you aspire to be a bon vivant while paying your dues as a broke bachelor’s candidate. The section is roughly four weeks old right now, so it’s about three pages tall and one broadsheet wide; fear not, though, because we’ll be expanding as more events happen.

In case you’re impatient, look no further than thevermilion.com.

I’ve enlisted the help of resident music and hair gel aficionado George Clarke to help build our “Lafayette Events” page listed under our “Allons” tab. We’ll be searching for cool on-campus and off-campus events to put on this page including (but not limited to) concerts, museum presentations and festivals.

We’ve rallied freelance writers, seasoned columnists and burgeoning news writers who want to hone their experiences in narrative storytelling; we’ve also defied the paper’s template to bring you creative content on an ever-shifting pallet.

As for our beloved columns that incite thought as much as they do contentious Facebook discourse: Almost all columns will be published weekly either online, in print or both. This online-only stint will also give us ample space to make way to cover more topics such as religions other than Christianity and political views other than Liberal. Be on the lookout for a food column, too.

From fresh faces in the Downtown Development Authority to new spaces around town that aren’t bars or nightclubs, Lafayette has grown exponentially. Although some people have compared the town to Austin, Texas, I believe we are doing ourselves a disservice by doing such. I mean no disrespect to Austin; I truly hope it will always stay weird and thoroughly enjoy every visit to the middle of the Lone Star State.

Just like Lafayette is at the precipice of a wonderful adulthood, “Allons” has a good future ahead of it. We’ve enlisted our younger writers to take on this new system, and our older employees have their hands full; however, I would like to enlist your help as well.

Allons is your section as much as it is ours. We have space for more opinions, more letters to the editors and more columns. If you have any ideas, suggestions or comments, please send them over to me at kaileybrous@gmail.com. The Vermilion staffers jump up and down when we receive submissions.

To close out this trite, egotistic ode to progress: allons commencer.
19 2017-02-08
Lafayette

UL’s College of Business honors its namesake


More than 100 UL Lafayette students, faculty, staff, alumni, friends and supporters honored the College of Business Administration’s namesake, B.I. Moody III, in connection with the 15th anniversary of the renaming of the college.

At the Feb. 1 event, UL Lafayette President Dr. Joseph Savoie and Dr. Gwen Fontenot, interim dean of the college, gave welcomes before the unveiling of three bronze plaques that will be displayed permanently in the Moody Hall lobby.

The unveiling was followed by a presentation in an adjacent auditorium about the impact of Moody’s contributions to the University, which total over $8.2 million, including a Moody Match program implemented in 2006.

“We are elated to share in this celebration of Mr. Moody and his family’s legacy. Many students have asked about him, so this was not only a way to honor him but a great way for the students to learn about his life. The highlight of his night was meeting students who introduced themselves and expressed their gratitude for his support,” Fontenot said.

Moody, 91, is chairman of The Moody Company and of Louisiana State Newspapers Inc.

Moody’s college career was interrupted by service in the U.S. Navy during World War II. After the war ended, he graduated from Southwestern Louisiana Institute (now UL) in 1949 with a bachelor’s degree in accounting. He is a founding partner in the CPA firm of Moody, Broussard, Poché & Guidry and later became president and CEO of Chart House Inc. in Lafayette and chairman of the board for First National Bank of Lafayette.

Moody has served on the boards of directors of many other companies, including First Commerce of New Orleans, Riviana Foods Inc., Celeron Oil Company Inc. and Quantum Restaurants.


19 2017-02-07
Lafayette

UL students donate blood to help save lives


VIDEO
19 2017-02-07
Lafayette

UL enrollment dips 1 percent in spring


University of Louisiana at Lafayette enrollment dropped by about 1 percent, year over year, for the spring 2017 semester.

UL Lafayette officials confirmed Monday spring enrollment in January was 15,771 students, down from 15,971 students in spring semester 2016.

State university officials were uncertain how undergraduate students, particularly those on state-sponsored Taylor Opportunity Program for Students scholarships, would respond to scholarship cutbacks linked to a Fiscal Year 2017 state budget shortfall.

DeWayne Bowie, vice president for enrollment management at UL, said in January that 7,000 UL students hold TOPS scholarships, scholarships earned through high school GPA and test scores in a program initiated two decades ago and fully funded until 2016-17. This academic year, in response to devastating Fiscal Year 2017 state budget cutbacks, TOPS was funded at about 93 percent in the fall semester, 41 percent in spring.

Bowie said UL had been planning for the TOPS shortfall since the Louisiana Legislature announced planned cuts last year. He said UL counseled students who felt the pinch and offered some additional campus jobs or work-study to help students stay enrolled.

Some students told The Daily Advertiser they had found additional off-campus work or took loans to meet the shortfall.

Bowie said many students and families were already facing hardships before TOPS was cut. Some were affected by the downturn in oil and gas prices in recent years; others were affected by cataclysmic floods in north Louisiana in spring 2016 and south Louisiana in August.

Joe Rallo, Louisiana commissioner of higher education, said there was no model for projecting how many students would not register for classes this semester because of the TOPS cutbacks. The nine member institutions of the UL System are filing their enrollment numbers to the system.

Rallo said the state Board of Regents, which oversees all of Louisiana higher education, will get complete information later, perhaps by March.
19 2017-02-06
Lafayette

UL rings in Chinese New Year


VIDEO
19 2017-02-06
Lafayette

UL Lafayette student skips graduation, heads to India for missionary work instead


LAFAYETTE, La. (KLFY) Warner Cain Menard graduated in December from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette in applied sciences with a concentration in business.

Instead of walking across the stage for Commencement, he boarded a flight bound for India and celebrated his graduation by doing missionary work and trekking up Mount Everest with his cap and gown. Now that’s Ragin’ Cajun determination!

In Kolkata, Menard volunteered with the Missionaries of Charity, and Saint Teresa’s Order of Sisters.

He also worked in shelters with the sick and impoverished and spent Christmas among children living in the streets.

“Hiking to mount Everest Base Camp took about 10 days and was an incredible test of endurance,” Menard said.

“We faced altitude sickness, caught colds, endured freezing temperatures in unheated lodges, and the biggest test of all… no wifi. It was an incredibly challenging but rewarding couple of months that I’ll never forget.”

Thanks for your work, Warner, and for proudly Wearing Red even in the coldest and highest of mountain tops! #ulwearred #geauxcajuns


19 2017-02-06
Lafayette

ULL UNVEILS PLAQUE HONORING CROWLEY BUSINESSMAN MOODY


By: HOWELL DENNIS
LSN Editor
LAFAYETTE -- Crowley businessman B.I. Moody III was honored for his distinguished career and his generosity during a ceremony Wednesday night at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette (ULL) in the Business Administration building which bears his name.
Over 100 people were in attendance including dozens of Moody’s family and friends, several of the college’s leaders including ULL President Joseph Savoie as well as dozens of business students who wanted to hear the renowned Crowley businessman speak.
Following the unveiling of a plaque which detailed Moody’s service in World War II to his later business accomplishments, the gathering moved to the building’s auditorium to listen to the Interim Dean of the BI Moody III College of Business Administration, Gwen Fontenot discuss Mr. Moody’s contributions to the school. She emphasized how much of a positive impact the Moody Matching Funds ($3.25 million) Program, has had on the school.
“Thanks to the Moody matching funds, we have received a total of 117 total gifts matched, 92 new funds, 59 endowed scholarship funds, 24 endowed professorship funds, two endowed chair funds, five faculty development funds and two departmental general use funds,” said Fontenot. “All of which has resulted in an $8.2 million impact on the business administration college.”
Those in attendance applauded.
It was then time for Moody to speak. Anyone who had reservations about the 90-year-old Crowley native speaking to the crowd soon had their concerns eased. Moody’s wit and recollection of his days as a young man moving up in the business world had the complete attention of all in attendance.
“When I was young I always wanted a large family. So I now have nine children, 41 grandchildren, 58 great grandchildren and three great great grandchildren. I guess I learned to be careful what you wish for and now you can understand why I’m still working,” he said to the laughter of those in attendance.
Moody went on to recall how a professor at ULL (‘It was SLI when I was here’) convinced him to finish college when he was considering going to work even though he only had two classes left to graduate.
“The dean pleaded with me and said I was making a mistake and so I listened to him and earned my degree. Then I learned that Bill Gates, the richest man in the world dropped out of college, and I wondered what could have happened if I dropped out,” he said drawing more laughter.
“Seriously however,” he said. “I want you to know that I am deeply honored by your presence here this evening.”
Moody received a standing ovation from those in attendance
There was one more surprise in store for Moody from the College of Business Administration staff when he was presented with a birthday cake. He will be celebrating his 91st birthday on Saturday.
A reception followed the presentation in the building’s lobby.
19 2017-02-06
Lafayette

UL reaches out to international students, faculty


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette has reached out to students and staff whose native countries are impacted by President Donald Trump's executive order.

UL has 10 students on student visas from the seven countries affected by the order — Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Yemen and Syria.

Nine of those students are pursuing doctoral degrees, and one is an undergraduate student, UL said in a news release. Eight of the students are from Iran, one is from Libya and one is from Yemen.

Rose Honeggar, director of UL's Office of International Affairs, has reached out to all 10 students.

"Everyone is accounted for, and none were traveling," Honeggar said in a news release. "Our priority is to make sure that they were safe and are here, and to provide support to our students and scholars. Everyone I've spoken with seems to be doing OK."

The Office of International Affairs hosted a question-and-answer session this week for international students and faculty. An immigration attorney was on hand to help answer questions. The office has also consulted with embassies and sponsoring agencies, and with nonprofits such as the National Association of Foreign Student Advisors.

ADVERTISING


“We are in the process of providing as many resources as possible,” Honegger said.

A total of 563 international students on visas are enrolled at UL. Of those, 260 are graduate students, and 255 are undergraduate students. There are also 48 exchange students, scholars and their dependents on visas.

UL's 122 international faculty, staff members and researchers include individuals from 30 foreign countries. Five, who are from Iran, could be affected by the 90-day travel restriction. Of those five employees, one is an administrator and four are faculty members.

Any international student who has questions or concerns about the executive order should contact the University’s Office of International Affairs, which is in Room 136 of the Student Union. The Office’s phone number is 337-482-6819; its email is oia@louisiana.edu.

UL’s Graduate School will accommodate any students who are completing their degrees. For more information, go to the Graduate School in Martin Hall, Suite 332, send email to gradschool@louisiana.edu, or phone 337-482-6965.

Faculty members with questions or concerns should contact the Office of Academic Affairs in Martin Hall, Room 231, 337-482-6454, provost@louisiana.edu.

Counseling for students and faculty is available at the Counseling and Testing Center in Saucier Wellness Center, 337-482-6480, counseling@louisiana.edu.


19 2017-02-06
Lafayette

New UL boss eager to get to know Cajun coaches


He will arrive at UL with an open mind, anxious to get to know Ragin’ Cajun coaches — in all sports — on a personal level.

That is the plan for Bryan Maggard, an associate athletic director for the last 21-plus years at the University of Missouri who was hired last Monday and introduced Wednesday as UL’s new athletic director.

Not in the plans, he suggested when asked, are sweeping changes or new hires — either among head coaches, or in the athletic department — when Maggard starts work in Lafayette sometime in early March.

“I do not have ‘my own guy,’” he said.

“My approach to coaches is this: The coach is, if not ‘the,’ one of the most-critical roles in the athletic department.

“They’re the most-influential individuals to our student-athletes,” added Maggard, who replaced the ousted and reassigned Scott Farmer. “So I’m excited about coming in, and I believe firmly we have to support our coaches at the highest level, so they can be successful.”

Once he’s back on campus, Maggard indicated a natural period of evaluation will follow.

ADVERTISING


UL decides Maggard is right fit as athletic director
“But my focus is on coming in and learning from the coaches, and what are their needs, and how can I support them,” he said.

The approach evidently will be similar for staffers in UL’s understaffed athletic department. No hires will be made right away, Maggard said, and there is no plan for instant change.

The Cajuns’ new athletic director instead plans to listen, learn and assess during his early days on the job.

Bryan Maggard is introduced as the new Athletic Director
Bryan Maggard is introduced as the new Athletic Director of the Louisiana Ragin Cajuns. Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017. (Photo: SCOTT CLAUSE / USATODAY Network)
“It may be a situation where we need to just align people in different roles to play on strengths,” he said.

During an exclusive interview with The Daily Advertiser several hours before he was formally introduced to donors, coaches, student-athletes, staffers and media members, Maggard was asked specifically about UL’s football program and Cajuns coach Mark Hudspeth.

UL went 9-4 and won four straight New Orleans Bowls from 2011-14, during Hudspeth’s first four seasons as head coach of the Cajuns.

But the Cajuns went 4-8 in 2015.

Last year, they lost scholarships, vacated games including two of the bowl wins and remain on NCAA probation due to a lengthy investigation that found multiple recruiting-related rules violations, including a former assistant football coach who allegedly steered multiple recruits to a rural Mississippi test site as a part of an effort to boost their ACT scores and aid them in becoming academically eligible.

NCAA releases ruling on UL violations
Hudspeth was cleared of wrongdoing, and no other Cajun assistant coaches were implicated.

UL’s 2016 football season was marred by the participation of a few Cajun players in a vulgar anti-Donald Trump song cellphone video that was filmed in their locker room on the day of the United States presidential election and that went viral.

No Cajun players were suspended as a result of the video, but some were disciplined and the program later announced a series of measures in response including community service plans and a change in how music is played in the team’s locker room.

UL did make it back to the New Orleans Bowl in 2016, but the Cajuns lost to Southern Mississippi and finished a second straight losing season at 6-7.

UL coach apologizes after Trump-song video, regrets some remarks
“My focus is gonna be coming in and learning in more detail, ‘Are there issues there that need to be heavily evaluated or reviewed?’ ” Maggard said while talking about the Cajun football program. “And I don’t have those answers right now.

“So, again, my approach is I’m gonna come in and sit down with all our head coaches. I’m going to have genuine relationships with all of them.

“And not that this makes me any different than any other AD in the country, but I just think it’s important that the athletic director and his or her coaches have genuine relationships,” Maggard added. “Through that is how I can be assess how a coach is effectively leading our program.”

UL has several high-profile coaches whose programs also have enjoyed postseason success in recent seasons, including baseball’s Tony Robichaux and softball’s Michael Lotief, whose programs frequently are nationally ranked.

They’re both regular NCAA Regional and/or Super Regional participants the last few years, and Lotief’s softball team last went to the Women’s College World Series in 2014.

Men’s basketball coach Bob Marlin took his team to the 2014 NCAA Tournament, and both his program and that of women’s coach Garry Brodhead are recent regular postseason participants as well.

Maggard said he is “looking forward to coming in, working with, getting to know, and providing as much support as we can to position them (Cajun coaches) to be successful.”

“As of right now I look forward to working with Coach Hudspeth and all of our coaches,” he said, “to try to position them to be as successful as they can.”



19 2017-02-03
Lafayette

UL History Department hosts discussion on the history of immigration


The president's immigration ban is the topic of discussion at the UL library. Students and faculty gathered there to show solidarity with those affected by the recent order and to learn about immigration in American history.

They're calling it a history harvest. Students are asked to write and recite stories on how they became Ragin' Cajuns and how their families arrived in the United States.

"My mom got on this boat; I think she was alone, but there were other families on there, and they were just escaping Vietnam. Their destination was unknown; they just wanted to go," says Delena Phung.

"Having to write my Dad's story, and seeing how he's provided me with an opportunity to go to college, just made me see the privilege and how great an opportunity I have here in Lafayette, Louisiana," says Sirikhwan Pamornkul.

History professor Lena Suk says students have an immigration story even if they don't realize it. She points out army families moving and people relocating after Hurricane Katrina.

"Everybody has that story of migration and of displacement, and we can humanize that immigration experience and see how that's everybody's story around here," says Suk.

Many of those immigration stories are the result of Congress getting rid of immigration quotas just a few decades ago.

"When we think about immigration, this country, people talk about immigration and people being welcome, but for much of the history of this country, that wasn't the case. People really couldn't just come from anywhere, that's only after 1965," says UL history professor Rich Frankel.

No matter when or how their families got here, the students who told their stories are now part of university history.

"It's going to go into our UL archive. It's something that will be there and be preserved, so future generations can come back and listen," says UL grad student Meghan Sylvestor.


19 2017-02-03
Lafayette

UL students share immigration, migration stories


Laura Jaen didn't hesitate to share her family's story of immigrating to America during a public history event held Thursday afternoon on the University of Louisiana at Lafayette campus.

Her father moved to America from Spain for more job opportunities. Her mother's family moved to America from Cuba as refugees escaping Fidel Castro.

"The American view of refugees was not then what it is today," Jaen said. "We've talked about it a lot in my family. In the 1960s, one of the greatest threats to America was communism, and my family was coming from Cuba and they were welcome. They were loved."

A student writes a personal story during the HistoryBuy Photo
A student writes a personal story during the History Harvest event, where participants were invited to share their experiences with migration Thursday, Feb. 2, 2017 on the University of Louisiana at Lafayette campus. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)
Jaen is a junior child and family studies and Spanish major at UL.

She grew up in Miami and moved to New Orleans as a teenager. As a Hispanic-American, her new Louisiana home also showed her a new perspective of what it's like to be a minority in a community instead of part of the majority.

Jaen has found herself speaking up more because of the current political climate.

"I'd like to see more of an understanding of immigration laws and the vetting process," she said. "A lot of people think it's easy to come to this country, and I'm not sure where that perspective comes from. People don't understand that even if you are doing it legally, it takes time and effort, and it's a long process."

Jaen's story was one of many shared during History Harvest: UL Stories of Immigration.

The goal of Thursday's event was for people to gain an understanding of the experiences of people who have migrated from one place to another. Few immigrants shared their stories, but many students shared stories about how they came to live in Lafayette or how their families came to live in America.

Students write their personal stories during the HistoryBuy Photo
Students write their personal stories during the History Harvest event, where participants were invited to share their experiences with migration Thursday, Feb. 2, 2017 on the University of Louisiana at Lafayette campus. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)
"We wanted to show support and a welcoming environment for all of our students," said Lena Suk, an assistant professor of history and an organizer of the event. "And since we're historians, we thought, 'What better way than this?'"

The UL history department has put on other History Harvest events, but this is the first one to focus on immigrant stories.

A student holds a sign expressing unity with immigrantsBuy Photo
A student holds a sign expressing unity with immigrants during the History Harvest event, where participants were invited to share their experiences with migration Thursday, Feb. 2, 2017 on the University of Louisiana at Lafayette campus. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)
Students and professors displayed posters with messages such as "We love our immigrant community" and "We stand together" during the event in response to President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration.

What you need to know about Trump's immigration plan
The order, signed Jan. 27, suspended the U.S. refugee program for 120 days, banned all immigrants from seven Muslim countries for 90 days and ordered Trump's administration to develop "extreme vetting" measures for immigrants from those countries to keep "radical Islamic terrorists" out of the United States. It also bars all Syrians from entering the U.S. and gives preference in admission to Christians.

Stories collected Thursday will be archived in a digital format and shared via the UL history department's Facebook page.

Cheylon Woods holds a sign as she enilsts people forBuy Photo
Cheylon Woods holds a sign as she enilsts people for the History Harvest event, where participants were invited to share their experiences with migration Thursday, Feb. 2, 2017 on the University of Louisiana at Lafayette campus. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)
After the storytelling event, the history department hosted a teach-in event at the Ernest J. Gaines Center on the third floor of the campus library.

Rich Frankel led the discussion with a talk called "When America Closed the Golden Door: From Chinese Exclusion to the Holocaust." Following the lecture, a panel of speakers continued the discussion with a Q&A session.

Acadiana residents side with Trump on executive order
As Cajuns, 'we cannot close our home to the refugees'

19 2017-02-03
Lafayette

Seeking innovative thinkers, programmers for coding competition


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette's Center for Business & Information Technologies (CBIT) is seeking innovative thinkers and programmers of all types - professional software developers, students (high school/college), business professionals and entrepreneurs to build and present exciting new "Smart Community" applications for the annual CajunCodeFest 5.0 competition March 30 - April 1, 2017. Winners will receive cash and prizes. Registration is now open for teams or individuals ready to join a team. Team space is limited, so register today at www.cajuncodefest.org.

Teams will have 24+ hours to create unique ways for Lafayette residents to access, display and interpret pertinent civic data from Lafayette Consolidated Government (LCG). "CajunCodeFest taps Acadiana's entrepreneurial spirit and allows Lafayette to be the testbed in the use of networked technologies and gigabit innovations as a Smart Community," said Matthew Delcambre, Director of CBIT. Additionally, the event strengthens lasting relationships among students, professionals, technology leaders, start-ups and corporations.

US Ignite designated Lafayette as a charter Smart Gigabit Community because of the LUS Fiber infrastructure and the university's commitment to innovation. This designation encourages developers, businesses, civic organizations and individuals to bring next generation gigabit applications to life. Lafayette has made a significant commitment toward levering next-generation smart city and internet technologies to keep pace with the world's rapidly changing technology and economy.

"Pursuing Smart City solutions in order to transform how LCG serves and interacts with citizens and businesses is critical to economic growth in Lafayette," said Joel Robideaux, Mayor-President, LCG. "Integrating our information systems and enabling open data initiatives will foster our economy, improve government services and increase citizen engagement."

The competition is hosted by the Center for Business and Information Technologies (CBIT) at UL Lafayette with support from LCG, CGI and INNOV8 Acadiana. Sponsorship opportunities are available now. This event is a great place to recruit, network with the tech community and check out innovative Smart Community ideas. Call (337) 482-0627 or visit www.cajuncodefest.org for more event information.

The Center for Business & Information Technologies (CBIT) supports the University's economic development agenda through research, development and technology transfer of business and information technologies. The annual coding competition, CajunCodeFest, is a signature event for CBIT that fosters innovation in the community. Visit cbit.louisiana.edu for more information.


19 2017-02-02
Lafayette

UL Lafayette unveils plaque for B.I. Moody Business College namesake



The University of Louisiana at Lafayette unveiled a new plaque at its College of Business.

The B.I. Moody III College hosted an unveiling ceremony for a plaque created in dedication to the college's namesake B.I. Moody III.

The building created in 2002 was without a plaque or picture mentioning Mr. Moody. The school hopes that this new plaque will help shed light on the man for which the business college is named.

B.I. Moody III was in attendance at the unveiling. The plaque details Mr. Moody's contributions to the university and provides photos throughout his life.
19 2017-02-02
Lafayette

Bryan Maggard named athletic director at University of Louisiana-Lafayette: 'this is a great job, a great job'


Bryan Maggard has an advantage over most administrators taking over a director of athletics position.

Instead of the process of formulating a plan for the future, Maggard was handed a blueprint for success when he became a finalist for the AD position at the University of Louisiana-Lafayette. And that blueprint was assembled by the man he worked under for nearly two decades at the University of Missouri.

Former Mizzou athletic director Mike Alden did a six-month study of the Ragin’ Cajun program as a consultant, and made a series of recommendations in a report last spring. Maggard officially ended a 21-year career in the Missouri athletics department on Wednesday when he was announced as UL-Lafayette’s new director of athletics.

“Having that is huge, in a word,” the 49-year-old native of Dexter, Kansas, said shortly after he was introduced by UL-Lafayette president E. Joseph Savoie. “That report provides an incoming athletic director a great deal of information. Because I have a relationship with Mike, we know each other very well, I know the accuracy of it, I know the thoroughness of it and I know that it’s a document I know I can absolutely trust.”

Maggard had been UM’s executive associate athletic director since 2012 and worked under Alden until 2015, when Alden left that AD post and shortly thereafter was retained by the Cajun program as a consultant. Alden also coordinated UL-Lafayette’s search to fill the spot left vacant in late November when Scott Farmer resigned under pressure, but Savoie said the Missouri connection had little to do with his final selection.

“Mike’s a go-getter,” Savoie said, “and he said we couldn’t go wrong with anyone we had in our final group. It’s been 33 years since we’ve conducted a comprehensive national search for an athletics director, and with the recent growth in our budge, our fundraising, our facilities, our student-athlete academic ranking, our athletic success, our brand recognition and our fan support, we needed to make sure we kept that success going.”

Screening committee chairwoman Anita Hazelwood said Alden fielded more than 200 inquiries about the post before narrowing it to a list of 32 and finally to a list of 18 that was turned over to the committee, which included ex-Cajun All-American and two-time Olympian high jumper Hollis Conway, former Ragin’ Cajun Athletic Foundation chairman Robert Daigle, Rebounders Club president Karren Hays, Cajun baseball coach Tony Robichaux, Cajun volleyball coach Heather Mazeitis-Fontenot, and student-athletes DJ Sanders from softball and Denise Emokpae from soccer.

The committee interviewed seven semifinalists in Dallas two weeks ago and eventually gave Savoie two names — Maggard and current LSU deputy director of athletics Eddie Nunez — with Savoie making the final decision.

Maggard said he and wife Kerry toured Lafayette and the UL-Lafayette campus on Monday, and Savoie called him with the job offer Monday afternoon.

“I got the call about 4:15,” Maggard said, “and I was just hoping, and wondering if I would be the second call. But he gave me the offer and I was elated to accept and very humbled. You ask people around our industry, this is a great job, a great job.”

Maggard, a journalism graduate of Kansas State who was on staff there and at Florida State before moving to Missouri, said several factors made the Cajun post appealing.

“First, it was leadership,” he said. “Dr. Savoie is a great supporter and I know I have a great boss and great support. The university and its people, there are 19,000 students here and great academic programs. There has been a strong tradition of athletic success. And Lafayette has made a great impression on us in this short a time. My wife and I researched this together and we had four boxes we wanted to check off, and we checked all those boxes.”
19 2017-02-01
Lafayette

UL will announce new AD tomorrow


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette has called a press conference on Wednesday to officially announce and introduce its new Director of Athletics.

The press conference will take place in the Board Room at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette Alumni Center at 1 p.m.

The university has been looking for a new Athletic Director since Scott Farmer resigned in November. Jessica Leger has served as interim AD since that time.


19 2017-02-01
Lafayette

Mexico mission: A Louisiana win?


A Gulf Coast business development mission to oil-rich southeastern Mexico last week was fruitful in advancing cooperation between Louisiana and neighbors to the south, participants say.

"We were able to secure more than 200 face-to-face meetings involving Louisiana businesses participating in this business development mission," said Don Pierson, secretary of Louisiana Economic Development. He said the group also secured commitments from the Mexican state of Tabasco that they would lead a delegation of energy-related businesses to come to Louisiana this year and that there would be additional opportunities for Louisiana companies to engage with Mexican companies.

"They were gracious hosts," Ben Broussard, director of marketing and membership development for Louisiana Oil & Gas Association, said of the Mexican representatives from the states of Tabasco, Campeche, Yucatan and Veracruz.

Mexico, which under President Enrique Peña Nieto has opened up its oil and gas business to international investment, has spent more than two years talking with Louisiana energy companies about helping to develop prospects in shallow water and especially deepwater Mexico, where the state-operated Mexican oil company has little experience.

"Essentially, they’ve figured they can’t do it on their own," Broussard said. "They need involvement from folks who know how to do it. Our companies have serviced deep water for decades. They know how to do it well, safety, within budgets. It shouldn’t be a surprise they are interested in what we have."

Broussard said the energy industry is global and important to Louisiana, which has myriad companies accustomed to working internationally. With energy prices still low, he said, it's important to Louisiana companies to investigate how they might be able to work with Mexico to meet that country's energy needs.

The business development mission, which involved representatives from Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas and Florida, was conducted last week under the backdrop of a testy dispute between the U.S. and Mexico governments about construction of a wall to divide the countries at the border. The Mexican president canceled a trip to Washington on Thursday, the day after the business development mission concluded.

But Pierson said last week's meeting involving Louisiana officials was held far from the Mexican border and was conducted respectfully.

READ MORE: Guarded optimism for economy

READ MORE: $100 a barrel bad, Gulf of Mexico good

Gregg Gothreaux, president and CEO of Lafayette Economic Development Authority, said last week's mission was the third in which LEDA has participated and that the continuity is paying off.

Since 2014, U.S. Gulf of Mexico states, led by Louisiana, have been working with our Mexican counterparts to strengthen business cooperation between the regions.

"The Lafayette delegation met with the secretary of economic development for Campeche, who visited Lafayette during the 2016 Gulf States Trade Mission," Gothreaux said. "We had in-depth discussions about the opportunities in the energy sector and their need for technology and expertise of Lafayette energy companies.

"UL Lafayette also continued their discussions with several Mexican universities to establish exchange programs. The city of Campeche, in particular, has many commonalities with Lafayette — size, culture, industry — that will make strengthening our relationship beneficial to both regions."

Two months ago, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette signed cooperative agreements with representatives of Mexican universities. The Mexican officials were interested in training Mexican engineers and in better preparing faculty members at Mexican universities to teach engineering. They were also interested in cooperation involving business, computer science and environmental studies.

READ MORE: Mexican officials, UL make pacts

READ MORE: Mexican rep talks about oil reforms

Pierson said that the North American Free Trade Agreement, in place since 1994, was also a topic of interest for trade mission participants. NAFTA was intended to eliminate barriers to trade and investment between the U.S., Canada and Mexico, but President Trump, in campaigning for president, has pledged to alter or end NAFTA, which he said works to the United States' disadvantage.

Lafayette Mayor-President Joel Robideaux said the international dispute involving national leaders was too far distant to disrupt business development mission.

"Our relationships with local people there will outweigh any international gnashing of teeth," he said. "The local people in Mexico know what they need and we know what we can provide. That's not to say national governments won't get in the way, but we are committed to these relationships.

"The bonds are there for them to continue traveling and holding conversations with our universities, with us and with our local energy companies."
19 2017-02-01
Lafayette

Mexico mission: A Louisiana win?


A Gulf Coast business development mission to oil-rich southeastern Mexico last week was fruitful in advancing cooperation between Louisiana and neighbors to the south, participants say.

"We were able to secure more than 200 face-to-face meetings involving Louisiana businesses participating in this business development mission," said Don Pierson, secretary of Louisiana Economic Development. He said the group also secured commitments from the Mexican state of Tabasco that they would lead a delegation of energy-related businesses to come to Louisiana this year and that there would be additional opportunities for Louisiana companies to engage with Mexican companies.

"They were gracious hosts," Ben Broussard, director of marketing and membership development for Louisiana Oil & Gas Association, said of the Mexican representatives from the states of Tabasco, Campeche, Yucatan and Veracruz.

Mexico, which under President Enrique Peña Nieto has opened up its oil and gas business to international investment, has spent more than two years talking with Louisiana energy companies about helping to develop prospects in shallow water and especially deepwater Mexico, where the state-operated Mexican oil company has little experience.

"Essentially, they’ve figured they can’t do it on their own," Broussard said. "They need involvement from folks who know how to do it. Our companies have serviced deep water for decades. They know how to do it well, safety, within budgets. It shouldn’t be a surprise they are interested in what we have."

Broussard said the energy industry is global and important to Louisiana, which has myriad companies accustomed to working internationally. With energy prices still low, he said, it's important to Louisiana companies to investigate how they might be able to work with Mexico to meet that country's energy needs.

The business development mission, which involved representatives from Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas and Florida, was conducted last week under the backdrop of a testy dispute between the U.S. and Mexico governments about construction of a wall to divide the countries at the border. The Mexican president canceled a trip to Washington on Thursday, the day after the business development mission concluded.

But Pierson said last week's meeting involving Louisiana officials was held far from the Mexican border and was conducted respectfully.

READ MORE: Guarded optimism for economy

READ MORE: $100 a barrel bad, Gulf of Mexico good

Gregg Gothreaux, president and CEO of Lafayette Economic Development Authority, said last week's mission was the third in which LEDA has participated and that the continuity is paying off.

Since 2014, U.S. Gulf of Mexico states, led by Louisiana, have been working with our Mexican counterparts to strengthen business cooperation between the regions.

"The Lafayette delegation met with the secretary of economic development for Campeche, who visited Lafayette during the 2016 Gulf States Trade Mission," Gothreaux said. "We had in-depth discussions about the opportunities in the energy sector and their need for technology and expertise of Lafayette energy companies.

"UL Lafayette also continued their discussions with several Mexican universities to establish exchange programs. The city of Campeche, in particular, has many commonalities with Lafayette — size, culture, industry — that will make strengthening our relationship beneficial to both regions."

Two months ago, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette signed cooperative agreements with representatives of Mexican universities. The Mexican officials were interested in training Mexican engineers and in better preparing faculty members at Mexican universities to teach engineering. They were also interested in cooperation involving business, computer science and environmental studies.

READ MORE: Mexican officials, UL make pacts

READ MORE: Mexican rep talks about oil reforms

Pierson said that the North American Free Trade Agreement, in place since 1994, was also a topic of interest for trade mission participants. NAFTA was intended to eliminate barriers to trade and investment between the U.S., Canada and Mexico, but President Trump, in campaigning for president, has pledged to alter or end NAFTA, which he said works to the United States' disadvantage.

Lafayette Mayor-President Joel Robideaux said the international dispute involving national leaders was too far distant to disrupt business development mission.

"Our relationships with local people there will outweigh any international gnashing of teeth," he said. "The local people in Mexico know what they need and we know what we can provide. That's not to say national governments won't get in the way, but we are committed to these relationships.

"The bonds are there for them to continue traveling and holding conversations with our universities, with us and with our local energy companies."
19 2017-01-31
Lafayette

UL responds to immigration ban, Trump's order different from Obama's


UL responds to Pres. Trump's immigration ban, and a professor explains the differences between Trump's order and Obama's order.

President Savoie released a statement today offering advice for international students and faculty--telling them to cancel plans if they are traveling to one of the countries on the ban list.

Dr. Rick Swanson, UL political science department head, said, "Apparently no administrative agencies were consulted beforehand nor was Congress. So, the federal government and Congress is still unclear as to what all Trump intended, how it's supposed to be interpreted, how it's supposed to be applied, or what's going to happen going forward."

Swanson expects to see some legal pushback to President Trump's unprecedented order banning immigration from certain countries.

"The president cannot act like a king. No president can. So, it remains to be seen by the courts how far President Trump can go - if he's going within his realm of power or if he's going beyond into what Congress should have the authority to do."

However, many say President Obama did something similar in 2011.

Swanson explained, "Prior to that, you could come into the U.S. without even getting a visa. All Obama did by declaring these countries of concern was say that you had to go through the visa process. He did not ban anyone coming into the country. He just simply said you have to apply for the visa."

With an absolute ban, President Trump wants to deny entry to all immigrants from the seven countries, whether or not they have a work or student visa. However, there's still time for that to change.

The political science professor said, "This is all so new. This is all going to be really developed in the coming days, weeks, if not months and years."

Click here for the university's official statement.



19 2017-01-30
Lafayette

UL narrows search for new athletic director


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s national search for a new athletic director is narrowing.

The Ragin’ Cajuns, in fact, could come to a decision and announce a hiring as soon as sometime next month, UL chief communications officer Aaron Martin said.

But the search is “ongoing” and there is a possibility it will take a little longer than that, UL marketing officer Ryan Conway, a search committee facilitator, said Friday afternoon.

No offers have been extended yet.

“We’re kind of right in the thick of it,” Conway said.

“We have targeted the month of February," he added, "but we’re certainly not pigeonholing ourselves into that, if there is some need to go further.”

The job’s official posting lists an anticipated start date of April 1.

“We’re giving ourselves some time there,” Conway said, “because … it’s been 33 years since we’ve done a (national) search like this, and we’re gonna make sure we go through the process in its fullest to get, really, the right fit.”

The position was posted in December.

Farmer resigns as UL's athletic director
Since then, Conway said, “well over 200 (telephone) calls” have been fielded regarding the vacancy.

The group has been narrowed to what Conway called “a top-tier level of individuals” that includes male, female and minority candidates.

“We have a core group that is very diverse in a number of ways,” he said.

That diversity, Conway indicated, also comes in the form of experience.

The search, Conway said, has led to “conversations with” a number of sitting athletic directors and senior-level associate athletic directors.

Among them are current employees at Power 5 programs — schools belonging to either the SEC, ACC, Big 12, Pac-12 or Big Ten conferences.

The top-tier candidates, Conway added, form a “well-rounded group” with backgrounds “from development to academics to marketing to other areas.”

“We kind of have run the spectrum,” Conway said, “and made sure we have a very diverse group of experiences and background.”

Former University of Missouri athletic director Mike Alden has been spearheading the search as a special consultant to a search committee chaired by UL allied health professor and NCAA faculty representative Anita Hazelwood.

UL names athletic director search committee members
UL put Alden under contract in 2015 as a paid consultant to independently examine its athletic department.

UL president Joseph Savoie will make the hire.

With Alden facilitating the process and Conway assisting him, the committee — which also includes UL baseball coach Tony Robichaux and volleyball coach Heather Mazeitis-Fontenot, among others — has reviewed in detail candidates for the position.

“That screening role,” Ryan Conway said, “is meant to give information to the ultimate decision-maker, and that’s Dr. Savoie, so he can make the most informed decision he can make.”

Last April, UL released a lengthy report born from Alden’s sixth-month analysis that recommended a series of changes for the program.

Roughly seven months after that, UL athletic director Scott Farmer resigned under pressure from Savoie and was reassigned to a faculty position.

At the time of Farmer’s November 2016 exit, Savoie was asked what his new athletic director’s charge would be.

“I want them to read the evaluation of the program, get an understanding of it,” he said.

“I want them to talk to a lot of people — our supporters, and our staff. I want them to get a good sense of the special culture that we have here. And then I want them to make things happen.”

UL releases consultant's athletics report
That includes continued implementation of 20 strategic recommendations in the Alden Report.

The report outlines a six-year plan to address a variety of issues including understaffing, along with ways to create revenue streams by capitalizing on underutilized multimedia and marketing opportunities.

Savoie at the time also suggested he would expect the new athletic director to be someone who could oversee continued implementation of the university’s $115 million-plus athletic facilities masterplan.

Under Farmer’s watch, the school built an athletic performance center that houses football coaching offices, new locker rooms and a state-of-the-art strength training facility; expanded Cajun Field by adding new seating behind one end zone; and started now-completed renovation at its track/soccer facility.

Late in the Farmer era UL also began renovation of M.L. “Tigue” Moore Field at Russo Park, an ongoing project whose start was controversially delayed while awaiting funding finalization.

The masterplan contains several other proposed projects, the biggest of which is massive expansion at UL’s Cajun Field football stadium.

Cajun Field expansion not done, but on schedule
UL short $6 million for renovations to Tigue; work moving ahead now
With Farmer out and a new hire eventually in, Savoie said he did not anticipate “any changes to anything there.”

“I mean we’ve got the plan, we’ve got good support, we’ve got donors we’ve been talking to, we’ve got lots of commitments and we’re just gonna keep pushing that ball down the road,” Savoie said.

At the time of Farmer’s resignation, Savoie also said the school would seek “a visionary” with “great integrity and a great work ethic,” a “relationship-builder,” someone who could “focus on academics as well as athletic success” and someone who has “ability to generate financial support.”

Alden’s role, Savoie said then, would be identifying candidates and “checking them out.”

“Making sure that they have a solid record that meets the characteristics that we’re looking for, bringing them to the committee to evaluate and to vet, making sure we check everything to make sure the people are appropriate for the position,” Savoie said.

The UL president also said he expected Alden’s “vast network in the athletic community” would be “very helpful for us.”

Following a short stint as athletic director at Texas State, Alden was Missouri’s athletic director for 17 years starting in 1998.

Rather than “just putting an ad in the paper and seeing who shows up,” Savoie said UL’s intention — boosted by Alden’s involvement — was to “target people who may or may not have thought about coming here, and try to expose them to the great potential here and the great opportunities to build something special here.”

“I think that’s the greatest advantage it will bring to us,” he said of Alden’s part in the search.


19 2017-01-30
Lafayette

Book news


University of Louisiana at Lafayette history professor Dr. Thomas Cauvin was recently named the new director of the public history program at UL Lafayette and has published the first single-authored textbook in North America about public history and the new digital technology practices that are shaping the field. Cauvin’s book, “Public History: A Textbook of Practice,” is a compilation of resources needed to teach public history at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

The American Library Association announced its 2017 youth media award winners and among them was Louisiana author/illustrator Mo Willems, who won the Theodor Seuss Geisel Award for the most distinguished beginning reader book for his “We Are Growing: A Mo Willems’ Elephant & Piggie Like Reading! Book,” written by Laurie Keller.

“Freedom in Congo Square,” a picture book set in New Orleans that’s illustrated by R. Gregory Christie and written by Carole Boston Weatherford, took a Caldecott Honor Book award and a Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor Book award.

Looking to write a book? I’m offering my Writing the Mass Market Novel class from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. for four Wednesday nights in February through UL-Lafayette’s Continuing Education. Then on Feb. 11 I’ll teach an afternoon workshop titled “So You Want to Get Published” detailing the many opportunities available to writers these days. UL Continuing Education offers lots more leisure classes; visit keeplearning.louisiana.edu or call 482-6386.

Two faculty members in the School of Humanities in ULM's College of Arts, Education, and Sciences were awarded grants from the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities (LEH). English instructor Vanelis Rivera was awarded the 2016 LEH Rebirth Grant for her project titled, “The Write to Word: ULM Storytelling Initiative.” The project strives to host creative writing workshops for women in local shelters. English instructor Lesli Rambin received a grant for her project “Byway Blues: A Guide to Northeast Louisiana’s Blues History.” The grant funds will be used to continue field research trips for production of the radio segment, “Byway Blues,” which airs on 90.3 KEDM, Public Radio.


19 2017-01-30
Lafayette

UL to issue statement on travel ban


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette will be issuing a statement Monday about President Donald Trump's executive order barring travel from seven countries.

When contacted Sunday night, officials with the school told KLFY that it is currently looking into details of the order.

UL has 677 international students and scholars from 98 countries.





The executive order, issued late Friday afternoon, sparked protests across multiple cities and airports, where a handful of travelers had been detained. According to USA Today, the American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit on behalf of two men from Iraq who were detained Friday at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport after Trump signed his executive order. In response to the suit, a federal judge in Brooklyn blocked part of Trump's controversial order late Saturday, barring officials from deporting those detained in U.S. airports because of the ban.

19 2017-01-24
Lafayette

UL-Lafayette unveils Ragin' Cajuns French Roast


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette has added a new item to its line of promotional food and beverages: the Ragin’ Cajuns French Roast Coffee.

The dark roast was created through a partnership between UL-Lafayette and Mello Joy, which three years ago released the Ragin’ Cajun Strong Championship Coffee, a temporary blend to commemorate the university’s athletic achievement. The Ragin’ Cajun French Roast, however, will be available year-round.

“We want to be a permanent spot in the coffee aisle,” Mello Joy General Manager David Elmore said at an event Monday to launch the new university branded coffee.

The blend is available exclusively at Rouse’s grocery stores in Lafayette, Youngsville and Morgan City and at the Ragin’ Cajun Store on campus.

Elmore said he hopes to expand the brand in other retail stores when the exclusivity agreement with Rouse’s expires in late February.

This blend will be the first permanent line of coffee released by the university, accompanying other “consumables” such as the Louisiana Ragin’ Cajuns Genuine Louisiana Ale and Lager, which are brewed by Bayou Teche Brewery; Ragin’ Red, the university’s seasoning blend; and the Ragin’ Cajun burger, which is sold at Sonic Drive-In during football season.

Leslie Saloom, assistant director of trademark licensing at UL-Lafayette, said working with local companies and using local ingredients is very important to the university. She said the university likes to be closely involved in the development of a product.

“It’s very important to us, when licensing a product, to be involved from start to finish,” Saloom said.

University representatives aided Mello Joy representatives in choosing the flavor, and a university staff member designed the packaging.

Courtney Jeffries, assistant director of creative services for the communications and marketing department, used coffee instead of paint to develop the package color.

She also drew an old-fashioned, white French coffee pot next to small white cups. She said she was inspired by UL-Lafayette’s dedication to preserving Cajun and Creole culture.

“I wanted to showcase us as being keepers of that culture,” Jeffries said.

Elmore said a dark roast was chosen because it is the most popular flavor in southern Louisiana. He described the Ragin’ Cajun French Roast as a full-bodied beverage that has a “sweet, chocolaty aftertaste.”

A portion of the profits from sales, as with all licensed UL-Lafayette products, will go back to the university, Saloom said.


19 2017-01-22
Baton Rouge

iobb3q01


wh0cd761749 triamterene buy eurax metformin 500 mg buy triamterene epivir Buy Colchicine
19 2017-01-17
Lafayette

TOPS cuts weigh heavy on UL students


LAFAYETTE, La. (The Daily Advertiser) – Courtney Bergeron said getting shortchanged on TOPS funding in her senior year at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette imposed a hardship on her and her family.

The Taylor Opportunity Program for Students, the state’s college scholarship program for students who meet certain benchmarks for grades and ACT scores in high school, was a North Star for her. In high school at Hahnville, she was ever-cognizant of the standards needed to earn a scholarship; in college, studying public relations, she knew the TOPS standards she needed to meet to keep her state funding.

“I feel for the students who are just coming in,” Bergeron said. As a college freshman, she was certain of her TOPS scholarship; nowadays, she said, underclassmen are less certain.

Spring awards cut more than half

DeWayne Bowie, vice president for enrollment management at UL, said Bergeron is one of 7,000 UL students on TOPS, initiated two decades ago and fully funded until this year.

A Louisiana budget shortfall in Fiscal Year 2017 caused cutbacks in the program, which had grown as an annual state expense from about $50 million a year to $300 million. In the first semester, TOPS awards were paid out at about 93 percent; this semester, the awards are being paid at about 41 percent. Overall, students reaped about 67 percent of the TOPS scholarship benefit.

Reed Steva, a freshman from New Iberia majoring in exercise science, said the effect was “huge” for him.

In the fall, he said his student loans were “decent,” manageable. This spring, he said, he began to appreciate the weight that additional loans to meet expenses will bear on his finances.

“I’ll have a lot of debt when I graduate,” he said.

Some seeking additional jobs

John Crittenden, a freshman from Delcambre High School in Vermilion Parish, said he’s applied for additional scholarships and landed a second job to help pay the difference. He also pays for his own car and insurance, both necessary for a commuter student.

Bowie said UL has been planning for the TOPS shortfall since the Louisiana Legislature imposed that reality in 2016. He said UL has counseled students who are feeling the financial heat. The school is offering some additional campus jobs or work-study to fill the gap for some students.

He said the school has communicated with students and parents since last spring, advising them on loans — many students are wary of debt — and preparing them in advance for the cutbacks that were to come. Loans, he said, remain advisable for many students. Degrees are valuable.

But Bowie said many students and families were already facing hardships before TOPS was cut. Some have been affected by the downturn in oil and gas prices in recent years; the Lafayette Metropolitan Statistical Area led the nation in job losses last year.

Cataclysmic floods in north Louisiana in spring 2016 and south Louisiana in August also put some UL students and their families at additional financial disadvantage.

Regents, lawmakers await numbers

Joe Rallo, Louisiana’s commissioner of higher education, said Louisiana students had until Friday to opt out of their TOPS awards at no penalty this semester. The upside to such delay: Students would be eligible for TOPS awards, perhaps at full value, later. But a better deal is no sure thing.

Rallo said there is no model for projecting how many students will not register for classes this semester because of the TOPS cutbacks. He said the state Board of Regents, which oversees all of Louisiana higher education, will get that information later, perhaps by March.

He said state lawmakers will also want to know the effects of this semester’s cutbacks. He is higher education’s main lobbyist to the Legislature.

Bowie said UL has tightened up classes, merging sections to avoid half-empty classrooms.

For now, Bowie said, the TOPS setback doesn’t seem to be affecting UL recruiting for next year’s freshman class.

“We’re seeing no problems in numbers at all,” he said. “Students are applying.”

Despite TOPS cuts, UL was their school

Freshman Niya Davis, an Acadiana High School graduate and geology major, said she likely would have attended UL no matter the TOPS situation. Her mother attended UL, she said, and her hometown campus offers her major.

She also reaps some student aid as a member of the school band. But she said she feels the sting of losing a portion of her TOPS award.

“It feels like I worked for something that was taken away,” she said.

Bergeron, who works on campus as a guide, said high school students who tour campus frequently talk with her about TOPS. “What’s going on with TOPS?” is always a question she can’t answer.

Like Davis, though, she said she likely would have attended UL no matter TOPS’ status.

“I loved UL from the start,” she said. “This was always my school.”


19 2017-01-13
Lafayette

UL's online bachelor program among top 75 in nation


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette is among the top 75 universities offering online bachelor programs, according to new News & World Report rankings released Tuesday.

The university's online bachelor's program earned a ranking of 68. It was the highest-ranked program in the state, according to a press release from UL.

To determine the rankings, more than 1,300 graduate and undergraduate schools were assessed in four general categories that included student engagement, faculty credentials and training, peer reputation, as well as student services and technology using university-reported data for the 2015-2016 academic year.

UL offers three online undergraduate programs, all in health care: an RN to BSN program, a bachelor's in kinesiology and a bachelor's in health services administration.

UL was also recognized for its online graduate education program. Its master's of education in curriculum and instruction was ranked at 158.

UL offers 11 online undergraduate, graduate and graduate certificate programs. Out-of-state online students are charged in-state tuition unless they're enrolled in a special program, such as RN to BSN.

To learn more about the University’s online program offerings, visit online.louisiana.edu/programs.


19 2017-01-13
Lafayette

COMO NAMED OUTSTANDING GRADUATE


Staff Report
Benjamin Brady Como named the Outstanding Graduate for the College of Engineering for the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s winter graduation ceremony.
Como is the grandson of B.L. and Jackie Como of Patterson. His parents are Brady and Patricia Como of Broussard
A petroleum engineering major, Como has a 3.8 GPA. He is a member of Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi Kappa Phi, and Pi Epsilon Tau honor societies.
Como was a member of a UL Lafayette team that placed second in the world, and first in North America, in 2016 Petrobowl Competition. The tournament was held at the Dubai World Trade Center.
PetroBowl tournaments match student teams from colleges in contests to answer questions related to petroleum engineering.
Como is an Eagle Scout and an assistant scoutmaster.
Como has been active in many university organizations, including chapters of the Society of Petroleum Engineers and the American Association of Drilling Engineers. He was vice president of the University’s Society of Petrophysicists and Well Log Analysts chapter.
Como was a founding member of the rechartered Louisiana Beta Chapter of Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity and its finance committee chairman.
He will pursue a graduate business certificate at UL Lafayette, then a career as a deepwater well site engineer in the oil and gas industry.

19 2017-01-13
Lafayette

New Cajundome roof 'self-cleaning'


Like the Mercedes Benz Superdome in New Orleans, Lafayette's new Cajundome roof cleans itself.

Over the past few years, mildew formed on the Cajundome's roof, leaving unsightly black streaks over the pink surface. When money was allotted to clean and resurface the roof, administrators looked into options to stop a repeat of the black growth.

For an additional $50,000, a chemical compound that's resistant to algae and fungus was applied to the resurfaced roof, Phil Ashurst, Cajundome operations director, said.

"The material that's up there is designed so the things that usually accumulate will not attach themselves to the roof," Cajundome Director Greg Davis said. "And when the rains come, it washes off."

The product, Kymax by GAF Coatings, was applied to the Superdome after Hurricane Katrina. When the Cajundome staff prepared bid specifications for the roof resurfacing project, it included that as an alternate, not sure if it was affordable, but the bid came in at an affordable $50,000, he said.

The use of that material, Ashurst said, secured the Cajundome a 20-year clean warranty instead of a 10-year warranty.

If you've seen black splotches on the roof lately, it isn't a recurrence of the mildew, but black ash from burning sugar cane fields.

The Cajundome roof project was part of a large-scale $21 million renovation. Cleaning and resurfacing the exterior dome and metal roofing section cost $1 million and was paid for by the sale of bonds secured with hotel and motel tax collections.
19 2017-01-12
Lafayette

Board of Regents makes recommendations for changes to TOPS program


LAFAYETTE, La. (KLFY) There appears to be another change in the works for the state’s higher education scholarship program TOPS. The staff at the state Board of Regents has drafted some new recommendations.

This comes after sharp cuts to funding were made in the 2016-2017 school year. In the Fall semester, students were awarded a little over 93 percent of full funding, but in the spring, students received only about 42 percent.
News Ten’s Renee Allen brings us up to speed on what’s being talked about now.

“The state board of regents says the recommendations are in response to the request that they conduct a review of the state’s colleges and universities and take a look a how the state’s resources are best being used.”

The state of board of regents received the tops recommendations from staff members on Monday.
One would award TOPS on a percentage basis: 80 percent for freshman, 90 percent for sophomores, and 100 percent for juniors and seniors.

The Vice President of Enrollment Management at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette Dr. Dewayne Bowie says he’ll back anyting that provides consistent funding… especially to give juniors and seniors financial help to graduate.

“We do see the challenges at universities in graduating students having enough money to help them to finish; with the way it’s structured i do support it.””

The board of regents says if percentage based funding isn’t approved, then a flat form of allocation should be considered — regardless of where a student is enrolled.
bowie says that’s what many educators thought tops would end up doing — because increasing funding with tuition — hasn’t worked.

BOWIE: “In otherwords, you have this set amount each year. The only way it’s going to increase is if we go back to the legislature and they can increase the amount.”

Courtney Lyles of Maurice is in her Freshman year at UL Lafayette. She receives TOPS.

“Of course I wish there was more money coming in but I understand that state is tyring to solve things.”

Lyles like other tops students is trying to find other financial resources to supplement what’s been cut.

“Im trying to look for scholarships and then working as best i can but mostly student loans.”

Another recommendation is to require 30 credit hours per academic school year as opposed to the current 24 tops eligible.

“All three drafted recommendations are being suggested to begin with the incoming class of 2018.”


19 2017-01-12
Lafayette

RCAF announces increased fundraising


The Ragin’ Cajuns Athletic Foundation (RCAF), the official fundraising arm of University of Louisiana at Lafayette's Ragin’ Cajuns Athletics, announced Wednesday that contributions to the RCAF Annual Fund have topped the previous years' for the third year.

RCAF officials also announced that total contributions in cash and pledges during the 2016 Fiscal Year approached nearly $11 million. Contributions to the RCAF Annual Fund in 2016 totaled $2.168 million, exceeding contributions of $2.165 million in 2015.

Through Dec. 31, $10.872 million in total cash and pledges was raised by the RCAF with total cash contributions in all areas (Annual Fund, Endowment Funds, Excellence Funds, Sport Restricted, Capital Campaign) totaling $8.109 million. During the most recent fiscal year, total campaign pledges to the RCAF totaled $2.762 million with over 300 new donors joining the ranks.

“To raise over $10 million with everything this community has endured in the last year is remarkable,” said RCAF Executive Director Jim Harris. “It is a testament to the loyal donors and fans that make up Ragin' Cajuns Nation. There are a lot of people who had a hand in this achievement."

Contributions to the RCAF Annual Fund provide unrestricted funds to enhance the student-athlete experience and enable support for overall operations, personnel, and facility improvements, such as elements of the Athletic Facilities Master Plan, which was released in 2013. Projects in Tier 1 of the three-tier plan included the addition of nearly 6,000 seats in the south end zone at Cajun Field, the completion of the new Soccer/Track Facility and the completion of the 100,000-square foot Student-Athlete Performance Center, which benefits all student-athletes in the Ragin’ Cajuns 16 Division I athletic programs.

Projects in Tier II are currently underway, including the construction of M.L. Tigue Moore Field at Russo Park, along with a new facility at Oakbourne Country Club that will benefit the Ragin’ Cajuns golf program.

For more information on the RCAF, visit myRCAF.org or call (337) 851-2904.


19 2017-01-06
Lafayette

University of Louisiana at Lafayette primate center welcomes drug research company to its campus


University of Louisiana at Lafayette leaders hope a pharmaceutical development company's decision to set up shop at the school's primate research center will be the first in a long line of new partnerships as the facility works to expand its scope.

Crown Bioscience, a California-based drug discovery and development company with facilities worldwide, announced plans last week to invest $1 million to renovate a vacant space at UL-Lafayette's New Iberia Research Center and create 10 new research jobs there.

NIRC has long done contract testing on primates for private drug companies at its sprawling 100-acre campus, but there has been relatively little original research on site.

Three years ago, university officials began contemplating a shift to attract more funding for homegrown research and more partnerships to work hand-in-hand with private companies on medical breakthroughs, said Ramesh Kolluru, UL-Lafayette vice president for research, innovation and economic development.

"We felt that we were selling ourselves short," Kolluru said. "Not too many communities can create something like this from the ground up, so we should take advantage of that."

Kolluru was among a crowd of elected officials, university leaders and economic development players who came to NIRC Thursday to formally welcome the Crown Bioscience leadership team.

Kolluru said the company's expansion to NIRC signals a major shift for the research center, and he hopes it will be the first of many such announcements as NIRC begins to flex its research muscle.

"Companies come not just to work here and go away but to come and work with us," Kolluru said. "So now, we are creating new knowledge here."

He said one of the first moves in shifting the focus of the center was recruiting Francois Villinger, a respected researcher, as NIRC director about a year ago.

Since then, Villinger has secured more than $10 million in National Institutes of Health funding for research projects at the center, Kolluru said.

Villinger said one of his top priorities is to highlight the capabilities of NIRC, which with more than 6,000 animals is the largest primate research center in the United States.

"The center is the largest and the most unknown," Villinger said. "We are trying to really attract more people."

Villinger said Crown Bioscience will renovate a now-vacant 20,000-square-foot building on the NIRC campus for its research facility, and NIRC staff will provide animal care and lab support services.

Crown Bioscience CEO Jean-Pierre Wery said the company is planning for a long-term relationship.

"I think this is the beginning of a really good story," Wery said.

NIRC, like primate research centers across the country, has increasingly found itself in the crosshairs of animal welfare groups, and the welfare group SAEN released an open letter to Crown Bioscience on Thursday urging the company to withdraw from the NIRC deal.


19 2017-01-06
Lafayette

UL to offer master's degree on environmental resource science


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette is now offering a master’s degree in environmental resource science.

The Louisiana Board of Regents approved the new degree program in December, according to a press release from the school. The degree will be available through UL's School of Geosciences.

The new graduate program will produce highly trained environmental scientists who will address challenges primarily related to water and soil resources, the press release says.

David Borrok, director of the School of Geosciences, noted that “Louisiana’s core economic sectors are direct reflections of the natural resources available in our state, and some of our most critical resources are water and soil.”

Substantial job growth in the environmental sector is expected in Louisiana. Job growth nationally is predicted to be around 11 percent over the next decade, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Students with a bachelor’s degree in a related scientific or engineering field can apply for admission into the program. The 35-hour curriculum includes thesis and non-thesis options. In addition to required core courses, students can choose from a variety of elective courses offered in the College of Sciences and the College of Engineering.


19 2017-01-05
Lafayette

Bayou to Beltway: January 4, 2017


This week Bayou to Beltway talks to Dr. Richard Fossey, the Paul Burdin Endowed Professor Education at UL Lafayette, about student loan debt which has reached $1.2 trillion dollars, an amount larger than Americans credit card debt. Meanwhile, colleges are getting more expensive as state funding for education drops across the United States. What can college students and their parents do? Where should they turn for good information and answers about the best way to pay for college? Tune in to this instructive program to hear from an expert on student loan debt and paying for college. Today at 12:30 PM and Saturday at 5:30 PM on KRVS, 88.7 FM and streaming online at KRVS.org.


19 2017-01-03
Lafayette

UL-Lafayette forging closer bond with university counterparts in Mexico, noting shared interests


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette is forging closer bonds with its university counterparts in Mexico, finding they share common interests even if their accents differ.

UL-Lafayette already has signed collaborative agreements in place with 15 institutions, and officials say they plan to add three more.

The universities are located in the Mexican states of Campeche, Tabasco and Vera Cruz, which house 95 percent of the country’s oil reserves.

The states also lay victim to hurricanes and environmental threats such as erosion.

“Basically, other than a difference in accents — my Cajun accent and their Mexican accents — the two regions are very, very similar with the same challenges,” said Mark Zappi, dean of UL-Lafayette’s College of Engineering.

The agreement will allow university faculty members with master’s degrees to work toward doctorates at UL-Lafayette and return to teach at their original university.

Zappi said high-performing undergraduate students from Mexico also may spend six months at UL-Lafayette to gain research experience.

“Many of these universities are just getting into research,” Zappi said. “They are going to come from a good research university and go down there with a know-how of how to perform research and how to even get grants from both the government as well as the private sector.”

He said the agreement will help enrich both areas’ small businesses and economies, as well as increase collaboration.

“That would expose our university expertise as well as our regional and industrial expertise to the leading decision-makers out of Mexico,” he said.

Ramesh Kolluru, UL-Lafayette's vice president for research, innovation and economic development, said the universities will focus initially on joint research opportunities before pursuing student exchange programs slated to begin in the fall.

Kolluru said two students from Mexico already have visited UL-Lafayette to explore prospective paths to research and have met with some of the faculty who will guide their research efforts.

“They came very excited and they left even more excited about the possibility that they and their colleagues would have (at UL-Lafayette),” he said.

Zappi said discussion among the universities grew out of the 2015 Louisiana Gulf Coast Oil Exposition convention.

That following June, Zappi, Kolluru and Rafael Hernandez, the chemical engineering department head, visited Mexico.

“We left in June realizing that we are very, very similar,” Zappi said. “In many ways, they have the same interests as us, but they have a real love for their ecology and they’re real pro-energy. … We left very excited.”

He said the UL-Lafayette group also realized that the Mexican states have an increasing demand for engineers and are increasing the amount of STEM-focused institutions around the country.

He said the Mexican states with oil reserves to tap are in a similar position to Louisiana in the 1940s and ’50s, "when companies were just moving to Lafayette and things started to happen. That’s where they were at.”

UL-Lafayette first signed an agreement with the Higher Technological Institute of Centla in Tabasco.

The agreement allowed students with less than two years of coursework completed at the institute to finish their studies at UL-Lafayette, as well as include graduate-level programs and faculty training.

The agreement spurred the interests of other states, Kolluru said, and UL-Lafayette officials began meeting with Mexican universities’ leadership to discuss expanding the agreement.

“We believe that this partnership that we have between these Mexican universities and UL will allow us to create new knowledge, to share the knowledge we have acquired here in addressing some of these problems in the context … to see what works and what does not,” he said.

Zappi said more universities may sign on in the future.

“We have had some interest expressed from some Mexican states not already tied to these (states),” he said.


19 2016-12-30
Associated Press

UL attracts bioscience project


A disease research company will set up a pharmaceutical research and development facility at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s New Iberia Research Center.

Gov. John Bel Edwards and Crown Bioscience Inc. CEO Jean-Pierre Wery announced the project Wednesday.

Wery says the project will enable Crown Bioscience to advance treatments for cardiovascular and metabolic disease research. Louisiana Economic Development says the company will make a $1 million investment and create 10 jobs with an average salary of $70,000.

Wery says they chose Louisiana because of the growing biomedical science community and the operational excellence that exists at NIRC. The company will begin operating at NIRC in January.

Headquartered in Santa Clara, California, Crown Bioscience formed in 2006 and operates research campuses in China, the United Kingdom, San Diego and Indianapolis.


19 2016-12-30
Lafayette

Scholastic awards pour in for Patout, ULL College of Nursing’s outstanding graduate


Angelle Lasalle Patout of New Iberia was honored recently as the Outstanding Graduate for the College of Nursing and Allied Health Professions from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

Patout, 23, completed her nursing major with a 4.0 GPA, and graduated on Dec. 16. She made appearances on both the President’s List and the Dean’s List.

“I was really proud that I had been chosen,” Angelle Patout said.

She also received the Nursing Pharmacology Award.

She received multiple scholarships to help her pursue her degree, including the Rotary Club of Lafayette Scholarship, the Sister Agnes Marie Fitzsimons/Lourdes Regional Medical Endowed Scholarship, the Dolores Bess Endowed Scholarship, the Sister Janet Falgout Memorial Endowed Scholarship, the Lynn Coco Hinrichs Endowed Scholarship for Clinical Nurses, the Dr. Harold P. Chastant Award for Clinical Excellence Scholarship and the Mr. and Mrs. Auguste Verot Memorial Endowed Scholarship..

Patout was active in campus societies as a member of the National Society of Leadership and Success, and Sigma Theta Tau, the international honor society of nursing.

She is active in her community, volunteering with Habitat for Humanity, Companion Animal Alliance, Iberia Parish Humane Society and Walk for Life.

Patout said she did not grow up wanting to be a nurse.

“Nursing was a career I chose because I didn’t know what else to do,” she said. “I ended up loving it.”

Patout loved her nursing studies despite the difficulty of the curriculum.

“UL’s nursing program is definitely one of the hardest nursing programs around here, and it should be. To be a nurse, you should go through a hard curriculum,” she said. “It’s definitely the hardest thing I’ve ever had to get through or accomplish in my life.”

Patout will start Jan. 9 as an operating room circulator nurse at Lafayette General Medical Center.

“I am extremely excited. It hasn’t really hit me, the reality of not being in school,” Patout said. “I’m nervous also, but it’s a good kind of nervous. I’m excited.”

Patout’s parents, Ric Patout and Virginia Lasalle Barnett, both of New Iberia, are excited as well.

“Dad is very proud of her. She was very driven,” Ric Patout said. “She worked very hard and that curriculum is very difficult, so that’s an accomplishment.”

“She has worked very hard. She made a lot of sacrifices for that 4.0,” Barnett said. “I think she’s going to be an outstanding nurse.”


19 2016-12-22
Lafayette

UL Fall Graduation List


University of Louisiana at Lafayette awarded degrees to 1,435 graduates during Fall 2016 Commencement ceremonies on Friday.

The graduates are part of the largest fall semester graduating class in the history of UL Lafayette. To see the names of all graduates, scroll down.

Bachelor’s and master’s degrees were conferred at ceremonies that were held at different campus locations on Friday. Bachelor’s degrees were awarded to 1,226 graduates. Master’s degrees were awarded to 177 graduates. Twenty-three graduates received doctoral degrees. Five graduates received graduate certificates. Four graduates earned post-baccalaureate certificates.

“The world needs what you have to offer, critical thinking skills and the determination to stay the course,” said Dr. Joseph Savoie, University president, during the General Assembly.

Savoie also urged graduates to remain positive when dealing with adversity.

“There is an overabundance of critics these days. And it’s easy to be negative, because not much in life is perfect. But you can decide to take a positive approach to almost any challenge that you face. You can choose to lift up, rather than put down. You can work toward finding solutions to problems, instead of just complaining about them. That may not be the easiest path, but it will always be the right path.”

Lloyd J. “Red” Lerille, a 1987 graduate of the University, gave the Commencement speech. He received an honorary doctorate of educational leadership. He founded and operates one of the largest health clubs in the south, Red Lerille’s Health & Racquet Club.

Lerille told graduates that a strong work ethic, passion for their jobs, attention to detail, and determination are some of the attributes necessary for successful careers and lives.

Most importantly, he said, “you can’t ever stop learning.”

Donald Mosing also received an honorary doctorate, in systems engineering. He earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University in 1950, which was known then as Southwestern Louisiana Institute.

Mosing was the longtime president of the family business known today as Frank’s International, N.V. The publicly traded company has 3,000 employees in 40 locations across the U.S. and around the world. He retired in 2011.

Amélie Desormeaux was named UL Lafayette’s Outstanding Graduate. A political science major with a concentration in international relations, Desormeaux received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the College of Liberal Arts. She is the daughter of Catherine and Scott Desormeaux of Abbeville, La.

Jude Monte was recognized with the Outstanding Master’s Graduate Award. He received a Master’s degree for the College of Nursing and Allied Health Professions.

Four students were recognized as summa cum laude graduates for achieving perfect 4.0 grade point averages.

Meredith Broussard, who majored in sociology, received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the College of Liberal Arts.

Amélie Desormeaux, who majored in political science, received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the College of Liberal Arts.

Angelle Patout, who majored in nursing, received a Bachelor of Science degree from the College of Nursing and Allied Health Professions.

Olivia Savoie, who majored in English, received a received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the College of Liberal Arts.


19 2016-12-20
Lafayette

UL adds three to business faculty


The B.I. Moody III College of Business Administration added three faculty members for the fall 2016 semester, now completed.

The three were:

Brent Baker, assistant professor of marketing. Baker earned his doctorate in marketing from University of South Florida and won several awards including Best Paper and Best Reviewer in the 23rd and 28th Annual International Society of Franchising Conferences. He also won the Junior Faculty Scholarship Award from the College of Business and Public Administration at the University of North Dakota. His research focuses on business to business relationships and his areas of speaking and consulting expertise are on topics surrounding professional and personal selling. He is heavily involved as a professor and coach in the department’s professional sales program.
Joshua Bendickson, assistant professor of management. Bendickson earned his bachelor's from St. Cloud State University in 2003 and his MBA from Augsburg College in 2007. He earned his doctorate from Louisiana State University, where he received the James W. Reddoch Award for excellent teaching by a doctoral student in the Department of Management. While at LSU, he also received the Graduate Teaching Award for the E. J. Ourso College of Business. Prior to joining the Moody College of Business faculty, Bendickson was an assistant professor of management at East Carolina University. Bendickson’s research interests include strategic human capital, entrepreneurship and international strategy and his work has been published in peer-reviewed books and journals. He is a member of the Academy of Management, the Southern Management Association, and the United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship.
Lisa Bowles, visiting instructor of hospitality management. A St. Landry Parish native, she graduated from Louisiana State University in 1997 with a bachelor's in mass communication. In 2002, Bowles earned a master's in tourism administration from The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. She was director of sales for the Austin, Texas, Convention Center. In 2012, she returned Louisiana, where she was director of marketing for the St. Landry Parish Tourist Commission from 2012 to 2015 and director of sales and marketing at the Wyndham Garden Lafayette.

19 2016-12-19
Lafayette

UL-Lafayette fall graduates urged to embrace change, stay positive


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette's fall graduates, young and old, were urged to embrace change and keep a positive attitude at commencement exercises Friday.

Speaker Lloyd “Red” Lerille, owner of the city's oldest and largest health club, said a willingness to make changes is an important part of building a successful life.

“If you’re going to be a success in life, you’re going to have to keep changing things,” he said. “Y’all have been at the university for three, four, five years; look at the changes you’ve seen.”

Around 1,400 students received bachelor’s or master’s degrees, and 23 received doctorates at the general assembly at 11 a.m.

University President E. Joseph Savoie, , led college deans, administrators and guests to the stage, and David Danahar, interim provost and vice president for academic affairs, led the ceremony.

During his welcome speech, Savoie urged the new graduates to remain positive.

“There’s an overabundance of critics these days, and it’s easy to be negative because not much in life is perfect,” he said. “You can decide to take a positive approach to almost any challenge you face … That may not be the easiest path, but it will always be the right one.”

After Savoie’s speech, Lerille and Donald Mosing were awarded honorary doctorates in educational leadership and systems engineering, respectively.

“They are graduates who have supported the university over the years and exemplify the characteristics we associate with Ragin’ Cajuns such as hard work and innovation,” Savoie said.

Mosing, 87, was president of Frank’s International, a publicly traded company named after his father. He earned his bachelor’s in mechanical engineering from the then-Southwestern Louisiana Institute of Liberal and Technical Learning in 1950; however, he began working for Franks in 1943 when the company was short on workers during World War II. He served as president of his family’s business until 2011, when he retired. He holds over 40 patents — one of which was recently issued.

“This guy just never stops,” said Keith Mosing, Donald Mosing’s son. “To get his last patent at 87 years old and he’s still working on it is just amazing.”

Lerille, best known as owner of Red Lerille’s Health and Racquet Club, graduated from the University of Southwestern Louisiana in 1987 and was the 1960 Mr. America and Mr. Universe. He opened his first health club on Johnston Street in 1963, and later opened “Red’s” in 1965.

He received the Club Industry 2011 Lifetime Achievement Award, which acknowledges people who have impacted the health club industry. Lerille is also the 2013 recipient of the Lafayette Civic Cup Award, which is bestowed based on an individual’s contributions to the community.

In addition to running Red’s, Lerille also enjoys restoring antique airplanes.

During his speech, he credited his longtime habit of posting pictures of his aspirations to his wall as his avenue to success.

“You gotta have goals,” he said. “You gotta keep putting something up there — a new picture.”

SPONSORED CONTENT ON THE ADVOCATE
Stress At Work May Be Solved With An Integrated Wellness Program
Stress At Work May Be Solved With An Integrated Wellness Program
BY HUMANA
Students were also honored for their achievements.

One student from each college was recognized as the UL-Lafayette Alumni Association’s outstanding graduates. Students selected were nominated by their college’s dean for excellence in community service, leadership and scholarship.

Honorees include: Nataly Elendt, Casey Dugas, Amanda Sphar, Benjamin Como, Amélie Desormeaux, Angelle Patout, Juliane Mahoney and Erica Didier.

The Alumni Association also chose outstanding graduates from the graduate programs. Honorees include Ian Madray, Thomas Mouton, Jade Bujard, Jude Monte, Nolan Williams, and Daniel Forest.

Administrators Ellen Cook, assistant vice president for academic affairs, and Anita Cook Hazelwood, Health Information Management program director, became UL-Lafayette’s first two students to earn a doctorate in educational leadership with a concentration in higher education. The university began offering the concentration in 2013, in addition to the K-12 education concentration already offered.

The ceremony was one that Brianna Moran, who earned her bachelor’s in performing arts, described as a “bittersweet moment.”

“UL’s been my home for four-and-a-half years,” she said. “Now, I’m moving off to Disney to do the Disney College Program.”

In addition to working for Disney, Moran said her long-term goals include furthering her education.

“I want to be in entertainment and perform for a while, and then eventually, way later on, go back and get my master’s to teach at either the collegiate level or a pre-professional company,” she said.
19 2016-12-19
Lafayette

Outstanding Graduates recognized at UL fall commencement


LAFAYETTE LA -
Eight students will be honored during Fall 2016 Commencement ceremonies as the University of Louisiana at Lafayette Alumni Association’s Outstanding Graduates.

Every spring and fall semester, deans from eight academic colleges each nominate a student as an Outstanding Graduate, based on leadership, scholarship and service. A selection committee of the Alumni Association interviews the candidates and selects one to receive the overall award.

The overall Outstanding Graduate will be announced during the Fall Commencement General Assembly on Friday, Dec. 16, at the Cajundome. That ceremony begins at 11 a.m.

Here’s a look at this semester’s Outstanding Graduates:

Nataly Kruh Elendt is the Outstanding Graduate for the College of the Arts. She is a music major, with a concentration in performance. Elendt has a 3.84 GPA.

Casey M. Dugas is the Outstanding Graduate for the B.I. Moody III College of Business Administration. A marketing major with a concentration in professional sales, she has a 3.96 GPA.

Amanda Sphar is the Outstanding Graduate for the College of Education. She is an instrumental music education major with a 3.95 GPA.

Benjamin Brady Como is the Outstanding Graduate for the College of Engineering. A petroleum engineering major, he has a 3.8 GPA.

Amélie Desormeaux is the Outstanding Graduate for the College of Liberal Arts. A political science major with a concentration in international relations, she has a 4.0 GPA.

Angelle Lasalle Patout is the Outstanding Graduate for the College of Nursing and Allied Health Professions. She is a nursing major with a 4.0 GPA

Juliane G. Mahoney is the Outstanding Graduate for the Ray P. Authement College of Sciences. She is a biology major with a 3.92 GPA.

Erica Didier is the Outstanding Graduate for University College. She is a General Studies major, with a concentration in humanities. Didier has a 3.58 GPA

________________________________________

Six graduate students have been selected as finalists for the Outstanding Master’s Graduate designation.

Each graduate program can nominate one student for the award, based on leadership, scholarship, service, and research. A committee, led by the dean of the University’s Graduate School, selects the top candidates.

A UL Lafayette Alumni Association committee interviews each candidate and chooses one as the overall Outstanding Master’s Graduate.

Thomas J. Mouton is the Outstanding Master’s Graduate for the School of Architecture and Design. He has a 3.63 GPA.

Ian Madray is the Outstanding Master’s Graduate for the Department of Electrical Engineering. He has a 3.9 GPA.

Jade Bujard is the Outstanding Master’s Graduate for the School of Geosciences. He has a 3.88 GPA.

Jude Monte is the Outstanding Master’s Graduate for the College of Nursing and Allied Health Professions. He has a 3.75 GPA.

Nolan Williams is the Outstanding Master’s Graduate for the Department of Psychology. He has a 4.0 GPA.

Daniel Forest is the Outstanding Master’s Graduate for the Department of Industrial Technology. He has a 3.85 GPA.


19 2016-12-16
Lafayette

Sisters and educators to become first two graduates of UL-Lafayette’s new doctorate program


LAFAYETTE, La. (KLFY) – As the University of Louisiana at Lafayette prepares for it’s Fall 2016 Commencement Ceremonies Friday morning, two sisters are preparing to make history.

Ellen Cook, 64, and Anita Cook Hazelwood, 62, will become the University’s first two students to earn a doctorate in Educational Leadership, with a concentration in higher education.

Ellen currently works as the University’s assistant vice president for Academic Affairs, while Anita is the director of the Health Information Management program.

The two Houma natives have worked for UL-L since 1977 and 1976, respectively.

Cook and Hazelwood will be hooded during the Commencement General Assembly Friday morning at the Cajundome.

Ellen previously earned a bachelors degree in accounting from UL-L, followed by a master’s degree in accounting from LSU.

Meanwhile, Hazelwood earned a bachelors in medical record science and a master’s in library science from UL-L and LSU, respectively.

At one point both of them and their younger sister, Kathy, were professors at UL-Lafayette.

Then in 2013 the University added a higher education concentration to its doctorate in educational leadership.

Cook explains that the decision to enroll in the new program was a no-brainer.

“Earning a doctorate was something I always wanted to do, and the educational leadership program made sense for me because, as an administrator, it was an opportunity to learn so much, and I did,” Cook explained. “Besides, I needed the numbers to justify offering the program.”

Hazelwood, however, says that her decision to pursue the doctorate was made for her by her older sister.

“I only did it because I was kind of bullied into it,” Hazelwood said jokingly, “but that’s OK, because I’m very glad I did. It’s a great program.”

Despite the hard work the sisters persevered, even after the flood of 2016 flooded their neighborhood and home.

While being rescued, they made sure to keep two computers protected from the waters since the devices held their dissertations.

The Fall 2016 Commencement General Assembly begins at 11:00 a.m.


19 2016-12-16
Lafayette

Bigger than a bowl: McGuire, four teammates to graduate


NEW ORLEANS — Five University of Louisiana at Lafayette football players will graduate here Friday afternoon, in the ballroom of a Marriott hotel more than 100 miles away from their school of choice.

For all five — quarterback Jalen Nixon, receivers Jared Johnson and Devin Scott, punter Steven Coutts and running back Elijah McGuire — it’s a big deal.

Each has his own story.

Carencro High-product Nixon, who is engaged, had his fifth-year senior season cut short by a broken ankle. Johnson, who went straight from his honeymoon to his final preseason camp last August, missed time due to a concussion, but is good to go again. Scott blew out a knee in the offseason, but will be back for one more year in 2017. And Coutts, just a sophomore eligibility-wise, came all the way from Australia to Louisiana to play a sport he never previously had.

But for one in particular, it’s an especially big deal.

Prior to the 2016 season getting underway, McGuire and Ragin’ Cajuns coach Mark Hudspeth chatted.

McGuire briefly considered leaving UL for the NFL, but he ultimately opted to return for his senior season. And on Friday he’ll make good on a challenge presented by Hudspeth.

McGuire has unfinished business at UL
“I’m very proud,” McGuire said, “because I’m … one of the first people in my family to graduate from college.

“Even before the season started, me and Coach Hud talked about it. He told me he wanted me to graduate at a bowl. And I told him … ‘It’s gonna happen.’”

Both will.

The five Cajuns, including pro-prospect McGuire, will experience pomp and circumstance at the team hotel here, and not with their fellow classmates back in Lafayette, because UL is in town to play Southern Mississippi in Saturday night’s 8 p.m. New Orleans Bowl at the Superdome.

The 6-6 Cajuns made it by winning three of their last four games, including a 30-3 victory at UL Monroe on Dec. 3 that sealed the deal.

UL president Joseph Savoie will bestow their degrees in between prep for what’s now the Cajuns’ biggest game of the season.

A few minutes after graduating, the five and their teammates will head to the New Orleans Saints’ NFL facility for their final pre-bowl practice.

What to know before UL's New Orleans Bowl
“He is the face of our program,” Hudspeth said of McGuire, a product of Vandebilt Catholic High in nearby Houma.

“Not only is he one of the greatest players ever to wear the Ragin’ Cajun uniform … he’s gonna graduate, then (about) 24 hours later he’ll play in a bowl game. What a great way to end your career.”

McGuire will leave UL after four seasons as its career leader in all-purpose yards, points and total touchdowns.


Celebrate the season with jolly, happy offers

Reserved for our members
UNWRAP MY OFFER
But the bigger achievement may be what it took him just three-and-a-half years to do.

“Man, that’s huge,” UL running backs coach Marquase Lovings said of McGuire being the first from immediate-family tree to graduate from college.

“He’s changed his whole life. He’s changed his whole family. He’s changed what ‘McGuire’ means now. Now, his kids are gonna go to college and say, ‘I need to get a degree, too.’”


19 2016-12-14
Lafayette

'Tigue' Moore Field renovations on schedule, Cajuns to play all home games there


LAFAYETTE — The Louisiana-Lafayette baseball team is set to play all of its 2017 home games at M.L. “Tigue” Moore Field at Russo Park, interim athletic director Jessica Leger announced Tuesday.

Renovations to the 4,000-seat stadium, which will reportedly cost $16 million, are on schedule, the school announced.

“This is huge for us,” Cajuns coach Tony Robichaux said. “As excited as we are about the new stadium, we are equally excited that we will not have to leave here to play home games. I have to commend The Lemoine Company on what they have been able to do including allowing us to be out on the field all fall.

“This is mostly important for our fans, as they will not have to travel to another venue to watch us compete,” Robichaux added. “It’s also important for the integrity of the teams we play."

SPONSORED CONTENT ON THE ADVOCATE
3 Ways Small Business Can Solve The Group Health Coverage Question
3 Ways Small Business Can Solve The Group Health Coverage Question
BY HUMANA
The Ragin’ Cajuns open the home slate on March 3-5 when they host to Southern Miss in a three-game, nonconference series.


19 2016-12-14
Lafayette

Red Lerille, Donald Mosing to receive honorary doctorates from UL


Lloyd J. "Red" Lerille, owner of Red Lerille's Health & Racquet Club, and Donald Mosing, former president of Frank's International, will receive honorary doctorates from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette during its commencement ceremony Friday.

UL President Dr. Joseph Savoie will present honorary degrees to Lerille and Mosing during the General Assembly. It will begin at 11 a.m. at the Cajundome.

A 1987 graduate of the University, Lerille will receive an honorary doctorate of educational leadership. Lerille will also give the commencement speech. He founded and operates one of the largest health clubs in the south, Red Lerille’s Health & Racquet Club. Lerille won Mr. America and Mr. Universe titles in 1960. In 1963, he opened a small health club on Johnston Street with $200 and handmade equipment.

The next year, he purchased two acres on Doucet Road and built a 4,000-square-foot health club that opened in 1965. It now sits on 20 acres, has grown to about 200,000 square feet, and has about 200 employees.

ABOUT RED LERILLE: Red Lerille talks about getting 2 new shoulders | Red Lerille's adds design-your-own salad bar to gym cafe

Lerille received the UL Lafayette Alumni Association’s Outstanding Alumni Award in 2002 for service to the community and commitment to the University and its students. In 2011, he honored at the Alumni Association’s Spring Gala.

Lerille received the Club Industry 2011 Lifetime Achievement Award, given annually to a person who has had a significant, sustained impact on the health club industry.

In 2013, he received the Lafayette Civic Cup Award from the Young Men’s Business Club. Established in 1933, the award is given each year to one person for contributions to the community.

Mosing will receive an honorary doctorate in systems engineering. He earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University in 1950, which was known then as Southwestern Louisiana Institute. Mosing was the longtime president of the family business known today as Frank’s International, N.V. The publicly traded company has 3,000 employees in 40 locations across the U.S. and around the world. He retired in 2011.

Mosing lettered in football and in track and field while enrolled at UL. After he earned a bachelor’s degree, he returned to work for the company where he had been employed since the age of 14, Frank’s Casing Crew & Rental Tools Inc.

His father, Frank Mosing, and his mother, Jessie Mosing, founded the oilfield services company in 1938. It “ran casing” in connection with the drilling of oil and gas wells.

ABOUT FRANK'S INTERNATIONAL, MOSING: Oil industry donor visits UL College of Engineering | Frank's International shares industry tips with students

Donald Mosing, the oldest of the couple’s three sons, started working for Frank's in 1943. The company was short-staffed during World War II, and Mosing provided cheap labor. In 1950, with several casing jobs under his belt and a freshly minted degree from SLI, Mosing became a paid employee of the family business. He became president of Frank’s in 1989.


Celebrate the season with jolly, happy offers

Reserved for our members
UNWRAP MY OFFER
During his tenure with Frank’s, Mosing worked in every aspect of the company’s operations, from flying a float plane to call on customers in the bayous to designing and managing the manufacturing of oilfield equipment.

Mosing holds 40 patents, including one that was issued recently.

The Louisiana Gulf Coast Oil Exposition named him LAGCOE Looey for 1997-1999. LAGCOE Looey is the ceremonial host of the biennial event. In 2011, “World Oil Magazine” recognized Mosing with its Lifetime Achievement Award.


19 2016-12-12
Lafayette

Acadiana ninth-grade girls get guidance on 'non-traditional' careers at UL-Lafayette expo


Nearly a thousand ninth-grade girls from throughout the Acadiana region descended on the University of Louisiana at Lafayette on Friday to learn about non-traditional careers available for them to pursue.

“We’re just trying to expose them to what’s out there,” said Paul Bourgeois, director of dual enrollment at South Louisiana Community College (SLCC) and facilitator of what's known as the Non-Traditional Career Expo.

This is the third year for the expo, which was held in the UL-Lafayette student union ballroom, and it has come a long way from the 150 students hosted in its inaugural year.

The expo offered the students a look at SLCC programs, as well as some offered at UL-Lafayette and Louisiana State University at Eunice.

The expo had two parts: First, the students would listen to two presenters — successful women who shared their success stories — and then they would move on to meet teachers and representatives from different schools and disciplines.

The purpose of the program, Bourgeois said, is to show young women there are alternative paths and careers for their future. He noted that a lot of young women study nursing or become teachers, and he wants to show them other vocational options at colleges and universities.

He said it's important to make students aware of their options as ninth-graders because by the end of the 10th grade they will have to pick either a TOPS track to attend college or a vocational track.

“If you don’t know about it, you can’t do it,” Bourgeois said.

Olivia Duck, a 14-year-old Comeaux High School student, said the speaker presentation was inspirational. She said she was excited to attend the expo so she could learn more about available careers.

“I learned to always follow your dreams,” Duck said.

She said she was impressed by what she heard from Phyllis Dupuis, Ph.D., the former chancellor of SLCC and regional director of Acadiana Technical College. Dupuis presented a PowerPoint and lecture about how young women can grow to be leaders in their careers.

“I think it’s important that young women understand the options that are available to them,” Dupuis said.

She added that it’s important for young women to know they can have a successful career and a fulfilling home life.

Dupuis earned her doctorate in leadership development at the University of New Orleans. She retired from her positions at SLCC in 2012.

Zoe Roy, a 14-year-old Acadiana High School student, said she was also inspired by Dupuis’ discussion about how to become a leader. Roy said she hopes to join the military because her mother was in the Navy.

Bourgeois said some jobs that may not occur to young women as possibilities include working in a machine shop, on electronics or being a civil surveyor. He said a lot of the work in these fields are now done mainly on computers, instead of in hot, messy work areas.

Michael O’Pry, civil surveying and mapping instructor at SLCC, said there were no female students in the program when he went to school. As a teacher at the community college, he added, there were only two women and “they were probably the best students I’ve ever had.”

O’Pry said the field he teaches traditionally mandated being outdoors, which didn't hold much interest for a lot of women. Now, he added, a lot of the work is done on a computer with graphic information systems. He said this appeals to more people who want to get away from outdoor data collection and focus on processing.

“Basically, you can choose your own destiny and where you want to go in this field,” O’Pry said.

Asked what his message to the young women at the expo was, Bourgeois said: “You can do anything a man can do, but better.”


19 2016-12-09
Lafayette

UL-Lafayette taking reins at LITE technology center


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette has agreed to take over management of a $27 million state-funded technology center that has struggled to cover expenses despite its central role in helping shape the city's emerging technology sector.

The Louisiana Immersive Technologies Enterprise facility — a high-end, 3-D visualization center and tech company incubator — was built by the state 10 years ago in the university's Research Park but has been managed by an independent commission and has been responsible for securing its own funding for operations.

The University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors on Thursday signed off on a plan for UL-Lafayette to assume oversight at the facility effective Jan. 1.

The agreement also envisions the eventual dissolution of the LITE Commission and the transfer of ownership of the facility to the university.

UL-Lafayette Vice President for Research, Innovation and Economic Development Ramesh Kolluru, whose office will oversee operations at LITE, said the agreement will allow staff there to worry less about the cost of building upkeep and focus more on the core mission of nurturing the area's technology sector.

"We see LITE as a hugely successful component of our economic development landscape here in the region," said Kolluru, who also serves on the LITE Commission.

In recent years, LITE has had a tough time covering basic operating expenses at the 70,000-square-foot facility as state funding gradually dropped from more than $2 million in 2011 until it was zeroed out last year.

But the facility has been credited with helping lure a number of major technology companies to Lafayette, including CGI, Enquero and Perficient, and is playing what many say is a critical role in nurturing tech startups.

"What we have created is an economic development hub for anyone who wants to accelerate or start their business," said LITE Commission Chairman Douglas Menefee.

Kolluru said he expects few changes in LITE's focus after the university assumes oversight.

"The mission is not changing," he said. "The university is committed to economic development, and the university knows how to do economic development."

Kolluru and Menefee said the new agreement will open the door at LITE for much deeper involvement with UL-Lafayette researchers and students.

It will also lessen the burden of maintenance and upkeep because LITE will just be one building among scores already being managed by the university's maintenance staff.

"We are coming in and providing greater support through all of our infrastructure and expertise throughout the university," Kolluru said.

The agreement approved Thursday is the first step in the transfer process.

Legislative approval is required to dissolve the LITE Commission and shift ownership of the facility to UL-Lafayette.

As part of the agreement, the commission has pledged to support the legislation in next year's Legislative session.


19 2016-12-08
Lafayette

UL names athletic director search committee members


After announcing last week the resignation of Scott Farmer as the Ragin’ Cajuns’ athletic director, UL president Joseph Savoie revealed plans for forming a search committee to aid in the hiring process.

At the time, Savoie spelled out the characteristics he hoped to see in the committee.

“This team will be diverse, inclusive and represent a broad range of constituents,” he said.

STORY FROM WALGREENS
Matte lip mastered in 4 simple steps
“Their purpose,” Savoie added, “will be to vet candidates, provide guidance and provide advice.”

UL on Friday revealed the members of the committee — three days after they met for the first time.

They include two current head coaches, two student-athletes and a two-time Olympic medalist.

Anita Hazelwood, an allied health professor and the athletic department’s NCAA faculty representative, is chairing the committee.

Also on the eight-person committee: UL alum Hollis Conway, a two-time Olympic medal-winning high jumper; Robert Daigle, chairman of the Ragin’ Cajuns Athletic Foundation; Karren Hays, a former UL Alumni Association president; volleyball coach Heather Mazeitis-Fontenot; baseball coach Tony Robichaux; and two student representatives, women’s soccer player Denice Emokpae and softball player DJ Sanders.


THE ADVERTISER
Farmer resigns as UL's athletic director

Former Missouri athletic director Mike Alden is a special consultant to the search committee, as Savoie previously announced.

Alden recently oversaw an extensive study of the UL athletic department, and he was in town dealing with with the search committee when it met earlier this week.

No hire is expected until sometime in 2017.

The committee is conducting a nationwide search, but Savoie said he will make the final decision on a hire after receiving its recommendation.

The committee was formed following the resignation of Farmer, who has been reassigned to a full-time faculty position in UL’s School of Kinesiology.

Farmer had been UL’s athletic director since 2011.

Jessica Leger, UL’s deputy athletic director, is serving as the program’s interim AD a hire is made.


Celebrate the season with jolly, happy offers

Reserved for our members
UNWRAP MY OFFER

19 2016-12-06
Lafayette

UL has short window to sell New Orleans Bowl tickets


Shortly after UL accepted an invitation Sunday to play Southern Mississippi in the 2016 New Orleans Bowl, Matt Casbon became a busier-than-usual man.

UL’s director of ticket operations has less than two weeks to sell the Ragin’ Cajuns’ allotment before the Dec. 17 game is played at the Superdome in New Orleans.

“As soon as the announcement was made, we had people buying online (Sunday) night,” Casbon said Monday.

“As soon as the call center opened at 10 a.m. (Monday),” he added, “the phones lit up, and I’ve had a steady flow of emails.”

Casbon said Cajun fans will be seated on the “same sideline as we were on for previous bowl games,” which includes sections 104 through 124 on the Superdome’s Plaza level in addition to loge-level sections.

Seats in sections 113, 114 and 115 cost $60; tickets and seats in all other sections allotted to the Cajuns cost $40, according to Casbon.

“The New Orleans Bowl staff is prepared to increase our allotment should we get an increase of fans,” he said, “so we are prepared for that.”

UL’s initial allotment, according to Casbon, is 10,000.

OPINION: Cajuns dug deep to revive season

The Cajuns have played in four previous New Orleans Bowls, winning each from 2011-2014.

The smallest New Orleans Bowl crowd UL has played in front of was 34,014 for its 2014 win over Nevada. The largest: 54,728 against Tulane in 2013. UL also beat San Diego State in 2011 (42,481) and East Carolina in 2012 (48,828).

Priority ticket requests from Cajun fans will be accepted until noon Friday.

Seating for Ragin’ Cajun Athletic Foundation members will be based — for the first time in a bowl game in which UL will be taking part — on priority points ranking, with the best seats going to those who’ve accumulated the most points through a variety of means including donations to the athletic department and season-ticket purchasing history.

UL rolled out its RCAF priority points plan earlier this year.

The Cajuns are encouraging their fans to purchase tickets through the Cajundome ticket office, in part so that it can “show future bowl destinations the amount of fan interest there is for Ragin’ Cajuns football.”

According to information from UL, “the Cajundome ticket office will sell the best tickets available behind the Ragin’ Cajuns bench” so fans have “the ability to sit with fellow” UL fans.

MORE: New Orleans Bowl gets matchup it wanted

Specific seating location will be based first on RCAF priority points ranking as of noon Friday, followed by 2016 football season-ticket holders who are not currently RCAF Annual Fund donors; current UL students on a first-come, first-served basis in the bowl’s “Red Zone”; UL Alumni Association members; and finally the general public on a first-come, first-served basis.


Celebrate the season with jolly, happy offers

Reserved for our members
UNWRAP MY OFFER
Ticket quantity also will be based on 2016 RCAF Annual Fund donor level as of noon Friday, as follows: Vermillion level donors ($20,000 and up), 20 tickets; Louisiana Classics ($10,000-$19,999), 16; Athletic Director’s Circle ($5,000-$9,999), 12; All American ($2,500-$4,999), 10; All Cajun ($1,000-$2,499), 8; All Conference ($500-$999), 6; Coach’s Staff ($250-$499), 4 tickets; and Varsity Club ($100-$249), 2.

According to UL: “If ordering more tickets than your RCAF donor level allotment, you can forgo priority seating in order for entire party to sit together. Fans that wish to be seated near one another should return all ticket order forms together at one time.”

As a bonus, RCAF Annual Fund donors who purchase tickets prior to Friday’s priority deadline will receive additional RCAF priority points.

Program supporters purchasing up to four bowl tickets will receive five additional RCAF priority points; fans purchasing five tickets or more will receive a total of 10 additional priority points.

Ticket order forms are available on the Bowl Central Page at RaginCajuns.com.

Tickets can be ordered four ways: Online by clicking the link at the top of Bowl Central; download the form, fill it out, scan and email order form back to ultickets@cajundome.com; filling out an order form in person at the Cajundome box office; or by calling the Cajundome box office at 265-2170 from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. on weekdays until Dec. 15.

Fax orders are not accepted.

Patrons cannot pick their own specific seats when buying through the Cajundome box office, but they can through other outlets.

According to information from UL, ticket pickup at the Cajundome is scheduled for noon until 5:30 p.m. Dec. 12 and from 10 a.m until 5:30 p.m. Dec. 13-15.


19 2016-12-05
Lafayette

AD search committee members announced


The search is on for a new athletic director for the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

Last week, Scott Farmer stepped down from the position he had held for the past five years. To see his announcement and read our story about that, click here.

On Friday, UL announced that the search committee held its first meeting on Tuesday.

Dr. Anita Hazelwood, ’76, allied health professor and faculty representative to the Athletics Department, is chair of the committee. Other members include Hollis Conway, ’91, Olympic medalist; Robert Daigle, chair of the Ragin' Cajuns Athletic Foundation; Karren Hays, ’80, past Alumni Association president; head volleyball coach Heather Mazeitis-Fontenot; head baseball coach Tony Robichaux; and student representatives Denice Emokpae and DJ Sanders.

Mike Alden, former Mizzou athletics director, is a special consultant to the search committee. He was on campus to meet with the committee this week, UL announced.

Farmer resigned to take a faculty position in the University's School of Kinesiology. He served as director of Louisiana Athletics for the past five years and led the department to unprecedented growth. Under his leadership, the department doubled its athletic budget, spent more than $69 million facilities improvements and doubled donations to the RCAF.

Deputy Director of Athletics Dr. Jessica Leger is the interim AD while the university conducts the search. The appointment of Leger is pending approval of the Board of Supervisors of the University of Louisiana System.
19 2016-12-02
Lafayette

Fans rave over Cajundome renovations


LAFAYETTE, La. (KLFY) – The Ragin’ Cajuns hit the court for the first time at the newly renovated Cajundome and fans are raving about the changes.

It was a different atmosphere at the Cajundome Thursday night.

“When I approached the new gym I was instantly just startled at all the changes,” said UL-Lafayette student Jacob Ambrose.

The lights, the seats, and even the basketball court have a new look, and fans can’t get enough.

“You know, the atmosphere, the ambiance, the colors, really, really nice,” said UL-Lafayette fan Paul Gibson.

The history sprinkled throughout the facility seemed to be a fan favorite.

“The concourses with all the history and the background of theCajuns athletics, really, really nice,” said Gibson.

“When I first walked in I saw some of my team mates on the wall, so it’s very, very nice,” said former UL-Lafayette basketball player Alonzo Allen.

One of the most noticeable features is the unique gym floor.

“It’s pretty different,” said Allen.

The art on the court features a swamp complete with cypress trees and a pelican, but so far there have been mixed emotions.

“I bet it looks great on tv, but from our seats which are sort of low in the arena you pretty much have to look for it and have to know what it is,” said Gibson.

But, for the most part, fans are very pleased to call the Cajundome home.
19 2016-12-02
Lafayette

Is ULM biggest rivalry for UL football?


The UL athletic department has grown by leaps and bounds in many areas over the past decade or so.

One area that hasn't, however, is those special bitter rivalries that makes sports so much fun.

There are a few here and there. The UL-South Alabama softball rivalry has certainly produced its fair share of thrills over the years, as has UL-South Alabama baseball for that matter.

In basketball, the Georgia State series a few years back uncorked some tense moments.

With the Cajuns coming off a thrilling 24-19 win over league-leading Arkansas State and on their way to UL Monroe on Saturday with a bowl berth on the line, it made me wonder.

DRAMATIC FINISH PROPELS CAJUNS

Exactly which one is the UL football program's biggest rival these days — ULM or Arkansas State?

Full disclosure, I went into this little project with my mind made up that the answer was Arkansas State ... and my opinion hasn't changed.

But as you peel back layer after layer, it becomes very obvious that the question is an even better one than I realized.

There are many factors that go into evaluating the magnitude of a rivalry. When you add up all the numbers, though, it would be difficult to historically proclaim one over the other.

The raw numbers have UL leading the ULM series 26-24 with 26 single-digit outcomes. The UL-Arkansas State series, on the other hand, has the Cajuns with a slight 23-20-1 lead after Saturday's win with 25 games decided by single digits.

That's about as close as two separate series can get.

Asked to settle on one in Monday's press conference, head football coach Mark Hudspeth understandably had a tough time.

“Just one? Ew," Hudspeth said. "That’s a tough question. But to be honest with you? Louisiana-Monroe. In-state opponent, for us. In-state opponent who we have a lot of respect for is always a tough, challenging football game. But, you know, we have other people we like competing against also, whether it’s Arkansas State, whether it’s Tulane. So, ha, hard to give you just one."

In the last decade or so, the Arkansas State rivalry has been more significant in the Sun Belt standings. Back in 2005, the two programs tied for first, but Arkansas State won in the most agonizing fashion for UL — 39-36 with 25 points in the fourth period. Since Mark Hudspeth arrived, the Cajuns and Red Wolves have perennially battled in the top three of the Sun Belt standings.

In fact, my pick for the best Cajun performance in the Hudspeth era was the 23-7 revenge win in Jonesboro in 2013 after getting shellacked 50-27 on national TV at Cajun Field the year before.


Celebrate the season with jolly, happy offers

Reserved for our members
UNWRAP MY OFFER
While the ULM games during that stretch haven't been as meaningful, they sure have been close. Seven of the last eight games have been decided by single digits, and the one stray was that controversial final-seconds TD pass by the Cajuns in Monroe in 2012 for a 40-24 win in a game much closer than that final score.

While UL and ULM have been battling for the "Louisiana" name — off and on anyway — for most of this century, the hatred factor seems to lean toward Arkansas State. In 2014, the rivalry got really intense when a cheap shot was taken against UL offensive guard Mykhael Quave on a late extra point in UL's 55-40 win on national TV.

When UL defensive tackle Taboris Lee was asked about the heated Arkansas State rivalry after Saturday's big win, he included ULM as well. Either way, he maintains the Cajuns play better in the rivalry games.

“And ULM,” Lee insisted. “All the years I’ve played them, the majority of the time, most of the time, 99 percent of the time, to me, I feel like we are way more physical in rivalry games. And I know we’re gonna go out Saturday and play hard and try to get this W.”

The scene at the end of Saturday's game only served to intensify the UL-Arkansas State rivalry with both teams taking turns charging the field in the face of their hated opponent.

UL's WILD WIN OVER ASU

HUD APOLOGIZES FOR TEAM'S POST-GAME BEHAVIOR

Of course, the ULM rivalry was spiced by the late touchdown in 2012 and all the fantastic finishes, highlighted by UL's 36-35 dramatic comeback featuring Ladarius Green's memorable onsides kick recovery.

Both rivalries are filled with memorable wins and agonizing losses.

In 1977, for instance, the Cajuns were 5-2-1 heading to Jonesboro. The then-Indians scored 14 points in the fourth quarter to win 17-15 to begin a three-game tailspin for the Cajuns.

Then in 1982, in one of the most memorable comebacks in Cajun history, the Cajuns trailed then-Northeast 26-0 at the half, before a furious second-half rally produced a 40-26 win to help UL finish 7-3-1 that year.

ATTACKING OFFENSE HELPED CAJUNS

Through the decades, UL and Arkansas State have journeyed from conference to conference together - almost like the New Orleans Saints and Atlanta Falcons.

ULM and the Cajuns have been together at times, although NLU was in the Division I-AA in the 1980 after the Cajuns elected to stay in Division I in 1982. And of course when NLU won the 1-AA national championship in 1987, the Cajuns beat the Indians 17-7 in Monroe that season.

Just like old rivals are supposed to treat one another.

So take your pick, which one is UL's biggest football rival these days?

The side-by-side history through the years and the current level of hatred between the two still make it UL vs. Arkansas State for me.

Just by a slimmer margin that originally expected.

UL vs. ULM

Series: Cajuns lead 26-24.

Single-digit games: 26.

Largest Cajun Field attendance: 28,176 in 2011.

Most memorable UL win: With apologies to Dwight Prudhomme's miracle comeback in 1982, the Cajuns trailed by 11 points with just over two minutes left and somehow rallied to win 36-35, thanks to the infamous onsides kick recovery.
Most heartbreaking UL loss: The Cajuns won four of their final five games in 2005 and that would have been five of six if not for a 45-42 homecoming loss to ULM. The two teams combined for 1,061 total yards, ULM kicked the game-winning FG with 1:46 left and the Cajuns got nine yards on a fourth-and-10 to end it.

UL vs. Arkansas State

Series: Cajuns lead 22-20-1.

Single-digit games: 25.

Largest Cajun Field attendance: 30,176 in 1976.

Most memorable UL win: Old-timers certainly remember the excitement around the 1976 game when the Cajuns overcame a 14-10 halftime deficit to get two TD pass from Roy Henry to Walt Slattery and two late field goals from Rafael Septien for a 23-14 win in front of the largest crowd in Cajun Field history at the time.

Most heartbreaking UL loss: This is one of the most heartbreaking all-time UL losses. The Cajuns were 6-5, 5-2 in 2005 to tie for first place in the Sun Belt. If not for this late ASU comeback, though, UL would have won the outright title and hosted Southern Mississippi in the New Orleans Bowl at Cajun Field. UL rushed for 457 yards in the game, only to see ASU score 25 points in the fourth quarter and a kick a FG with no time left for a 39-36 win in Jonesboro, Ark.


19 2016-12-01
Lafayette

Job fair held at Lafayette’s Picard Center


Job-seekers from all over the parish attended a professional career-based job fair in the Picard Center in Lafayette today.

The Louisiana Workforce Commission hosted the event in conjunction with the Lafayette Economic Development Authority and the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

Ten companies in fields such as banking and information technology were part of the event and actively looking for new employees.

If you missed out today, don’t worry.

You can see a list of the companies at today’s event at Lafayette.org


19 2016-12-01
Lafayette

Cajundome's new look a huge hit


The Cajundome didn't move to a new location.

Structurally, it's the same building that opened back in 1986.

But when the $21.2 million renovation project began in May, the idea was to make it feel like a completely different arena once you've walked inside.

On Tuesday, the incredibly unique new court design was unveiled to area media and later in an official unveiling to thousands of fans.

The first impressions from UL Ragin' Cajuns basketball players after practicing on the new Swamp floor was ... mission accomplished.

"When we first walked in, I was like, 'Wow'," UL women's senior guard Jaylyn Gordon said. "It looked like I was at an NBA game.

"Everyone was so excited the first time we practiced on it (Monday). It was a great practice. Everybody was practicing at game speed."

So many things about the arena has changed. The new LED lighting is almost immediately noticeable.

If not that, the primary color of black with the new seats and walls all being black now to direct all the focus to the court area.

THE NEW CAJUNDOME: 30 projects tackled in $22M Cajundome renovation | Taste the Cajundome's new concessions | New Cajundome filled with change

Many more will enjoy the new lights and the improved background than just the photographers, videographers and basketball players, Cajundome Operations Manager Phil Ashurst said Tuesday.

Visiting tours like WWE Wrestling, he said, have disliked the white walls in the Cajundome for years and are ecstatic over the new changes.

"(UL freshman forward) Justin Miller thought it looked like the Indiana Pacers arena," UL men's coach Bob Marlin said. "I mean, it looks like an NBA arena.

“The floor is really nice. The seating’s nice. The lighting. Everything is more fan friendly. … Just the atmosphere. … We’re very proud of the building. We think it is gonna help us with recruiting. We certainly have shown it off.”

Facebook
Twitter
Google+
LinkedIn
The awesome new basketball court at Cajundome unveiled
Fullscreen
A straight-on top-level view of the new Cajundome court
Buy Photo
A straight-on top-level view of the new Cajundome court that features a silhouette of Cypress Lake on the UL campus was unveiled to media and fans Tuesday. LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER
FULLSCREEN
A straight-on top-level view of the new Cajundome court1 of 8
New signage welcomes visitors to the newly-renovated
The UL women's basketball team practices on the basketball
A view of the Cypress Lake swamp scene on the newly-designed
An aerial view of a silhouette of Cypress Lake on the
The UL women's basketball team practices on the basketball
The UL women's basketball team practices on the basketball
The UL women's basketball team practices on the basketball
Next Slide
8 Photos
The awesome new basketball court at Cajundome unveiled
The most unique thing about the new Cajundome, though, is the floor.

Somewhat similar to the Oregon forest court, UL's new floor has a swamp scene with a black framing around the court and the Ragin' Cajun logo at center court.

“There’s not gonna be another one like it in the country," Marlin said. "Praters (Praters Hardwood Floors) floor, from Chattanooga, is gonna use it as a benchmark for them. The head of their company came down to make sure it was installed correctly. They were amazed at the layout, the design, and they were able to put it together exactly the way we wanted it."

READ MORE: SNEAK PEEK INTO NEW CAJUNDOME

UL junior forward Bryce Washington also gave a big thumbs up to the new court design.

“Oh, man. I love it," Washington said. "The swamp. It’s gonna be to our advantage.

“It was fun playing (at Blackham), especially when some of the old players from USL come and watch us play. I think we have more energy when (those) guys came and (saw) us play. But I think a lot of people are excited to see the ’Dome. I (saw) it the other day. It’s gonna be a sight to see.”

UL women’s coach Garry Brodhead said he loves the identity that the new-look Cajundome gives his program.

A straight-on top-level view of the new Cajundome courtBuy Photo
A straight-on top-level view of the new Cajundome court that features a silhouette of Cypress Lake on the UL campus was unveiled to media and fans Tuesday. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)
From the player banners in the front lobby to the historic timeline on the walls focusing on the history of both the men’s and women’s programs from Earl K. Long to Blackham Coliseum to the Cajundome itself to the many photos of former players, the new-look Cajundome has basically been transformed into a Cajun basketball shrine.

“Before, it was nice, but there was the IceGators and other things,” Gordon said. “Now it feels like it’s all about UL basketball. You see us all over the walls. You can walk around and see former players all over the walls. It’s very exciting.”

Brodhead said when he first became the coach, his initial stance was that “you couldn’t build a Division I program playing in Earl K. (Long gym).”

So even though his women didn’t play every game in the Cajundome, playing most of them there helped him fight off the negative recruiting that they played in a “middle school gym.”

But this new-look Cajundome brings recruiting to all new heights.

“I think it’s really going to help us in recruiting,” Brodhead said. “We just had a great recruiting class and a lot of that had to do with facilities.”


19 2016-11-30
Baton Rouge

Sources say Ragin' Cajuns likely headed to New Orleans Bowl if they beat ULM on Saturday


Thanks to a wild finish last week, the R+L Carriers New Orleans Bowl and Louisiana-Lafayette are on the verge of renewing their fruitful relationship.

The Ragin’ Cajuns, coming off a 24-19 upset of Arkansas State when a last-minute touchdown by the Red Wolves was overruled by replay, can earn their fifth trip to the New Orleans Bowl in the past six years with a victory Saturday at Louisiana-Monroe, which would make them bowl-eligible, sources said Tuesday.

RELATED

Second-quarter goal-line stand gave Cajuns a boost in Saturday's surprising win
Second-quarter goal-line stand gave Cajuns a boost in Saturday's surprising win
LAFAYETTE — A wild final play and a replay overturn decided the Louisiana-Lafayette football…
UL-Lafayette (5-6) would most likely meet Southern Miss (6-6), which gained bowl eligibility an 39-24 upset of Louisiana Tech on Friday in the Dec. 17 game in the Mercedes-Benz Superdome.

The Cajuns played in the New Orleans Bowl in 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014, winning all four and helping to account for the four largest crowds in the bowl’s 15-year history. That includes a turnout of 54,728 in 2013 for their 24-21 victory against Tulane.

That’s why the New Orleans Bowl, which has the first pick of Sun Belt teams, would take the Cajuns over any of the league’s potential tri-champions, Arkansas State, Troy and Appalachian State, although Arkansas State would get the bid if UL-Lafayette loses Saturday. The Red Wolves lost to Louisiana Tech in last year’s game.

The Cajuns have won seven of their past eight meetings against ULM (4-7), including a 30-24 victory last season.

Victories Saturday by UL-Lafayette and South Alabama (5-6) against New Mexico State would give the Sun Belt a record six bowl-eligible teams. The league previously never had more than four.

SPONSORED CONTENT ON THE ADVOCATE
Why Tom Ford’s Thrilling ‘Nocturnal Animals’ Is a Modern Classic
Why Tom Ford’s Thrilling ‘Nocturnal Animals’ Is a Modern Classic
BY NOCTURNAL ANIMALS
“This shows that we’re a maturing conference,” Sun Belt Commissioner Karl Benson said. “We’ve gone through some pretty significant changes in our membership over the years.

“But now we’ve stabilized, and that has resulted in more depth throughout the league.”

Like UL-Lafayette, Southern Miss, which went 4-4 in Conference USA, would be appearing in its fifth New Orleans Bowl. The Eagles’ last time in the game was a 42-32 loss to Middle Tennessee in the 2009 game.

UL-Lafayette and Southern Miss have played 51 times with USM holding 39-11-1 series advantage. Their last meeting was in 2008 when the Eagles won 51-21.
19 2016-11-30
Lafayette

UL Police: Suspect throws concrete block through door of university’s bookstore


LAFAYETTE, La. (KLFY) Police at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette are asking for the public’s help in identifying a suspect that broke into the university’s bookstore on Saint Mary Street.

Lt. Billy Abrams said the suspect threw a concrete block through the front glass door of the bookstore at 3:53 a.m. on November 25, 2016.

Investigators believe the suspect stole some Ragin’ Cajun apparel and some food items before running out of the store towards East Lewis Street.

The suspect is described as 6ft tall, weighing approximately 250 lbs, and having a light complexion.

He was last seen wearing “a grey colored jacket, black pants, black undershirt and what appears to be some type of boots,” Abrams said.

The suspect has long hair that is folded underneath a fitted baseball cap.

Anyone with information about this crime is asked to contact the UL Police Department at 337-482-6447.


19 2016-11-30
Lafayette

Secret concert preserves local history


A concert and fundraiser with a former Louisiana poet laureate and Creole music legend is going on Saturday. But the location is secret — unless you have a ticket.

Organizers say the exclusive nature of the concert only adds to the enjoyment.

“People who attend get a real, exclusive experience with the musicians,” said Jennifer Ritter Guidry, an assistant director for the Center of Louisiana Studies. “It’s a much more personable experience with the music, the stories behind the music, as well as getting to know the musicians better.

“The musicians have expressed how meaningful it is for them. David Greely, who did the house concert in Avery Island back in May, he specifically talked about how these kind of performances really resonate with him. It’s the kind of performances he does when he does his East Coast travels.”

Poet Darrell Bourque and Creole accordionist Goldman Thibodeaux are the featured guests for “Songs and Stories,” a house concert at 2 p.m. Saturday at a local, private residence. Patrons who purchase the $40 tickets will receive an email with directions to the event by 5:30 p.m. Thursday.

The concert raises money for the Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore, a historical collection at the Center for La. Studies, located in the Dupré Library on the University of Louisiana at Lafayette campus. The archives contain more than 20,000 hours of audio and video recordings that include oral histories, music performances and field recordings done by students, professors and researchers.

Along with 30,000 photographs, holdings include recordings from years of Festivals Acadiens et Creoles and broadcasts of the landmark Rendez-Vous des Cajuns show from the Liberty Theater in Eunice. from 1987 to the early 2000s. All material is available for public use.

ADVERTISING

inRead invented by Teads

Thibodeaux Goldman and Lawtell Playboys.jpg
(Photo: <252>Submitted photo)
The fundraiser helps archives personnel transfer those fading, historic items to a permanent collection. Archivist and musician Chris Segura is in a constant race against time, transferring material on outdated technology into the digital world for the next generation.

“We have tons of old equipment that’s always breaking down,” said Segura. “We have to replace or repair it. We’re always looking for old equipment that we can put back into use or harvest parts from.

“We’re also starting the process of saving up for a new server system. Right now, we have a 30 terabyte system that’s in service. It’s also got an automated tape back-up system, so everything is really, really safe.

“But we’re really close to filling up those 30 terabytes. They’re probably going to be full in about a year or so. Within that amount of time, we’re probably going to have to double out storage. Every little drop in the bucket helps for that.”

The archives continue to seek out historic items and welcomes any donations.

“If anybody has recordings they think might be of interest, we’ll be happy to talk to them,” said Segura. “If it’s something that fits our archives, we’ll digitize it and make copies for them and put copies here as well, so they’re safe. Nothing will happen once they come here.”

Want to go?

When: 2-5:30 p.m. Dec. 3

Where: To be announced 5:30 p.m. Dec. 1

Tickets: $40 at http://ACCFStoriesandSongs.EventBrite.com/
19 2016-11-28
Associated Press

Farmer steps down as Louisiana-Lafayette athletic director


LAFAYETTE, Louisiana (AP) - Scott Farmer has announced that he will no longer serve as director of athletics for the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Farmer stepped down Tuesday after holding the position the last five years.

The announcement did not detail why Farmer is leaving the position.

The university plans to promote former deputy of director of athletics Dr. Jessica Leger to interim athletic director while the school looks for a permanent replacement. Leger's assignment must be approved by the Board of Supervisors of the University of Louisiana System.

Farmer will now teach in the School of Kinesiology after seeing the athletic budget double during his tenure. The athletic department is in the midst of a $115 million plan to upgrade athletic facilities that began in 2013.

Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


19 2016-11-28
Lafayette

Cajundome wrapping up $21 million makeover: colder beer, better seating, improved color scheme


Cajundome patrons can look forward to colder beer, better food and a more intimate and comfortable arena experience when the facility reopens next month after a $21 million renovation.

The Cajundome has been closed since May for the most extensive upgrades since it opened in 1985.

The dome's roughly 11,000 orange-and-white seats from 30 years ago have been replaced with sleek new black ones, all with cup holders, and seating has been reconfigured for better sight lines and more capacity.

The new seating arrangement will let spectators get closer to the action at University of Louisiana at Lafayette basketball games, said Cajundome Director Greg Davis.

"The first row of seating, their feet will be on the basketball court," he said. "The configuration is going to be far more intimate for UL basketball games."

UL-Lafayette basketball is among the Cajundome's main attractions, and the history of the school's basketball program is told in a series of new graphics throughout the facility.

Perhaps the most obvious change is the darker color scheme in the arena.

The old dingy white walls are now black and various shades of gray, a change that — when coupled with the new black seats — cuts down on reflections and focuses the lighting and attention on the performance or game.

"It allows for a theatrical presentation," Davis said. "The (old) color scheme didn't work very well."

The arena's lighting has been replaced with a modern LED full-color system, said Cajundome Operations Director Phil Ashurst.

In the concession area, new grills and fryers will allow more food to be cooked on-site rather than carted in from an outside kitchen.

Davis said patrons can look forward to an expanded menu of made-to-order items.

SPONSORED CONTENT ON THE ADVOCATE
Feeling Over-Taxed? This Infographic Will Help
Feeling Over-Taxed? This Infographic Will Help
BY WELLS FARGO
"In order to have a diverse menu, you have to have the ability to cook in the stands," he said.

There will be a bigger selection of regular and craft brews at the renovated bar area, and the draft beer system features refrigerated lines running from a spacious new keg cooler.

"The lines are chilled all the way through," Ashurst said. "It keeps the beer cold all the way to the tap."

A few other notable changes: the massive roof was cleaned of mildew and coated with new sealant, handrails were installed inside the arena, the entrance was spruced up and the restrooms were renovated.

The facility had a soft opening this week with a youth conference but is scheduled to officially reopen on Dec. 1 to host a UL-Lafayette basketball doubleheader with men's and women's games.


19 2016-11-28
Lafayette

Sun Belt grants UL its name preferences


Confirming what officials from UL previously disclosed, the Sun Belt Conference on Wednesday revealed it has granted the Ragin’ Cajuns’ wishes regarding what they prefer to be called.

The name controversy has been a long and ongoing fight for the Cajuns, who now want – and have been granted, according to the SBC’s newly revised reference guide – “Louisiana” as their name on first reference, “Louisiana Ragin’ Cajuns” as their nickname and “LA” as a short abbreviation when limited characters are used for statistical purposes and bottom-of-the-TV ticker lines used in reporting game scores.

“We are extremely excited we have reached this agreement with the Sun Belt Conference and (its) member institutions,” said Jessica Leger, UL’s newly appointed interim athletic director.

“Our reference and our abbreviation will definitely improve our visibility on a national level, which improves our national brand.

“Our program has evolved recently, and we’ve experienced great successes,” Leger added, “and we feel the timing is right to be known as ‘Louisiana,’ and we’re pleased the conference is giving us this opportunity to receive this national recognition.”

The guide is intended to encourage preferred name use for all SBC programs by media members and others, but it is not mandated.

ADVERTISING

inRead invented by Teads

UL’s official name remains the University of Louisiana at Lafayette for academic purposes, and it will continue to short-reference itself as “UL Lafayette,” according to the university.

UL earlier this month said it had reviewed its “brand standards,” and that “after discussions with its president’s office and the office of communications and marketing” it had opted to revise its first reference and abbreviation preferences.

In January 2014 the Sun Belt assigned UL with UL Lafayette as its first-reference athletics name and UL-L as its short abbreviation, something that – following much debate – was settled on after fellow SBC member UL Monroe prevented the Cajuns being called what they want.


THE ADVERTISER
New SBC guide: Cajuns to be UL-Lafayette or UL-L

Neither the Cajuns nor many of their fans were happy with the compromise, however, and most felt ULM won out.

So the Cajuns nevertheless continued using their preferred “Louisiana” on first reference, suggesting it was the first part of a modified nickname – Louisiana Ragin’ Cajuns – that in reality they created with only as a way to get around the Sun Belt style guide.

Now the Sun Belt is going along with what they want.

It’s unknown why UL kept “Louisiana Ragin’ Cajuns” as its nickname when it got its way with “Louisiana” on first reference, as now the program’s teams would be referred to as the “Louisiana Louisiana Ragin’ Cajuns” when first reference and nickname usages are combined.

But that perhaps is a battle for another day.


THE ADVERTISER
Hudspeth: "Louisiana" will be a part of new uniforms

“We talked about (that) since this press release has come out,” said Leger, who was not involved in the name-preference discussions.

“We’re fine with the way that it will read, because we are known as Louisiana Ragin’ Cajuns and … we’re pleased with the recognition with the Louisiana name being presented nationally.

“That’s something we can evaluate in the future as a department,” she added, “and see if that’s a request we would put forward in the future – to possibly remove ‘Louisiana’ from the nickname.”

UL Monroe’s approved preferences for its first reference and short abbreviation are “ULM” for both, and it continues to use “Warhawks” for a nickname.

UL president Joseph Savoie dodged a question Tuesday asking what happened that made ULM and its president, Nick Bruno, allow the Cajuns to have their way, and if he (Savoie) was confident the Sun Belt would permit that.

Savoie’s response: “That’s an ongoing conversation.”

In reality, the issue already had been decided.


THE ADVERTISER
UL coach apologizes after Trump-song video, regrets some remarks

All leaders of Sun Belt-member universities were aware of each school’s preferences before they signed off on the new guide, which was created after SBC schools filled out a form to submit their requests.

No objections to UL’s preferences were raised.

Questions on the matter that were submitted to Bruno’s office via a ULM spokesman, including ones about why ULM did not object to UL’s preference and if there were any negotiations or concessions involved, were not immediately answered Wednesday.

The changes went into effect immediately.

“I was informed by all Sun Belt presidents and chancellors of what they wanted to use in terms of the Sun Belt standard guide,” Sun Belt commissioner Karl Benson said Wednesday, “and that is what we’re going with.

“I’ve always said from the beginning it is not the conference office’s responsibility or obligation to enforce or interpret any statutes or laws or provisions.

“We will refer to our member universities,” Benson added, “as they request.”


19 2016-11-28
Lafayette

UL president Savoie addresses Trump controversies


Two weeks after video showing University of Louisiana at Lafayette football players dancing and profanely singing to an anti-Donald Trump rap song in their locker room, UL president Joseph Savoie addressed it and other national election-related incidents at the school.

Savoie spoke Tuesday, when asked about the matter as he also discussed the unrelated resignation of Ragin’ Cajuns athletic director Scott Farmer.

“Optics were not good,” Savoie said of the video, which went viral via social and traditional avenues and brought negative national attention to the university.

“I think that particular video was one event,” he added. “We had others on campus, which caused concern for various groups for various reasons.”

Savoie said he has “been spending a lot of time the last couple weeks meeting with student groups of various sorts,” and that on Monday afternoon and evening he met with “probably several hundred students in groups of 10 or 15, 20.”

“There are multiple perspectives to the events which occurred,” the UL president said.

“There are sincere feelings of concern and threat among various groups, and, you know, universities are places where thoughts and speech and conversation should be able to be discussed and considered, and what is takes is respect.”

RELATED: NAACP questions reprimanding of UL athletes | Sanctity of the UL locker room: How private is it?

Graffiti including comments saying “F--- your safe space” and “Build a wall” was seen written in chalk on campus one day after Election Day.

The video showed some Cajun players, at least four of whom were disciplined but not suspended, dancing and singing – and in some cases making obscene hand gestures – as the protest song FDT (F--- Donald Trump) by rap artists YG and Nipsey Hussle blared on the background.

Multiple players were shown videoing the scene with their cell phones, at least one of whom was naked.

Others are known to be upset by what they witnessed.

The video was filmed on the same day Trump was elected President of the United States.

Some UL boosters threatened to pull their financial support of the program as a result of both the video and reaction to it by head coach Mark Hudspeth, who suggested shortly after a road win at Georgia Southern that those who criticized the players but voted for Trump were hypocrites.


THE ADVERTISER
UL coach apologizes after Trump-song video, regrets some remarks

Hudspeth later said he regretted his ‘hypocritical’ suggestion, but explained he was being protective of players who were being labeled as “thugs” by at least one program booster.

“Obviously the hand gestures and the lewd language were very disappointing, especially toward one of the candidates," Hudspeth said initially.

“But I will say this: It’s also disappointing that so many people have vilified a few 19-year-olds making some immature decisions, and then they were the same ones that voted for someone that has done much worse by grabbing a female in the private areas for the office of the (President of the) United States of America.”

A few days later the coach made an emotional apology and announced several repercussions, including no more locker-room videos by players, no more music from players’ phones being piped into common areas and 1,000 hours of community service by players and coaches at local schools and youth organizations in the form of discussions about lessons learned.

In a subsequent open letter addressed to Hudspeth, Savoie and the school’s faculty and staff, UL’s chapter of the NAACP and other student organizations – Black Male Leadership Association, Black Woman Leadership Association, Students for the Advancement of Women, African Student Association, National Pan-Hellenic Council, Black Student Union – called for university leads to “remain unbiased and consistent” in the issuing of disciplinary action.


THE ADVERTISER
RCAF looks at effect of profane video

The letter reminded the school of its pledge to celebrate student diversity, and questioned inconsistencies in university response to the pro-Trump graffiti compared to the anti-Trump song video.

“Dealing with these groups,” Savoie said, “someone said, ‘Well, we need to get unity back.’

“I said, ‘I’m not sure we’re gonna have unity, but we can at least have respect and listen to one another’s opinions and talk through issues and treat people as individuals and not stereotypes.’ ”


19 2016-11-28
Lafayette

SLCC and UL sign agreements to help technology students


VIDEO
19 2016-11-23
Lafayette

UL-Lafayette athletic director Scott Farmer resigns; president Joseph Savoie discusses the search for his replacement


An emotional Scott Farmer abruptly announced his resignation Tuesday as Louisiana-Lafayette director of athletics, citing family concerns and the stress of the position he has held for five years.

“Athletic administration is not a job; it’s a lifestyle,” Farmer said Tuesday, reading from a prepared statement at UL-Lafayette’s Student-Athlete Performance Center. “For the past 30 years I loved the lifestyle. I loved the job. But the job demands take a toll on you.

“It takes a toll on your loved ones, on your friends, on your health and your commitment to your church. I have paid a price for being an athletics director through the loss of time with family, the inability to develop friendships outside of work, and a discontinuity in my spiritual life.”

Farmer’s resignation is effective immediately, and he will move into a teaching position in UL-Lafayette’s school of kinesiology. Deputy director of athletics Jessica Leger will serve as interim AD while president E. Joseph Savoie conducts what he called a “national search” for a replacement.

Savoie said Tuesday he will put together a search team by early next week to evaluate and interview candidates, and that former Missouri athletic director Michael Alden will serve as a consultant on the selection.

Alden was hired earlier this year to conduct a review of the Ragin’ Cajun athletic department and continues in a consultant role. Savoie said that alone would make the final decision.

“We’re going to take our time,” Savoie said. “We’re not going to sacrifice quality for speed. Given the holidays at this time of year, it’s likely that interviews won’t begin until after the first of the year. During that time, I have confidence in Jessica to keep the department and the program moving in the right direction.

“We had already decided to keep Mike Alden on contract on a consulting basis to help us in the implementation of several of his recommendations. But Dr. Leger is going to be the athletic director, and I’m going to decide who the next athletic director is going to be.”

Farmer came to UL-Lafayette in 2007 as associate athletic director, moving from a similar position he held at Troy from 1999-2007. He was named director of athletics in October of 2011 after serving several months as interim AD. He replaced retired longtime university administrator David Walker.

Farmer read a prepared six-minute statement and thanked the UL-Lafayette staff, and particularly the coaches, for their efforts. He did not take questions and left the building with his wife, Jackie, immediately after his statement .

“What we have accomplished has been the result of great people, not great resources,” he said. “I only with the athletic world knew how little our coaches had in some areas. Only then could they fully understand the truly outstanding job our coaches have done.”

Farmer referenced the 2013-14 athletic year, which included six Sun Belt Conference titles and a No. 34 national ranking in a listing compiled by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA). UL-Lafayette was the highest-ranked school outside the “power five” conferences in that listing and ranked 44th in that same list during the 2014-15 athletic year.

Most notably, the football team made its first four Division I bowl appearances during his tenure, winning the New Orleans Bowl an NCAA-record four straight years, and UL-Lafayette was the only school in the nation to have its baseball and softball teams reach the NCAA super regionals in each of the past two years.

Off the field during Farmer’s five-year tenure, UL-Lafayette doubled its athletic budget to $21.9 million, spent more than $69 million on facilities and more than doubled annual donations to the Ragin’ Cajun Athletic Foundation, with $10 million total funds donated in 2015.

Speculation about Farmer’s future had been present recently on social media, a presence that increased two weeks ago when video a profanity-laced anti-Donald Trump song, performed by four football players in UL-Lafayette’s locker room, went viral.

Football coach Mark Hudspeth initially expressed disappointment in fans “vilifying a few 19-year-olds making some immature decisions.” Hudspeth later apologized for both the players’ actions and his initial comments.

Savoie said the video and its aftermath was not a factor in Farmer’s resignation, and said Farmer had broached the topic to him as early as late September.

“Scott has an annual evaluation when we sit down and talk about things, and that was back in September or October,” Savoie said. “As we were talking about his future, he mentioned that he always wanted to go back to the classroom, he wanted to teach, and he wanted to spend more time with his family.

“We continued to talk about it, and this evolved as the result of that conversation. We talked about it on and off over a two- or three-week period.”

Savoie did not directly answer when asked if Farmer would have been allowed to remain as athletic director had he expressed that desire.

“We didn’t have that … that wasn’t the tone of the conversation at the time," Savoie said. "We were talking about the future, and he expressed interest in some things, we talked through that and we tried to make that happen for him.”

Savoie said he and Farmer concluded two weeks ago on this course of action, and talks with Leger, senior athletic staff and RCAF leadership had been held over the past week.

Savoie also listed requirements and characteristics he's looking for in a new athletic director. He wants a sitting athletic director or a senior-level administrator at a Division I program. He did not set a timeline but said interviews would not begin until January.

“We’re looking for someone who is visionary,” he said. “We’re looking for someone who has great integrity and a great work ethic. We’re looking for a relationship builder; someone who can focus on academics as well as athletic success; someone who has a solid understanding of NCAA regulations and university standards and can operate within those rules; someone who has the ability to generate financial support; and someone who will be collaborative with university departments and the various communities that we serve.”

Farmer was a coach and athletic administrator at Georgia Southern for 17 years before moving to Troy and helping elevate Troy’s program from what was then Division I-AA to Division I-A (now the Football Bowl Subdivision). Georgia Southern is now a Sun Belt Conference rival.

Farmer gave a cautionary warning at the end of his statement and cited the importance of the future hiring.

“The future will be tough,” he said. “We are in a time of exponential change. Decisions that would have been good yesterday will be losers tomorrow. Athletics is a multi-faceted business and it is nearly impossible to explain the workings of all the variables to the layman.

“Athletic decisions must be made by athletic professionals. It is a multi-billion-dollar business and too advanced for those outside the profession to fully understand. I wish to see UL athletics continue to rise and have a chance to move forward. This can only be accomplished by hiring the best, supporting him or her with all the resources available, and following his or her advice. Anything but a complete, unselfish effort by everyone involved is planning for failure.”


19 2016-11-23
Lafayette

Agreement means 2 degrees in 4 years for IT students


Acadiana students have a new pathway to an education in computer science thanks to a new articulation agreement between local schools.

A "2+2" articulation agreement signed Tuesday connects South Louisiana Community College’s application software development program and University of Louisiana at Lafayette's informatics program.

So students can complete an Associate of Applied Science in application software development at SLCC and transfer to UL to complete a Bachelor of Science in informatics — all in four years. The first two years are spent on courses at the community college and the last two at the university.

It's not the first articulation agreement between the two schools, nor will it be the last, UL President Joseph Savoie said at a news conference Tuesday.

More will follow, "providing greater opportunities for people to qualify for some of these growing and high-demand efforts," he said.

University of Louisiana at Lafayette President JosephBuy Photo
University of Louisiana at Lafayette President Joseph Savoie talks Tuesday about a new "2+2" articulation agreement with South Louisiana Community College. (Photo: Leigh Guidry/The Advertiser)
This agreement focuses on the information technology industry, which is growing globally and right here at home.

"As public institutions we have a responsibility to provide training for people to get good jobs," Savoie said. "And there's nothing bigger in the Acadiana area now than these IT jobs."

"It's a good day for economic development, a good day for the community, a good day for our businesses and certainly for UL and SLCC," he continued.

In an area reeling from hits to the oil and gas industry, "diversifying our industry here through IT is extremely important," SLCC Chancellor Natalie Harder said.

It's predicted that more than 1,000 jobs in the IT field will be available in the greater Lafayette area in the next five to 10 years, according to an SLCC release. The demand for IT professionals is high and UL boasts a 90 percent job placement rate for graduates.

South Louisiana Community College Chancellor NatalieBuy Photo
South Louisiana Community College Chancellor Natalie Harder talks Tuesday about an agreement connecting the college's application software development program with UL Lafayette's informatics program. (Photo: Leigh Guidry/The Advertiser)
"We intend to grow this technology sector by leaps and bounds for many, many years," said Gregg Gothreaux, president and CEO of Lafayette Economic Development Authority. "... There lies the future of our workforce. They'll be coming from these doors (at SLCC) and the doors of the school down the road."

William LaBar, vice president of consulting services with CGI, called the partnership a "force multiplier" that is essential to his company.

"It reflects the commitment that SLCC and UL have for workforce development in the IT industry," LaBar said. "This commitment is one of the reasons that CGI decided to open up a center here about two years ago and it has enabled us to have more than 330 members in the community today."

The community college established its application software development program in 2014. The two-year program prepares students to design, develop, test and modify software applications. It has a strong focus on database design and programming, web development and programming languages such as Java, JavaScript, C++, HTML, SQL and CSS, according to a school release.

The goal of UL's informatics program is to educate students to apply information technologies and to design, maintain and adapt information systems that solve problems with an understanding of human needs and context, according to the school's website.

The two schools are each other's largest transfer partner.

"More than 1,200 students graduated from us last year and moved over to UL, and we only see those numbers growing," Harder said. "And our '2+2' arrangements, our articulations, really help feed that."


19 2016-11-23
Lafayette

UL students ready for the bandstand


Since last September, students in the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s Traditional Music Program have been learning Cajun waltzes, zydeco two-steps, bluegrass tunes and the blues. But the time has come for students to move their new skills from the classroom to the dancehall.

Mark Dewitt, director of the program, says that real-world stage is key in the students’ music education.

“It’s the culmination of the work they’ve been doing this semester,” said Dewitt. “It’s pretty much band practice. They’re trying to gel as a band, develop set lists and arrangements of various songs.

“They work with the instructor on what song they are going to do, how they’re going to put the arrangements together. It’s about a whole professional delivery.”

Student musicians in Cajun, zydeco and blues ensembles play their semester-ending performances at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 29 at the Blue Moon Saloon in downtown Lafayette. The show is free and open to the public.

The performance features the Angelle Aces, a Cajun ensemble headed by Grammy-nominated accordionist and guitarist Roddie Romero. Nathan Williams Jr., a 2008 UL graduate in jazz studies and popular zydeco musician, leads the Zydeco Ragin’ Steppers. Grammy nominee Corey Ledet heads the Ragin’ Blues Band.

ADVERTISING

inRead invented by Teads

Vermilion Express, Len Springer’s bluegrass ensemble, performed Sunday at Artmosphere and Tuesday at Burke-Hawthorne Hall on the UL campus.


THE ADVERTISER
Downtown Alive! includes tree lighting, toy drive

Since 2012, UL’s program, formally known as Dr. Tommy Comeaux Endowed Chair in Traditional Music, has offered instrument classes for credit in these folk genres. UL is one of 25 colleges in the United States that offers a degree in traditional music.

Students must audition to show some knowledge of the genres. The blues class is only in its second semester, but it has attracted music business majors who are not necessarily interested in the traditional genres.

“There’s definitely some blues guitar players out there, especially with this music business program we have. We have a lot more guitar players who learn in their garage. They didn’t come up through the classical music route or the jazz route.

“It’s a natural outlet for the music business majors. Right now, we don’t have what might be called a commercial music ensemble or a rock ensemble. This is the closest thing we have to something like that.”

When the semester ends, students are able to repeat in the program. In the spring, a beginning Cajun accordion group class will meet at 2 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Nathan Williams Jr., aka Lil Nate, directs the Zydeco
Nathan Williams Jr., aka Lil Nate, directs the Zydeco Ragin' Steppers, a student band in the UL Traditional Music Program. (Photo: David Simpson)
Dewitt welcomes the new and returning students.

“It’s nice to have students come back. That gives the group a tighter sound when they’re already used to playing with each other. Some of our more established groups, like our jazz combos, they usually audition in the fall. They’ll stay together all year.

“Until now, we haven’t had the luxury of that in the Traditional Music Program. I’ve seen a lot of turnover. But we’re getting more traction, especially with the music business majors who need that ensemble credit.”

Want to go?

What: UL Traditional Music Program student ensembles

When: 7:30 p.m., Nov. 29

Where: Blue Moon Saloon, 215 E. Convent St.

Admission: Free

Information: bluemoonpresents.com


19 2016-11-22
Lafayette

Cajundome renovations nearing completion


Forgive Cajundome Director Greg Davis and Operations Manager Phil Ashurst if they’re feeling a little giddy these days.

For six long months, they’ve been waiting for this time.

Since the spring, the Cajundome has been closed for renovations … major ones.

“It’s a $21.2 million dollar renovation,” Davis said. “It’s a major renovation.”

The official grand opening will be for UL basketball doubleheader on Dec. 1, but actually, there was a “soft opening” Tuesday with the Louisiana Baptist Youth Conference packing the remodeled facility.

While so many construction projects often take longer than expected, there was never a fear of that obstacle in this project.

“There was never a doubt that it would be ready,” Davis laughed. “This event has been booked for over a year. It was going to be ready.”

Ashworth said he began planning for the renovation since 2010.

“The schedule was the most important thing,” Ashworth said. “I started scheduling things a year and a half ago. We’ve been working with JB Mouton (Builders) for a long time on this. They’ve been great to work with.”

In short, the new-look Cajundome will look fancier, have far less wasted space, include far more options in the concessions areas and fans have will far more accessibility to their seats, to restrooms area and concession areas.

“I just think the entire fan experience will be much better,” Davis said.
“Everything is just so much more efficient than it was before,” Ashurst said.

RELATED: Cajundome moves to second stage | Cajundome roof gets a makeover | Cajundome update includes new seats, interactive murals | Cajundome breaks ground on renovations

But the thing that’s got Davis the most excited is way the basketball game or the concert will be viewed now.

“It’s going to be a lot more like going to the theatre,” Davis said. “It’s going to be a lot more intimate.

“The court is going to be the center of focus. There will be more lighting on the court and the light will dissipate as you go up.”

The seats and the walls are now black, so feature the light on the court or the stage more than before.

The new seats also feature cupholders on every seat in the house and there will now be rails from the floor to the ceiling to make climbing stairs to your seats a much easier process.

“I think people will really enjoy that,” Davis said. “That’s going to be very nice. We’ve always heard a lot of comments about not having those.”

The primary focus was to enhance the viewing for basketball games.

Basketball seating will go from about 11,200 to 12,300, sais Ashurst.

Concert seating will increase from about 9,000 to 10.3, and “and the big thing there is we added a lot prime seating on the first level,” Davis said. “That’s a big deal with competing for national tours.”

The old aisle between the courtside seating and the first row of seats has been replaced with three rows of new seats.

The new configuration on the floor will provide about 500 more seats for concerts and 12 different configuration options to provide more flexibility for different events.

The lightshow aspect of basketball games and concerts will be enhanced.

For example, the area can now be any color desired. So picture the scene for a UL basketball game. The court will be more lighted, the seating areas will be more in the dark and the entire ceiling could be in red.

Concessions is another area to receive a major upgrade.

Previously food was prepared outside the concession areas and brought there to be sold.

Now the concessions areas have been enlarged so the grilling and frying will be done in each concession area.

“So if you want to order a grilled chicken sandwich with grilled onions and no cheese or cheese and sweet potato fries, you’ll be able to do that now,” Davis said. “Before, you could just order what was there.”

Davis said there will also be many more options for hot dogs, nachos and hamburgers.

Also, all the concession stands will now have TV by them, so customers won’t have to miss the action while in line for food.

The bar areas will also be enhanced with the beer options doubling from eight to 16.

And in the corridors underneath the new seating areas, there will be tables and TVs to sit and eat.

The other obvious improvement will be the timeline graphics on the walls behind the seating. It’s a museum-style presentation on the history of UL basketball.

“There’s a great history of UL basketball from the beginning,” Davis said. “I’m from the time of Bo Lamar and Roy Ebron, so I was very excited about seeing that..

The front lobby will also be filled with banners of Cajun players, as well as a display of former UL players in professional basketball.

For Cajun basketball fans, the Cajundome will no longer look like a civic arena that hosts UL games. It will look more like a shrine to UL basketball.

The only parts of the project that won’t be completed by the official Dec. 1 grand opening will be restrooms and concession areas on the third level concourse area.

By that Dec. 1 date, Cajundome officials will be ready to make money again after six months of inactivity.

Several steps were taken to withstand that huge financial hit. For starters, Davis said the Cajundome overbooked events in the 18 months prior to the project.

Secondly, Cajundome employees were used to help with the renovations, largely in restroom repairs and seat installation.

“We definitely wanted to protect our Cajundome employees,” Davis said. “We were very concerned about that.”

The increased efficiency of the facility will help as well.

“We won’t have to change a light bulb in 10 years,” said Ashurst, who said the LED lighting will save between $20,000 and $40,000 over the next five years.

The bathrooms will now have auto flushers with a 10-year battery life.


19 2016-11-21
Lafayette

UL sorority throws cook-off for charity


UL sorority Phi Mu hosted a jambalaya cook-off at Couret Farms in Lafayette on Saturday to raise money for Children's Miracle Network. Attendees enjoyed a variety of food, played games and listened to music from Myles Miguel and Magic Crawfish.

19 2016-11-21
Lafayette

Voices: There's still questions surrounding UL video


An article on SB Nation on Nov. 11 makes me question exactly what the UL coaching staff was apologizing for in their recent response to the obscene anti-Trump locker room video. If you thought they were shocked and upset by the vulgar lyrics, as they clearly implied, think again.

The SB article includes other videos of obscene music being broadcast in the full presence of the coaching staff after the 2011 bowl win and during a field practice session.

The people of Lafayette, UL students, faculty, alumni and supporters deserve a straight answer. Has loud, obscene music been played or condoned by the UL coaching staff in UL or other public facilities? Were the men charged with setting examples for our student athletes instead promoting music with obscene lyrics, including violence, degradation and disrespect towards women? What about all the young men who did not want to listen to that garbage, but were forced to, anyway?

Did UL administrators know of this practice and approve of, or tolerate it? Would the broadcast of that same music throughout the student union and other UL public facilities be permitted? Is this acceptable to the people who run the University of Louisiana?

No more spin or quibbling. Yes or no?

If yes, and I sincerely hope it is not, the coaches have failed in their most basic function -- leadership of the young people entrusted to their care, and they should resign or be replaced immediately.

— Richard Thornton

Lafayette


19 2016-11-21
Lafayette

NAACP questions reprimanding of UL athletes


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette chapter of the NAACP wants the school's administration to rethink taking disciplinary action against Ragin' Cajun football players depicted in a profane locker room video that went viral last week.

The video in question depicts several student-athletes in the locker room dancing and singing to the lyrics of YG and Nipsey Hussle's rap song "FDT" (F--- Donald Trump).

Most of the football players seen in the cellphone video are African-American.

The four players initially involved faced disciplinary action last week, and additional players now face disciplinary action, Hudspeth said earlier this week.

In an open letter, the NAACP and other student organizations pressure the UL administration to lift the disciplinary action against four student-athletes and "remain unbiased and consistent" in their issuing of disciplinary action.

"As these athletes face a hardship known exclusively to minorities and their allies, as they seek a safe space to communicate their frustrations, the question remains: Can they depend on their school to support and protect them as our country revisits its familiar history of intolerance?" the letter reads.

"Can the students of UL rely on the university to protect our inalienable rights?" the letter asks. "Will the university arise to its promise of celebrating diversity? Or will it bend beneath the pressure of bigotry?"

ADVERTISING

inRead invented by Teads

The open letter is addressed to football coach Mark Hudspeth, UL President Joseph Savoie, and university faculty and staff.

It is signed by the UL chapters of the NAACP, Black Male Leadership Association, Black Woman Leadership Association, Students for the Advancement of Women, African Student Association, National Pan-Hellenic Council and Black Student Union.

UL administration did not respond to a request for comment Friday. The UL, Lafayette and national chapters of the NAACP also did not return requests for comment.

The letter opens with a reminder to the university of its promise to celebrate diversity among students. It then questions why pro-Trump graffiti on the campus last week resulted in no action while football players singing rap music in a locker room did.

Lines such as "F--- your safe space" and "Build a wall" appeared in chalk on the campus Nov. 9.

UL police have not identified suspects involved in that incident. Should a suspect be identified, he or she would face a charge of simple criminal damage and could face disciplinary action from the university, according to Lt. Billy Abrams, spokesman for the UL Police Department.

The day of the graffiti incident "an arguably vague letter" was issued by UL President Joseph Savoie, according to the student organizations' letter to UL's administration. It didn't mention the graffiti incident but instead reminded students of the right to freedom of speech, the open letter said.

The "arguably vague letter" might refer to a blog on the university's website published Nov. 9 under the UL Office of the President. The blog, titled "Standing, Learning Together," addresses the tense climate following the presidential election.

"University campuses are places where men and women of all races and religions should be able to exchange ideas and learn from one another," the blog reads. "We grow as human beings by listening to others who have different backgrounds and experiences. The University strives to provide an environment that nurtures healthy discourse."

The open letter questions why the university has chosen to punish the players for exercising the right of freedom of speech.

"It does not follow that students should be punished for using profanity in the locker room when it was permissible only a week previously," the open letter reads. "By reprimanding these athletes a dangerous precedent has been set in the establishment of a 'Big Brother' relationship between the university and its students."

Although the First Amendment protects Americans' right to free speech without fear of retaliation from the government, it does not prevent a university from reprimanding a student for speaking in a way that might reflect poorly on the school or team.

The open letter says that other videos exist of the student-athletes swearing as they sing along to rap songs while in uniform, and the university hosted Lil' Wayne, a rapper known for vulgar language in his music, earlier this year.

"Why then is the enjoyment of rap music, a unique form of cultural expression especially in the African-American community, only accepted if it is commoditized by the university?" the letter said. "Why has the university chosen to punish players for exercising their freedom of speech? Does freedom of speech not extend to rap lyrics infused with profanity? Why have the student-athletes been punished for protesting in the safe space allotted to them as students and champions of the university? Does the university take umbrage with the crudeness of rap lyrics or the denouncing of Donald Trump? Why are the players' comments against a man who fans the flames of intolerance condemned so harshly? Why is some free speech protected while others are persecuted?"

The student-athletes have faced criticism for the video, but their coach has faced even harsher criticism for his initial response to the video.

“Obviously the hand gestures and the lewd language were very disappointing, especially toward one of the candidates," Hudspeth said last week.

“But I will say this: It’s also disappointing that so many people have vilified a few 19-year-olds making some immature decisions, and then they were the same ones that voted for someone that has done much worse by grabbing a female in the private areas for the office of the (President of the) United States of America.”

Hudspeth has since apologized for his words and has announced new locker room policies for the team.

Players will no longer be permitted to film in the locker room, and music in the locker room and common areas will now be played by the team's video department instead of through players' phones.


19 2016-11-16
Lafayette

UL Lafayette’s Big Data Research Center Hosts International Conference


(LAFAYETTE, LA, November 15, 2016) The University of Louisiana at Lafayette hosted the National Science Foundation Center for Visual and Decision Informatics’ (CVDI) Fall Industry Advisory Board Meeting from October 31 to November 2. The center partners with industry and government to conduct research in data science to develop solutions that unleash the transformative potential of Big Data. Established in 2012, the center is an Industry/University Cooperative Research Center (I/UCRC) that taps university researchers and students from UL Lafayette, Drexel University and Tampere University of Technology in Finland to team up with 13 industry partners to solve Big Data challenges.

At the meeting, Professor Peter Beling from the University of Virginia gave the keynote address on Big Data for the Internet of Things. Speakers from the industry who offered their perspectives on the Internet of Things and Big Data included Richard Bissonette, Senior Vice President at CGI, Steven Greenspan, Vice President of CA Technologies and Matti Vakkuri, Big Data Director at Tieto.

CVDI received more than $5.1 million in funding since 2012 from industry members, the National Science Foundation and Tekes, a Finnish Funding Agency for Innovation. In its first four years, CVDI completed 25 research projects that developed next-generation technologies that help industry members improve the process of analyzing and interpreting large volumes of data.

“The rapid growth of CVDI is directly impacted by the level of commitment of the partner universities and industry members to collaborate on the research projects,” said Vijay Raghavan, CVDI Director and Alfred and Helen Lamson Endowed Professor, UL Lafayette. The center will advance to Phase II of the NSF program in 2017 marked by a number of noteworthy accomplishments. “In particular, CVDI is proud to announce our industry members nominated two projects as technological breakthroughs to the National Science Foundation – Schumacher Clinical Partners nominated the flu forecasting model by Dr. Raju Gottumukkala, and CGI nominated the innovative hotspot prediction technique by Dr. Jian Chen,” noted Vijay Raghavan.

CVDI is the only National Science Foundation center in the state of Louisiana and is the only NSF I/UCRC with a primary focus on the theme of data science, big data analytics and visual analytics.

CVDI is poised to move to Phase II soon and is expected more than double in size, in the next couple of years, with the addition of four domestic academic research sites – the University of Virginia, Stony Brook University, Brigham Young University and the University of North Carolina at Charlotte- and one international research site- Amrita University.
19 2016-11-14
Lafayette

Some like it HOT! UL-Lafayette employee uses gut instinct on quest for world's hottest pepper


From scarfing down his grandmother’s pickled jalapeños to planting his first pepper in 2004, Troy Primeaux has always had an admiration for the hot commodities.

And now, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette employee is poised to break the Guinness World Record for hottest chili pepper with his genetic concoction: The Louisiana Creeper.

And, jeepers, the sting of these Creepers is guaranteed to show in your watery peepers: The pepper is the spawn of the BBM and the 7-Pot Primo, two of Primeaux’s prior creations, and a play on the current record-holder, the Carolina Reaper. Weighing in at an average 2 million Scoville Heat Units, the Creeper trumps the Reaper’s average of 1.57 million SHU.

An El Paso, Texas, native who moved to Crowley and later Lafayette, Primeaux, 45, says the pepper is also a great tool for community unity and local sustainability.

“I’ve always said that we’re last in a lot of things,” he said, “but Lafayette’s what, the happiest city in America? Louisiana’s got all these happy awards. (The Creeper) is a way to pull the community in and state in to believe in something we’re doing.”

The pepper combines the average 1.479 million SHU the 7-Pot Primo packs with the “creeping” bite the BBM delivers. Primeaux said the end result is adrenaline tantamount to a heart-pounding, near-death experience followed by what feels like a runner’s high.

“If you don’t know all that goes into it and you just think you’re about to eat some nacho jalapeño rings, it’s going to take you for a ride and you could have a panic attack,” he warns. “You could have an anxiety attack. It won’t kill you, but you might think you’re dying.”

Before he began plying his pepper passion, Primeaux was a nursing major with an interest in horticulture. Before he was a nursing major, he was a guitarist in Santeria, a Southern psychedelic rock band. Brother Dege, the band’s singer, would go on to have a song in the movie “Django Unchained.” With some persuasion from his wife and after his band mate got hit head-on by an 18-wheeler, Primeaux said, he decided to attend UL-Lafayette.

A work-study employee, Primeaux did his stint in Hamilton Hall with the renewable resources department. While there, he chatted up the horticulturists across the hall and “picked their brains” about peppers.

“I was always interested in peppers, and naïveté would dictate that, in time, I just thought taking a hot pepper and another hot pepper, I’d make a hotter pepper,” he said.

Although he managed three years as a nursing student with a 3.8 GPA, Primeaux changed his major to sustainable agriculture. Primeaux began his pepper-peddling business when he purchased 10 bhut jolokia seeds — better known as the ghost pepper — for $40 from a European distributor. After he grew the plants, he reaped $4,000 by selling the seeds on eBay.

With that exponential return on investment came an invaluable business lesson: “If it leaves your backyard, all bets are off,” he says. “You better trust the people involved. It’s very cutthroat.”

Around the same time he obtained the ghost pepper seeds, Primeaux’s friend gave him some 7-Pot seeds from a trip to Trinidad, the pepper’s place of origin. Named after its ability to spice seven pots of stew, the pepper is also used as marine paint in Trinidad to ward off barnacles, and as an ingredient in military-grade tear gas.

Primeaux combined the 7-Pot and the bhut jolokia to create the 7-Pot Primo. Utilizing UL-Lafayette's Ira Nelson Horticulture Center to grow the plants, he began selling the pepper when the strain stabilized, producing more-uniform pods.

Primeaux transformed his and his mother’s backyards into a hot-pepper haven. Although he lost 200 plants in the floods in August, he said, he has backup plants in different states. Nevertheless, he said, he will not sell seeds until next year.

In the meantime, Primeaux is working as a watershed coordinator at UL-Lafayette, a job that entails collecting and analyzing water samples from the Lacassine swamp. His wife is perfecting pepper jellies, which some restaurants use today. Primeaux said the next step is expanding his business’s scope past hot sauce and seeds.

“People ask me all the time, ‘Do we have a seasoning? Do y’all have pickles? Do y’all have a ketchup?’” he said. “I could put the Primo or the Louisiana Creeper in all kinds of products, and people would buy it.”

He has also started a dialogue with UL-Lafayette about collaborating on a Ragin’ Cajun-themed pepper.

“We are very interested in growing our licensed consumable products based on the success of our licensed burgers, beers and coffee,” said Charlie Bier, communications specialist for the university.

Even if Primeaux breaks the Guinness World Record for hottest chili pepper, he says, he will begin focusing on making an even hotter pepper.

“Maybe it’ll be the world’s sweetest pepper: A cold-tolerant, flood-tolerant pepper,” he joked.

In any case, Primeaux is going to embark on his next hot-pepper trek in the same manner he did creating the 7-Pot Primo and the BBM: with passion and love.

“I have a pretty good gut instinct of doing things,” he said. “It’s never failed me.”

FOLLOW RICHARD BURGESS ON TWITTER, @RBB100.​
19 2016-11-14
Lafayette

UL-Lafayette student who fabricated assault story named, issued summons for criminal mischief


A University of Louisiana at Lafayette student faces a criminal mischief charge for allegedly fabricating a story about being attacked near campus Wednesday by two men who yelled ethnic slurs and then stole her wallet and hijab head covering.

Khadija Altamimi, 18, was issued a misdemeanor summons for a violation of the city's criminal mischief law, which carries a penalty of up to $500 and 30 days in jail, according to Lafayette Police records released Friday.

She was not booked on the charge, and no court date had been set.

Altamimi could not be reached for comment on Friday.

News of the attack went viral after the University of Louisiana at Lafayette sent out an e-mail to students Wednesday evening with a description of the suspects that stated one was wearing a white "Trump" hat.

RELATED

Report: UL-Lafayette student who made up story of being beaten, robbed of wallet and hijab facing charge
Report: UL-Lafayette student who made up story of being beaten, robbed of wallet and hijab facing charge
A University of Louisiana at Lafayette student who told police she was beaten and subjected to ethnic slurs by two men who then robbed her wallet and took her hijab has admitted making up the story, Lafayette Police said Thursday.
Lafayette Police announced Thursday that the student had made up the story, though no explanation was offered why she did.

The student's claim of being attacked was reported online Thursday morning by almost every major news organization in Louisiana and several national news outlets.
19 2016-11-14
Lafayette

Four UL-Lafayette football players punished for anti-Trump rap profanities, gestures


LAFAYETTE — Louisiana-Lafayette football coach Mark Hudspeth disciplined four players in response to a locker room video showing members of the team dancing and singing the lyrics of a profane rap song that disparages Donald Trump.

The song, by YG and Nipsey Hussle, is called "FDT (F--- Donald Trump)," and the video was made sometime shortly before Tuesday's election in which Trump was voted in as president.

Hudspeth said Thursday that he was disappointed with a few players' immature behavior. He said four players were disciplined. He did not detail what the discipline was, and he defended his players to a degree when asked about the video following Thursday's win at Georgia Southern.

In a release from the university Friday, Hudspeth detailed his reaction Friday: "I am disappointed by the actions that a few student-athletes demonstrated. The immature behavior of those individuals is not condoned by our program. It does not represent our entire team or the views of the university. We’ve disciplined four student-athletes and are taking steps to educate all of our student-athletes to prevent this from happening again.


"I apologize to our alumni, fans, supporters and the university, who deserve more responsible behavior by our student-athletes. I regret my response to a reporter’s question after last night’s game that may have offended some voters in the recent election."
19 2016-11-14
Lafayette

Louisiana-Lafayette coach addresses profane Trump song video in locker room


LAFAYETTE, La. — University of Louisiana at Lafayette football coach Mark Hudspeth has responded to a locker room video showing multiple Ragin’ Cajun players dancing in the team’s locker room and singing the lyrics of a profane rap song.

The song by YG and Nipsey Hussle is called FDT (F— Donald Trump).

The cellphone video was made sometime shortly before Tuesday’s election in which Trump was elected president.

Some of the unidentified Cajun players in the video also are seen making obscene gestures.

“I am obviously disappointed in a few of our players’ immature behaviors that they demonstrated in the locker room,” Hudspeth said shortly after UL’s 33-26 win at Georgia Southern on Thursday night. “We do not condone that type of behavior. It is not an example of our entire team. It does not represent our entire team.

“It has been handled,” he added, “and it will be a learning experience for these young men that were involved — although it was very few.”

Four Cajuns were players were disciplined, Hudspeth said. He did not detail what the discipline was, and said that would remain “in-house.”

But Hudspeth did indicate some if not all of the four played in Thursday night’s game, and their playing time was not limited in any way.

“The few men involved did not even vote in the presidential election,” Hudspeth said. “So, did not have a dog in the hunt. Obviously the hand gestures and the lewd language were very disappointing, especially toward one of the candidates.”

“But I will say this,” he added. “It’s also disappointing that so many people have vilified a few 19-year-olds making some immature decisions, and then they were the same ones that voted for someone that has done much worse by grabbing a female in the private areas for the office of the (President of the) United States of America.”

Hudspeth said he considered that “somewhat hypocritical.”

“And if they have never done anything that they were a little bit ashamed of when they were 19,” he said, “then they can get in line to throw the first stone against our team.”

Hudspeth said he stood by his team’s record of discipline since he arrived at UL prior to the 2011 season.

“I am confident that we probably have won the national championship of the most-disciplined team in the country,” he said. “We have had very few if any off-the-field incidents within our program within the last 5-to-6 years, when many top programs around the country are littered in the paper weekly for arrests of marijuana, guns, violence toward women.”

“And knowing that this is probably the worst thing that we’ve done, as disappointed as I am,” he added, “we will use it as a learning experience to educate our young men on how to represent themselves better in certain situations.”

UL athletic director Scott Farmer has no comment on the video when asked for one Thursday night.

Hudspeth wanted to make it clear as to where his program stands regarding the office to which Trump has been elected.

“I can say this, though, with confidence: That our entire team is in full support of the Office of the President of the United States of America, regardless of who’s in office,” he said. “We are 100 percent behind Mr. Trump, or President-Elect Trump, as we would be behind anyone.”

“In football there is a chain of command, and we respect authority,” Hudspeth added. “And will respect that, and honor that office.”



The video, evidently shared publicly by one or more program boosters, did not start spreading via social media and other channels until two days later.

But Hudspeth said he was aware of it shortly after the video was filmed.

Hudspeth also said that afterward the four players involved “were very apologetic, very remorseful, and handled it the right way.”

“They were caught up in a song, and used poor language, poor hand gestures,” he said,. “And, like I said before, it will be a learning experience. And does it by no means represent our entire team.”

It’s unclear who distributed the video initially.

“There’s a code, if you plays sports, that things you say in the locker room stay in the locker room when you leave the locker room, whether it’s a coaches’ postgame rant, a coaches’ speech, or two players that may have odds with one another after a real tough practice,” Hudspeth said. “That’s just the way things are.

“We will do a better job, though, of monitoring the behavior of our young men, but also continuing to educate them and helping them develop into mature adults that one day will be great citizens of our communities.”
19 2016-11-14
Lafayette

The University of Louisiana at Lafayette School of Music and Performing Arts presents State of LA Danse


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette School of Music and Performing Arts will present State of LA Danse at 7:30 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, Nov. 17-19, and at 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 20, at Ducrest-Gilfry Auditorium in Angelle Hall on campus.

The production, directed by Kenneth L. Jenkins, will premiere a range of dances, both ballet and modern dance, which are varied innovative in their approach.

A unique aspect of this year’s production is that all of the choreographers are women who are Louisiana natives.

Guest artist and choreographer Clare Cook will premiere "FRAGMENTS," an excerpt of a work in progress. She collaborated with architect Ashlie Latiolais, of the UL-Lafayette School of Architecture, to explore how fundamental architectural principles inform the creation of spaces and how dancers utilize space.

Cook and Latiolais are Lafayette natives and grew up dancing together.

Guest artist and choreographer Cathy Hebert, of Opelousas, will premiere "Homage to Balanchine." In this original work, Hebert's choreography is both indicative of Balanchine’s use and development of the classical ballet vocabulary while paying homage to this master choreographer.

Guest artist and choreographer Amanda Martin, of Jeanerette, premieres "Surface." Using contemporary dance styles combined with a suggestion of hip-hop, Martin has created a work that is fun to watch but captures an underlying message of unity and strength.

Resident artist faculty member and UL-Lafayette dance graduate Marie Broussard, originally from Opelousas, has taken a major departure from the classical form in "Viens Jouer Avec Nous (Come Play With Us)" performed to a musical score performed by the Lounge Lizards.

Resident artist faculty member and UL-Lafayette graduate Sonia DeVille, of Ville Platte, continues to deepen her response to the affects of Alzheimer’s disease on the entire family unit in "Threading Memories."

Tickets are $10; $5 for alumni, senior citizens and students; and free for UL-Lafayette students, faculty and staff with valid ID.

Tickets are available at dance.ulpfar.org or at the door. For more information, call (337) 482-6357.
19 2016-11-11
Gannett

BREAKING: Police say UL student made up robbery story


Lafayette police said a woman made up a story about two men attacking her and stealing her wallet and hijab on Wednesday.

"During the course of the investigation, the female complainant admitted that she fabricated the story about her physical attack as well as the removal of her hijab and wallet by two white males," the Lafayette Police Department said in a news release.

The incident is no longer under investigation, police said.

The initial report came just after 11 a.m. Wednesday, when University of Louisiana at Lafayette police said they received a report of a robbery on Smith Street near campus.

In the initial report, the woman said two men hit her, made her fall to the ground, yelled racial obscenities, then stole her wallet and hijab, a head covering sometimes worn by Muslim women.

Initial reports also suggested at least one of the attackers was wearing a Donald Trump hat.

The alleged incident had garnered national attention and had drawn the response of the Louisiana affiliate of the American Civil Liberties Union.

UL President Joseph Savoie posted a blog Wednesday. The post did not reference the robbery report, but urged students and staff to work to find common ground after the divisive presidential election.

“University campuses are places where men and women of all races and religions should be able to exchange ideas and learn from one another,” Savoie’s post read. “We grow as human beings by listening to others who have different backgrounds and experiences. The University strives to provide an environment that nurtures healthy discourse. I encourage you to take advantage of resources available on our campus that can help you contribute, in your own way, to a better future.”


19 2016-11-11
Lafayette

Messages of love appear on UL's campus after student reportedly robbed of her wallet and hijab


KATC/AP) - A UL college student told police she was assaulted and robbed of her wallet and hijab by two men, one of whom was wearing a white "Trump" hat.

The 18-year-old woman told investigators she was walking near the University of Louisiana at Lafayette's campus Wednesday morning - hours after Donald Trump's presidential victory - when she was accosted by two white men who drove up in a gray sedan, police said.

The student said the men struck her with a metal object, knocking her down, and stole her wallet and hijab, a headscarf worn by Muslim women. She also said the men shouted racial obscenities as they struck her several times in the back, Lafayette police said in a statement Thursday.

Police haven't identified any suspects. The student declined medical treatment.

Lafayette Police Department spokesman Cpl. Karl Ratcliff said investigators haven't found witnesses or surveillance video to assist them.

"Basically, all we have is her statement," Ratcliff said. "At this point, there's not really much else we can do with it."

The university's police department issued a statement notifying staff and students about the student's reported attack.

UL Lafayette President Dr. Joseph Savoie sent a message to the campus following the election that read in part "University campuses are places where men and women of all races and religions should be able to exchange ideas and learn from one another. We grow as human beings by listening to others who have different backgrounds and experiences. The University strives to provide an environment that nurtures healthy discourse.

Today messages of love and acceptance began appearing throughout the university. Some of them include "Love Trumps Hate", "You matter to me", and "Hate is not the answer".

The ACLU released the following statement on the incident:

The ACLU of Louisiana is outraged at the news of a young Muslim woman being assaulted and robbed of her hijab in Lafayette yesterday morning. The report that her attackers also shouted slurs and wore Donald Trump clothing is especially troubling in light of Mr. Trump’s frequent use of anti-Muslim rhetoric on the campaign trail.

We condemn this rhetoric and this behavior. We call on all Louisianians to reject anti-Muslim bigotry. Muslim Americans and residents have the same rights that we all do: to practice our religion freely and openly, to live and work without fear, and to participate equally in public life. To act otherwise is in direct contradiction of the values enshrined in our founding documents and our laws
19 2016-11-11
Lafayette

Banks unveils art, new animation series


Little red tricycles have meant a lot to artist Vergie Banks. When she was a 5-year-old girl growing up in Broussard, Banks longed for a tricycle, just like the ones all her friends had.

But then a Christmas surprise arrived.

“One Christmas, my dad and them came home, and I was looking all over in the car for it,” said Banks. “I thought I didn’t get one, but it was in the trunk.

“But that’s how it all transpired. After I got a degree from UL, I needed a signature. That was it.”

Banks unveils her signature pieces and a new animated series, “The Journey of Zoe and the Little Red Tricycle” during ArtWalk at 6 p.m. Saturday at the Acadiana Center for the Arts. The 18-piece exhibit remains on display until Dec. 3.

Banks will offer a sneak peek of the “Tricycle” animation series being developed by James Tancill and the students in the visual arts department at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Their work will result in a DVD that will be released within the next two months.

The Banks and UL collaboration is the result of ArtSpark, an individual artist funding program at the Acadiana Center for the Arts. For the pasts three years, AcA and the Lafayette Economic Development Authority have issued grants, ranging from $2,000 to $7,500, to assist artists with specific, short-term projects.

“They work on a project for a little under a year,” said Paige Krause of the AcA. “We work with the Opportunity Machine which does professional development courses with Zach Barker. He pinpoints to them what they might need assistance with.

“They also do outreach. Verge’s exhibit is going up and they’re doing a talk for the during ArtWalk, to talk about the process. The whole idea is for us to be able to expose the process of what the artists are creating and not just the product.”

For Banks, the animated series is the climax of a two-decade dream. After creating her first “Tricycle” painting in 1997, the image of Zoe on her three-wheeler has been used in promotions for the state of Louisiana in the United States and Europe.

Clients for her paintings have included Cher, Bill Cosby, Gov. Kathleen Blanco, Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu and numerous museums, restaurants, hotels and galleries. The animation series further expands Banks’ artistic reach.

“This is a whole new ballpark as far as Zoe and the Little Red Tricycle,” said Banks. “It’s really, really fun. It has great character and movement to draw the kids’ eyes to. It teaches three different languages — French, English and Spanish.

“I’m elated to finally see the dream come true. It’s amazing, surreal almost.”

Want to go?

What: "The Journey of Zoe and the Little Red Tricycle” exhibit

When: 6 p.m. Saturday

Where: Acadiana Center for the Arts, 101 W. Vermilion St.

Admission: Free

Information: acadianacenterforthearts.org

Also at ArtWalk:

In addition to ArtWalk events, the Southern Screen Film Festival is back Downtown this year through Nov. 13 with screenings, panels, red carpet events, parties and workshops celebrating the film industry. Get behind the scenes details of the films and hear from the creative team that brings these stories to the big screen, including a few hometown filmmakers. Buy a pass to get the full experience!

2nd Saturday ArtWalk Special Features:

Browse Arts & Fleas at Parc de Lafayette and meet local vendors.
Enjoy live art, dance and music by the Kabuki Kru at the Times of Acadiana Bandstand at Parc de Lafayette!
Acadiana Center for the Arts

101 W. Vermilion St.

Main Space: "American Beauty"

The exhibition loosely centers around the political climate of America and the many issues that fuel our current political, industrial, social and moral future. Artists: Luis Cruz Azaceta, Heidi Cody, Annie Laurie Erickson, Ernie L. Fournet, Sharon Jacques, Malcolm McClay, Maxx Sizeler, Dan Tague, John Isiah Walton, Carl Joe Williams.

Reiki Healing Meditation

7-7:25 p.m. in conjunction with Sharon Jacques’ Installation “A Boundless Freedom for Women”

Side Gallery & Mallia Gallery

Floyd Sonnier

*New Coca-Cola Studio

Hannah Walters “People and Places”

Artmosphere

902 Johnston St.

This month, Artmosphere features art and photographs from local, up-and-coming artists!

Basin Arts

113 Clinton St.

During ArtWalk step into this container for creativity. A space where artists come together to create, collaborate and learn from one another.

Benoit Gallery

535 ½ Jefferson St.

Bryan Benoit was born and raised in Lafayette. He studied architecture at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. As a self-taught artist, he began his journey into the art world in 2009. His perception of the African Diaspora & the Creole Culture is expressed through his mixed media works.

Cajun Spice

535 Jefferson St.

This month at ArtWalk, Cajun Spice features two special artists, Anna Meaux and Charlotte Gallet Broussard. Anna Meaux a watercolor artist, began painting at age 50, after an art class with Laura LaHaye.

Charlotte Gallet Broussard, also a native of Kaplan, is the second featured artist. With a bachelor's degree in fine art from USL, Broussard's had numerous exhibits and juried shows. Her watercolors, blockprints, and paintings will be on exhibit through November.

Carpe Diem

812 Jefferson St.

Carpe Diem! Will be featuring the works of local artists, fresh gelato and scrumptious coffee!

Chase Tower

600 Jefferson St.

Chase Tower will be featuring local art by Pamela Ratliff.

Creations by Fire

100 E. Vermilion St., Suite 140

Danielle J. Moss will be the featured artist at Creations By Fire for the month of November. As the owner of Creations By Fire, Danielle has brought her jewelry to canvas as mixed media art. Her canvas art is an interesting combination with layers of paint, glass, metal, watch parts, pearls, shells, healing rock shavings and anything else you can imagine! She also has a personal quote that goes with each of her pieces, giving you a glimpse of her mind and the meaning of each piece to her heart. Danielle has a bachelors degree in Art from USL and has been creating for 30 years. Danielle's biggest inspiration was her grandmother, Jeanne Moss, a very talented artist and china painter.

Francis Pavy Studio

210 Gordon St.

Open studio; recent works.

Gallery 333

333 Monroe St.

This month at ArtWalk, Gallery 333 will feature local artists and hand-crafted offerings.

Gallery 549

549 Jefferson St.

Gallery 549 features work by Don Leblanc and other local artists to create a diverse body of work within the gallery for purchase.

King Rob and His Court: Art Gallery & Design

100 E. Vermilion St.

King and His Court welcome Leslie Tammariello to the gallery for November and December. Leslie is a very talented local Lafayette artist who works in acrylics and mixed media in a style that can be best described as “Spiritual Abstraction”.

Lafayette Arts & Fleas

Parc de Lafayette, 539 Jefferson St.

Arts & Fleas features art, crafts, gifts, clothing and accessories from local designers, artists and vendors. Dressing rooms will be set up to try on clothing. Come support your very own local pop-up shops and score one-of-a-kind finds.

Lounge Gallery

402 S. Buchanan Street

The Lounge Gallery presents a series of new paintings and works on paper by Michael Eble. The exhibition will run through the months of November and Decemeber. Eble earned his BFA from University of Louisiana, Lafayette and his MFA from the University of Mississippi. Since leaving the south, Eble has been a resident of Minnesota, where he is an Associate Professor of Studio Art, gallery curator and a working artist at the University of Minnesota, Morris, a selective public liberal arts college. He has shown work regionally and nationally and has been a recipient of many prestigious awards and grants. He is currently to looking forward to returning to Lafayette permanently this coming December.

Parlor

207 Jefferson St.

This month, Parlor will feature live music by Abby Sonbuchner.

Right Angle

119 E Main St.

During ArtWalk, Right Angle's office space transforms from advertising agency to art gallery. November ArtWalk will feature painter Andrea Schellman. A native of Virginia, Schellman moved to Lafayette three years ago and now spends her time exploring Louisiana's farms, back roads, coastlines, and waterways. Inspired by the intersection of land, water, and sky, Schellman's watercolor work reflects a strong connection to Louisiana's nature. Stop by 119 E. Main St. to meet Schellman and explore some of her work.

Sans Souci Gallery

219 E. Vermilion St.

Art, pottery, jewelry and gifts made by Louisiana Crafts Guild artists every ArtWalk and during regular gallery hours.

SOLA Violins

424 E. Vermillion St.

Live music and local art!

Zoom Photo Studio

205-A W. Vermilion St.

This ArtWalk, The Garage at Zoom presents work Travis Gauthier.


19 2016-11-11
Lafayette

Police: UL-Lafayette student made up story of being beaten, robbed of wallet and hijab


Update, 2:25 p.m.; Nov. 10, 2016

A University of Louisiana at Lafayette student who told police she was beaten and subjected to ethnic slurs by two men who then robbed her wallet and took her hijab has admitted making up the story, Lafayette Police said Thursday.

Original story

Two men repeatedly punched and yelled racial slurs at a middle eastern University of Louisiana at Lafayette student Wednesday before stealing her wallet and hijab head covering, according to an initial police report of the incident.

Police said the two white males assaulted the 18-year-old student in the 100 block of Smith Street about 11:00 a.m. Wednesday.

University of Louisiana at Lafayette police, in an e-mail sent to students Wednesday evening, had initially stated one of the two men wore a white "Trump" hat, but investigators with Lafayette Police, which is taking the lead on the case, have not confirmed that description, said Lafayette Police spokesman Officer Karl Ratcliff.

"That information has not been corroborated," Ratcliff said.

According to the initial report, the woman tried to walk away after two white males pulled up hear in a grey sedan and got out.

The men then struck her in the back with what she believes was a metal object, causing her to fall down, according to the report.

The men the repeatedly punched her while yelling racial slurs and the fled with her wallet and her hijab, a head covering, according to the report.
19 2016-11-11
Lafayette

UL-Lafayette students react to fabricated attack


LAFAYETTE, La. (KLFY) – A UL-Lafayette student claims she was attacked by Trump supporters and turns out that story was made up and now students are speaking out and sending positive messages promoting unity and peace on campus.

since the election, tensions have been high across the nation stirring up controversy even here at home.

Wednesday a student claimed she was physically attacked by two men, one wearing a Trump hat. She said they struck her with a metal object, removed her hijab and stole her wallet.

“That’s terrible if it was racially provoked, racially fueled because we are in America everyone should be considered equal this is our country we have diversity everywhere,” said Robine Gonzalez, a UL-Lafayette student.

Police investigated and determined it was all a lie.

“But the fact that she would come up with these lies just to stir up this pot even more as I said in the first place is just sad,” said Kyle Salazar, a UL-Lafayette student.”If you’re fabricating that that’s actually going to get somebody else angry and they might just go and say oh since you fabricated that I’m going to do it now,” said Gonzalez.

“If you’re fabricating that that’s actually going to get somebody else angry and they might just go and say oh since you fabricated that I’m going to do it now,” said Gonzalez.

Now with more than six thousand shares on facebook and several national newspapers reporting the story students are worried about the message the university is sending to our nation.

“It’s making our university look bad which is not true at all University ofLouisiana at Lafayette is an amazing university. I love it here,” said Salazar.

Many students are fed up with the hate.

“It’s very important to come together now especially after the election we need to be united not separated,” said Gonzalez.

But now one day after the fabricated attack messages of hope are splattered across campus.

“There’s only one way that we are going to get through this together and that’s prayer,” said Salazar.

“You are loved” is just one of the messages students are sharing, a message students hope will spread faster than the made up story, a message they hope is heard around the world.

“We need unity at this time because as soon as we can come together then we can have peace and hope that can follow.”




19 2016-11-11
Regional/National

Police Investigate Attacks on Muslim Students at Universities


Officials at universities in Louisiana and California said the police were investigating attacks on Wednesday against female Muslim students, and officials described one of the episodes as a “hate crime.”

The attacks, coming the day after the nation voted to elect Donald J. Trump, underscored the criticism he had faced throughout his presidential campaign from opponents who said his harsh anti-Muslim language was emboldening extremists.

A Muslim student at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette told the police on Wednesday morning that she was walking when a car pulled up to her, and two white men stepped out and attacked her, according to an email sent by the university to students, faculty and staff.

The men, one of whom was wearing a white hat emblazoned with “Trump,” hit her with a metal object, dropping her to the ground, she said. While she was down, the student said, they stole her head covering and wallet.

Photo

Students on the San Diego State University campus. Credit Gregory Bull/Associated Press
University officials did not comment on the attack, but confirmed the details of the email, which was sent just before 8 p.m. on Wednesday, and that the police were investigating. The victim was not identified.

The Lafayette Police Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

In California, the San Diego State University police said they were investigating a similar attack, which they described as a “hate crime.”

A student who was wearing traditional garments and a hijab reported that while she was walking to her car, two men — one white and one Hispanic — confronted her and made comments about Mr. Trump and Muslims, according to a police summary.

The student reported that the men had grabbed her purse and backpack and had taken her car keys before fleeing. She was not injured. The unidentified victim alerted the police and led them back to the scene, discovering that her car was gone.

In a joint statement, the university president, Elliot Hirshman; the vice president for student affairs, Eric Rivera; and the interim police chief, Josh Mays, said: “We condemn this hateful act, and urge all members of our community to join us in condemning such hateful acts.”

Sign-up for free NYT Newsletters

Morning Briefing
News to start your day, weekdays

Opinion Today
Thought-provoking commentary, weekdays

Cooking
Delicious recipes and more, 5 times a week

Race/Related
A provocative exploration of race, biweekly

Enter your email address
Sign Up

Receive occasional updates and special offers for The New York Times's products and services.

PRIVACY POLICY
“Hate crimes are destructive to the spirit of our campus, and we urge all members of our community to stand together in rejecting hate.”

After the election, universities also reported campus graffiti referring to Mr. Trump and some of the themes he has espoused.

New York University’s Muslim Students Association said on its Facebook page that students at the Tandon School of Engineering awoke on Wednesday to find “Trump” scrawled on the door of their prayer room, adding that they are “realizing that our campus is not immune to the bigotry that grips America.”

The Louisiana campus was also hit by “Trump” graffiti on the day of the attack on the Muslim student.

View image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on Twitter
Follow
Jass @JassMonique_
Welcome to the University of Louisiana at Lafayette where people have lost their damn mind. America will NEVER be great.
12:24 PM - 9 Nov 2016
63 63 Retweets 30 30 likes
In Wisconsin, the beating death in October of a Saudi student, Hussain Saeed Alnahdi, 24, who had been enrolled at the University of Wisconsin-Stout, is still unsolved. He was attacked outside a pizza restaurant, and the killing shocked the university campus where the 9,600 students include a tight-knit group of 142 from Saudi Arabia.


19 2016-11-10
Lafayette

Louisiana appeals court affirms $367,000 award in UL-Lafayette Police Department age discrimination case


A jury's finding that a longtime University of Louisiana at Lafayette Police Department employee was the victim of age discrimination has been affirmed by a divided state appeals court.

The jury, in East Baton Rouge Parish, awarded more than $367,000 to James Robinson, who was 66 when he retired with the rank of major in 2011 as second in command to UL-Lafayette Police Chief Joey Sturm.

Robinson had worked for the campus police department for 40 years.

A three-judge panel of the 1st Circuit Court of Appeal voted 2-1 Friday to affirm both the jury's unanimous age discrimination verdict and award of damages.

The University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors had appealed both to the Baton Rouge appellate court.

Robinson's attorney, Karl Bernard, said Wednesday he hopes the board won't appeal the case any further.

"He was proven to be right by the trial court and now by the appellate court," Bernard said.

The state Attorney General's Office, which is representing the UL System board, is considering its options, said Ruth Wisher, a spokeswoman for the office.

Dissenting 1st Circuit Judge Wayne Ray Chutz said the trial evidence was "simply insufficient" to support the jury's conclusion of liability under the federal or state age discrimination employment acts, or the amount of damages awarded.

Chutz said the awarding of $367,918 to Robinson was excessive and should have been reduced.

But Circuit Judges John Michael Guidry and Guy Holdridge said they found no error in the jury's determination of age discrimination by the UL-Lafayette Police Department.

"We find that the jury had conflicting evidence before it and apparently did not find credible defendant's explanation that Robinson voluntarily retired or that any adverse employment action taken against him was due to his insubordination," Guidry wrote.

Robinson claims he was forced to retire due to Sturm's elimination of his job duties and the chief's harassment of him.

Robinson received his first ever unsatisfactory job performance evaluation in early 2011, and the evidence custodian duties he had held since 1999 were ultimately turned over to another officer, the appeals court noted.

Sturm recommended disciplinary action against Robinson in March 2011 for failing to follow direct orders related to an evidence room audit and the transfer and transition of his responsibility as evidence custodian to the other officer, according to the court's ruling.

An evidence room audit had never been performed by anyone at the campus police department, the appeals court noted, and the department never had a problem producing evidence during Robinson's tenure as evidence custodian.

The proposed disciplinary action was rescinded after Robinson gave notice in May 2011 that he would retire in July of that year.

In his final months of service, Robinson was subjected to an internal affairs investigation over alleged missing evidence that was later located, and he was reassigned to patrol the New Iberia Research Center, where the university houses primates.

"It is undisputed that this assignment was not in conformity with his job description as a Police Major," Guidry wrote.

The judge acknowledged that Robinson continued to collect the same salary. Chutz said Robinson was paid $69,900 annually.




19 2016-11-10
Lafayette

UL student robbed of wallet, hijab near campus


A University of Louisiana at Lafayette student was robbed of her wallet and hijab Wednesday near campus.

Around 11 a.m. Wednesday in the 100 block of Smith Street, near St. Mary Boulevard and Johnston Street, a female UL student reported she was walking to class when a dark sedan approached her, according to public information officers with the UL Police and Lafayette Police departments.

Two white males got out of the car and hit the student, who fell to the ground. They took her wallet and her hijab, a head covering worn in public by some Muslim women, Billy Abrams, UL public information officer, said.

STORY FROM BANK OF AMERICA
Young Americans plan to vote with their pocketbooks
The victim said the men were wearing sweat pants and one wore a white hat or cap that had Trump on it, he said.

The suspects got back in their vehicle and drove off toward Johnston Street. The victim declined medical attention.

ADVERTISING

inRead invented by Teads

Cpl. Karl Ratcliff of the Lafayette Police Department added that the victim told investigators the suspects "were saying ugly stuff to her," but she did not specify.

So far, no witnesses or surveillance video have been located to assist police, he said.
19 2016-11-10
Regional/National

Women in hijabs on 2 campuses say they were attacked by men invoking Donald Trump


A Muslim student at San Diego State University was robbed and may have had her car stolen Wednesday by two men who made comments about President-elect Donald Trump and Muslims, according to police and university officials, who called the attack a hate crime.

In a separate incident Wednesday, a female student at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette was beaten, robbed and had her hijab ripped off by two men, one of them wearing a white “Trump” hat, police and university officials said.

The attacks occurred within hours of each other on a day marked by widespread protests over the Republican business mogul’s surprising victory against Hillary Clinton in Tuesday’s presidential election.

The SDSU student was walking to her car about 2:30 p.m. when two men accosted her in the stairwell of a campus parking building and “made comments about President-elect Donald Trump and the Muslim community,” campus police said in a statement. The men grabbed the woman’s purse and backpack, and removed her car keys before fleeing, police said.

The woman, who was not injured, left the area to report the attack, police said. When authorities arrived on the scene, they said, her car was missing.

Police described the suspects as a white male between 20 and 25 years old and a Hispanic male about the same age. Investigators are treating the incident as a hate crime, robbery and vehicle theft.

The SDSU Muslim Student Association said the victim was a Muslim student wearing a hijab and “full Islamic garb.” The group is planning a demonstration next week to protest Trump’s victory, saying his campaign has encouraged discrimination against blacks and Muslims.

“We are calling on all students, faculty, staff, and community members to come and show solidarity with our sister that was attacked and also stand against anti-Blackness, Islamophobia, and all other forms of discrimination that have become increasingly normalized during the campaign and now election of Donald Trump,” the group said on Facebook. “It is time we make it clear that the hate and racism of Donald Trump will not find a home in San Diego.”

CONTENT FROM ALLSTATE
What do millennials really care about?
A revealing survey of the generation that could swing the vote in this election.
University President Elliot Hirshman said in a statement that the victim appeared to have been targeted because of her Muslim faith.

“We condemn this hateful act and urge all members of our community to join us in condemning such hateful acts,” Hirshman said. “Hate crimes are destructive to the spirit of our campus and we urge all members of our community to stand together in rejecting hate.”

Hours earlier, Hirshman sent out a statement calling on members of the university to “ensure fair and equitable treatment of all members of our community” in the wake of the election, the independent student newspaper reported.

A strikingly similar attack was reported earlier in the day in Louisiana.

About 11 a.m., a female UL Lafayette student was walking to class when two white males stepped out of a dark sedan and hit her with a metal object, knocking her to the ground, university police told the Daily Advertiser and students. The men tore off the woman’s head wrap, took her wallet and hit her while she was down, police said. The woman reported one of the suspects was wearing a white hat that had “Trump” on it.

Authorities did not say whether the victim was Muslim, but a spokesperson for campus police told the Advertiser that she was wearing a hijab. Cpl. Karl Ratcliff of the Lafayette Police Department said the attackers “were saying ugly stuff to her,” but he did not elaborate, according to the Advertiser. An alert from campus police that circulated on social media said the men made “obscene comments.”

Kareem Attia, president of the Muslim Student Association at UL Lafayette, said the attack rattled the campus.

“No one wants this to happen, and it’s hitting home for us,” he told The Washington Post in an interview. “The idea that a person in your community could be targeted just for wearing a headscarf, which is part of our religion, it’s disgusting. It’s very un-American.”

Attia said Muslim and international students are “very integrated” at the university, which statistics show has a student body that is roughly two-thirds white. He described the students as generally religious and tolerant.

CONTENT FROM OPPENHEIMERFUNDS
It's time to invest in female workers
More women have jobs than ever before, but they still face barriers in the workplace.
“I don’t think that a campus that has such ties of religiosity could really stomach the idea of another religion being attacked,” Attia told The Post. “It’s like, I have a religion, you have another, and that’s sacred to both of us.”

Trump’s vows over the past year to ban, deport or use “extreme vetting” against Muslims entering the country has struck fear in many U.S. Muslims, who have faced a surge in hate crimes since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Those proposals, along with the president-elect’s repeated condemnations of Muslims on the campaign trail, have led some critics to accuse him of bringing anti-Islamic sentiment into the mainstream.

The incidents in San Diego and Louisiana come less than two weeks after a Saudi Arabian student at the University of Wisconsin-Stout was assaulted and killed near campus. Allegations spread online that the attack on 24-year-old Hussain Saeed Alnahdi may have been a hate crime, but police have yet to identify a motive or name a suspect in the case.
19 2016-11-09
Lafayette

Cajuns Clarify Branding Standards for Athletics


Today, the Louisiana Ragin’ Cajuns athletic department released revised branding standards for its athletic teams.
The official name of the University is the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. UL Lafayette will continue to be used when referring to the academic side of the University.
However, the athletic department today issued official standards for referring to the school as it pertains to athletics.
First reference (to be used by print media when referring to teams for the first time in a story) Louisiana
Nickname: Louisiana Ragin’ Cajuns
Abbreviation: LA is to be used for sports statistical purposes that require abbreviated characters. Previously, the Sun Belt Conference and others have used UL-L for those purposes.
The changes are effective retroactive to November 1.


Read More: Cajuns Clarify Athletic Branding Standards | http://espn1420.com/cajuns-clarify-branding-standards-for-athletics/?trackback=tsmclip
19 2016-11-08
Lafayette

24-year-old exchange student killed in Lafayette pedestrian crash


LAFAYETTE LA -
Lafayette Police say a foreign exchange student was killed in a pedestrian crash on Johnston Street.

Officers say the incident happened on the 3800 block of Johnston Street on Sunday November 6th. The pedestrian, identified as 24-year-old Rustam Nizamutdinov, was struck by a vehicle and died at the scene.

Officials say Nizamutdinov was a foreign exchange student at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.


19 2016-11-08
Lafayette

UL Lafayette's Beaux Arts Ball was on fire


The theme for this year's ball was fire and students definitely turned up the heat in their designs. These talented guys and girls created costumes to reflect the theme in this sizzling competition.


19 2016-11-04
Lafayette

Busy Week for UL Homecoming


It’s homecoming week at the university of Louisiana at Lafayette.
This weekend’s football game will be the Ragin’ Cajuns’ first home game on a Saturday in over a month.

Elementary schools across Lafayette Parish are painting the town red. This is one of the many activities to get everyone excited for the big homecoming game this weekend.

Painting The Town Red, a display of pride for the Ragin’ Cajuns, is one of the many activities for ul’s homecoming week.
It helps spreads school spirit across the community.
Mandi Fuselier and Monique Villien are both UL alumna and say that a lot of planning has gone into this 2016 homecoming week.
“This year we are really focusing on tradition and trying to get as many alumni and students back on campus to celebrate with us,” says Fuselier.
Yell Like Hell, a pep rally for students, will bring a rumble to Parc International Thursday night from 7:30- 10 pm.
Loud noises and music will be followed by a paint party in Downtown Lafayette.
As for Friday, everyone even pets, are expected to wear red.

Fuselier tells us that Friday is busy day too. “Friday we also have a tennis tournament, Downtown Alive pep rally, and we do a pub crawl right after Downtown Alive.”

Gameday kicks off with a 5k race at the Alumni Center, followed by a parade that’ll make its way through the campus.
Tents are already being set up by tailgaters at the stadium.
Christian hayes, a Junior at UL says his favorite part is tailgating for the football game. “There’s a lot of good food out there,” he adds.
The Ragin’ Cajuns will take on the ZIdaho Vandals 4pm Saturday at Cajun Field.


19 2016-11-03
Lafayette

2016 UL Career Day


VIDEO
19 2016-11-03
Lafayette

2016 Paint the Town Red


VIDEO
19 2016-11-03
Lafayette

2016 Paint the Town Red


VIDEO
19 2016-11-01
Associated Press

University providing aid to 110 flood-affected students


LAFAYETTE, LA.
A south Louisiana university says its distributing $65,000 to help 110 of its students overcome financial hardships brought on by the August floods.

The University of Louisiana at Lafayette made the announcement in a Monday news release.

DeWayne Bowie, vice president for Enrollment Management at ULL, says each qualified student will receive at least $500 applied toward their tuition or other educational expenses.

To qualify, students had to submit applications and copies of Federal Emergency Management Agency documentation to demonstrate their need. A committee reviewed the applications.


19 2016-11-01
Lafayette

UL Homecoming kickoff


LAFAYETTE LA -
Homecoming festivities kicked off this morning at the UL Lafayette Alumni Center. Alumni, students, and football fans won't have to wait until the Ragin' Cajuns face off against the Idaho Vandals for homecoming fun.
The week will begin with the Food Truck Roundup. Seven food trucks will sell a range of treats, from barbecue to frozen custard. The roundup will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Participating vendors are: Blanchard's BBQ, The Bus Stop, Buster's Frozen Custard, Cacklin Hens, Kona Ice of Acadiana, Mad LuAnn's, and Rice Kings. The women's boutique Adorn will set up a station where items such as jewelry and accessories will be sold.
During the food truck roundup, the University's Office of Career Services will team with One Acadiana to host Welcome Home Acadiana. A tent will be set up near the Alumni Center. Representatives of 10 local companies will offer career advice, distribute information, and accept résumés from alums.


19 2016-11-01
Lafayette

Activities abound for UL Homecoming Week


A slew of Homecoming Week events are on tap for alumni, students and football fans leading up to Saturday's homecoming game between the Ragin’ Cajuns and the University of Idaho.

Kickoff will be at 4 p.m. Saturday at Cajun Field, but not before pep rallies, parades, tailgating and activities such as karaoke, and tennis and golf tournaments.

Here's a look at Homecoming 2016 events:

Tuesday
• Ragin' Cajun Karaoke, Cajundome Convention Center, 7 p.m.

Wednesday
• Cajuns Can Care Food Drive, Alumni Center, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.
• Wear Red, Get Fed, Boucher Street, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
• Alumni Night at the Museum, Hilliard University Art Museum, 5:30 p.m.

Thursday
• Yell Like Hell Pep Rally, Parc International, 7:30 to 10 p.m.


THE ADVERTISER
Cajuns Baseball announces 2017 slate

Friday
• Tennis tournament, Red Lerille's Health and Racquet Club, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
• Bill Bass Open Golf Tournament, Vieux Chenes Golf Course, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
• Homecoming Pep Rally at Downtown Alive!, Parc Sans Souci, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.

ADVERTISING

inRead invented by Teads

Saturday
• Ragin' Road Race 5K, Alumni Center, 8 a.m.
• Open House, Alumni Center, 9 to 11 a.m.
• Homecoming Parade, viewing at Alumni Center, 10 a.m., Parade begins at Blackham Coliseum and ends on St. Mary Boulevard near the Alumni Center.
• Zydeco Brunch, Cypress Lake Dining Hall, Student Union, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
• Cajun Walk, Reinhardt Drive, 1:35 p.m.
• Pride of Acadiana Marching Band pregame performance, Cajun Field, 3:45 p.m.
• Louisiana Ragin' Cajuns vs. Idaho Vandals, Cajun Field, 4 p.m.


19 2016-10-31
Lafayette

UL-Lafayette shows high school students that science can be fun


Hundreds of high school students arrived at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette campus Friday morning for the annual Science Day and discovered the university's programs can open the door to interesting careers ... and it can be fun.

“I remember as a high school student that I wanted to be a college student. I couldn’t wait to do that, and I was so curious about how that would feel and what that would be like,” said Patricia Mire, a biology professor at UL-Lafayette who was instrumental in putting together the event. “So this gives them a chance to have a day to experience life as a college student, particularly a student in the College of Sciences.”

Students were given tours of all the science departments at the university and received demonstrations of what college students did through experiments that ranged from blowing up pumpkins using acetylene gas to creating jack-o’-lanterns in the chemistry labs to allowing students to use a Van de Graaff generator to gather static electricity in the halls of the physics lab to harmlessly shock classmates.

“That was really, really cool,” said Chase Wilkerson, a student at David Thibodaux STEM Magnet Academy, after using the Van de Graaff generator. “I had never felt a shock like that. I didn’t know static could get that strong. My hair was standing up like when you use a balloon.”

Amelia Larroque, a junior at Catholic High of New Iberia, said she the program helped her and her friends learn more about college life and possible careers after graduation.

“It’s an awesome way to be exposed to science in college,” said Larroque. “I didn’t know half of the things you could do with a physics degree.”

Their biology teacher, Lisa Hebert, said the event “opens (her students') eyes to all the possibilities that science can give them for their future.”

UL-Lafayette students also took part in Science Day by teaching small classes and giving demonstrations of interesting hands-on experiments the high school students could do if they pursued a degree in the sciences.

Such experiments include liquefying a student’s breath inside a balloon using liquid nitrogen and setting up a telescope in the quadrangle to let students study the sun without harming their eyes.

“Science Day is important because I wish someone would have told me science was fun when I was in high school,” said Alyssa Bienvenu, a chemistry and mathematics student at UL-Lafayette who was teaching one of the classes with the help of her fellow college students dressed as witches or mad scientists.

Science Day was organized not just as a way to expose high school students to college life and the sciences, but also as a way to drum up interest in the university as a whole.

“It’s become a much more competitive endeavor to get students to register as undergraduates at particular universities and particular programs,” explained Mire. “We are competing with LSU and colleges out of state. It’s important to show the students what we have to offer, which, for our university, is really quite impressive.”

Last year’s program had just over 600 students attend and several schools did not show up despite registering to participate. This year, students and faculty from the Ray P. Authement College of Sciences, welcomed more than 700 students, teachers and parents from over a dozen regional high schools and opened up their labs and classrooms to let these potential future Ragin’ Cajuns experience a “day in the life” of a UL-Lafayette student. All schools that registered participated. The event lasted from 7:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. and was sponsored by Halliburton, which allowed the students and schools to register free of charge.

Mire said the program can help both the futures of students and the university.

“A lot of (these students) have not made up their minds on what they want to major in,” Mire said. “This gives them an opportunity to see what science has to offer them, in general, and, more specifically, what area of science they might want to pursue. It’s a great experience all around.”
19 2016-10-28
Lafayette

Ernest Gaines discussion at UL


A University of Pennsylvania scholar discussed how best-selling author Ernest Gaines uses aspects of folklore and oral storytelling in his fiction.

Dr. Thadious M. Davis, a professor of English, spoke during the fourth annual Ernest J. Gaines Lecture Series.

Gaines is writer-in-residence emeritus at UL Lafayette.

"In his fiction, people often give renditions of their lives and histories. The vehicle that moves the story forward in all of Gaines' work is conversation," said Cheylon Woods, director of the Gaines Center.

Davis teaches courses about African-American literature and Southern literature. She has published widely on Gaines and lectured internationally.

This summer, Davis was among a panel of lecturers who participated in a nationally funded summer institute, titled "Ernest J. Gaines and the Southern Experience," that was hosted by the Gaines Center.
The Gaines Center is an international center for scholarship on the writer and his fiction.

Gaines was a faculty member at the University for 21 years before he retired in 2004. His literary career, which includes nine works of fiction, began in 1964, with the publication of "Catherine Carmier."

His "The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman," is a first-person narrative of a fictional 110-year-old woman born into slavery. Published in 1971, it earned the writer a widespread audience, critical acclaim and was adapted into a TV movie that won nine Emmy Awards.

"A Lesson Before Dying," about an illiterate man condemned to death that was published in 1993, won a National Book Critics Circle Award. The novel was selected for Oprah Winfrey's popular book club. Gaines received a National Medal of Arts in 2013 at the White House.

The Gaines lecture was free and open to the public.
19 2016-10-28
Lafayette

UL announces Homecoming Court


Courtney Bergeron, a senior majoring in public relations, is the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s 2016 Homecoming queen.

Maids on the Homecoming Court are Oluwakemi Ajala of Lafayette; Katelyn Bayhi of Lafayette; Katie Frith of Kaplan, La.; Megan Parfait of Lafayette: Kristen Petitjean of Lafayette; and Kayla “Katie” Wappel of Springfield, Ill. Nominees for the court are submitted by UL Lafayette student organizations. Senior Louisiana Ragin’ Cajun football players choose the court after nominees have been interviewed.

The Homecoming Court will be featured on a float in the annual Homecoming Parade that begins at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Nov. 5. Later that day, the court will be presented on the football field during halftime of the Homecoming game. The Ragin’ Cajuns will square off against the Idaho Vandals at 4 p.m.

Bergeron was nominated for the Homecoming Court by the Black Male Leadership Association.

She is a tour guide and member of the social media team for UL Lafayette’s Office of Admissions. She is a member of Delta Delta Delta Sorority, National Society of Leadership and Success, UL Public Relations Student Society of America and Ragin’ Cajun Catholics. Bergeron is also a lead mentor with UL Lafayette Peer Mentors.

Bergeron was named UL Lafayette Outstanding Freshman of the Year in 2014 and graduated from the Alpha Class of the UL Lafayette Emerging Leaders Summit in 2015.

She is a previous Walt Disney World entertainment cast member as part of the Disney College Program.

She has been a volunteer for St. Joseph Diner, Acadiana Center for the Arts, and New Hope Tutoring Program. This year, Bergeron was Festival International de Louisiane’s social media manager; she’s also a member of the organization’s Marketing Committee.

She is the daughter of Patrick and Cassi Bergeron of Luling, La.

Oluwakemi Ajala, a senior majoring in chemical engineering, was nominated by the National Society of Black Engineers. She’s public relations chair of that group.

Ajala is student vice president of Phi Kappa Phi, and a member of the African Student Association, American Institute of Chemical Engineers and the Society of Women Engineers. She is a previous chapter president of Tau Beta Pi, a previous College of Engineering senator with the Student Government Association, a previous associate ambassador for UL Engineering Ambassadors, and previous vice president of the International Student Council Executive Board.

She is a volunteer for New Hope Tutoring and for Festival International de Louisiane.

Ajala is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Shola Ajala of Lagos, Nigeria.

Katelyn Bayhi, a senior majoring in public relations and criminal justice, was nominated by Kappa Delta Sorority. She is the sorority’s pledge class coordinator, and has held several of its leadership offices.

Bayhi has been an active member of the Student Government Association. She is vice president of the Criminal Justice Society and a member of the National Society for Leadership and Success and Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society.

Bayhi volunteered with flood relief programs after historic flooding in Louisiana this year.

She is the daughter of Paul and Judy Bayhi of Baton Rouge, La.

Katie Frith, a senior majoring in biology, was nominated for the court by Students for the Autism Society. She is president of that organization.

Frith is also a member of UL Lafayette’s Pre-Professional Society and the National Society of Leadership and Success. She has been a volunteer with football game day operations and with Science Day on campus.

Her community service includes volunteering with the Pediatric Department of Women’s and Children’s Hospital. Frith has been a Maltrait Memorial Catholic School and Mount Carmel Elementary volunteer basketball coach.

She is the daughter of Clint and Trisha Frith of Kaplan, La.

Megan Parfait, a senior majoring in chemistry, was nominated by the Interfraternity Council.

She is a member of Phi Mu sorority and vice president of programming on the executive board of the Panhellenic Council. An Honors student, she is president of the College of Sciences for the Student Government Association and a member of the National Society of Leadership and Success.

Parfait has tutored students and has been a volunteer for Habitat for Humanity and for FoodNet.

Parfait is the daughter of Sheila and Brett Cooley of Lafayette.

Kristen Petitjean, a senior majoring in psychology and public relations, was nominated by the Honors Program. She has been an Honors Program Board member since 2015.

Petitjean is a founding member of Alpha Delta Pi Sorority, and a member of the Student Orientation Staff and the Big Event executive board. She is also a member of many other organizations, including Phi Beta Delta Honor Society, the Psychology Colloquium and the Residence Hall Association.

Petijean has performed over 200 service hours at area festivals.

She is the daughter of Brian and Carol Petitjean of Rayne, La.

Kayla “Katie” Wappel, a junior majoring in business informatics, was nominated by the Student Government Association. She is a College of Sciences senator for SGA and was named SGA’s 2015-16 Outstanding College President.

Wappel is vice president of Communications for Alpha Omicron Pi. She has held several leadership offices with the UL Lafayette Honors Program and is a member of the Student Leadership Council and the Panhellenic Council Executive Board.

She was UL Lafayette Ragin Recognition’s 2016 Outstanding Sophomore.

Wappel is the daughter of Paul and Patsy Wappel of Springfield, Ill.
19 2016-10-28
Lafayette

UL athletes bring Halloween surprise to patients


UL athletes bring Halloween surprise to patients
19 2016-10-28
Lafayette

Cajuns helping football player raise money for mother's funeral


LAFAYETTE -

The UL Athletic Department is helping a Ragin' Cajun football player during a time of grief and need.

Cajuns defensive back Kamar Greenhouse's mother, Allison, died Tuesday. She was 43 and a single mother to Kamar and his three siblings.

The athletic department has started a GoFundMe account to help Greenhouse raise money to pay for his mother's funeral. To make a donation, click here.
19 2016-10-27
Lafayette

Halloween concert boosts UL Symphony


When Michael Blaney started conducting the University of Louisiana at Lafayette Symphony orchestra 21 years ago, the program needed help. Few knew it existed and students barely participated.

But Blaney hit on a winning idea — a Halloween concert. The effects are still being felt more than two decades later.

“I thought this could be an idea to get people really excited about the group,” said Blaney. “It definitely worked. People think a Halloween concert sounds like fun and more people do join the group.

“We’ve had a packed auditorium at Angelle Hall every year since it started. It’s a really fun show. We do something different every year.”

Blaney said he hopes for another sold-out crowd when the UL Lafayette Symphony hosts its annual Halloween Concert at 7:30 p.m. Friday at Angelle Hall. Ticket proceeds help the school’s orchestra program.


THE ADVERTISER
Stage Backers give actors a financial hand

The annual concert has become a classical music and Halloween party. Audience members are encouraged to wear costumes. Symphony musicians dress up as their favorite characters.

The Halloween concerts have accomplished their mission. The symphony now features 75 members, which include 50 students, along with community musicians who are amateurs, professionals, retirees and high school students.

Other participants in this year’s concert include the UL Lafayette Chorale and Lafayette Ballet Theatre, who will perform to Edvard Grieg’s “In the Hall of the Mountain King.” The UL Dancers perform to Johannes’ “Hungarian Dance No. 5.” The Ragin’ Cajun Women’s Choir participate in “Che faceste? Dite su.”

Music from “Macbeth,” “Spider-Man,” “Harry Potter” and “West Side Story” will also be featured.


THE ADVERTISER
Metoyer, Huval earning their time to shine

“The music is classical pieces that anybody who comes to this concert is going to recognize, whether it’s been in commercials, TV or a movie,” said Blaney. “People will know a lot of them.”

Want to go?

What: UL Lafayette Symphony Halloween Concert

When: 7:30 p.m., Friday

Where: Angelle Hall, 601 E. St. Mary Blvd.

Tickets: $8, free for ages 17 and younger and UL students, faculty and staff with ID

Information: 337-482-6012


19 2016-10-27
Lafayette

High school parents invited to financial aid info session


The Lafayette Parish School System will host its first High School Parent Financial Aid Night at 6 p.m. Wednesday.

This event will be in the UL Union Ballroom, on the campus of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

Free parking will be available in the E.K. Long Gym parking lot, across from Girard Park, as well as the Girard Park Circle, behind the UL Alumni House.

Guest speaker will be Kristina Ellis, author of “How to Graduate Debt Free” and “Confessions of a Scholarship Winner.”

There also will be breakout sessions for parents of students in all high school grades. These sessions will be led by UL personnel and members of the Louisiana Education Loan Authority.

The event is being sponsored by LPSS Student Services, Gear Up and UL.
19 2016-10-27
Lafayette

Making the Turn: Supporters see plan for UL golf facility coming to fruition


When George Peppard played Hannibal Smith on the old “The A-Team” television show, his catch phrase was “I love it when a plan comes together.”

That’s how most felt Monday afternoon during the official groundbreaking ceremony for UL golf’s first practice and home facility at Oakbourne Country Club.

Mostly, though, that’s how Theo Sliman, Brad Mosing, Cliff Wagner and Jeff D’Amico must have felt Monday. It was that quartet that first sat around a table in the grill at Oakbourne and formulated a plan that officially came to fruition with the ceremonial turning of dirt and the beginning of construction over the next couple of weeks.

“That was 15 months ago,” said Sliman, the Cajuns’ golf coach. “It seems like a long time ago, and there were some times that I wasn’t sure this was going to happen. But so many people did so much work to make this a reality.”

DETAILS:Learn more about the UL golf facility

Wagner is Oakbourne’s long-time head professional and has never had a true teaching facility. D’Amico, a member of Oakbourne’s board of directors, was also then involved in the planning of the now-active Vermilion Links support group for Cajun golf.

But Mosing was the trigger man. His generous contribution, and a matching one from his father Don Mosing, provided the bulk of the funds — $400,000 between the two — to get the facility moving. The Vermilion Links then kicked in $250,000 — $5,000 apiece from its first 50 founding members — to provide the rest of the funding.

Many others have been involved, and even after the financing was in place, there were a lot of hurdles to be cleared. Mostly, it was the details of an extended agreement between the university, a public entity, and Oakbourne, a private company.

“You have to give a special thanks to Oakbourne and its members,” said UL president Dr. Joseph Savoie, “for continuing to support the university. One of the primary responsibilities of a university is to provide the tools and the latest technologies for our students, and the same goes for our student-athletes. This facility will provide that.”

Joe Giglio III, president of Oakbourne, gave Sliman and Wagner credit for coming up with the concepts that will be incorporated into the 4,000-square-foot pair of buildings.

“Cliff and Theo have worked tirelessly on the details of making this building great,” Giglio said. “It’s going to help both the UL players and Oakbourne members for years to come.”

Sliman and Wagner’s ideas were turned into plans by local architect and long-time Cajun supporter Knobbie Langlinais, and as of Monday’s groundbreaking the Thompson Bros. Construction Co. and Buzzy and John Thompson are tasked with making the building a reality. Construction is scheduled to take six to seven months, which would put completion close to the end of the Cajuns’ spring season.

Bill Bass upcoming

There’s only one more week to get entries in for the annual Bill Bass Open, UL’s annual Homecoming golf tournament that is scheduled for one week from Friday. The Nov. 4 four-person scramble is set one day before the Ragin’ Cajun football team takes on Idaho in the annual Homecoming game.

All proceeds from the tournament go directly to support the Ragin’ Cajun golf team, whose members will be on hand during the event and will hit shots with each participating team.

Entry blanks are available at all area golf courses, and players who have participated in the tournament in the last three years should have received an entry blank by mail. In addition, members of the Ragin’ Cajun Athletic Foundation received an entry form and information in this month’s online newsletter.

An entry form is available at ragincajuns.com on the golf page by clicking on “Additional Links.” Players who enter online may pay entry fees on tournament day.

The four-person scramble event features availabilities for morning and afternoon shotgun starts, with play beginning at 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. in the two waves. Registration begins 90 minutes before each tee time, and lunch will be served after play for the morning wave and before play for the afternoon session.

Snacks and beverages will be available on the course, and there will also be special “Homecoming” holes in play throughout the round.

This year for the first time, RCAF members will get a bonus, with those members paying a $125 entry fee per player. Regular entry fee is $150 per player or $600 per team. Players may make up their own four-person team or may enter as individuals to be paired up on teams, and a team handicap index will be used so that all players have a chance at the Cajun-themed prizes that go to winning squads.

More information on the Bill Bass Open is available by calling (337) 857-8754.

State Seniors success

Several local players finished near the top of the leader board in both divisions of last weekend’s state Senior Amateur Championship conducted by the Louisiana Golf Association, but the overall winner was Oakbourne Country Club.

The event had to be delayed several weeks after the August flooding that ravaged Acadiana and other points in South Louisiana, but instead of heading for higher ground the LGA delayed the championships until mid-October to provide time for the course and the area to recover.

It turned out to be a good move, since the course drew rave reviews from virtually all the players taking part. Many of them came from areas who were hit by the flood waters, so they had an appreciation for the efforts that went into getting the course back in championship condition.

Monroe’s Ken Buchan took the overall title, edging first and second-round leader Grady Brame of Hammond by one stroke with a three-under-par 69 in Saturday’s final round of the state’s premier event for players age 50 and over.

RELATED: State Senior champion has impressive background

Three Lafayette players finished in the individual top 10, including former State Amateur champion and two-time State Senior runner-up Robert Shelton who had a Saturday 77 and finished sixth with a 225 score. Bill Land was two more strokes back in eighth at 227 but joined Buchan as the only players to go under-par Saturday with a one-under 71, while Brad Mosing finished with an 80 after going 73-75 in his first two rounds and tied for ninth at 228.

Lafayette’s Dwayne Brown tied for 12th at 233 and Youngsville’s Dennis Smith, also a former State Senior runner-up, tied for 14th at 234.

In the Super Seniors division for players 65 and over, there was also a strong local contingent among the leaders. Bill Kallam of Lafayette finished fifth with a 76-81—157 score, while the Lafayette pair of Mark Tolson and Tony Vicknair were one spot back and tied for sixth at 159. Lafayette’s Les Bradley also hit the top dozen, finishing 11th at 78-85 – 163.

More LGA stuff

It’s more than a year away, but the local area will host the LGA’s two premier adult events during its 2018 championship season. Oakbourne will be the host course for the LGA’s State Amateur Championships June 7-10, and Le Triomphe will be the site of the State Mid-Amateur (age 25 and over) Championships Aug. 3-5.

Next year’s Senior Amateur tournament will move to a May event and will be played at Southern Trace in Shreveport on May 18-20. Other key 2017 sites include the State Amateur June 8-11 at the Country Club of Louisiana in Baton Rouge, the Mid-Amateur Aug. 4-6 at City Park in New Orleans, and the Junior Amateur July 12-14 at Tchefuncta Country Club in Covington.

Acadiana pro-am

The next outing for the Acadiana Pro-Am Tour, sponsored by Community First Bank, is next Thursday, Nov. 3, at Squirrel Run. Tour events are open to all golfers regardless of ability with handicaps used to provide balanced competition, and players may make up their own foursomes for play. Tee times are available during the week of the event, and more information is available by calling (337) 367-0863.

Vieux Chenes seniors

The Vieux Chenes Seniors Association will double up its tournaments this month and will hold a second October event Thursday (tomorrow) at Les Vieux Chenes. The events are open to all senior players, with registration at 7:30 a.m. and a shotgun start at 8 a.m.

More information is available at Les Vieux Chenes or by calling 837-1159.

Baseball golf

UL baseball’s annual fundraiser tournament to raise funds for the program is just over one week away on Monday, Nov. 7, at Le Triomphe. The four-person scramble tournament has lunch and registration at 11 a.m. prior to a noon shotgun start, and entry fee is $250 per person or $1,000 for a team. Entries and other information are available from the Chitimacha Louisiana Open office at 593-8000 or by e-mailing Danny Jones at djones@laopen.com.

Aces

Josh Smith finally matched his father’s achievement on Sunday, when he used an Adams Tight Lies 5-iron and a Bridgestone ball to hole out on the 162-yard third hole at Les Vieux Chenes. “I’ve been playing Vieux Chenes since I was a kid,” the 27-year-old eight-handicapper said. “My dad has always bragged about his ace while playing for Comeaux High.” Smith clubbed up to the 5-iron into the wind but didn’t see it land, and was looking in the rough behind the green when playing partner Wade Rodriguez told him it was in the hole. “I was on the phone with my dad even before Wade putted,” he said.

Les Vieux Chenes also had a hole-in-one on Friday. Ken Theriot of Lafayette used a 6-iron to ace the 148-yard seventh hole. The 66-year-old Theriot was in a group with Louis Richard, Aaron Hollier and Tom Surhoff.

“Making the Turn” appears each Wednesday from February-November in the Daily Advertiser. Clubs, courses and individuals with information about local golf events may email Dan McDonald, editorial director at Golfballs.com, at danmcdonald@cox.net, FAX to (337) 857-8763 or call (337) 857-8754 and leave a message with phone number.


19 2016-10-27
Lafayette

Fundraising held for late UL Lafayette student


In education news, we have information about a scholarship at UL Lafayette for students majoring in Kinesiology.

And, it’s easy to win because a student’s grades and academic accomplishments aren’t a major factor.

This scholarship honors the life and legacy of David Trosclair, a former Kinesiology major, who died suddenly in 2010.

To help raise funds for this scholarship here’s what you can do:
Buy a $10 ticket to win a custom designed cruise for 2. Another fun part, that same ticket gets you a free car wash at any of the three locations of Todd’s car wash or dessert and coffee at Indulge.

David’s mother, Carol Trosclair, says when other K-P-A members reach their goals in higher education, her son’s legacy continues through their success.

For ticket information, call Carol at 337-255-8155.

Top News
19 2016-10-27
Lafayette

State and local school district pool resources to educate future college students about financial aid opportunities


LAFAYETTE, La. (KLFY) Paying for college can be hard on any family and tonight educators teamed up to shed some light on dealing with that financial burden.

The Lafayette Parish School System along with Gear Up and U-L Lafayette helped parents financially prepare their teenagers for college with a financial aid information night at the U-L Lafayette student ballroom.

Parents of students in high schools throughout Acadiana were invited to attend.

They received vital information on the resources available to pay for college.

Author Kristina Ellis spoke at tonight’s meeting about paying for college all on her own.

Ellis says learning the ins-outs of financial aid contributed greatly to her success.


19 2016-10-27
Lafayette

Students weigh-in on the pros and cons of Constitutional Amendment No. 2


LAFAYETTE, La. (KLFY) – The long battle over who should regulate the cost of higher education in Louisiana may soon come to end. On November 8, Constitutional Amendment No. 2 is up for a vote.

According to the Public Affairs Research Council of Louisiana, a vote for the amendment would allow higher education management boards to be the decision maker when it comes to tuition and fees for public universities and colleges.

The basics of Constitutional Amendment No. 2 is quite simple – yes or no — should state legislators continue to have a hand in the price of higher education. Some believe it would be difficult to hold a board member accountable. “If we leave it with our elected officials and if they keep raising our school tuition, then we always have the option of voting them out,” says student Phillip Wortman.

“Leaving it with the universities would leave more room for corruption,” adds student Clint Guillory. University of Louisiana at Lafayette Political Science Professor Dr. Pearson Cross says the state Board of Regents that would do the tuition setting would be appointed by the governor and thus keeping politics at the table.

“The question is what’s best for the student, what’s best for the higher education and the state, and what’s going to make our system run better?” says Dr. Cross,

Dr. Cross says there’s also the concern the price of education would increase too much with a university board; that lower income students would be priced out. Some believe keeping public lawmakers at the helm would help control that.
“Some people have said we need that. We are a state where there are lots and lots of people who are poor, who are lower income, and they need someone looking out for them and keeping tuitions low,” explains Cross.

With every no there’s a yes. Some people support universities and colleges price setting even if that would perhaps include different rates for different degrees like engineering or nursing. Keep in mind, a school short on funds could be a school lacking in services.

“I feel like lawmakers shouldn’t have the right to tell universities what it should be,” says a student.

“I say we should leave it with the state because if we leave it with universities they will probably try to ante it up a little bit. That’s in my opinion,” says a student.


19 2016-10-26
Lafayette

High school parents invited to financial aid info session


The Lafayette Parish School System will host its first High School Parent Financial Aid Night at 6 p.m. Wednesday.

This event will be in the UL Union Ballroom, on the campus of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

Free parking will be available in the E.K. Long Gym parking lot, across from Girard Park, as well as the Girard Park Circle, behind the UL Alumni House.

Guest speaker will be Kristina Ellis, author of “How to Graduate Debt Free” and “Confessions of a Scholarship Winner.”

There also will be breakout sessions for parents of students in all high school grades. These sessions will be led by UL personnel and members of the Louisiana Education Loan Authority.

The event is being sponsored by LPSS Student Services, Gear Up and UL
19 2016-10-25
Lafayette

Construction to begin soon on state-of-the-art golf training facility for UL-Lafayette and community


The ceremonial dirt was thrown Monday, so it shouldn’t be long before actual construction begins on a first-ever home facility for the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s golf team.

That’s the hope of the Ragin’ Cajun squad and the members of Oakbourne Country Club, all of whom will reap the benefits of a $600,000 project providing office and locker-room space for the Cajun program and an all-weather practice facility for both UL-Lafayette and Oakbourne members.

“This is a win for golf,” Cajun coach Theo Sliman said at Monday's groundbreaking ceremony for the 4,000-square-foot facility next to Oakbourne’s current driving range. “It’s really an historic day for us.”

Approximately 100 UL-Lafayette supporters, including the current Ragin’ Cajun team, were on hand for the ceremony for the long-proposed facility, which is the result of a collaboration among the university, the athletic department, the UL-Lafayette Foundation, the Ragin’ Cajun Athletic Foundation and Oakbourne.

“We had to have the vision, the passion and the expertise from all these parties to make this happen,” said UL-Lafayette director of athletics Scott Farmer.

The facility will include two connected buildings, one of which will be a technology-loaded teaching area featuring three all-weather hitting bays. One bay will be reserved for long-time Oakbourne pro Cliff Wagner and the club membership, with the other two for use by the Cajun squad, whose players also automatically become Oakbourne members under terms of the agreement.

Oakbourne president Joe Giglio III said the equipment in those areas will be state-of-the-art.

“Today’s technology for golf and teaching golf is just amazing,” he said.

“The game has changed so much, and players are looking at numbers a lot and using visualization with cameras,” said Cajun senior golfer Thomas Strandemo, of Fargo, North Dakota. “The young guys on our team and the players that will be here in the future will be able to track those numbers throughout their careers.”

The other half of the building will include coaches’ offices, a lobby and a first-ever locker room for the Cajun players.

“Winning teams always have great chemistry,” Strandemo said. “Having a locker room that we can call our own will be a part of building that chemistry.”

Construction of the facility was made possible by two $200,000 contributions from Oakbourne member and Cajun supporter Brad Mosing, and his father, Don Mosing. An additional $250,000 was raised by 60 founding members of the Vermilion Links club, the newly-created support organization for Cajun golf.

“This project wouldn’t have teed off if not for Brad and his father, Don,” said Wayne Elmore, past RCAF chairman and co-campaign chair for UL-Lafayette’s Athletic Master Plan.

Those lead gifts were in keeping with family connections within the Cajun program. Sliman’s father, Teddy, also served as UL-Lafayette golf coach, and his stint as team mentor was sandwiched between Cajun coaching legends and father-son Bill and Bob Bass. One donation by former player Brett Overman was for naming rights for the coach’s office, which he has designated as “The Coach Bass Office” to honor the two.

“There’s 50 years of just two names,” Theo Sliman said. “That’s a testament to the culture we have in south Louisiana. They honor us by what they have done, and we are honored to have this as a home and we will be proud of it.”

Local architect and long-time Cajun supporter Knobbie Langlinais designed the facility, which will match the current Oakbourne clubhouse in exterior design. John and Buzzy Thompson of Thompson Bros. Construction will build the facility, a project expected to take six to seven months to complete.


19 2016-10-24
Lafayette

UL-Lafayette bookstore commits to stocking fair-trade apparel made by workers receiving living wages


After a student-driven campaign for socially conscious clothing, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette bookstore has committed to carrying fair-trade apparel.

The university’s chapter of Catholic Relief Services Student Ambassadors, an organization that addresses human rights issues, had been advocating for the change.

Amélie Desormeaux, CRS president and a senior international relations major, said her organization had made consumer consciousness a key goal this semester.

“Essentially, what we are saying is that every purchasing act is a moral act,” she said. “It’s not just this moral transaction — it’s a human transaction. I am buying the goods that human hands have gone into making.”

The bookstore has committed to working with Alta Gracia Apparel, a Dominican Republic-based clothing company with a mission to pay living wages to its workers. It is owned by Knights Apparel, a college-logo apparel company based in Spartanburg, South Carolina.

Charlie Bier, communications specialist for UL-Lafayette, said in an email statement that Alta Gracia has entered the licensing process with the school, which would enable the company to produce official UL-Lafayette apparel.

“The university-owned Ragin’ Cajuns Store has committed to place a merchandise order once Alta Gracia is licensed,” he said.

Wil Perkins, the university’s Student Government Association president, said although the initial order will not replace a significant amount of apparel already carried, the bookstore may order more if the products are well-received by students.

SPONSORED CONTENT ON THE ADVOCATE
How the NFL Is Making a Crucial Catch Off the Field
How the NFL Is Making a Crucial Catch Off the Field
BY NFL
Desormeaux said because of brand loyalty — and Adidas’ support for the Ragin’ Cajuns football team as its official apparel sponsor — she does not see Alta Gracia overtaking any others provided currently.

“We really just want that third to be cutting into their order — not get rid of them completely,” she said. “People are very dedicated to those brands, so we’re not going to even try to ask about that.”

Desormeaux said Catholic Relief Services Student Ambassadors has garnered support from other student organizations such as Spanish Club, The Muslim Student Association and SGA.

“When we sat down and deliberated, we saw that there was no negative side to what they’re asking,” Perkins said. “They weren’t looking to take away brands from the bookstore or anything like that; they were asking to add a brand, offering more to students," all for a good cause.


19 2016-10-24
Lafayette

UL-Lafayette Symphony Orchestra to perform its annual costumed Halloween concert on Oct. 28


Sometimes Michael Blaney doesn't know if he's cueing his first-chair French horn player or a cast member of "The Walking Dead."

"I see a zombie sitting there, and I don't quite know who it is," he says. "It's hard to keep a straight face sometimes."

Members of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette Symphony Orchestra also might have some difficulty recognizing their conductor at their annual Halloween concert at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28. Everyone shows up in costume, and Blaney never reveals his Halloween disguise before the concert.

"Last year, I showed up as Aladdin because we were performing music from 'Aladdin,' ” Blaney says. "And this year, well, they won't know who or what I'll be until I step on the podium. … It's always a surprise."

The audience also is invited to get in on the fun, coming in their own Halloween attire.

"This is, by far, our most popular concert of the year," Blaney says. "And we play music that's recognizable to everyone. Even if they don't know the titles of the classical pieces, they've heard them in movies or commercials or cartoons."

This year's lineup includes Edvard Grieg's "In the Hall of the Mountain King"; music from Danny Elfman's film score for "Spiderman"; music from John Williams's film score for "Harry Potter"; Maurice Ravel's "Pavane for a Dead Princess"; Johannes Brahms' "Hungarian Dance No. 5"; and Leonard Bernstein's "Mambo" from "West Side Story."

Rounding out the night will be guest appearances by the UL-Lafayette choirs, the UL-Lafayette dance department and the Lafayette Ballet Theatre.

"Everyone in these groups will also be in costume," Blaney says. "It's always interesting to see what the students come up with. They're so creative with their costumes."


19 2016-10-24
Lafayette

McKinley Street transformed for the day as part of latest "Better Block" event


University of Louisiana at Lafayette students, city-parish government employees and community group members temporarily gave McKinley Street a makeover Saturday, transforming it into a family-friendly hub.

At noon, a couple blocks of the street known for bars like the Loose Caboose and Bolt reopened with a dog park, street market and outdoor café, as well as permanent string lights over the street. The otherwise four-lane street was reduced to two lanes, with potted trees lining the new boundaries. A trolley transported people from UL-Lafayette to the "Better Block" event, as well as on to the Boudin Cook-Off downtown.

Elizabeth “EB” Brooks, a chairwoman for the Freetown-Port Rico neighborhood Coterie, said the temporary changes on the street are intended to inspire long-term improvements. Lafayette has been home to several "Better Block" campaigns, which aim to revitalize particular corridors.

“It’s just envisioning the future and trying to figure out how to make McKinley Street everything that all these different residents and users want instead of one place you go for Saturday night,” she said.

The building that once held the Keg was transformed into a pumpkin patch, a place where the Children’s Museum of Acadiana set up bubble-blowing and craft stations. A live mural was installed adjacent to the Loose Caboose and people could paint and try their hand at a chalk-drawing contest. At a performance stage, Dustin Gaspard, Hunter deBlanc, Shrugs, Social Circle, Toonces and Grand Nathaniel & The Ghosts performed.

The event ended with a viewing of the UL-Lafayette game against Texas State University projected on an inflatable screen.

Along with temporary changes, the event also introduced the McKinley Street Saturday Market, which will be held every Saturday afternoon through the end of the year at 205 McKinley St. In addition, Lafayette Utilities Services installed permanent string light fixtures over the street.

Brooks said the event was a demonstration of a “complete street,” or one that would be appealing to a wide variety of people during different times of day.

“We have really high hopes in this neighborhood that McKinley will once again really become a vibrant district,” she said. “Obviously, it’s had a long history of having a ton of bars. We’re not opposed to bars; we just want other types of things to be alongside the bars.”

Alyssa Porche, a UL-Lafayette student who lives near Bolt, said the neighborhood is considered a “college section” of town that is sometimes labeled an unpleasant place to reside.

“Having the Keg and everything right here has been kind of rambunctious,” she said. “If they can improve (the neighborhood) to make it more friendly towards our neighborhood, that would be great instead of it having a bad vibe.”

As part of UNIV 100, a mandatory class for UL-Lafayette freshmen, a few classes participated in designing the event as part of The Big Event, a university-sponsored service day. Students enrolled in the class “Stalking Beauty” began setting up the event at 8 a.m.

Peter Newton, a senior advertising major and peer mentor for one section of the class, manned the bubble-blowing station with his freshman class.

“They have been doing plans for this block since day one,” he said. “They have really been very hands-on about how to do certain things. It was exciting for them to see it all come together.”

Maddie Hull, a freshman psychology major who participated in the day design process and Big Event, said she was surprised to see the class’ efforts come to fruition.

“I didn’t think (the community was) really going to take our ideas into account because we’re just some young kids, but I really liked how they did implement a lot of our ideas,” she said.

Newton said the class — as well as participating in TBE — is designed to show students their potential to make a positive change in the community.

“It doesn’t take a village,” he said. “One person can really make the difference between a community that’s kind of coming down and building it back up at the same time. We all know McKinley Street is not, you know, the pride and joy of Lafayette, so it’s kind of crazy to see such small little changes can really make this space so beautiful.”


19 2016-10-24
Lafayette

20 Under 40: Alise Hagan


Name: Alise C. Hagan

Employment: University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Director of Institutional Assessment, 8 years

Hometown: Lafayette

Current city: Lafayette, nearly all my life, but returned here 8 years ago (in 2008)

Career and community achievement: Growing up my parents encouraged me and my sisters to be involved in at least one activity not connected to school, so we learned early the importance of time management and service. As an adult, I’ve maintained this balance of professional and civic responsibility.

My professional career was built on the academic foundations of my undergraduate and graduate experiences at LSU and Auburn University, and in 2008 I returned to my hometown and joined the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

One of my greatest professional achievements occurred while I was with the Office of Distance Learning. As the first instructional designer on staff, I was responsible for designing and implementing faculty professional development; our goal was to have all faculty teaching online or hybrid courses certified through our professional development track.

Within two years, our comprehensive faculty training program had trained and certified all faculty teaching online or hybrid courses, and was recognized nationally by the Online Learning Consortium with the 2013 Excellence in Faculty Development for Online Teaching award.

Civically, the greatest achievement has been being recognized by Junior League of Lafayette as the “2014-15 Active of the Year,” a humbling honor because I believe so strongly in its mission of “promoting volunteerism” and “developing the potential of women.” While Junior League has provided me the opportunity to lead and serve in the areas of community, personnel, and communications, I am most proud of my time as Provisional Chair.

In that role, I led the provisional committee in preparing approximately 50 provisional members for active membership. Baring witness as these women embraced the mission and vision of JLL under our mentorship remains a highlight of my nearly eight years of League service.


19 2016-10-21
Lafayette

UL to cut tuition by more than half for out-of-state online degrees


LAFAYETTE, La. (KLFY)—The University of Louisiana at Lafayette is cutting the out-of-state fee for most online degree programs and graduate certificate programs by more than half, according to the university’s website.

“We are trying to be more responsive to working adults and those who want a UL Lafayette degree but are unable to relocate.”- Downden
In September, the university finalized the rate decrease and out-of-state students will start to see the cuts starting in spring of 2017.

According to UL-Lafayette, students enrolled in an online degree program will pay the same rate, whether they live within or outside of Louisiana.

Luke Downden, Director of Distance Learning said the university is already attracting an increasing number of students because of the reputation of the university’s programs.

“The reduced tuition is key to helping meet the needs and expectations of out-of-state students,” said Luke Dowden, director of Distance Learning. “We are trying to be more responsive to working adults and those who want a UL Lafayette degree but are unable to relocate.”

For information about online programs at UL, visit online.louisiana.edu.


19 2016-10-19
Lafayette

UL students share their stories


VIDEO
19 2016-10-17
Lafayette

Agreement reached with apartment complexover faulty bridge leading to UL-Lafayette campus


After spending more than a year sneaking through a fenced-off bridge to quickly reach the University of Louisiana at Lafayette campus, students living at University Place Apartments may soon have a safer bridge to cross.

Lafayette city-parish government this month approved a contract with 200 Oakcrest LLC, which owns the apartment property, transfering bridge ownership to the company so it can construct a private pedestrian bridge.

In return, the city will give Oakcrest $100,000 to build the bridge and to repair any damage done to the coulee during the flood. The pedestrian bridge will cost an estimated $700,000.

City-Parish Director of Public Works Tom Carroll said the agreement settles discrepancies in whether the bridge is public or private — as well as whether the city or Oakcrest owned the faulty bridge.

“When it was built … for the apartment complex to have their people and residents be able to cross the bridge and get onto the UL campus, I think there was a document that said, ‘And we hereby dedicate that (bridge) to the city of Lafayette,’” he said. “Our attorneys are not quite sure whether or not that conveyance actually conveyed the rights of the bridge.”

In April 2015, the city determined the bridge to be unstable and fenced off the area. UL-Lafayette provided students with shuttle services to campus in the fall semester when the university leased the complex after on-campus residence halls filled up. However, the closure didn’t stop students from cutting holes in the fence and using the path.

RELATED

A bridge too far: UL-Lafayette students still scrambling over bridge blocked off for safety concerns
A bridge too far: UL-Lafayette students still scrambling over bridge blocked off for safety concerns
Some off-campus students are walking the extra mile or so to get to school while others are …
Andrea Ferrão, a sophomore majoring in economics who lived in UPA during the 2016 spring semester, said she frequented the bridge, and stopped only when police would watch the bridge for trespassers.

“Without the bridge, it’d be utterly difficult for students that don’t have any mode of transportation,” she said. “UPA is one of the closest places to campus and affordable to students. If not for the bridge, I suppose people would try to look for places near Cajun Field so that they could avail the bus.”

The bridge, which connects the property with Lewis Street, joins private and public property — a situation that Carroll, the public works director, said is both rare and problematic for private property owners.

“Coming off Johnston, there (are) a couple of streets that lead up to the apartment complex,” he said. “Then you go into the apartment complex, which means you’re going across private property to get back to a public road.”

Christopher Gastinell, a junior public relations major who has lived at UPA for three months, said people still frequently use the bridge. The letters on the bridge sign that says “coming soon” have faded.

“I think it’s sad how long they’ve had that bridge,” he said. “That bridge has been out for a good two years now … People pay rent there, and now they can’t even go straight to their apartment.”

Carroll said the bridge left the city with two options: to rebuild or to enter an agreement with Oakcrest.

“It is vital to maintain that connection to the parking complex, so we participated in providing (part of the) cost of what it would have taken us to demolish the bridge, and then they will provide all the other engineering and construction funding to construct a pedestrian walkway.”

Joey Pons, director of public safety for UL-Lafayette, said the university is glad an agreement was reached.

“Even though we may not have any of our students under lease with the university, we know that students live at UPA apartments,” he said.


19 2016-10-17
Lafayette

2016 UL Career Day


VIDEO
19 2016-10-13
Lafayette

'Send Silence Packing' raises suicide awareness at UL


VIDEO
19 2016-10-13
Lafayette

Have a ball funding UL's art program


Ball. Fire. Spark.

They’re all interconnected and they all come together for the annual Beaux Arts Ball, set for Friday, Oct. 21, at the Atchafalaya Ballroom in the University of Louisiana at Lafayette Student Union, 620 McKinley Street.

Guests will enjoy a buffet dinner with wine pours and a cash bar while dancing the night away to the 20-piece UL Jazz Ensemble. The theme this year is “Fire” and guests are encouraged to dress accordingly.

“It’s a fundraiser wrapped up into a couple of other things,” said Michael Eble, curator of exhibitions and events, at the College of the Arts at UL. “We’ll also be announcing our Spark Lifetime Achievement Award.”

And that goes to Herman Mhire.

The Beaux Arts Ball celebrates the artistic contributions of students, faculty, and alumni, along with raising important and much needed funds.

Eble said funds raised go to the College of the Arts in general, and, more specifically $2,500 student scholarships (music, theater, architecture, visual arts, dance), student organizations (12) and research grants for faculty and students.

Funding for student organizations, somewhere around $1,000, is also in the mix.

“We like to give those student organizations additional funding to help with travel to professional conferences, or to put on an exhibit,” said Eble. “To do different things that will help develop their career.”

Research grants, $500-$2,000, go to faculty who “emphasize collaboration and technology,” Eble said.

Herman Mhire is the recipient of the 2016 Sparks Lifetime
Herman Mhire is the recipient of the 2016 Sparks Lifetime Achievement Award. (Photo: File)
The funding also assists in student recruitment, faculty development, faculty/student grants, publicity for public performances, exhibits and other events that showcase the College of the Arts.

ADVERTISING

inRead invented by Teads

The Spark Award goes to “someone who has contributed to the university, or the region, or the community — also, nationally or internationally — in a significant way,” said Eble, adding that it is rotated between three departments within the College of the Arts: Performing Arts, School of Architecture and Design, and Visual Arts.

“His roots start within the Department of Visual Arts in the late '70s, early '80s,” said Eble. “Then he was curator of the University Art Museum. And then you got to go from there.

“During that time, Festival International is born kind of under his input and the guidance and a number of other people,” he said. “And then it’s his vision to build the Hilliard.”

Trained as a painter and printmaker, Mhire holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette (1969) and a Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Arkansas (1972).

“He’s been a prolific artist and he was also a really good professor while he was here, too,” said Eble. “The Department of Visual Art talked about his teaching and where’s he’s grown from there.”


Mhire joins A. Hays Town, Elmore Morgan Jr., Joe Stewart, George Rodrigue, Keith Sonnier, Dickie Landry, and Eddie Cazayoux with the honor.

“The importance for me is that the acknowledgment really is coming from my peers in visual arts,” said Mhire. “It’s gratifying because, frankly, I retired in ’05 and that’s 11 years ago and there really only a very small number of faculty who are there now who would have actually worked with or taught with.

“So, it’s gratifying,” he said. “It’s one of those moments where you sort of put a period at the end of a sentence; if you look at a career, in terms of my educational career, my teaching career at the university, and the work I did at the museum.

“It’s an acknowledgement that people appreciate what you did,” said Mhire. “It’s nice.”

Tickets are $100 per person or $1,000 for a table and sponsorship. Tickets and sponsorship can be purchased here or by calling 337.482.6224.
19 2016-10-12
Lafayette

UL holding its first suicide awareness event in quad today


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette is holding a suicide awareness event this morning, and there’s a way for the Lafayette community to get involved.

The National Alliance of Mental Illness on campus is holding its first ever suicide awareness event this morning at UL.

It’s called “Send Silence Packing” and will be held from 8:30 until 2:30 today in the UL Quad.

The organization, NAMI on campus, says 1,100 college students commit suicide every year.

Organizers say suicide is a subject that people don’t really want to talk about, but need to talk about.

NAMI wants to set up 1,100 backpacks to give people a sense of how serious this problem is.

So far, the group has collected about 500 backpacks and is asking for more new or gently used backpacks

NAMI will place backpacks around the fountain in the quad.

Anyone who lost a family member or friend to suicide can memorialize them with their name, photo, biography, dates, and words to remember them by.

This event targets students, faculty, and staff but is open to the public.

Some of the donated backpacks will be given to Acadiana’s homeless population and flood victims.

Other backpacks will be saved for next year, as the group plans to make “Send Silence Packing” an annual event.

Top News
19 2016-10-12
Lafayette

More than 2,000 expected at UL-Lafayette’s “Big Event”


BAYOU VISTA, La. (KLFY)— More than 2,100 UL-Lafayette students, faculty, and staff will join together in this year’s “Big Event” to spend a day sprucing up the community, according to an event organizer.

The daylong community service project will be held Oct. 22.

Volunteers will spread out to more than 30 sites across several parishes to pick up litter, plant trees, paint school and public parks, and remove illegal signs from roadways and medians.

“Dozens of students, faculty, and staff work together to make the ‘Big Event’ a success,” said UL-Lafayette Dean of Community Service, “but the students really deserve the credit for pulling it off.”

According to a news release, afterwards, those who participated will be able to attend a block party on McKinley Street to celebrate a job well done.

The “Big Event” began in 1982 at Texas A&M and grew to more than 72 universities across the nation.

If you would like to be part of the event or learn more, Click Here.


19 2016-10-11
Lafayette

Arts ball on 'fire' this year


Get a special buzz from creativity and love to dress up? The University of Louisiana at Lafayette has just the event for you.

The College of the Arts is hosting its seventh annual Beaux Arts Ball, a themed costume ball fundraiser that represents the various branches of the performing and visual arts. Each ticket and sponsorship provides necessary funding that drives scholarships, events, student organizations, grants and more. They will also commend this year’s SPARK Lifetime Achievement Award honoree Herman Mhire, who is the founding president of Festival International, the mastermind behind the Paul and Lulu Hilliard Art Museum, a professor emeritus of visual arts and alumnus of UL. Mhire will be UL’s artist-in-residence at the university until next October in accord to this honor.

The theme for this year is "fire."

CAR WASH: Listen to zydeco while you wash your car

There will be music provided by the university jazz ensemble as well as complimentary food, a cash bar, and dancing to provide atmosphere and spirit. Silent and live auctions will take place throughout the night bidding local works from alumni and regional artists. Bidding starts early, so make sure to check the Beaux Arts Ball website for more information. If you or your company chose to sponsor, you will receive a complimentary table at the event, as well as recognition within the university.

There will be a costume and table decorating contest, so go all out!

Want to go?

WHERE: ULL Student Union, Atchafalaya Ballroom

WHEN: Friday, Oct. 21

TIME: 7 to 10 p.m.

TICKETS: $100, $45 with a valid student ID

For more information on Beaux Arts visit ullafayette.ejoinme.org/BeauxArtsBall


19 2016-10-10
Lafayette

UL Lafayette students place second in global PetroBowl


A team of University of Louisiana at Lafayette petroleum engineering students placed first in North America and second in the world in the international PetroBowl Championship held in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

The competition pits members of Society of Petroleum Engineers student chapters against each other in a quiz bowl format. Participants must answer industry-related questions in a series of rapid-fire rounds.

UL Lafayette students – and members of the SPE Evangeline Student Chapter – who competed in Dubai last week are:

Stephen Au, a senior from San Marino, California;

Benjamin Como, a senior from Broussard, Louisiana;

Gordon Guillory, a senior from Sugartown, Louisiana;

Nicholas Jarrett, a graduate student in geology from Tyler, Texas; and

Brandon Salazar, a senior from Panama City, Florida.

The chapter adviser is Dr. Abdennour Seibi, an associate professor of petroleum engineering. The UL Lafayette team earned a $6,000 prize.

Au was the only member of the 2015 UL Lafayette team that earned the chance last year for UL Lafayette students to compete in the PetroBowl Championship at the 2016 SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition. The other 2015 members graduated or are attending graduate school at UL Lafayette.

Au said the team’s success “clearly validates the rigor of our petroleum engineering program. Besides the immense fame that the PetroBowl competition brings to the University, the PetroBowl competition enables industry professionals to easily notice UL Lafayette as a competitive petroleum engineering school.”

UL Lafayette teams had previously competed in PetroBowl Championships. In 2014, a University team was one of the top four teams in the world; in 2012, a UL Lafayette team was among the top eight teams in the world.

This was the first time that a UL Lafayette team reached the final game. To get there, it defeated teams from the University of Tulsa, the No. 1 seed who was favored to win; the University of Indonesia; Norwegian University of Science and Technology; and Pennsylvania State University.

Federal University of Rio de Janeiro took the last game in Dubai.

Au said the topics that teams were quizzed about ranged from drilling to production to reservoir engineering.

“Basically, anything that is remotely related to oil and gas was fair game, so the sheer number of possible questions makes predicting the competition very difficult. This year, they focused on technical questions, as opposed to trivia and history, which played into our hands, since we each specialized in a different area,” he said.

Au has participated in PetroBowl since he was a freshman. He competed in two regional qualifiers and two international competitions. “As the team captain, the former coach and I developed a rigorous curriculum that assisted us in achieving the results that we did. However, our team was well balanced this year, so we trusted others in knowing material that we weren't responsible for. Because of the even distribution of study material, we were able to synergistically achieve much more,” he said.
19 2016-10-07
Lafayette

UL-Lafayette, 1 of 4 universities to have CubeSat hitch a ride into space


LAFAYETTE, La. (KLFY)—Students from UL-Lafayette will be one of four universities in the U.S. whose student-built satellite will be launched into orbit, according to the university.

The miniature satellite will be launched for free by United Launch Alliance into orbit which will range from 125 miles to 21,700 miles from earth.

Students from the college will construct a CubeSat, a satellite which can weigh up to 2.9 pounds used to explore new space technologies and perform scientific research.

According to Dr. Paul Darby, an assistant professor in UL-Lafayette’s Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, the student’s CubeSat will gather data about matter expelled from the sun during solar flares. The satellite will also collect data from other sun-related activity.

Dr. Darby added that he estimates the cost of launching the satellite at about $100,000 had the university not been able to book a ride on Atlas IV’s Mission.

The satellite is scheduled to go into orbit in late fall of 2018.

For more information on this project, click here.
19 2016-10-03
Lafayette

Students strike gold at oil contest


If there was a turning point, it might have been this:

The University of Louisiana at Lafayette's student Petro Bowl team, competing Sept. 26 against Penn State in competition semifinals in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, challenged a quiz question that Penn State had apparently answered correctly with: "Clay." No, UL's petroleum engineering team protested: The correct answer was "fine grain." Forget the question.

UL got the judges to overrule the question as unclear, take the points away that had been awarded to Penn State, and put time back on the board.

READ MORE: Oil executive sees eventual recovery

READ MORE: Graduate and wait? Oil jobs scarce

UL participant Nick Jarrett said that reversal of fortune for Penn State stopped their team's momentum in the UL-Penn State quiz match. UL triumphed in a see-saw match and went on to the competition finals, losing to a buzzsaw of a competitor, Universidade Federal Do Rio De Janeiro, from Brazil but capturing $6,000 in prize money nonetheless.

It was UL's highest finish in the Petro Bowl, which is an annual feature in the Society of Petroleum Engineers Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition.

Jarrett, a graduate student in geology; Stephen Au, a senior in petroleum engineering; and seniors Ben Como and Gordon Guillory were the team members who competed. Thirty-two teams competed in Dubai, which hosted this year's conference. UL's team also includes an alternate and eight practice squad members.

Jarrett and Au said competitors had to handle questions across the curriculum in such academic areas as reservoir engineering, production, drilling, history and geology. The team qualified by virtue of their fourth-place finish last year, when Houston hosted the conference.

Au, from San Marino, California, said challenging the question during the Penn State match was part of the "gamesmanship" inherent in the annual competition. But the competitors all walk away friends, right?

"Oh, no, dude. It's cutthroat," he said. "You need the academics, but you also need the psychology."

READ MORE: UL draws STEM students

UL had both in the competition, which lasted all day. Early rounds involve eight-minute matches. By the quarterfinals, there are two eight-minute halves and the final involves two 10-minute halves. Au, who has competed three times in the round of 32, said teams cheer loudly, usually for other teams from their own country. LSU students were big supporters of UL.

Au said UL has traditional rivals that include Colorado School of Mines, the University of Tulsa and Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. The last, he said, is a powerhouse program that was upset by the eventual champions from Brazil.

Jarrett and Au said their second-place prize money was contributed by Frank's International, a Lafayette company. The Society of Petroleum Engineers, Evangeline chapter, made their travel possible, they said.

Next year, they said, the team, which is self-directed, may have to start anew, as most members are moving on. Jarrett, of Tyler, Texas, will focus more on geology than on his petroleum engineering studies; Au, who will graduate in May, will take an engineering job with Chevron in Houston.


19 2016-10-03
Lafayette

UL Lafayette history harvest at NUNU Saturday


University of Louisiana at Lafayette's public history program will be at NUNU Arts and Culture Collective 11 a.mm- 4 p.m., Saturday photographing and scanning documents, photos and items that tell the stories of Acadiana's people, according to a news release.

The stories will be included in an anthropological inventory being made by University of Louisiana at Lafayette representing Acadiana's people, culture and history, so gather up and help with this placement of pieces in the greater story.

Oral histories will be taken. Objects - be they musical, mechanical or otherwise - all have value.

The public is encourage to attend and stop by the collective for this unique opportunity to "get it right."


19 2016-09-29
New Orleans

BP Deepwater Horizon oil sped erosion in worst-coated marsh, study says


Patches of marsh grass that had a 90 percent or greater coating of oil from the BP Deepwater Horizon disaster suffered dramatic erosion rates during the two years after the 2010 well blowout, according to a new study. These marshes "didn't recover; they're now gone, having been converted to mudflats," one of the lead scientists said.

But surprisingly, marshes with less than 90 percent oil coating did not erode as quickly as the scientists had expected. They might even recover, given enough time.

BP oil damage 'dramatically diminished,' scientists say
BP oil damage 'dramatically diminished,' scientists say
Five years after wetlands and fisheries were devastated, insects and wildlife that depend on them are recovering

The study was published Tuesday (Sept. 27) in Nature Scientific Reports. It was conducted by a team of scientists that included researchers at Duke University and the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

The report outlines a period during and after the 87-day disaster when oil not only killed marsh grass outright in some spots but also affected grass roots in other locations, making those areas more likely to die. As that material decomposed, the soil that the grasses and their roots had been holding together was more likely to wash away, resulting in higher erosion rates in the second year after the spill. In the third year after the spill, the erosion rates returned to pre-disaster levels.

Locations surveyed for erosion caused by BP oil spill
This map shows the locations where erosion rates were monitored in the aftermath of the BP oil spill in 2010. The red dots indicate where oil covered 90 percent or more of the stems of wetland grasses.
Nature Scientific Reports

The researchers used data gathered at 103 sites during the federal Natural Resource Damage Assessment. They found that in locations where oil covered more than 90 percent of plant stems, the grass died, followed by rapid erosion at rates of 4.6 feet to 5.25 feet per year greater than in un-oiled areas.

Wetland locations in Louisiana made up the largest portion of the study's test sites and had the highest erosion rates, the scientists said. That comes as no surprise to state officials, who repeatedly complained in the two years after the disaster about the rapid erosion of wetlands at heavily oiled locations such as Bay Jimmy in northern Barataria Bay.

ADVERTISING

inRead invented by Teads

"Marshes that experienced elevated erosion due to high levels of oiling didn't recover; they're now gone, having been converted to mudflats in the shallow underwater environment of the Gulf," said Brian Silliman, the Rachel Carson associate professor of marine conservation biology at Duke's Nicholas School of the Environment.

In an interview Wednesday, Silliman warned that the rapid erosion resulted in deeper areas in several locations that will be difficult to restore.

"If they're just going to go planting grasses back in areas where the accelerated erosion occurred, it would take a tremendous amount of money and material to alter the physical stresses in that area," he said, in part because of the pre-existing rapid rate of erosion.

He said the state and federal trustees who will be directing restoration should not focus on the exact area where damage occurred, but instead in areas more likely to survive erosion, "where you get a bigger bang for the buck."

Oil from the Deepwater Horizon rig explosion was monitored across 435 miles of wetlands along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico, including well over 200 miles in Louisiana. The oil was concentrated along the outer edge of the marsh, "often visible as a black belt along the shoreline" that was about 15 to 50 feet wide.

The worst oiled areas are estimated to have included between 37 and 62 linear miles of saltwater marshes across the Gulf Coast.

Spilled BP oil lingers on Louisiana coast
Spilled BP oil lingers on Louisiana coast
But BP and the Coast Guard say the cleanup is winding down

The Natural Resource Damage Assessment on which the study was based is a requirement of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. It provides information that state and federal trustees use to determine how a responsible party -- in this case, BP -- must restore damage caused by the spill. BP entered into a settlement with federal and state officials to guarantees $8.1 billion over 16 years for natural resource damage restoration.

The most heavily oiled wetlands in Louisiana are in areas where some of the highest erosion rates already were occurring, the result of subsidence, sea level rise and a variety of other factors. But the study found levels of erosion in the most oiled areas were greater than the existing erosion rates.

When looking only at Louisiana results, where most measurement sites were located, the researchers found higher erosion rates for wetlands where 90 percent or more of the stems were oiled: 13 feet a year, compared to 4.6 feet to 6.1 feet for the other oiling levels, before the erosion rates were adjusted for wave action.

The researchers said the new study is in line with earlier Silliman studies that showed higher erosion rates at a limited number of heavily oiled sites, and with studies led by researchers Mark Hester and Jonathan Willis at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. The Louisiana researchers found widespread die-back of marsh plants at oiled sites.

"Given the vital roles coastal salt marshes play in protecting shorelines from erosion and flooding, providing habitat for wildlife and helping clean our water, scientists need to understand the thresholds of salt marsh resilience to human disturbances like oil," Silliman said. "By identifying the 90 percent threshold above which spill-induced erosion occurs, our study provides key knowledge to more accurately predict loss of marsh ecosystems following future spills."

The surprise in the new study was that marsh areas with less than 90 percent oil coating actually had less erosion than expected. "In these marshes, erosion rates did not accelerate, likely reflecting less oil impact," Silliman said. "So long as the marsh platform elevation is sufficient and the rooting system of the vegetation is healthy and intact, these marshes could potentially recover over time."

But during Wednesday's interview, Silliman also pointed out that those results don't mean that no damage occurred in less oiled areas. Both plant life and wildlife suffered major reversals that will take years to reverse, he said. But in the worst-oiled area, the results are likely irreversible.

The study includes authors from Duke, Iowa State University, the University of California at Santa Cruz, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Abt Associates of Boulder, Colo., and the Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras of Mar del Plata, Argentina. It was funded by the state of Louisiana, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, British Petroleum, the National Science Foundation, the Stolarz Foundation and the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative.


19 2016-09-28
Lafayette

Lafayette council approves Pinhook complex


The Lafayette City-Parish Council voted 6-3 Tuesday to clear the path for a 194-unit apartment complex on Pinhook Road, despite opposition from residents from nearby Bendel Gardens who complained of already unbearable traffic congestion that will only get worse.

The Lafayette Planning Commission shot down the proposed $39 million apartment complex earlier this year, but developers appealed to the council for approval.

The complex, planned for about 13 acres next to the DoubleTree Hotel, would be a gated development marketed to University of Louisiana at Lafayette students and young professionals.

"If not this, what? What goes on a tract this large?" said Councilman Kenneth Boudreaux, who voted to approve the development. "I think anything that goes there is going to bring a traffic issue."

More than 35 residents from Bendel Gardens and other nearby neighborhoods packed Tuesday's council meeting to oppose the complex.

Most had few complaints about the development itself but rather spoke of a congested Pinhook Road.

"We are not against progress … but we have to have the infrastructure to make sure the progress is done properly for all the citizens in the community," said Richard Haik Sr., a retired federal judge who lives in Bendel Gardens.

"People are putting their lives in their owns hands when they drive down there and try to turn on to Bendel. This situation is going to get more dangerous than it is now, and it's already dangerous."

Those concerns were shared by Councilwoman Nanette Cook, who joined councilmen Jared Bellard and William Theriot in voting against the development.

"I'm just concerned about the location," Cook said. "That's a very busy section of Pinhook."

Todd James, one of the developers on the project, said a traffic study shows the apartment complex would increase congestion in the area only about 4 percent during peak traffic times.

He also said developers hope to lessen the traffic impact by offering a full-time shuttle service for residents.

Staff with the city-parish Department of Planning, Zoning and Development had recommended approval of the complex.

On Tuesday, Boudreaux added stipulations to mandate that only right turns will be allowed in and out of one of the access roads for the complex, to require developers to build a turning lane on Pinhook and to require a detailed traffic study of the area to explore any needed improvements.

Voting with Boudreaux to approve the development were council members Jay Castille, Kevin Naquin, Pat Lewis, Bruce Conque and Liz Hebert.

No decision has been made on an appeal of the council's decision, said attorney Richard Haik Jr., who represented Bendel Gardens residents. He is the elder Haik's son.

"I think it's disappointing. You are taking something that is admittedly deficient and you are making it knowingly worse."


19 2016-09-28
Lafayette

Editorial: Where's students' magic?


If only Louisiana's college students had started the year 2-2. They might have gotten more attention.

Two wins, two losses is how LSU's football team weathered September, and powerful wheels turned quickly.

A big-time coach was fired with a multi-million-dollar buy-out after 12 years. The offensive coordinator was fired. An interim coach was put in place. A new line coach arrived in town.

All that took one tick of the clock on a football field at Auburn and a couple of days because the state's flagship university was not going to tolerate football mediocrity.

Passion abounded in Baton Rouge. Meetings were emotional. The new coach promised "magic" would return for the hundred or so football players.

But what about the other tens of thousands of everyday students who started fall semester at LSU and on other Louisiana campuses? Where is their magic?

The TOPS scholarship program, which helps most students attend LSU, was slashed this year, victim to steep budget cuts. Students who met guidelines for those scholarships won’t get all needed funds. Things may worsen in the spring.

Former Gov. Bobby Jindal's two terms saw funding for public universities dramatically diminished to where students are paying twice as much for tuition and fees in order to fund their educations.

Graduate student enrollment dropped at the University of Louisiana System campuses, the state’s largest higher education system. So did enrollment for non-traditional students, those 25 and older.

“It’s been quite a flip in a short amount of time,” said Cami Geisman, UL System spokeswoman. In 2008, the state funded about 63 percent of a Louisiana state student’s cost of enrollment. Students themselves generated the rest.

Nowadays, students’ “self-generated” funding for their education is 72 percent of the cost; the state pays 28 percent. The result: Students who paid $3,800 in tuition and fees in 2008 now pay $8,100. Scholarship money is getting more scarce as the price tags increase.

That means more students struggle, paying dearly, to attend state colleges. Half the students graduated in debt, with an average debt of $23,000 in 2014 — making it harder for graduates to launch their post-college lives.

That doesn’t factor in the cost of room and board, which has only increased since 2008. Geisman said that at UL System schools, about 34 percent of students are on TOPS. About 35 percent get federal Pell Grants, intended to help needy students pay for college.

Of course, funding those two Louisiana necessities — football and higher education — are different. In some cases, when trouble arose, so was the sense of urgency.

States need educated citizens, even more than they need winning football programs. Students and parents are holding their collective breath for TOPS news this spring. Let’s hope for magic, or for wheels to turn.


19 2016-09-28
Lafayette

First presidential debate leaves UL students with much to consider


All eyes were on Monday’s presidential debate across the country, including the young people in Acadiana.

Groups across the University of Louisiana at Lafayette campus showed up for the watch party, watching the debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

The Black Male Leadership Association, UL Christiana Smith African American Alumni Chapter, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority and the Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity hosted the watch party on UL's campus.

Many students had a variety of opinions going into the debate.

RELATED: How to register to vote

“I know a lot of people who are saying they don’t want to vote at all because they don’t want to vote for either or but I’m like you have to vote at least for someone,” Nykei Thomas said, vice president of the Black Male Leadership Association.

“They don’t want to see them attacking each other’s issues, they want to see what their actual issues are,” said Gabrielle Semien, president of the Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority.

“(Higher education) affects us so we really can see what we do because of budget cuts because we are the future being the youth and prime age at our lives,” said Kelton Jessie, vice president of the Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity.

Some students said they were voting for the very first time this election and this was their first debate they’ve ever watched.

ANALYSIS: Trump, Clinton came out swinging in fiercest presidential debate in modern times

State Rep. Vincent Pierre spoke at the watch party. Pierre said this election is crucial for young participation.

“Everyone can talk about how you’re going to get out and vote, when you are going to register to vote and the things we can do to be a part of this elective process,” Pierre said.


19 2016-09-28
Lafayette

First presidential debate leaves UL students with much to consider


All eyes were on Monday’s presidential debate across the country, including the young people in Acadiana.

Groups across the University of Louisiana at Lafayette campus showed up for the watch party, watching the debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

The Black Male Leadership Association, UL Christiana Smith African American Alumni Chapter, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority and the Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity hosted the watch party on UL's campus.

Many students had a variety of opinions going into the debate.

RELATED: How to register to vote

“I know a lot of people who are saying they don’t want to vote at all because they don’t want to vote for either or but I’m like you have to vote at least for someone,” Nykei Thomas said, vice president of the Black Male Leadership Association.

“They don’t want to see them attacking each other’s issues, they want to see what their actual issues are,” said Gabrielle Semien, president of the Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority.

“(Higher education) affects us so we really can see what we do because of budget cuts because we are the future being the youth and prime age at our lives,” said Kelton Jessie, vice president of the Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity.

Some students said they were voting for the very first time this election and this was their first debate they’ve ever watched.

ANALYSIS: Trump, Clinton came out swinging in fiercest presidential debate in modern times

State Rep. Vincent Pierre spoke at the watch party. Pierre said this election is crucial for young participation.

“Everyone can talk about how you’re going to get out and vote, when you are going to register to vote and the things we can do to be a part of this elective process,” Pierre said.


19 2016-09-27
Lafayette

UL alumnus creating world's hottest pepper


It's part rock 'n' roll, part science experiment and pure adrenaline rush.

It's the short and squat purple pepper that could be the spiciest chili in the world.

"When you put one of these in your mouth, it's a whole 'nother ball game," Ronald "Troy" Primeaux says. "A bear is chasing you. You've just been in a car wreck. You just got caught speeding, and a cop is giving you a ticket. Your heart is pumping, and it lasts for about 30 minutes.

"Your body thinks it's going to die. You're not going to die."

Primeaux is working to stabilize this early generation pepper he's dubbed the Louisiana Creeper, a nod to Smokin' Ed's Carolina Reaper pepper that holds the title of Guinness World Record for hottest chili.

The 2009 graduate and current employee of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette is also working with the university to create an official Ragin' Cajun pepper that could include a line of products — such as hot sauce and pepper jelly — to go along with it.

"The university has had preliminary discussions about collaborating on a Ragin' Cajuns pepper and is exploring options," UL spokesman Charlie Bier said in an emailed statement. "We are very interested in growing our licensed consumable products, based on the success of our licensed burger, beers and coffee."

Primeaux has loved spicy food for as long as he can remember.

He says his mother fed him spicy gumbo through a bottle when he was just an infant. As a young child, he'd eat dozens and dozens of pickled jalapeno rings. As a teen, his family dared him to eat a whole habanero pepper, and he did so — with no regrets.

"Why do I love peppers so much?" Primeaux asks. "It's because they're beautiful, yet they can be deadly. They're rock 'n' roll. There's something dangerous about them that's thrilling like a roller coaster."


Troy Primeaux looks over his pepper plants growingBuy Photo
Troy Primeaux looks over his pepper plants growing in his backyard in Lafayette August 26, 2016. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)


And he knows a thing or two about rock 'n' roll after playing guitar alongside local musicians Brother Dege and Tony Daigle for about 10 years.

But Primeaux has set aside his guitar for something he finds just as exhilarating — creating the hottest pepper in the world.

Primeaux learned the ins and outs of growing and crossing peppers from professors he met while studying nursing at UL.

He grew peppers for the first time in 2004 and became intrigued by the "mystery of the new varieties." He crossed his first peppers the next year that resulted in the 7 Pot Primo. As he worked toward his nursing degree, Primeaux continued to experiment with peppers and worked to stabilize his new creations.

But with a 3.8 grade point average and only two semesters left, Primeaux surprised his friends and family in 2007 by switching his major from nursing to sustainable agriculture.

"The bad thing about nursing is that you take it all home with you. It's a lot to carry around," Primeaux says. "It takes somebody who can give a lot of themselves. I switched to plants because if you kill a plant, it's not that big of a deal. And they don't sh-- on you, either."






















Subscribers can win





FOOTBALL GIVEAWAYS EVERY WEEK


totaling $7,000 in value


Touchdown!

Primeaux graduated in 2009 and continued growing peppers as he worked day jobs in and outside of his field. He currently conducts watershed testing for the university.

To create a name for himself, Primeaux crosses peppers of his own creation by a process best described as artificial insemination — using the male reproductive parts of a particularly hot pepper plant to fertilize a particularly hot female plant of a different variety.


Troy Primeaux's Swampadelic Sauce.Buy Photo
Troy Primeaux's Swampadelic Sauce. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)

He keeps each of the 120 or so pepper plants in his Lafayette backyard garden from unintentionally cross pollinating by covering plants in mesh bags. He meticulously labels and tracks every variable for each of his pepper plants.

His larger crop of about 200 peppers were lost during the recent flooding on his mother's land in Indian Bayou. Primeaux would have sold the 100,000 seeds he would have harvested from those peppers to growers for $7.99 for 20 seeds.

The Louisiana Creeper is a cross between two of Primeaux's creations, the 7-Pot Primo and the Big Black Mama or BBM.

Primeaux made the 7-Pot Primo by crossing a Trinidad 7-Pot chili — named because it can season seven pots of stew — with a Bhut Jolokia, which is better known as the ghost pepper. He created the BBM by crossing the Bangladesh Naga Morich chili and the Trinidad Douglah chili.

"I'm still selecting different attributes," he says. "I'll cut open a pepper and check out the physical attributes and judge the look and smell and all of that of the plant to get what I want."

It's difficult to determine exactly what the hottest pepper in the world is because there is no single governing authority that measures the spiciness of chili peppers.

Individual chili varieties have been tested by different universities but haven't been tested against one another at the same university.

The Carolina Reaper rates an average of 1.57 million Scoville Heat Units according to tests conducted by Winthrop University in South Carolina and holds the Guinness World Record for hottest chili.

The 7-Pot Primo rates an average of 1.4 million SHU, according to tests conducted by the Chile Pepper Institute at New Mexico State University.

By comparison, a habanero pepper is typically between 100,000 and 350,000 SHU, and a jalapeno pepper is between 1,000 and 20,000 SHU.

Primeaux hopes his Louisiana Creeper and Ragin' Cajun peppers will have an average of 2 million SHU or better. It's a possibility, considering a single Carolina Reaper pepper came in at 2.2 million SHU during university testing to determine the average.

And for Primeaux, creating alarmingly spicy peppers is just the latest venture in a quest to leave his mark on the world.

"I didn't intend to create the world's hottest pepper — arguably the world's hottest pepper," he says. "It's something I stumbled upon with a lot of passion, a little know-how and a lot of luck."

19 2016-09-27
Lafayette

UL professors bring Montessori-style learning to iPad


As it becomes more and more commonplace to find smartphones and tablets in the hands of children, a group of researchers at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette developed an an iPad game to give kids an opportunity to get a hands-on start in their math education.

"Archimedes' Roost," developed in 2012 by a team of UL professors and students, takes place inside a treehouse laboratory and gives first grade and preschool students a three-dimensional space to work out addition and subtraction problems with one-on-one guidance, much like in a Montessori school.

"We focused on visual representations of addition and subtraction because we know those methods are effective for learning math," Project director and UL professor Douglas Williams said. "We just took what we knew was working and tried to replicate it in a 3D space."

Williams and Yuxin Ma worked with a full-time programmer and a group of UL 3D and 2D art students to make the game. The app was funded by a grant from the Louisiana Board of Regents.

The story revolves around Archimedes, a bird living in the treehouse built by his former owner, a professor who found the tree and built a laboratory in it. The professor left Archimedes behind to tend to the treehouse and teach children who came upon it about math.

The bird plays the role of the Montessori teacher, guiding and encouraging the player as he or she manipulates blocks, beads and other objects to solve math problems.

Williams said if they can find more funding, he'd like to revisit the app to add in science games such as reconstructing a skeleton or classifying species found around the treehouse.

While most games take a couple years to develop, Williams said the whole game was made in about a year.

To his knowledge, there isn't another app on the market that uses a 3D environment to teach addition and subtraction.

"We did pull it off, but man, it was painful," Williams said.

"Archimedes' Roost" is available on iPad from the Apple App Store.

19 2016-09-27
Lafayette

UL makes local music a college major


In 1965, an editorial in the Opelousas Daily World newspaper, titled “They Call That Music??!!,” ridiculed Cajun music.

Writer Burton Grindstaff contended that crickets, “with an urge to make themselves heard,” made more music than three Cajuns with a fiddle, accordion and triangle.

Grindstaff wrote Cajuns “brought some mighty fine things down from Novia (sic) Scotia with them, including their jolly selves, but their so-called music is one thing I wish they hadn’t.”

Fast forward 50 years and Cajun music, and its Creole cousin, zydeco, are drivers in the local economy, tourism and heritage.

Once unimaginable, the genres are even taught at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, where the school’s sports teams are known as Ragin’ Cajuns.

Since 2012, the UL Traditional Music Program has offered instrument classes for credit in Cajun music and zydeco, along with recent additions, bluegrass and blues. Students can even obtain a bachelor of arts in music with a concentration in traditional music.

UL is one of 25 colleges in the United States that offers a degree in traditional music. No other university teaches Cajun music and zydeco.

Students must audition to show some knowledge of the genres. More than 20 working musicians, such as Grammy nominees Chis Segura, Kristy Guillory and Corey Ledet, have served as instructors.


UL Traditional Music Program offers Cajun ensembleBuy Photo
UL Traditional Music Program offers Cajun ensemble with Roddy Romero and a zydeco ensemble with Nathan Williams Jr. (Photo: SCOTT CLAUSE/THE ADVERTISER)


Each semester ends with students and teachers playing in a public performance at the Blue Moon Saloon, a popular live music venue in downtown Lafayette.

“You can take classes for credit in how to play the accordion, fiddle, how to sing in Cajun French, how to play in a Cajun and zydeco band with other people,” said Mark DeWitt the program’s director. “None of that, you have to know how to read music. It’s all by ear, which is traditionally done in those styles.

“Everything else in the school of music is predicated on learning how to read music first, then learning how to play more advanced stuff. That’s not how it works in styles that are not generally taught at a university.”

Remembering Dr. Comeaux

UL’s innovative program was born after a grassroots effort to establish the Dr. Tommy Comeaux Endowed Chair in Traditional Music.

Comeaux, a 45-year-old pathologist and musician who played with BeauSoleil, the Basin Brothers and other bands, was killed in a cycling accident in 1997.

Friends and fans rallied to honor him with an endowed chair at the university. Those efforts, which raised more than $600,000, included annual “Medicine Show” concerts highlighting local musicians. CD, T-shirt and poster sales were part of each show.

Individual and corporate gifts added to the funding. The Board of Regents added $400,000 to reach the $1 million goal, funds that would pay for instructors and other needs of the programs.






















Subscribers can win





FOOTBALL GIVEAWAYS EVERY WEEK


totaling $7,000 in value


Touchdown!

‘It’s a feeling’

Current instructors include Nathan Williams, Jr., leader of the popular band Lil Nate and the Zydeco Big Timers. In 2008, Williams graduated from UL with a degree in jazz studies.


UL Traditional Music Program offers Cajun ensembleBuy Photo
UL Traditional Music Program offers Cajun ensemble with Roddy Romero and a zydeco ensemble with Nathan Williams Jr. (Photo: SCOTT CLAUSE/THE ADVERTISER)


Williams, who has taught for six semesters in the program, said he’s learned as much as his students. He drills them on respect and innovation, subjects that can’t always be learned in textbooks.

“Even though these types of folk music are said to be monotonous, people really don’t respect it until they start playing it,” said Williams, a performer since the age of 5. “They may sound simple, but when you get into a situation of performing the songs, it’s quite challenging.

“A lot of students have brought that to my attention. They’ll play zydeco or classical, some of the most difficult pieces you can think of.

“But zydeco is a challenge, and they like it because it’s a feeling. You can know all the notes and every scale, but if you don’t have the feel, it’s hard to replicate.”

Still in disbelief

Challenges go beyond the classroom for this young music program.

DeWitt estimates more than 100 students have enrolled since the program began.

But there have only been six traditional music majors. There have been no graduates. A few majors have dropped out because of illness while others gravitated toward music business.

Ironically, UL consistently has a small, but steady stream of professional, working Cajun and zydeco musicians who are students on campus. But they are pursuing degrees in areas others and have little or no interest in music classes.

DeWitt said not all majors in UL’s School of Music are on board.


UL Traditional Music Program offers Cajun ensembleBuy Photo
UL Traditional Music Program offers Cajun ensemble with Roddy Romero and a zydeco ensemble with Nathan Williams Jr. (Photo: SCOTT CLAUSE/THE ADVERTISER)


“Some people are still in disbelief,” said DeWitt. “They have trouble taking it seriously. I’ve heard similar comments about universities in Ireland where folks learned Irish traditional music.

“I think zydeco music is a little cooler. We’ve had music majors who have been in that for a while now. Bluegrass is definitely cooler, maybe because it’s more exotic. You don’t see it that much around here.”

DeWitt adds the recruiting and marketing remain priorities. Many potential students, particularly on the high school level, don’t know the program exists.

“The other challenge we have is space. It’s really challenging to schedule all these rehearsals. We have four jazz combos, plus the jazz ensemble, all the band stuff, the opera program, the orchestras and choirs.

“Rehearsal space is limited. Sometimes the equipment too. Sometimes the growth of offerings is limited by the space. But there’s still a lot we can do. It’s pretty exciting.”

19 2016-09-27
Lafayette

First presidential debate leaves UL-Lafayette students with much to consider


LAFAYETTE, La. (KLFY) – All eyes were on Monday’s presidential debate across the country, including the young people in Acadiana.

Groups across the UL-Lafayette campus showed up for the watch party, watching the debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

The Black Male Leadership Association, UL Christiana Smith African American Alumni Chapter, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority and the Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity hosted the watch party on UL-Lafayette’s campus.

Many students had a variety of opinions going into the debate.

“I know a lot of people who are saying they don’t want to vote at all because they don’t want to vote for either or but I’m like you have to vote at least for someone,” Nykei Thomas said, vice president of the Black Male Leadership Association.

“They don’t want to see them attacking each other’s issues, they want to see what their actual issues are,” Gabrielle Semien, president of the Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority.

“[Higher education] affects us so we really can see what we do because of budget cuts because we are the future being the youth and prime age at our lives,” Kelton Jessie said, vice president of the Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity.

Some students said they were voting for the very first time this election and this was their first debate they’ve ever watched.

State Representative Vincent Pierre spoke at the watch party. Pierre said this election is crucial for young participation.

“Everyone can talk about how you’re going to get out and vote, when you are going to register to vote and the things we can do to be a part of this elective process,” Pierre said.

Students were able to register to vote at the watch party.

The next presidential debate between Clinton and Trump is Sunday, October 9th
19 2016-09-27
Lafayette

Former UL communications professor dies at 44


Aurora Auter, 44, who taught interpersonal and organizational communication at UL Lafayette from 2005-2014, died Monday morning after a long battle with brain cancer.

She was the wife of UL Lafayette mass communication professor Phil Auter, Ph.D.

A native of Toledo, Ohio, Auter earned bachelor’s degrees in sociology and communication at the University of Evansville in Indiana and her master’s in communication from the University of West Florida.

“Aurora had an infectious energy and an impressive clarity of thought,” said Lucian Dinu, Ph.D., interim head of the UL Lafayette communication department. “She could put in a few words ideas that made an impact.”

Besides her husband, she is survived by four children, Ariella Robinson, 23; Aisha Auter, 18; Aaron Auter, 15; and Aryanna Auter, 8; and her parents, Calvin Smith and Angelia Bell of Toledo.

The family has asked that in lieu of flowers donations be made in her name to Miles Perret Cancer Services.

The family is having a private memorial service. Her remains will be cremated.


19 2016-09-23
Associated Press

2 administrative positions filled at Louisiana-Lafayette


LAFAYETTE, La. (AP) - Two administrative posts at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette have been officially filled.
The university says in a Thursday news release that the University of Louisiana Board of Supervisors recently approved the appointment of David Danahar as interim provost.
Danahar fills the seat vacated by Jim Henderson, who became vice president for Academic and Student Affairs for the University of Wisconsin System.
The board also approved the appointment of Bobbie DeCuir as dean of the University College on the Louisiana-Lafayette campus, which was formerly known as the College of General Studies.
DeCuir has been interim dean of University College since 2012.
Copyright © 2016 The Washington Times, LLC.

19 2016-09-23
Lafayette

Don't miss these events in the outlying areas of south Louisiana (Sept. 23-29)


SCIENCE ON THE BAYOU: 7 p.m., The Jefferson Street Pub, 500 Jefferson Street, Lafayette. Enjoy two exciting talks from Phyllis Baudoin Griffard, Ph.D., Instructor, Department of Biology, University of Louisiana-Lafayette and Dr. Beth Stauffer, Assistant Professor (and Science on the Bayou organizer), Department of Biology, UL-Lafayette.
19 2016-09-23
Lafayette

Town hall meeting pin points education


Educators, parents and student discussed education and ways to improve learning in the classroom.

Town hall meetings titled ‘Lafayette Next’ wrapped up its series with a discussion on education and the important role it plays in the future of our community.

During the meeting, a panel answered questions regarding problems in the educational system. Tracey Landry is a principal at a school in Breaux Bridge. She said a big issue educators are battling is loss of interest.

“We’ll have to find new ways, new teaching strageties to get them encouraged and engaged because engagement is the first step to be able to learn.”

The panelists included Superintendent Don Aguillard, UL-Lafayette professors, and even a Lafayette Parish student.

State represenative Vincent Pierre said a student’s perspective is vital to finding solutions.

“It’s always good to have a student just to tell us what they are feeling and what they would like to have and what they would like to see.”

Alexis Arceneaux attended the meeting. Ahe is the first person in her family to attend college. Arceneaux said education has given her an opportunity for a better future.

“Education takes you very far. Most people don’t even look at you twice if you don’t have certain backgrounds in education, so I think education is very important.”

Pierre said he hopes the community takes action and helps the school system create a better and more successful environment for students.


19 2016-09-22
Lafayette

Coke machine gives free soda for a hug


VIDEO
19 2016-09-22
Lafayette

Photo exhibit goes beyond dancehalls


Viewers would expect a dancehall photo exhibit at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette to have images of drinking musicians and dancing couples. But the pictures are also snapshots of south Louisiana culture from as far back as the 1930s.

Mothers are shown in cry rooms, trying to make their children “fais do do,” or go to sleep. The French phrase evolved into a term to describe live, Cajun dances.

Another picture has accordion legend Aldus Roger playing over a table crammed with unlikely items — a case of beer, crucifix, bag of rice, fifth of Scotch and small statue of a naked couple. The mismatched items were donations for a benefit to help someone in need.

Photographer Philip Gould said the halls were more than just places to dance.

“The whole community revolved around them,” said Gould. “I hope people get a sense of the whole, geographic landscape. Buildings that were here are gone.

“One thing or another got them. You go around the (exhibit) room and there’s place after place that’s not there anymore.

“There’s still a number of them that are pretty viable. I hope people appreciate their value. Their role in the community is different now.”

Past dancehalls and the handful that remain are the focus of “Cajun Dance Halls and Zydeco Clubs: Then and Now,” an ongoing exhibit at the University Art Museum on the UL campus. Presented in partnership with Festivals Acadiens et Créoles and the Center for Louisiana Studies, the exhibit features 130 photos and film clips from the Archives of Cajun and Creole Folklore and “Ghost of Good Times,” a forthcoming book from UL Press from Gould and Daily Advertiser music and entertainment writer Herman Fuselier.

Gould, Fuselier and filmmaker John “Pudd” Sharp are part of a Louisiana Dancehall Panel Discussion at 6 p.m. Sept. 28 at the museum. The event, and book signing that follows, is free and open to the public.

The Blue Moon Club, New Iberia.
The Blue Moon Club, New Iberia. (Photo: Philip Gould)
Gould has been taking pictures of Louisiana music, architecture and culture since 1974, when he moved to the state from California. The Blue Moon Club, a defunct Cajun club in New Iberia, was one of his first assignments. He photographed the last performance there in 1978.

Sharp, the assistant director for research at the Center for Louisiana Studies, developed an interest in dancehalls while doing music research. Little information existed on the clubs, he discovered.

Sharp began compiling a list of dancehall names, which started at 20 and now includes more than 1,600.

“I thought I’d love to see pictures of these places, but I had a hard time finding pictures,” said Sharp. “I found a little information here and there. I said somebody should get to work on this.

“If you want the information, it’s inside people’s heads. Then I got a grant to make a film about it and I really started in earnest.”

Sharp’s film should be complete by early 2017. He hopes the photo exhibit sparks more interest in the region’s disappearing dancehalls.

“I hope people say, ‘I want to go. How many of these places are left? Where are they? I want to go there.’

“I hope people get some idea of the sense of community that used to exist in these places. We still have it, but it’s shifted focus and it shifted location.”

Want to go?

What: Louisiana Dancehall Panel Discussion

When: 6 p.m. Sept. 28

Where: University Art Museum, 710 E. St. Mary Blvd.

Admission; Free

Information: hilliardmuseum.org


19 2016-09-22
Lafayette

UL holds career fair


UL is hosting a Career Day today and tomorrow in the student union ballroom.

The Career Day is an opportunity for students and alumni to meet with employers from multiple companies in one location. Tomorrow from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. representatives from Engineering, Science, and Technology fields will be on hand to answer questions and take resumes.


19 2016-09-21
Lafayette

Fate of UPA Drive bridge decided


A bridge adjacent to the University of Louisiana at Lafayette campus that's been closed for more than a year will be demolished and replaced with a pedestrian-only bridge.

The UPA Drive Bridge allowed residents of the UPA apartment complex vehicular and pedestrian access to the UL campus until it was closed in April 2015 when it was determined to be structurally unsound, according to Tom Carrol, Lafayette Consolidated Government public works director.

The bridge crosses St. John Coulee and runs from Lewis Street to University Place Apartments on Oak Crest Drive. There's some uncertainty over whether the bridge is city property or private property, he said.

It will cost about $700,000 to replace the bridge.

On Tuesday, the Lafayette City-Parish Council approved an agreement with 200 Oakcrest LLC, which owns the apartment complex.

Carroll said LCG will contribute $100,000 for removing the UPA bridge and repairing the coulee, transferring any rights it has to the bridge to 200 Oakcrest LLC. The company will build a new pedestrian bridge and maintain it.

Also at Tuesday's council meeting, Mayor-President Joel Robideaux said LCG is entering the final phase of flood debris pickup. The final rounds of debris collection will take place over the next week or two. Residents who were flooded should get debris to the roadsides.

Anyone who believes they've been overlooked should call LCG at 337-291-8517, he said.
19 2016-09-21
Lafayette

UL host school supply drive for Livingston Parish


UL students are giving back . The UL Lafayette Department of Curriculum and Instruction is hosting a school supply drive today and tomorrow to benefit the teachers and students of Livingston Parish who were affected by the flood earlier this month. Over one-third of all the schools in Livingston Parish were destroyed by flooding, according to UL there is no timeline for when these schools will reopen. The drive is being held in the quad from 8:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m.
19 2016-09-20
Lafayette

UL's RCAF Priority Points System ready after delays


The RCAF’s much-awaited Priority Points System finally is ready for rollout.

The system ranks UL program supporters and ticket-holders for the Ragin’ Cajun Athletic Foundation, UL’s athletic fundraising arm, based on current levels and past history of giving to the program and season ticket purchases.

The rankings are being used to determine priority for matters including re-seating at two renovated venues for UL sports, the Cajundome for basketball and M.L. “Tigue” Moore Field for baseball, starting in the current 2016-17 school year.

After a couple delays, RCAF executive director Jim Harris said Monday, the system is ready to be implemented.

“Originally our deadline with Ticketmaster to have Priority Points up and running was Aug. 1,” Harris said. “That’s the date we’d been shooting for since (last) December.

“That has been delayed on two occasions now, and really it comes down to data conversion issues we’ve had moving from our university data base … to our athletic department data base.

“What we’ve been working on,” Harris added, “is on data all the way back the early (1960s) from our university system and converting over several hundreds of thousands of records.”


THE ADVERTISER
RCAF's Harris discusses UL's priority points system

But that’s all been converted now, and Harris said Monday afternoon that after a couple of tests the “first accurate run of the system” was scheduled for Monday night.

With rankings and other information loaded in UL’s “My Account Manager” system on its athletics website, ticketholders and supporters can expect to be told they can see their point totals online some time Wednesday.

Reseating of Cajundome begins next week, Harris said. The arena is scheduled to reopen Dec. 1, with UL games before then being played at the Cajuns’ former home, Blackham Coliseum.

UL basketball season-ticket holders already have been given the option of either keeping their newly assigned seats, or pursuing seating elsewhere with options based on the priority system.

Both the Cajundome and The Tigue are in the midst of major renovation projects, and planned future major renovation for UL’s Cajun Field football stadium is part the school’s athletic facilities masterplan.


19 2016-09-19
Lafayette

Suspects sought in Cajun Field burglary


University of Louisiana at Lafayette campus police are searching for two suspects in a Friday night burglary at Cajun Field.

Police said two males were caught on a surveillance video entering Gate A on bicycles. Police believe the suspects then jumped a fence at around 10:44 p.m. After entering the area, both subjects are seen removing items from the concessions area then walking toward the grassy area, police said.

One of the suspects is described as a white male wearing a red-and-gray beanie, dark-gray T-shirt and dark-blue or black pants. The other suspect is described as also white wearing a gray T-shirt and dark-blue or black pants.

Anyone with have any information about this incident or can identify the suspects, please contact UL Police Department at 482-6447.


19 2016-09-19
Lafayette

UL-Lafayette College of Business hosts flood recovery seminars


LAFAYETTE, La (KLFY) – UL-Lafayette College of Business administration hosted the first of two free seminars Friday afternoon designed to help Acadiana residents affected by the recent flooding.

About 75 people turned out to learn more about what flood victims should know as they go through the recovery process.

The informational seminar featured speakers from State Farm and the Louisiana Department of Revenue.

“We talked about the adjustment process and how to establish a rapport with your State Farm claim representative,” said State Farm representative, Bill Gourgues.

Dr. Gwen Fontenot, Interim Dean for the College of Business at UL-Lafayette, says this seminar was a way for the public to be educated on flood recovery resources out there that are available.

“There were so many people in the community that were devastated and we knew that going through something like this, there are so many areas that you just don’t know about because you’ve never been through this before,” said Dr. Fontenot.

Gourgues was one of several speakers at the seminar who spoke on what he says are key things to know before filing a claim.

“We ask our customers to register their policies before disaster strikes, also to review their coverage with their agents before disaster strikes so at claim time our customers are informed about what they need to do next,” said Gourgues.

Ellen Cook, Assistant Vice President of Academic Affairs at UL-Lafayette, was affected by the recent flooding and says she walked away from the seminar with a lot of useful information, learning about things such as what casualty losses are and rules for tax deductions.

“I think that at the end of this afternoon people will feel a little more secure about their situation,” said Cook.

There will be one more free seminar Saturday from 9am- 12pm at the Heymann Center.

Dr. Fontenot asks that attendees pre-register for the seminar through floodrecovery.eventbrite.com, but she says it’s not required and the public is welcomed to just show up.


19 2016-09-16
Lafayette

Constitution Day at UL


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette and its College of Liberal Arts held its annual Constitution Day on Thursday.

The event included live music, followed by a reading of the entire Constitution by students, faculty and other people in the community. UL Lafayette Constitutional scholar Rick Swanson was the emcee, and free copies of the Constitution were distributed. The League of Women Voters of Lafayette hosted a voter registration table.

Tonight at 7 p.m. the Political Science Club will sponsor a screening of “Lincoln” in Oliver Hall Auditorium. Dr. Ian Beamish, a visiting assistant professor of history, will provide historical commentary on the film.

All Constitution Day events are free and open to the public.
19 2016-09-15
Lafayette

Zachary Richard, others weigh in on new airport terminal's design


The public will have a better idea of what Lafayette’s new airport terminal will look like this spring.

Lafayette Regional Airport director Steven Picou told the commission on Wednesday that the administration and contracted firm Sides & Associates has been meeting with community stakeholders to get their take on the terminal's design.

A portion of the 107,520-square-foot terminal will be funded through a voter-approved 1 cent sales tax, which netted $32.6 million from November to April.

“We met with all of our stakeholders a few weeks ago and wrapped it up this week with commissioners giving their input on things they like and don’t like at the terminal building,” Picou told the commission.

The terminal is expected to be completed in 2020.

Those who have weighed in on the new terminal’s design include University of Louisiana at Lafayette President Joseph Savoie, architect Lynn Guidry, representatives of the Lafayette Economic Development Authority and One Acadiana, UL’s School of Architecture and Design, Lafayette City-Parish Council members, Lafayette Convention and Visitors Commission CEO Ben Berthelot, and Cajun musician and author Zachary Richard.

“Larry (Sides) will attest that we all thought Zachary was going to come in and say, ‘Make it Cajun,’” Picou said “No, that’s not what he said. He said ‘Make sure it is sensitive to all the groups that make up Acadiana and not just Cajun history and culture.’”

More than 6,000 public surveys were sent requesting feedback the airport’s performance, Sides told the commission. About 800 responded were returned. Feedback will be incorporated into the terminal’s design as the project moves forward, he said.

The terminal will include five boarding gates, a full-service restaurant and a gift shop. The airport’s parking lot will also be doubled.

Picou said the terminal commission’s goal is to have about 30 percent of the design available for review by March.
19 2016-09-14
Lafayette

UL research projects help city become a Smart Gigabit Community


An application that would allow public safety officials to access videos submitted by the public during an emergency is one of two being developed at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette that helped the City of Lafayette become a Smart Gigabit Community.

The app, called Crisis Eye, would provide a platform for uploading real-time videos that could help law enforcement or fire officials monitor a crisis, especially between the time a 911 call is made, and responders arrive.

The project was recently recognized at the US Ignite Smart Cities Innovation Summit in Austin as “Most Likely to Have a Big Impact.”

A second app being developed at UL, a virtual reality project capable of live streaming 3-D video within a shared virtual environment, duplicates an environment via computer-generated animation.

It can enable high school students to learn about alternative energy technology and research at the University’s Cleco Alternative Energy Center in Crowley, for example. Students wear a virtual reality headset to navigate a virtual energy center, including huge mirrored panels that capture sunlight for solar thermal power production.

The virtual reality app earned “Most Imaginative Gigabit App” at the US Ignite summit.

The two apps helped Lafayette become one of 15 communities in the country named members of the national network of Smart Gigabit Communities.

Each of those communities “has made a significant commitment toward leveraging next-generation smart city and Internet technologies to keep pace with the world’s rapidly changing technology and economy,” according to information from US Ignite. The nonprofit organization, based in Washington, D.C., fosters the creation of applications that benefit the public. The Smart Gigabit Communities initiative is sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

Each member of the smart Gigabit communities network has developed two advanced technology applications. Members have agreed to share those apps with other communities.

Dr. Ramesh Kolluru, vice president for Research, Innovation and Economic Development at UL Lafayette, accepted the award on behalf of the city.

“The University has a strong partnership with the visionary leaders in the community, including LUS Fiber and Lafayette Consolidated Government, that have the foresight to build the infrastructure for high-speed internet that allows university researchers to create forward thinking applications,” he said.

City-Parish President Joel Robideaux said he was “extremely proud of the global recognition that Lafayette, UL and LUS Fiber have received because of this award.”

“Our community benefits from both a world-class research university and community-owned fiber optic system. I look forward to seeing more applications which enhance the lives of our citizens resulting from this collaboration,” Robideaux said.

Learn more about US Ignite and its Smart Gigabit Communities at https://www.us-ignite.org/
19 2016-09-14
Lafayette

Two new apps earn UL national recognition



19 2016-09-14
Lafayette

Annual Constitution Day set at UL


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette and its College of Liberal Arts hosts the annual Constitution Day on Thursday.

At 11:40 a.m., a brief performance by Cajun musicians Marie-Laure Boudreau and Chris Segura will take place on East St. Mary Boulevard, across from Dupré Library, followed by a reading of the entire Constitution by students, faculty and other people in the community. UL Lafayette Constitutional scholar Rick Swanson will emcee, and free copies of the Constitution will be distributed. The League of Women Voters of Lafayette will sponsor a voter registration table.

At 2 p.m., the Office of Campus Diversity will host a “Black Lives Matter” panel moderated by Dr. D’Weston Haywood, a UL Lafayette assistant professor of African-American history at Bayou Bijou in the Student Union.

At 7 p.m. the Political Science Club will sponsor a screening of “Lincoln” in Oliver Hall Auditorium. Dr. Ian Beamish, a visiting assistant professor of history, will provide historical commentary on the film.

All Constitution Day events are free and open to the public. Participants are encouraged to bring brown bag lunches.


19 2016-09-13
Regional/National

Georgia Sanctuary Provides Lab Chimps with a Luxurious and Loving Place to Retire


Over the years there has been a shift in how chimpanzees are viewed in a research setting. Originally the animals were used in laboratory testing because of their similarity to humans, but over time scientists have found these close relations do not benefit research in the way they thought they would. This means many laboratories are working to release their chimps to a life outside the research environment.

While this is great news for the animals, it creates a new problem. Where do these chimps, many who have spent their entire lives in a lab, go?

Project Chimps has created an answer for the 220 chimps retiring from the New Iberia Research Center, which is part of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. The non-profit was specifically created in 2014 by a group of chimpanzee, non-profit, philanthropic, and legal experts to help create a happily ever after for the primates being released from medical research.

Courtesy Project Chimps
COURTESY PROJECT CHIMPS
Heading up this important work is Project Chimps president and CEO Sarah Baeckler Davis, a primatologist who saw the opportunity to help the animals she has devoted her life to in a big way and seized it. Through Project Chimps, Davis was able to secure an agreement with the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s New Iberia Research Center (NIRC) to take in all of its retiring chimps and provide them with a lifetime of love and care.

The golden years of these 220 chimps will be spent at a sanctuary built in Northern Georgia, designed to cater to every wish these apes could have. Amenities include oodles of enrichment toys, large open outdoor spaces filled with rolling hills to roam, a kitchen designed by Rachael Ray, a full veterinary clinic, breakfast smoothies and more.



Courtesy Project Chimps
COURTESY PROJECT CHIMPS
“The biggest difference is we’re bending over backwards to meet their needs and we don’t have any other priorities,” Davis told PEOPLE on how the chimps’ lives will change at their new home.

The sanctuary has scheduled the chimps to arrive in social group transfers from the NIRC of about ten at a time, and welcomed the first group this week. The primates stepped off the trucks into their new home, staffed with animal lovers dedicated to providing them with the most satisfying life possible. While the facility was created for the primates from the NIRC, it was built to house roughly 300 chimps, so future retired animals looking for a home won’t be turned away.

Courtesy Project Chimps
COURTESY PROJECT CHIMPS
“We are pleased the first group of chimpanzees made it safely to Georgia and expect other transfers to go as smoothly. We feel confident that Project Chimps will provide them with the high-quality care that they have been accustomed to receiving,” Dr. Francois J. Villinger, NIRC director, said in a statement.

The NIRC has taken an active role in finding its chimps an ideal place for retirement, with the University of Louisiana at Lafayette contributing funds to help the sanctuary.



Taking care of hundreds of chimps for the rest of their lives is expensive work that takes the dedication of dozens of individuals, but Davis is confident all of it will pay off and is excited to have the opportunity to help these animals.



Courtesy Project Chimps
COURTESY PROJECT CHIMPS
“I feel privileged to help them live out the rest of their lives,” she said of Project Chimps. Davis is also looking forward to the day that the work of the sanctuary comes to an end, because this will signal an even larger accomplishment.

“On the horizon, we see the opportunity to put ourselves out of business. We don’t want any more, we don’t want any babies born into captivity. It’s not where they belong,” she said.

To help Davis and Project Chimps provide the best retired life possible for these primates, visit the group’s website for more information on the sanctuary and how to donate.
19 2016-09-12
Lafayette

Former UL-Lafayette football coach's racial discrimination suit headed for third trial


A Baton Rouge judge has refused to do what the University of Louisiana at Lafayette could not persuade a jury to do earlier this year: rule in the school's favor in a long-running racial discrimination lawsuit filed by its first black head football coach.

Six months after an East Baton Rouge Parish jury deadlocked on the issue of whether Jerry Baldwin was fired in 2001 because he is black, state District Judge Todd Hernandez declined to throw out Baldwin's suit.

RELATED

Mistrial declared in former UL-Lafayette head football coach’s discrimination lawsuit
Mistrial declared in former UL-Lafayette head football coach’s discrimination lawsuit
A Baton Rouge judge declared a mistrial Thursday night after a jury deliberated for more tha…
The ruling means the suit is headed for a third jury trial.

"The court ... finds that reasonable fair-minded persons ... could arrive at a verdict favorable to (Baldwin) on the issue of (UL-Lafayette's) liability for his termination because of his race," Hernandez, who presided over the March trial, wrote Aug. 30.

The university's lawyers argued to the judge in late July that Baldwin was fired after the third year of his four-year contract because his record was pitiful.

RELATED

Mistrial declared in racial discrimination trial of ex-UL-Lafayette coach _lowres
Judge to consider whether 15-year court battle should continue over firing of UL-Lafayette coach
Four months after a jury deadlocked on the issue, an attorney for the University of Louisian…
"Jerry Baldwin was removed as head coach and his contract was paid out because of his record of 6 wins and 27 losses. Coach Baldwin had the worst record in UL's 115-year history," Lawrence Marino, one of the school's attorneys, wrote Thursday in an email response to Hernandez's ruling.

"Throughout the country, replacing a losing head coach is common and appropriate," he added. "UL was a leader in diversity in athletics and academics throughout (former UL-Lafayette) President (Ray) Authement's 34-year tenure. This leadership continues today."

Authement, who is white, hired and fired Baldwin.

Baldwin's attorney, former UL-Lafayette and NFL football player Karl Bernard, said Friday that in terms of the university support Baldwin received compared to his predecessor and successor, "he was treated differently." Bernard also contends Baldwin inherited a very poor team.

"I believe we have a great case," he stressed. "We will ask for a new trial date."

RELATED

New racial discrimination trial starts for UL-Lafayette football coach, fired in 2001 after three years on the job
New racial discrimination trial starts for UL-Lafayette football coach, fired in 2001 after three years on the job
Jerry Baldwin, the first black head football coach at the University of Louisiana at Lafayet…
A different East Baton Rouge Parish jury awarded Baldwin $2 million in 2007 after concluding that university officials breached his contract. The jurors also decided that race played a role in his firing but was not the sole reason for the coach losing his job.

A state appeals court panel threw out that verdict two years later and ordered a new trial. The panel cited jury selection, jury verdict form and expert witness issues.

Hernandez ruled in 2001 that UL-Lafayette acted within its contractual rights in firing Baldwin, but an appellate court reversed the judge. The state's highest court then ruled in 2014 that the school did not violate Baldwin's contract.

Baldwin is a pastor at New Living Word Ministries in Ruston and principal of New Living Word School, where he coaches.
19 2016-09-09
Lafayette

First group of retired chimps leave NIRC for sanctuary in Georgia


The first social group of nine retired research chimpanzees from the New Iberia Research Center arrived at the new Project Chimps sanctuary in northern Georgia on Sept. 8.

Project Chimps, a nonprofit organization, secured an agreement with the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s NIRC to resettle and provide lifetime care for the center’s entire research chimpanzee population. This was the first of many transfers that will be made to relocate all 220 chimpanzees from New Iberia, La.

NIRC chimpanzees will be moved in small social groups, according to Sarah Baeckler Davis, president and CEO of Project Chimps. Each group will be composed of up to 10 chimpanzees.

Dr. Francois J. Villinger, NIRC director, said, “We are pleased the first group of chimpanzees made it safely to Georgia and expect other transfers to go as smoothly. We feel confident that Project Chimps will provide them with the high-quality care that they have been accustomed to receiving.”

The University of Louisiana at Lafayette is contributing funding for the chimpanzees’ care at the sanctuary.

Baeckler Davis said Project Chimps is “grateful for the assistance of NIRC in working toward this day. We will be actively fundraising to secure support from the public to ensure the expeditious resettlement of the chimpanzees.”

For more information about the sanctuary, visit www.ProjectChimps.org.


19 2016-09-08
Lafayette

UL offers free flood seminars


The B.I. Moody III College of Business Administration at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette will host two free seminars designed to help Acadiana residents affected by recent flooding.

The seminars are titled “After the Flood: Getting Started on Recovery.” The first session will be held from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 16, at Moody Hall Auditorium on campus. The second will be held from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday, Sept. 17 at the Heymann Performing Arts Center Ballroom 1.

Gerald H. Schreiber, Jr., a certified public accountant who specializes in post-disaster taxes and finances, will lead the seminars.

Schreiber will provide information and answer questions on topics such as personal and business casualty loss and tax deduction protocol. He also will delve into dealing with agencies such as the Internal Revenue Service, Federal Emergency Management Agency, and the Small Business Administration.

Acadiana Open Channel will film the Friday seminar to air at a later date that can be viewed by residents who are unable to attend either session.

Event sponsors are Lafayette Consolidated Government and State Farm Insurance.

Parking will be available at the campus lot near E.K. Long Gym or the tower near Girard Park Circle.

Attendees are required to pre-register at floodrecovery.eventbrite.com.


19 2016-09-08
Lafayette

Fig auction raises $3,500 toward UL endowed chair


Some came for the figs. Some came to remember the man they knew. Some just wanted a beer. Whatever their motivation, about 55 people raised $3,500 at a fig auction Tuesday at Jefferson Street Pub.

The funds will help establish a new endowed professorship at University of Louisiana at Lafayette College of Education. Layne Darby St. Julien and a group of close friends of her late husband, John St. Julien, launched a nonprofit to raise money for an endowed chair honoring him.

Volunteers started by picking figs and canning them in July, and Tuesday's auction was the first fundraiser of St. Julien's Goods, a brand referring not only to goods as produce but also to the good John did for the community, his wife explained.





Layne Darby St. Julien discusses her non-profit, St. Julien's Goods,to create an endowed chair at UL Lafayette in honor of her late husband John St. Julien. Lee Celano

RELATED: Locals to sell fig preserves to fund UL endowed chair

Ola Prejean saw that good firsthand as she worked with John on the League of Women Voters of Lafayette.

Auctioneer Cecil Brown calls for bids for jars of St.Buy Photo
Auctioneer Cecil Brown calls for bids for jars of St. Julien's Goods figs Tuesday. All proceeds go toward establishing an endowed chair at UL in John St. Julien's name. (Photo: SCOTT CLAUSE/THE ADVERTISER)
"He was such a huge part of our organization," she said, adding that "he was just one of the good fellows."

So of course she planned to bid on a jar or two Tuesday.

"Even if I didn't like figs, I'd bid anyway," Prejean said.

The organization also donated to the fund Tuesday night.

Dane Hare, manager at the UL Alumni Center, said his connection to the university wasn't the only reason he attended the auction. It was the work volunteers had put into the effort that caught his eye as well as it being a one-of-a-kind fundraiser.

"I go to a lot of fundraisers, and this is one of the more unique ones," Hare said.

All funds raised from the figs will be used in the UL chair effort, beginning with the live auction, which featured an auctioneer, fig tastings, drinks and specially decorated cans. The figs are whole, not jam, and will be available at ArtWalk downtown Saturday for $25 per jar.

​"It's a great way to find some of the see money we're going to need," said Erin May, John's stepdaughter. "It's a great start."

Specially decorated jars of St. Julien's Goods figsBuy Photo
Specially decorated jars of St. Julien's Goods figs were part of a live auction Tuesday to raise money to establish an endowed chair at UL in John St. Julien's name. (Pictured- Layne St Julien (L) and Erin May) (Photo: SCOTT CLAUSE/THE ADVERTISER)
St. Julien and the group established a fund with the UL Foundation to create the endowed professorship. It has about $2,000 in it right now, and folks can donate directly to it. They have about a decade to raise $600,000, which would be matched with $400,000 from the state to reach the $1 million goal.

They work toward that number in six steps of $100,000, she explained. Once contributions reach $60,000, the state kicks in $40,000, and so on, St. Julien explained.

But the proceeds from the live auction and from future projects are for the St. Julien's Goods Foundation that the group just established. Going through the nonprofit allows them to use some of the money in their next fundraising project and make money to donate to the UL fund.


Subscribers can win
FOOTBALL GIVEAWAYS EVERY WEEK
totaling $7,000 in value
TOUCHDOWN!

19 2016-09-06
Lafayette

UL-Lafayette researchers explore how sea anemones could help hearing loss in humans


A discovery in the treatment of hearing loss made at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette comes from one of the most unlikely of creatures: the humble sea anemone.

Professors Glen Watson, Karen Smith and Pei-Ciao Tang have unveiled the fruits of almost 20 years of research exploring how proteins secreted by the sea-dwelling invertebrates to repair hair cells on their tentacles also might be able to repair damaged hair cells in the ears of mammals as well.

“In the mid-1990s, we found out that the hairs on sea anemones were vibration-sensitive like the hair cells in the inner ear,” Watson said. “Sea anemones use these hair cells to detect the movements of their prey so they know it’s not inanimate debris that bumped into it and it can sting it.”

Watson explained that when the sea anemone goes to sting and eat its prey, its prey will make large movements to try to escape, damaging the hair cells on the anemone’s tentacles.

He said methods were found in the late 1990s to damage hair cells that mimicked what is known as overstimulation, or damage to inner hair cells caused by loud noise.

“So at that time, I thought, ‘Well, if anybody could get over this kind of trauma, it would be a sea anemone,’ ” Watson said.

Watson said sea anemones are extremely resilient and tests showed that after damaging the hair cells, the anemones repaired the damaged cells in only four hours, far faster than what could be considered normal cell replacement.

That was when Watson discovered that sea anemones secrete proteins that repair the cells, instead of replacing them like in other animals such as birds.

“If you severely damage a hair cell in a mammal, the cell dies and is not replaced,” Watson said. “If you severely damage a hair cell in a bird, it’s replaced because the cell next to it divides to produce two cells to replace the dead one.”

When they used water in which sea anemones had gone through this repair process on another set of animals that had just had their hair cells damaged, the animals recovered in only eight minutes.

Since this discovery, Watson has tested the proteins on blind cave fish. The fish are in subterranean waters near south Texas and Mexico and are so completely blind that they must rely on hair cells detecting the movement of the currents to survive. During his testing, Watson saw dramatic results in hair cell recovery in these animals as well.

However, it wasn’t until Watson, Tang and Smith tried the tests on tissue cultures of baby mouse cochlea that they confirmed that the sea anemone proteins also worked on mammals.

Tang, who worked on the project as part of her dissertation research, and others on the team found delivering the sea anemone repair proteins to the cochlea to be extremely difficult.

“It’s better to do (cultures) on the first tests and work on a delivery system in live animals for a later test,” Smith said. “The important part at this stage is proving that the sea anemone proteins that repair the anemone would also work on mammalian systems.”

During testing, the hair cells were traumatized, treated and then saw almost 100 percent recovery of damaged cells.

Watson said the process would most benefit human health in situations where the hair cells have been damaged but have not yet died. Although this won’t help people who already have fully lost their hearing, he said, it would help people who have experienced a trauma and stop them from going deaf if the treatment was administered quickly enough.

The most notable beneficiary of such treatment would be soldiers in war zones or other people who were near an explosion that would otherwise have permanently damaged their hearing or deafened them.

However, delivering the proteins is extremely difficult and a process to do this needs to be developed before this treatment could see use in humans.

“Although it only has those special circumstances like that where it would be applicable, it still offers hope where there was not much beforehand,” Watson said. “But now we know the identity of these proteins, so hopefully the field will grow.”
19 2016-09-06
Lafayette

Fig preserves to support endowed chair in honor of late Lafayette education advocate John St. Julien


Friends of the late John St. Julien, an educator and longtime advocate for public education who died in January, are hoping to use figs to plant the seeds for an endowed professorship in his honor at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

A fig preserve fundraiser is 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday at Ceaux on Lee Avenue in downtown Lafayette.

"John was big on figs. He was passionate about figs," said Mike Stagg, one of the event's organizers.

Preserves are available for a $25 donation, and select jars decorated by artist Katy Richard will be auctioned.

There will also be fig tastings, music and drinks.

Stagg said the figs were picked locally this summer, and 280 jars are available.

The proceeds will help fund of an ambitious plan to raise $600,000 to endow a UL-Lafayette chair in St. Julien's name. If the group raises $600,000, the state offers a $400,000 match to create the endowed chair.

Figs are just the start, Stagg said.

Future events are already in the works, including a possible conference next summer in Lafayette focusing on technology, education and community building, St. Julien's three passions, Stagg said.

He said the fundraising effort draws on the experience of the group that successfully raised $600,000 through several years of concerts and other grass roots events to create an endowed music professorship in honor of the late Dr. Tommy Comeaux, a pathologist who was deeply involved in the local music scene.

"It wasn't any one thing that raised the money," Stagg said.

For more information, visit www.facebook.com/stjuliensgoods.


19 2016-09-06
Lafayette

Freshman class at UL includes record 160 valedictorians


This fall's freshman class at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette boasts a lot of superlatives.

It has a record number of high school valedictorians, has the highest GPA and ACT score, and is one of the largest classes. All signs point to this being the most academically prepared incoming class in school history.

More than 160 valedictorians are enrolled as freshmen, up 44 percent over last year’s 111. The class has the highest cumulative grade point average — 3.39 — from high school and highest average ACT composite score with 23.87.

These scores break the record held by last year’s freshman class, which had a cumulative 3.32 GPA and an average 23.4 ACT composite score.

Also, 626 first-time freshmen enrolled in the University’s Honors Program, which is 89 percent more than the 332 first-time freshmen who joined last year.

Read more: LSU's Shreveport medical school on life support | Locals to sell figs to fund UL endowed chair

This class has more than 3,000 students and will likely be the third-largest freshman class in school history, said DeWayne Bowie, vice president for Enrollment Management at UL. Official enrollment numbers will not be finalized until mid-September.

“Our reputation for providing plenty of support for valedictorians and other high academic achievers is growing,” Bowie said. “We have a superb Honors Program and offer special scholarships for exceptional students.”

UL's Enrollment Management staff helped freshmen and other students overcome challenges like recent historic flooding in south Louisiana and changes in the state’s TOPS scholarship program to enroll this fall.

Read more: $2.7M grant to help SLCC better serve African-American students | Fewer students are enrolled in Louisiana colleges

“We postponed tuition payment deadlines, provided payment plan options for students, and provided campus housing to as many freshmen as possible," Bowie said. "We worked nights and weekends to adjust scholarship and financial aid packages to do the best we could to assist our students.”

19 2016-09-06
Lafayette

ULL scientists say surface water use key to Chicot's sustainability


LAFAYETTE, LA -
The Chicot Aquifer. It's Louisiana's largest drinking water supply and the primary source of irrigation for Acadiana's rice farmers. Even Southwest Louisiana's plants draw its waters for coolant.

But scientists at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette say farmers and industry have been drafting the Chicot at a rate far greater than what nature replenishes - a trend that has grim repercussions for future generations.

"Wells will start to go dry; we'll have to dig deeper wells to get to that water," said David Borrok, ULL's director of geosciences. "And then ultimately you're going to be sucking in saline water, especially near the coast."

Borrok said overdrafting has caused the Chicot's groundwater to drop a foot per year over the past century.

"It's lowered the ability for the water to rise to the level it used to be able to rise to when you put in a well," he added.

To reverse this trend, Borrok has led a three-year study - funded by the National Science Foundation - to find ways to repurpose the region's groundwater for farming and industrial use.

"So we can make it sustainable for, you know, the next thousand years, basically," he said.

Borrok and his team recommend ponding - the collecting and storing of the Chicot's surface water in areas without crop.

"Canals and diversions that are put in the exact right positions to provide the greatest opportunity for the greatest number of farmers to use that water," he said, offering another solution.

Borrok also recommends weir systems in existing bayous and other waterways.

"So you raise the level of water when necessary - a foot or two - so it floods the area just a bit in some seasons," he said.

Borrok hopes his study will lead to policy that incentives surface water preservation. He said state officials are looking into policies for the future management of Louisiana's water system.

"It's simply to figure out the best way to manage the surface water where more people can use it," he said.

Copyright 2016 KPLC. All rights reserved.
19 2016-09-06
Lafayette

University to replace diplomas destroyed by recent floods


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette will replace diplomas for alumni whose diplomas were lost or ruined during recent flooding.

UL Lafayette will provide a free paper diploma, often referred to as a “sheet” diploma, to any graduate impacted by recent floods in south Louisiana.

Duplicate diplomas, which can be ordered through the University’s Office of the Registrar, typically cost $17. Replacement diplomas for flood victims will be issued through Sept. 30 at no charge.

They will be printed with the University name that corresponds to the time a graduate received their original diploma.

The University was known as the University of Southwestern Louisiana from 1960 until 1999, when it became UL Lafayette. It was Southwestern Louisiana Institute from 1921 to 1960 and Southwestern Louisiana Industrial Institute from its founding in 1898 until 1921.

To receive a replacement diploma, alums must fill out a “duplicate diploma request” form that can be downloaded from the UL Lafayette Office of the Registrar’s website.

Applicants must indicate on the form that their diploma was lost during the floods, and include a photo ID with the request.

Applicants also must provide documentation that their house, apartment or office was flooded, explained Dr. DeWayne Bowie, vice president of Enrollment Management.

“Alums who have questions or who want more information about how to obtain a replacement diploma should get in touch with the University’s Office of the Registrar,” Bowie said.

Contact UL Lafayette’s Office of the Registrar at registrar@louisiana.edu or (337) 482-6291.


19 2016-09-01
Lafayette

New UL beer debuts this weekend


Ragin’ Cajuns Genuine Louisiana Lager will be on draft at UL’s first home game and in select stores around Acadiana

RaginBeer
(Photo: Submitted photo)
Just about one year ago to the day, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette and Bayou Teche Brewing made brewing (and educational) history when they released the first officially licensed collegiate beer in the United States.

The idea behind what was to become Ragin’ Cajuns Genuine Louisiana Ale was hatched by the brewery, the university, and Schilling Distributing. The brewers at Bayou Teche Brewing crafted four beer recipes for a tasting panel comprised of representatives from the three organizations.

Of these beers, the tasting panel selected an adaptation of German style known as a Kölsch – albeit a recipe that included south Louisiana’s most important staple, rice.

Beer drinkers, devoted fans and UL alumni have been drinking A LOT of this beer. Crisp and easy drinking, it is perfect for tailgating in sub-tropical climes and for pairing with the well-seasoned Cajun and Creole cuisines found at nearly every Acadiana get-together.

UL did an amazing job on the packaging design and marketing, and Schilling Distributing as well as Bayou Teche Brewing’s other distributors have spent much of the last year working overtime stocking accounts with kegs and bottles.

Since this is a licensed beer, the University earns a royalty for all of the Ragin’ Cajuns Ale sold. Thus it was only a matter of time before other schools in Louisiana concluded that they needed their own beer as well.

Several are in the works, but just recently LSU and Baton Rouge’s Tin Roof Brewing have released the nation’s second officially licensed collegiate beer — Bayou Bengal.

Karlos Knott
Karlos Knott (Photo: File photo)
Currently available only in the Baton Rouge market, the style of this officially licensed beer is a Premium American Lager. I have not got to taste one yet, but I hope to score a six-pack before my weekend’s marathon of football watching.

DRINK FOR A GOOD CAUSE: Beer can be good for your prostate

However, Bayou Teche Brewing, UL and Schilling have not been resting on their collective laurels — they have been clandestinely crafting a second Ragin’ Cajuns recipe.

Called Ragin’ Cajuns Genuine Louisiana Lager, this new beer is a Creole-inspired Cerveza brewed with local honey.

Cerveza – isn’t that Spanish for beer? Yes it is T-Boy!

The red field of the Cajun flag honors not only the Spanish colony that was home to the arriving Acadians, but also to the Spanish immigrants who put down roots in Acadiana.

So we wanted the Ragin’ Cajuns Genuine Louisiana Lager’s recipe to pay homage to this Spanish influence — So Bayou Teche brewed a version of the Mexican amber style of Cerveza known as the Vienna lager.

So what makes a Cerveza “Mexican-style” and not just an American light lager?

A very brief history lesson: In Mexico at the end of the 19th century, German expats began commercially brewing the Vienna-style lager recipes they brought with them to the new world, which have evolved and now loosely become the Mexican lagers we see exported today to U.S. shelves.

FOOTBALL PREVIEW: UL position breakdown

Since Mexico’s climate is a bit warmer and more humid than Germany, the brewers substituted a bit of corn to lighten their beer’s body and flavor and a new, refreshing and yet flavorful style of Cerveza was created.

The new Ragin’ Cajuns Lager recipe also uses a local fermentable to lighten the body and flavor as well. In addition to the traditional corn, this new Cerveza is spiked with local honey harvested by an apiary near the University.

This amber hued beer is refreshingly light bodied yet flavorful. The honey adds a just a touch of floral complexity that pairs perfectly with everything from boudin to vacation time on the beach at Grande Isle.

This second beer, Ragin’ Cajuns Genuine Louisiana Lager will be released on draft at UL’s first home game this weekend, and in select retail accounts around Acadiana. If you’re going to the game you may want to bring your own lime slices for garnish.


19 2016-09-01
Lafayette

Cajundome roof gets a makeover


For a couple of years the Cajundome's iconic dome has been stained with dirt and mildew.

On Wednesday, its $1 million makeover began.

The work is being paid for with revenue from a bond sale secured with hotel/motel taxes.

"They're going to clean it first, prime it and re-coat it," Phil Ashurst, Cajundome operations director, said. "We plan to be done by Dec. 1, before the building opens."


Workers pressure wash the roof of the Cajundome asBuy Photo
Workers pressure wash the roof of the Cajundome as part of 14 million makeover August 31, 2016. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)


Brazos Urethane of Baton Rouge has the contract, he said.

The dome's roof was re-coated in 2003, but the metal part of the roof has never been re-coated since it was erected in 1984, Ashurst said.

The Cajundome also is undergoing a $21 million interior renovation that has it shut down since May.


Workers pressure wash the roof of the Cajundome asBuy Photo
Workers pressure wash the roof of the Cajundome as part of 14 million makeover August 31, 2016. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)


By the numbers

$1 million — cost to clean, prime and re-coat the roof

123,000 square feet -- size of the Cajundome roof

70,000 square feet -- size of the metal part of the Cajundome roof

10 -- number of people working on the roof project

19 2016-08-29
Lafayette

University of Louisiana at Lafayette offers relief to students


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette is relaxing deadlines for paying tuition, raising relief funds and taking other steps to help students and staff affected by the recent flooding across south Louisiana that hit just as classes were starting at the university.

“Our goal is to help students stay in school and make progress toward a degree,” UL-Lafayette President Joseph Savoie said in announcing student relief efforts on Friday.

Vice President of Student Affairs Patricia Cottonham said the university can’t pay entire bills or tuition for everyone, but will help on a case-by-case basis.

“We’re working very closely with the financial aid office to determine if students who are receiving financial aid have any additional eligibility they may be able to receive,” Cottonham said.

She said the university is also helping students without financial aid to apply for help with other school expenses, like books and meals.

On Monday, the University of South Alabama sent a tractor-trailer and four smaller trucks to UL-Lafayette packed with donations that included paper products, cleaning supplies, baby supplies, food, water and clothing.

Cottonham said the donations filled almost three rooms in the Student Union and have been almost completely been given away to flood victims.

“It was very much a benefit to campus community and every sort of gesture helps,” Cottonham said. “Everybody appreciates the hard work and generosity of the people of Mobile, Alabama.”

Cottonham urged anyone who works or attends UL-Lafayette and was affected by the storms to fill out the online form the university sent out last week as it’s the only way the university can know who needs help.

If any students needs support or assistance, Cottonham also said they should contact the Office of Student Affairs.

“We’re doing the best we can,” Cottonham said. “We know this is a very difficult time for students and their families and they’ll ultimately make the decision (to keep attending the university or not), but we do want the gesture of the university to be that we want to assist you in any small or big way that we can.”

19 2016-08-29
Lafayette

Savoie speaks to faculty and staff about budget cuts


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette released the following statements about the future of the university in light of ongoing budget cuts:

Despite eight consecutive years of state budget cuts that have resulted in the largest shift in revenue sources for higher education in state history, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette continues to protect its academic core.

UL Lafayette received two-thirds of its funding from the state eight years ago, Dr. Joseph Savoie, UL Lafayette president, said Friday. This year, state funding fell below 30 percent, he told faculty and staff in an annual address.

“This dramatic change in the funding paradigm created significant challenges, but we met the challenges head-on. We didn’t whine or whimper. We implemented strategies to increase self-generated revenues and protect the core academic mission of the University,” he said.

UL Lafayette’s new financial model relies on more auxiliary business operations, research funding and private philanthropy.

The University’s budget for fiscal year 2016-17 is comparable to its fiscal year 2015-16 budget. In fiscal year 2015-16, the budget was $161.2 million. For fiscal year 2016-17, it is $161.6 million – if there are no mid-year cuts in state funding.

“For the first time in many years, the budget is stable,” Savoie said.

One of the primary reasons the University’s budget has remained steady is “because of aggressive efforts to grow enrollment, in both quantity and quality. Following a slight dip a few years ago caused by raising our admissions requirements, we’ve had solid growth,” Savoie explained.

Despite a significant increase in student enrollment, he said, “we’ve been able to hold our student-to-faculty ratio steady at 22-to-1. It’s the same today as it was in 2008,” Savoie said.

Changes to the state’s TOPS funding could affect future enrollment.

“A new law capped future award increases, which means TOPS may not match future tuition rates. In the event of future state budget shortfalls, another law requires all TOPS awards to be reduced on a pro-rata basis.

“For this year, due to shortfalls of state funding, TOPS was not fully funded. TOPS was funded at 93 percent for this semester and is only funded at 47 percent for Spring 2017. That leaves many students, across Louisiana, having to make up the difference. This has implications for University-funded scholarship offerings,” Savoie said.

He noted that the University raised $15 million in private funds during fiscal year 2016 and increased the number of donors by nearly 11 percent over the previous year.

The University also has made significant progress in distance learning. It now offers 11 online degree programs and 287 online courses. “We’ve tripled the number of online and hybrid sections offered in five years,” Savoie said.

In another effort to combat dwindling state revenue for higher education, UL Lafayette has developed its own capital outlay program for campus improvements. The University has a backlog of $37.5 million in major repairs that are needed.

“Many of the improvements are about function rather than cosmetics. For example, we need to replace air conditioning units, windows and roofs, flooring, ceiling tiles and do lots of painting,” he said.

Another project, which will be funded by students’ self-assessed fees, will be an outdoor amphitheater adjacent to the Student Union and Cypress Lake. “We are working with student leaders and architects to complete the unfinished area,” Savoie said.


19 2016-08-25
Lafayette

Flood-affected businesses: Aid available


Louisiana Economic Development’s leader wants owners of flood-affected Acadiana businesses to know help is available.

LED secretary Don Pierson said Wednesday “great federal resources” are now available at the U.S. Small Business Association’s business recovery centers in Louisiana, including one at the Louisiana Immersive Technologies Enterprise Center on the University of Louisiana at Lafayette campus.

READ MORE: Business feel flood burden

READ MORE: Shop where your heart is

Pierson met with community leaders at the LITE Center before starting a tour of flood-affected business areas that included stops in Crowley, Abbeville, New Iberia and Youngsville.

Following the tour, Pierson said spreading the word about assistance remained important.

"It is evident that there are many small businesses that do not yet know of the federal, state, regional and local resources available to them to recover from August's powerful floods," he said. "The people of this area are resilient, but disaster recovery resources can help to ease this burden."

Pierson said he needed to hear business people's accounts of the flood's impact and to see the damage.

"It emphasizes the point that critical and comprehensive services are available and must reach affected business owners and speed their recovery," he said. "This is no time for hesitation; business owners must act quickly and decisively."

Small-business owners are eligible for low-interest federal loans and other assistance. Pierson said business owners must document their losses but staff members at the recovery center, which opened Saturday, would help.

Loans with 4 percent interest rates would be available within 18 to 21 days of qualifying, he said.

“We want to see robust numbers in loan applications,” Pierson said, which would confirm the message is getting out.

Recovery centers are in Ascension, East Baton Rouge, Lafayette and Tangipahoa parishes. Eligible business owners should come from any of the 20 Louisiana parishes eligible for flood-disaster aid.

Pierson: FEMA delivery improved

Pierson also urged people to register with Federal Emergency Management Agency for aid. He said FEMA’s performance is much improved — more streamlined, and quicker — from that shown in previous natural disasters in Louisiana.

READ MORE: People wait to reenter homes

Jason El Koubi, president and CEO of One Acadiana, said many small-business owners are not aware of available government assistance, which is available to business owners who suffered damage to their business or losses in business due to the rainfall and flooding that began Aug. 11.

Pierson said there is no official count of flood-affected Louisiana businesses, but he said it would number “in the thousands.”

“We have 116,000 FEMA (aid) applicants as of today,” he said.

For assistance, go to opportunitylouisiana.com on the web or to the LITE Center, 537 Cajundome Blvd., Lafayette, Room 239.


19 2016-08-25
Regional/National

The Men of the Ragin’ Cajun Swamps Assist with Louisiana Flood Recovery


Little known fact: The University of Southwestern Louisiana (ULL) was the first school to name its football stadium “The Swamp” in 1988. The more famous Ben Hill Griffin stadium, home of the Florida Gators received its moniker from former Coach Steve Suprrier in 1991.

Class is dismissed…

Fall camp has gone pretty well for the Cajuns as they prepare for the September 3 home opener named Herbert Heymann Football Classic against Boise State. Focus and attention to detail is key for Louisiana as the Broncos come in as the favorite. This isn’t your “cupcake” home opener most FBS teams have grown accustomed to. In recent memory, Boise St. has had the success, on the grand stage, that ULL hopes to reach.

Everyone in Lafayette has been thinking about the opener against Boise State, but Mother Nature has changed that. According to the National Weather Service, rainfall estimates for August 11 – 14, several cities and towns in the southern portion of the state of Louisiana received 25 inches of rain or more.

That’s over two feet of rainfall in a region that received rain 5 – 6 days out of the week throughout the Summer months. Some reports had the total rainfall broken down into gallons with 6.9 trillion gallons of rainfall in one week. 4,000,000,000,000!!! That’s enough water to fill 6,000,000 Olympic-sized swimming pools. I don’t think Michael Phelps could navigate those waters, but Ryan Lochte probably could, let him tell it.

Southeastern Louisiana has received the bulk of the media attention and rightfully so. Local media has done a great job at covering and providing information on what the Red Cross calls “the worst natural disaster to strike the United States since Hurricane Sandy four years ago.”

But the the devastation in southwestern Louisiana has been overshadowed. Several towns, including parts of the city of Lafayette, had its share of flooding. Highways and roads were closed, homes were destroyed by flood waters and families are still displaced.


Raymond Calais Jr.’s Twitter
Cajun football players helping local communities in the aftermath of the #laflood
Several of the Cajun players felt the need to do something, anything, to help the community. Their sentiments were echoed by head coach Mark Hudspeth. A few phone calls later and 100-plus Cajun football players were bussed to Youngsville (a town south of Lafayette) to help remove debris, carpeting, sheet rock, etc. from the flooded homes.

In less than a month in what will be one of the biggest home games in recent times, the Louisiana Ragin’ Cajuns’ are focused not on X’s & O’s, but on giving back to the communities that have given them so much.

Much respect to the school, coaches and players. Hustle up and bustle up, fight onto victory...
19 2016-08-23
Lafayette

UL professor dies during performance Saturday


Robert Sidman, a longtime actor in local theater, died during a performance of “The Odd Couple” Saturday night at Cite’ des Arts in downtown Lafayette. According to a press release from Mauree Brennan, executive director of Cite’ des Arts, Sidman was found unresponsive backstage during the performance.

Emergency responders were called, but Sidman could not be resuscitated.

“He had been ill last weekend, but felt ready to return to the stage this weekend,” Brennan said in the press release. “Dr. Sidman will be deeply missed.”

Funeral services for Sidman are pending.

Sidman was also a professor emeritus of mathematics from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. According to UL’s web site, Sidman was a recipient of the Distinguished Professor Award in 1983.

The Lauren Reilly Eliot Company, the theater group performing “The Odd Couple,” canceled Sunday’s performance. Shows will resume next weekend.


19 2016-08-22
Lafayette

UL Lafayette helps students cope with flooding challenges


Fall semester classes at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette will begin Monday as scheduled, with some accommodations for students still affected by catastrophic flooding in the state.

UL Lafayette was closed Monday, but personnel responsible for student services were on the job. "We've had to make some adjustments because of the extreme weather conditions, such as postponing Freshman Move-In Day from last Sunday to Wednesday, but operations have remained orderly," said Dr. DeWayne Bowie, vice president for Enrollment Management.

Bowie said the University recognizes that students whose homes and property have been damaged by floodwater may be facing some unexpected challenges.

Any student who is unable to get to campus for the first day of class as a result of flooding should call the Dean of Students Office at (337) 482-6276, send email to deanofstudents@louisiana.edu or go to studentaffairs.louisiana.edu to submit an online form.

The University has taken steps to help students in several ways.

"Families may be looking at unplanned expenses for temporary shelter, home repairs or transportation.

"So, the tuition payment deadline has been canceled. Students will now have more time to complete the payment process. We also have a payment plan for those who need to exercise that option," Bowie said.

The Office of Housing has been working with students to accommodate changing needs for on-campus housing. "All housing reservations are being honored unless canceled by the student. Our goal is to provide on-campus housing to as many students as possible. It may take a few days to sort everything out, but we're trying to remain as flexible as possible," he said.

Upperclassman Move-In Day is Saturday, as originally scheduled.

The University has also started a fundraising campaign to make sure that flood-affected students can afford to enroll for the fall semester or remain enrolled.

"Our goal is to help students stay in school and make progress toward a degree," said UL Lafayette President Dr. Joseph Savoie.

Donations made to the University Annual Fund will be used to address the most immediate and urgent financial needs of students. Priority will be given to students whose attendance is at risk because of unexpected expenses associated with catastrophic flooding.

All gifts to the University Annual Fund received by Sept. 30 will directly help students coping with flood-related challenges continue pursuing their educational goals this year.

Donations to the University Annual Fund can be made online, by mail or by phone.

To contribute online, go to ullafayettefoundation.org/giving/annualfund.

Checks made payable to the UL Lafayette Foundation should be mailed to: UL Lafayette Foundation, P.O. Box 44290, Lafayette, LA 70504. Please note on the memo line Student Emergency Relief.

Or, call the UL Lafayette Foundation at 337-482-0700 to give by credit card.

Bowie said the University is dealing with many flood-related issues on a case-by-case basis.

"We're trying to help as many students as possible with resources we have available right now. If federal financial assistance becomes available in the future, we'll make students aware of it," he said.

Orientation sessions for new students, international students and graduate students remained on track this week, along with a mandatory, two-day Cajun Connection briefing for freshmen. Students who were unable to attend any of those sessions were instructed to get in touch with the University to discuss alternatives.

UL Lafayette's campus did not sustain any significant flood-related damage, according to Bill Crist, director of Facilities Management. "We came through the weekend in very good shape."


19 2016-08-22
Lafayette

Are you a student impacted by flooding? Get info here


Classes at Louisiana colleges and universities begin Monday, but officials know some students, faculty and staff impacted by record flooding might not make it to campus for the first day.

University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Classes at UL will start Monday as planned. Officials report no damage to campus or dorms.

“Classes are still scheduled to begin on Aug. 22, but students who were impacted by flooding and who are not able to get to campus for the first day of class will receive an email with instructions on how to notify the university,” said DeWayne Bowie, vice president for Enrollment Services.

Many freshmen moved in Wednesday, which was rescheduled from Aug. 14. Upperclassmen can move in Saturday. Students are asked to arrive at the scheduled time from their original assignment email.

The Office of Housing is working with students to accommodate changing needs for on-campus housing, the school reports. All housing reservations are being honored unless canceled by the student. The housing website has updates athousing.louisiana.edu.

Bowie said the university recognizes that students whose homes and property have been damaged by floodwater may be facing some unexpected challenges.

Any student unable to get to campus for the first day of class as a result of flooding is asked to call the Dean of Students Office at 337-482-6276, send email to deanofstudents@louisiana.edu or go to studentaffairs.louisiana.edu to submit an online form.

The tuition payment deadline was canceled to give students more time to complete the payment process, as "families may be looking at unplanned expenses for temporary shelter, home repairs or transportation," Bowie said in a UL release.

“We also have a payment plan for those who need to exercise that option,” Bowie said.

More on flooding: Mermentau River cresting earlier than projected | Roof leaks, wet floors among damage at local schools | What's behind the continued flood warnings | LSU baseball team helps Denham Springs neighborhood | Fact Sheet: How FEMA rental assistance helps Louisiana flood survivors | Acadiana Roots concert to benefit flood victims | Hundreds find refuge at Heymann shelter

The university also started a fundraising campaign to help flood-affected students remain enrolled for the fall semester.

“Our goal is to help students stay in school and make progress toward a degree,” said UL President Joseph Savoie.

Donations to the University Annual Fund received by Sept. 30 will help students coping with flood-related challenges continue pursuing their educational goals this year. The donations will be used to address the most immediate and urgent financial needs of students, according to a school release. Priority will be given to students whose attendance is at risk because of unexpected expenses associated with catastrophic flooding.

Donations can be made online at ullafayettefoundation.org/giving/annualfund, by mail or by phone. Call the UL Lafayette Foundation at 337-482-0700 to give by credit card.

University of Louisiana at Lafayette students who are
University of Louisiana at Lafayette students who are members of SOUL Campers form a human chain Tuesday as they unload a shipment of clothing, water and other supplies to the Opelousas Civic Center. About 40 students arrived at the center by bus where they immediately started unloading the supplies for evacuees that have arrived at the center from throughout South Louisiana. (Photo: F. Herpin/The Daily World)
Checks made payable to the UL Lafayette Foundation should be mailed to: UL Lafayette Foundation, P.O. Box 44290, Lafayette, LA 70504. Note on the memo line Student Emergency Relief.

Students still trying to add classes that are currently full are asked to contact the department that is offering the class. They will have to call or go in person to request an override, according to UL.

A New Student Orientation session was held Tuesday as scheduled, but there will be more "mini orientations" held through Aug. 24. There is no need to pre-register, university officials said. Students can find the sessions that work best for them on the orientation website at http://bit.ly/2b966dF.

Graduate Student Orientation also was Wednesday. Students unable to attend should contact the Grad School at gradschool@louisiana.edu. More information can be found at http://bit.ly/2bi8Fvw.

Related: Meet the heroes of the Louisiana flood | Heroes of the Flood: UL athletes bring the muscle | Heroes of the Flood: Prep students help clean up | Heroes of the Flood: Carencro church takes in evacuees

Louisiana State University

LSU students in Baton Rouge moved in Wednesday, which was the first day of school for students in the veterinary and law schools. Other classes will start Monday as planned.

University officials will work with students and employees impacted by flooding. ​The deadline for fee bills has been extended to Aug. 24. The university also extended the undergraduate admission application deadline for the fall until Aug. 25.

The Office of Enrollment Management remains closed at this time, according to the university. All questions regarding admission can be answered when the campus reopens.

Displaced students now in need of on-campus housing for the 2016-17 academic year are advised to contact LSU Residential Life at 225-578-8663 or fill out an application at lsu.edu/housing.

"As the situation around Louisiana continues to evolve, the university will share further instructions regarding students unable to start classes at this time," according to LSU. "Employees impacted by the flood should contact their supervisors for details."

The LSU Welcome event for freshmen will be Sunday at 5:30 p.m. at the PMAC, as previously scheduled, and students can move into residence halls through Saturday.

But many other previously scheduled campus events have been postponed or canceled. Students can check on the status of events by visiting LSU Openings and Closures or by contacting the originating unit/department.

More information on flood relief is at lsu.edu/floodrelief.

Facebook
Twitter
Google+
LinkedIn
Teurlings students help "Flood the Love"
Fullscreen
Teurlings Catholic High School sports members help
Buy Photo
Teurlings Catholic High School sports members help out the United Way of Acadiana's "Flood The Love Drive" at 215 E Pinhook Rd in Lafayette during the flood of 2016 relief effort. Kerry Griechen/Special to the Advertiser
Fullscreen
Teurlings Catholic High School sports members help1 of 9
The Teurlings Catholic High School Cheer Squad helps
The Teurlings Catholic High School Cheer Squad helps
The Teurlings Catholic High School Cheer Squad helps
The Teurlings Catholic High School Cheer Squad helps
The Teurlings Catholic High School Cheer Squad helps
The Teurlings Catholic High School Cheer Squad helps
The Teurlings Catholic High School Cheer Squad helps
The Teurlings Catholic High School Cheer Squad helps
Next Slide
9 Photos
Teurlings students help "Flood the Love"
Southern University

Southern University's Baton Rouge campus was not damaged in the flood, and the campus is prepared for the fall semester that begins Monday, officials report. Students are moving in now, and dining services are operational.

President-Chancellor Ray Belton said many faculty, staff and students have been impacted by flooding and are in distress, prompting the Southern University System Foundation, in cooperation with university administration, to establish the Southern University Flood Relief Fund to provide assistance to affected students and employees, he wrote in a letter Tuesday. Donations can be made at netcommunity.sus.edu/pages/flood-relief-fund.

The System-wide Emergency Response Team was activated to provide assistance and to direct employees and students to services. All employees are asked to contact their respective supervisors or Lester Pourcaiu, associate vice president for human resources, to report their status. Pourcaiu's contact information is lester_pourcaiu@sus.edu or 225-771-2680.

If employees are unable to come to work, they can contact the Office of Human Resources at 225-771-2680.

The F.G. Clark Activity Center at SUBR has been serving as a shelter coordinated by the Louisiana Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) and the American Red Cross. It was housing approximately 400 evacuees on Tuesday.

Northwestern State University

Move-in day for NSU in Natchitoches remains set for this weekend before the first day of classes Monday, but the university created an "NSU 4 You" website and email address for students affected by flooding in south Louisiana.

If students cannot move in or be on campus for the first day of classes or those with questions about registration, fee payment, housing, advising and other issues can visit nsula.edu/nsu4you, email nsu4you@nsula.edu or call 318-357-5286 where university personnel will assist them in meeting their needs.

“Nothing is more important to us than our students and their safety,” said Chris Maggio, vice president for The Student Experience. “We will work with those who have been affected by flooding and respond to their concerns. Our mission is to serve our students.”

Louisiana College

Rain, flooding and road closures delayed some freshmen moving in to Louisiana College in Pineville on Saturday, and officials are aware that some might miss the first day of school Monday.

"We told them to get here when they can, and we'll help get them caught up," LC President Brewer told The Town Talk.

Contact the school for more information at 318-487-7000.

Have information from your school? Send it to lguidry@theadvertiser.com, and we'll add it.


19 2016-08-22
Lafayette

UL to raise money to help students affected by flooding


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette is launching an initiative to help students who need financial assistance for the fall semester in the aftermath of historic flooding in much of south Louisiana.

The University Annual Fund was established five years ago to address the most immediate and urgent financial needs of UL.

“Many UL Lafayette students, including incoming freshmen, have lost their homes and possessions, putting them at risk of not being able to attend school this fall. Our goal is to help students stay in school and continue progress toward a degree,” UL President E. Joseph Savoie said in an issued statement.

All gifts to the University Annual Fund received by Sept. 30 will directly help students who are coping with flood-related challenges to continue pursuing their educational goals this year. Priority will be given to students whose attendance is at risk because of these unexpected expenses.

MORE FLOOD COVERAGE: Mermentau River cresting earlier than projected | Roof leaks, wet floors among damage at local schools | What's behind the continued flood warnings | LSU baseball team helps Denham Springs neighborhood | Fact Sheet: How FEMA rental assistance helps Louisiana flood survivors | Acadiana Roots concert to benefit flood victims | Hundreds find refuge at Heymann shelter

Students will be able to make requests for assistance online. A committee will review the requests and determine how the funds raised will be disbursed.
Donations to the University Annual Fund can be made online, by mail or by phone.

To contribute online, go to ullafayettefoundation.org/giving/annualfund

Checks made payable to the UL Lafayette Foundation should be mailed to: UL Lafayette Foundation, P.O. Box 44290, Lafayette, LA 70504. Please note on the memo line: Student Emergency Relief.

Or, call the UL Lafayette Foundation at 337-482-0700 to give by credit card.


19 2016-08-22
Regional/National

'Important' for UL Lafayette football team to help flood victims


VIDEO
19 2016-08-19
Lafayette

Flood cleanup was jaw-dropping for Cajun football team


They practiced Tuesday morning, then had meetings Tuesday afternoon.

Nearly two weeks into preseason training camp in preparation for their Sept. 3 season-opener against Boise State, they were tired and sore.

Then they went to work early Tuesday night, volunteering in Youngsville to help victims of disastrous Louisiana flooding clear and clean their damaged homes.

And with that, members of the the Ragin’ Cajuns football team — especially those in a group guided by UL cornerbacks coach Melvin Smith, including Savion Brown, Simeon Thomas and Christian Goodlett — seemed to catch a second wind.

“They just got a freshness about ’em,” said Smith, an assistant coach previously at programs including Auburn, Mississippi State, Texas A&M, Alabama and Ole Miss who now is in his second season as UL’s defensive coordinator.

“They had what I call ‘a humble sweat.’ They went to work on that house … and I’ve never been prouder of a group.

“It was really touching for me to see our kids in that light,” he added Thursday, “and for people to see our kids trying to help, trying to give back. … It’s one of the highlights of my life, and, you know, I’ve been around for a little while.”


THE ADVERTISER
Heroes of the Flood: UL athletes bring the muscle

Before helping out at the homes of local residents they did not previously know, some Cajuns helped Smith in his own house, which was damaged by flood waters as well.

Later, 100-plus UL players and staff members fanned out in Youngsville.

“When the people saw us,” Smith said, “they didn’t really know what to expect.”

Neither did the Cajuns.

“I think they were a little bit like me,” UL head coach Mark Hudspeth said of his team members, many of whom live in somewhat of a cocoon as they move from the dorms to their practice facility and back to their dorms during preseason camp.

“It was just heavy rain, the way it felt … around our university. It just seemed like it was big, heavy rain that just wouldn’t stop.

“So we head out there (to Youngsville)… and everybody’s jaw just dropped,” the Cajun coach added. “It really hit home fast.”

UL coach Mark Hudspeth rips out drywall at a floodedBuy Photo
UL coach Mark Hudspeth rips out drywall at a flooded home in Youngsville on Tuesday. (Photo: KERYY GRIECHEN/SPECIAL TO THE ADVERTISER)
From standing water still where it shouldn’t be to debris seemingly everywhere, the picture was not pretty.

Hudspeth, who pitched in personally, described what it was like walking into a flooded home.

“It took it to a whole ’nother level,” he said, “with two or three inches of water still sitting on their floors and the carpet is halfway pulled up and you’re knocking down all the sheetrock and you’ve got all wiring and all the installation and everything’s wet.”


THE ADVERTISER
Business owner: 'It’s never flooded like this'

Even two days later Brown, a first team All-Sun Belt Conference pick at cornerback, appeared to be especially moved by the experience.

On Thursday he called it “real humbling,” and called himself “sad.”

“When you see those people, when you see what happened to them, it brings you back down,” said Brown, who calls Shreveport home. “It brings you back down to the world. It brings you back down to the Earth.

“Because it can happen to anybody. It can happen in the blink of an eye.

“I really love the fact (that) me and my teammates, we went out and helped those people,” Brown added. “I wish I could go back and help them right now.”


THE ADVERTISER
Sun Belt's Jaguars lend helping hand to flood victims

Flood victims, however, weren’t the only ones who benefited from the convoy of help, which UL director of football operations Troy Wingerter organized with the assistance of others in the Cajun athletic department.

Cajun players gained something, too.

For them, it was a bonding experience.

“Those types of things bring you together,” Brown said. “They make you closer, more than (happens) just through football.”

It was only a few hours’ worth of work, but when multiplied a hundred-fold with everyone from kickers and punters to hulking linemen it amounted to a lot getting done quickly.


THE ADVERTISER
How to apply for FEMA aid, clean up damage

Impacted homeowners in one small part of the state — more than 40,000 houses in south Louisiana have been damaged by the deadly storm — were pleased that the process of preparing their dwellings for repair could be expedited.

And Hudspeth was happy his team, which has been busy doing what it can to bounce back from a 4-8 season in 2015, did what it could for those in need.

“It’s gonna take some time, unfortunately, for them to get their homes back the way they want it,” he said. “But with the attitudes I saw of the families there — amazing.

“I hope our team handles adversity the way they handled some adversity. … Because they had the best attitudes, the best outlook on life.

“I was proud to be a resident of Acadiana and Lafayette,” Hudspeth added, “after coming out there and seeing those people.”


19 2016-08-18
Lafayette

UL students join supply effort


St. Landry Parish residents and United Way thank the University of Louisiana at Lafayette freshmen participating in UL Soul Camp for bringing in supplies collected by The Daily Advertiser.

The Soul Camp participants unloaded a UL bus filled with supplies at the Opelousas Civic Center, which is a designated shelter for St. Landry Parish.

A new drop off site is being set up at 619 Cresswell Lane in Opelousas, behind Taco Bell. Hours of operation are from 9 a.m.-6 p.m.


19 2016-08-17
Lafayette

Heroes of the Flood: UL athletes bring the muscle


As the downpour of rain subsided but flood waters continued to rise, soaking homes and displacing families throughout much of Acadiana and elsewhere in Louisiana, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette football team wondered how it could help.

“On Sunday, everybody had the same feeling,” Ragin’ Cajuns director of football operations Troy Wingerter said Tuesday.

“As soon as we walked in the door, I had two offensive players who were in my office asking questions about what we were gonna do. (Head) Coach (Mark) Hudspeth walked in my office wondering what we were gonna do, and clearly we needed a plan.”


So Wingerter made some calls and by Tuesday afternoon busses were ready to take 100-plus Ragin’ Cajun football players to Youngsville so they could help remove everything from carpeting to sheet rock from flooded homes there.

It’s the Cajuns’ way of giving back, Hudspeth said Tuesday.

“That’s important for a young man — to learn the importance of giving back to your community,” Hudspeth said. “This is just a life lesson we’re trying to teach them, but also it’s our responsibility. You know, our community supports us. We have great crowds.

“So it is important that we give back … because it’s the right thing to do. That’s what we’re trying to get across to our kids.”


19 2016-08-16
Lafayette

UL, SLCC announce start dates after flooding


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette South Louisiana Community College have announced important dates for the start of the Fall 2016 semester, many of which were rescheduled after recent flooding.

University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Freshman Move-In Day has been rescheduled for Wednesday, August 17. Please arrive at the scheduled time from your original Golden Ticket. If you cannot move on that day, contact the Housing office at oncampusliving@louisiana.edu to set up an alternative date and time. All housing reservations are being honored unless cancelled by the student. Please check the Housing website for updates.

Upperclassman Move-In Day is Saturday, August 20. Please arrive at the scheduled time from your original assignment email. If you cannot move on that day, contact the Housing office at oncampusliving@louisiana.edu to set up an alternative date and time. All housing reservations are being honored unless cancelled by the student.

The New Student Orientation session on Tuesday, August 16, will be held as scheduled. If you were registered for this session and cannot attend, there will be mini-orientations held at numerous times from August 17 - 24. No need to pre-register, just arrive at the sessions that work best for you. See the list of times on the Orientation website.

Graduate Student Orientation is on Wednesday, August 17. Students unable to attend should contact the Grad School at gradschool@louisiana.edu. More information can be found here.

International Student Orientation took place on Monday afternoon, as scheduled. If you were unable to attend, please come to the Office of International Affairs during business hours at your earliest convenience to check-in with staff. Please be sure to bring your I-20 and passport.

SOUL Camp C is still scheduled to begin on Tuesday, August 16, through Friday, August 19. The SOUL Camp director has emailed all registered campers with updated details. Please check the email address you used when registering for SOUL Camp.

Cajun Connection will be held, as scheduled, on Thursday and Friday, August 18–19. Students and parents are asked to check your email for information from the Office of the First-Year Experience (OFYE) on details about Cajun Connection, which is mandatory for all incoming freshmen. Information can be found online here. Parents: If you have not been getting emails from OFYE, please sign up for the parent newsletter.

The University has extended the deadline for fall semester payments and/or confirmation of financial aid to Friday, August 26. Check your University email daily for updates on tuition payment deadlines.

Students who are still trying to add classes that are currently full should contact the department that is offering the class. You will have to call or go in person to request an override.

South Louisiana Community College

Students at South Louisiana Community College will begin classes for the Fall 2016 semester on Wednesday, August 17 at all campuses.

All SLCC campuses, however, will be open on Tuesday, August 16 to assist students with the exception of the Acadian Campus in Crowley and the Gulf Area Campus in Abbeville. Student Services offices on the Lafayette Campus (Ardoin Building) including Admissions, Advising, Financial Aid, Registrar, and Student Accounts as well as the Campus Bookstore will be open to serve students on Tuesday.

All employees who are able to report to work should do so Tuesday, August 16 except for the following campuses: Acadian Campus in Crowley and Gulf Area Campus in Abbeville. Faculty and staff at the Crowley and Abbeville campuses need to contact their supervisor immediately to discuss their situations.

Any employee who is unable to report to work should contact their supervisor immediately to discuss their situation. Any student who cannot attend class needs to contact their instructor. The safety of our students, faculty, and staff is our top priority.
19 2016-08-16
Lafayette

UL now among school closures


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette will be closed Monday. Areas that support students, such as housing, residential life, food services, health services, orientation, advising, registration, cashiers, and financial aid, will be open.

Essential personnel are required to report to work on Monday.

The University will reopen on Tuesday, with full operations resuming at 7:30 a.m.

Here are the latest Acadiana k-12 schools that announced closures for Monday:

All Lafayette Parish public schools

St. Thomas More Catholic High School

Teurlings Catholic High School

First Baptist Christian School

Ascension Episcopal School

Acadiana Renaissance Charter Academy

Lafayette Renaissance Charter Academy

Willow Charter Academy

Sts. Peter and Paul Catholic School

All St. Martin Parish public schools

Schools of the Sacred Heart in Grand Coteau

See the latest flood coverage here.


19 2016-08-16
Lafayette

UPDATE: UL Freshmen residence move in postponed


UPDATE: UL Lafayette freshmen residence hall move-in has been rescheduled for Wednesday, August 17.

Students are being instructed to follow the same appointment times they previously were assigned.

Students are encouraged to check the Housing website for updates.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

UL Lafayette Officials say that Operation Move-In, the plan for freshmen to move into the residence halls originally set for Sunday, August 14, at University of Louisiana at Lafayette has been postponed.

The new date will be announced by the end of today, based on guidance from state and local authorities.

The school asks that students not travel to the University residence halls until further notice. Students are encouraged to check the Housing website and University email for updates, including when the move-in will be rescheduled.


19 2016-08-11
Lafayette

As freshman move-in day approaches, UL Lafayette campus police issue Pokémon Go advisory


LAFAYETTE, LA. (KLFY) If you are playing the game Pokémon Go, be careful while hunting for the app-created virtual creatures. Your safety and the safety of others are important.

In the virtual world, you “gotta catch ‘em all.” In the real world, players have encountered danger as they stare into their gadgets, often oblivious to their surroundings.

We urge you to stay alert and be respectful as you explore the augmented reality of Pokémon Go. Some precautions should include the following.

• Keep your head up.
• Don’t play Pokémon Go while driving or cycling.
• Don’t wander into traffic rights of way while in pursuit of Pokémon.
• Avoid suspicious locations and be aware of strangers.
• Avoid trespassing on private property, or public places after hours.
• Make sure that people can see you if you’re playing at night.

Remember that Pokémon characters disappear and move to different locations in the game. If that coveted character is hiding in an unsafe or inappropriate location, you can wait for it to move to more suitable hunting ground.

If you see something suspicious, say something by notifying the campus police department at (337) 482-6447 or call 911.

Happy (and safe) hunting!


19 2016-08-09
Lafayette

Proposed student housing shot down by Lafayette Planning Commission


vIDEO
19 2016-08-08
Lafayette

Photos- UL Graduation Ceremony Thomas Blake Doucet at the University of Louisiana Buy Photo Thomas Blake Doucet at the University of Louisiana1 of 15


PHOTOS
19 2016-08-05
Regional/National

Could this be a cure for deafness? Sea anemone proteins may help 'restore' damaged hearing Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article


Most people will be familiar with the feeling of a ringing in their ears after a night of loud music.
Although the ringing is normally temporary, repeated damage like this in humans, and other mammals, leads to hearing problems and eventually causes deafness.
But sea anemones possess a skill we do not - they can repair cells like those damaged in human ears through loud noises, a new study has shown.
Repeated damage like this in humans, and other mammals, would eventually lead to deafness. But sea anemones have a skill we do no - they can repair the damage caused in their ears by loud sounds, a new study has shown
+4
Repeated damage like this in humans, and other mammals, would eventually lead to deafness. But sea anemones have a skill we do no - they can repair the damage caused in their ears by loud sounds, a new study has shown
SELF-HEALING ANEMONES
When loud noises cause damage in our ears it is because the hair cells in the inner ear are affected.
Sea anemones detect passing prey with vibration-sensitive hair cells covering their tentacles.
Researchers at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette showed the creatures can repair these hair cells after being damaged.
In laboratory experiments, a cocktail of the proteins triggered rapid recovery of damaged cochlear hair cells - the cells of the inner ear that translate sound vibrations into nerve signals.
When loud noises cause damage in our ears it is because the hair cells in the inner ear are affected.
Sea anemones detect passing prey with vibration-sensitive hair cells covering their tentacles.
Researchers at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette showed the creatures can repair these hair cells after being damaged.
In laboratory experiments, a cocktail of the proteins triggered rapid recovery of damaged cochlear hair cells.
The creatures are known to possess a miraculous ability to replace lost tissue.
They can even rebuild themselves after tearing in half during asexual reproduction.
RELATED ARTICLES
Previous
1
Next

How a rider's ill-fitting bra can hurt... her horse! Animals...

Is the F-35 REALLY ready for war? Air Force bosses claim...

Dinner and a show: The 'soy shape' containers that create...

The Matrix is coming! 'Neural dust' lets you implant a...
SHARE THIS ARTICLE
Share
925 shares
Hair cells have a bundle of minute hair-like structures on the surface, called stereocilia, that are tethered at the tips by protein strands in a V-shaped formation. Stereocilia from a frog's inner ear pictured
+4
Hair cells have a bundle of minute hair-like structures on the surface, called stereocilia, that are tethered at the tips by protein strands in a V-shaped formation. Stereocilia from a frog's inner ear pictured
Dr Watson hopes that this ground-breaking discovery will eventually lead to a treatment for patients with acute hearing loss. However, he said it is early days and he is keen to discover the mechanism that could eventually allow sea anemones to restore our hearing
+4
Dr Watson hopes that this ground-breaking discovery will eventually lead to a treatment for patients with acute hearing loss. However, he said it is early days and he is keen to discover the mechanism that could eventually allow sea anemones to restore our hearing
COULD THIS CURE DEAFNESS?
The scientists, who reported their findings in the Journal of Experimental Biology, hope the early research will eventually lead to a treatment for patients with acute hearing loss.
The researchers found evidence mice produce many proteins that are closely related to the sea anemone repair proteins, suggesting that it may be possible to mobilise the same repair mechanisms in mammals with damaged hearing.
Dr Watson hopes that this ground-breaking discovery will eventually lead to a treatment for patients with acute hearing loss.
However, he said it is early days and he is keen to discover the mechanism that could eventually allow sea anemones to restore our hearing.
'It occurred to me that if any animal could recover from damage to its hair bundles, anemones would be the ones,' said lead researcher Dr Glen Watson, from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.
Hair cells have a bundle of minute hair-like structures on the surface, called stereocilia, that are tethered at the tips by protein strands in a V-shaped formation
It is these tethers that break when hair cells are damaged, causing the stereocilia to collapse.
The scientists extracted proteins from mucus-coating sea anemone bodies that appeared to hold the key to their regenerative powers.
They then deprived mouse hair cells of calcium to simulate the serious damage to mammalian hearing organs inflicted by loud blasts of sound.
When the cells were exposed to the sea anemone proteins for an hour they restructured themselves and recovered enough to absorb a marker dye.
The creatures are known to possess a miraculous ability to replace lost tissue. They can evenrebuild themselves after tearing in half during asexual reproduction
+4
The creatures are known to possess a miraculous ability to replace lost tissue. They can evenrebuild themselves after tearing in half during asexual reproduction
'The stereocilia splayed rather than occurring in well-organised bundles' said Dr Watson.
This is similar to the way our cochlea cells are damaged by loud sounds.
The scientists, who reported their findings in the Journal of Experimental Biology, hope the early research will eventually lead to a treatment for patients with acute hearing loss.
The researchers found evidence mice produce many proteins that are closely related to the sea anemone repair proteins, suggesting that it may be possible to mobilise the same repair mechanisms in mammals with damaged hearing.
Dr Watson hopes that this ground-breaking discovery will eventually lead to a treatment for patients with acute hearing loss.
However, he said it is early days and he is keen to discover the mechanism that could eventually allow sea anemones to restore our hearing.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3722702/Hearing-damage-restored-sea-anemones.html#ixzz4GSiuArPS
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
19 2016-08-02
Lafayette

UL athletics director speaks on the $16M Tigue Moore Field renovations


LAFAYETTE, La. (KLFY) – Demolition of the Tigue Moore Field is underway to make room for a brand new baseball stadium at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

UL Director of Athletics Scott Farmer said he, as well as other officials, wanted the stadium to have nicer amenities and be of higher quality.

Contractors and builders originally projected the new stadium to cost $10 million, but now it’s estimated to cost $16 million.

“When we first started the project, we charged the construction team and architects 10 million dollars, [that] was the budget they put together. They came back to us early on and said this is what you can get for 10 million dollars and it wasn’t exactly what we wanted,” Farmer said.

According to Farmer, the extra $6 million will go towards new decks behind the bleachers on first and third base, a new club level and building a concrete-system stadium, as opposed to an aluminum-system stadium.

So far, the UL Ragin’ Cajuns have raised about $9 million for the new stadium.

To get to the $16 million mark, Farmer said they have a bridge loan set up to be able to begin construction.

“We’re going to privately raise the money. The more we raise, the less we’ll have to use out of that bridge loan,” Farmer said.

For UL student Christopher Gastinell, he said a new baseball stadium will bring more opportunities for the university.

“That will bring publicity for the athletics and in turn bring in more money for the university…so by all means build anything you want on campus, as long as it brings the school more money,” Gastinell said.

Farmer said he is waiting to project any sort of completion date for the new stadium, until after demolition and the hurricane season is over.


19 2016-08-02
Lafayette

UL Lafayette Summer Commencement set for Friday


LAFAYETTE, La. (ULL)– Undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral degrees will be conferred during the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s Summer 2016 Commencement on Aug. 5.

The ceremony will be held at 11 a.m. in the Cajundome Convention Center exhibit hall adjacent to the Cajundome. All graduates are required to attend and participate in full regalia.

Commencement ceremonies are now held three times each year: in the fall, spring and summer.

In 2014, the University held its first summer ceremony since 1949. Summer Commencement was reintroduced to give graduating seniors an opportunity to participate in a ceremony without having to wait until the end of the fall semester.

The summer ceremony is much smaller than Commencements held in the fall and spring. About 275 degrees will be conferred during Summer 2016 Commencement. During Spring 2016 Commencement ceremonies, by comparison, 1,676 degrees were conferred.

Dr. John Tetnowski, a professor in the College of Liberal Arts at UL Lafayette, will be the Summer 2016 Commencement speaker. He received the University’s 2016 Distinguished Professor Award, which was presented by the UL Lafayette Foundation, and is the Ben Blanco/BORSF Endowed Professor in Communicative Disorders. He is also the graduate coordinator for the University’s doctoral program in Applied Language and Speech Sciences.

Learn more about Summer 2016 Commencement at commencement.louisiana.edu
19 2016-08-01
Associated Press

UL attorney asks judge to end discrimination battle


BATON ROUGE - An attorney for the University of Louisiana at Lafayette has asked a Baton Rouge judge to dismiss former head football coach Jerry Baldwin’s claim that the school fired him in 2001 because he is black.

But Baldwin’s lawyer, who wants another trial, argued that just because one East Baton Rouge Parish jury couldn’t reach a decision doesn’t mean a different jury can’t come to a conclusion on his racial discrimination claim.

State District Judge Todd Hernandez, who presided over the March jury trial of Baldwin’s claim, said he will consider the oral arguments presented to him Thursday, as well as written arguments filed in the case.

Baldwin, who was UL’s first black head football coach, compiled a record of six wins and 27 losses in three seasons.

Larry Marino, one of the university’s attorneys, told Hernandez that Baldwin’s record was the worst in school history.

“This record was just terrible,” he argued, adding that season ticket sales plummeted as a result. “The stands were increasingly empty, particularly in his final year.”

Marino also said donors were refusing to give donations to the football program.

“Community support for the program was evaporating,” he said.

Former UL President Ray Authement, who hired and fired Baldwin, “just didn’t have another year to give him,” Marino argued.

There is no evidence, he said, that Baldwin was fired because of the color of his skin.

“There’s no connection at all,” Marino told the judge. “Nothing ties this to race.”

Baldwin’s attorney, former UL football player Karl Bernard, countered that while there was no evidence of racial slurs or epithets in the case, the jury “could not agree on what actually happened.”

“The jury has already spoken,” Bernard argued. “Maybe we have to do a better job in presenting our evidence.”

Bernard contends Baldwin inherited a bad team and was not expected to immediately turn the struggling program around.


19 2016-08-01
Lafayette

What took so long for The Tigue's grandstand to fall?


As a demolition crew outside was busy Thursday tearing down the grandstand at M.L. “Tigue” Moore Field, the UL baseball stadium now undergoing a $16 million renovation, Ragin’ Cajuns athletic director Scott Farmer sat inside his nearby office and fielded questions about a widely perceived delay in the project.

Farmer smiled, and paused.

“I’m hesitant,” he said, “because you’ve never heard anyone at the university mention the word ‘delay.’ Ever.

“Now you’re gonna laugh at that, but you’ve never heard any of us mention delay,” Farmer added. “There has been work going on. … It’s just not necessarily what people can see.”

In any event, full-fledged demolition did not begin until this week — almost two months after nationally ranked UL’s season ended with back-to-back losses to Arizona in the NCAA Lafayette Regional played at The Tigue.

Farmer on Thursday outlined the confluence of events that kept the grandstand, press box and operations booth from falling much earlier — something that might have lessened the number of dates UL might have to play elsewhere early next season, when the reno work is expected to be in its final stages.


THE ADVERTISER
The Tigue's grandstand finally demolished

It begins with the Cajuns deciding they wanted the stadium available to host 2016 postseason play, something that paid off with the awarding of the NCAA Regional that also featured Princeton and Sam Houston State.

“The decision to allow postseason play backed the project up to the last week of June anyway,” Farmer said.

The Regional ended June 6, and UL kept ensuing dates open at The Tigue for potential Super Regional play that never materialized.

Even while the Regional was underway, utilities-related infrastructure work around the stadium had already started.

According to Farmer, that work allows all of UL’s athletic-complex buildings to have their own power source — something requisite before major demolition could begin, anyway.

“We started what we could,” he said.

“What they did,” Farmer added, “will make this go faster.”


THE ADVERTISER
Tigue Moore comes crumbling down

The biggest factor slowing demolition, however, was UL’s decision to increase the budget for Tigue renovation by about $6 million.

“Yes,” Farmer said, “we got into a situation where the original construction budget was $10 million.

“We couldn’t necessarily get exactly what we wanted for $10 million, so the budget grew to $16 (million) to get everything that we wanted.”

Just what does that extra $6 million buy?

For starters, Farmer said, “We’re getting a cement-type of stadium instead of all just aluminum.”

Additionally: “We’re getting decks behind the first-base and the third-base bleachers that we were not able to do at the $10 million mark,” he said.


THE ADVERTISER
What can you buy with $10 million?

That’s not all.

Seating capacity still is expected to be about the same 800 more than the stadium’s previous 3,775, and the count of new suites is still at 10.

But Farmer mentioned everything from “nicer amenities” in the suites, a “bigger and nicer” club level, better restrooms and concession area to even a space for “Mr. Vic,” The Tigue’s popular peanut salesman.

Before committing to the full $16 million, however, the Cajuns had to come up with a way to pay for it all.

According to Farmer, they currently have raised about $8.6 million in funds — some of which is pledged and will be spread out over time.

That includes $5 million from major donor Chris Russo, who earlier this year was named in a lawsuit filed a Harris County, Texas, civil court that accuses him of business-related fraud.


THE ADVERTISER
EXCLUSIVE: Shared love spurs $5M donation for UL stadium


THE ADVERTISER
Executive behind Tigue donation sued for fraud

Russo already has donated $3 million, and the Cajuns still expect to receive the additional $2 million.

“Chris Russo pledged $5 million to this project,” Farmer said Thursday, “and he is current on the pledge. … I have no reason to believe it’s not going to be a fulfilled pledged.”

Even at $8.6 million, however, the gap to $16 million is a huge one.

“So we had to either, A: stop the project and finish the fundraising, or B: secure some other type (of financing),” Farmer said. “We looked at about seven different processes, and we ended on this bridge loan.”

MidSouth Bank is the lender for the loan, which was not revealed publicly until late last week, and according to Farmer it permits the Cajuns to borrow up to $10 million.

Securing it, though, was no simple process.


THE ADVERTISER
Renovations to ‘The Tigue’ could ‘slightly’ surpass $10M plan

“It doesn’t happen overnight,” Farmer said. “It doesn’t happen as easily as you can go down there and say, ‘Hey, I want to borrow that money,’ and you sign a piece of paper and you walk away.

“You’re dealing with a government entity, and all the approvals that have to take place, and all the safeguards, and then you have a very large bridge loan.

“And the bank has its rules and its regulations, and the two groups, they worked their tails off to get this done, to be quite honest with you,” the Cajun athletic director added. “I am very proud of, and pleased for, the people that did roll up their sleeves and get it done.”

On UL’s side, Farmer said the Ragin’ Cajun Athletic Foundation (RCAF), UL Lafayette Foundation and Ragin’ Cajun Facilities Corp. all were involved, with lawyers “working nights, working weekends.”

“A phenomenal amount of time went into getting this thing signed, sealed and delivered,” Farmer said.

Nevetheless…

“You don’t want to do the major demolition,” Farmer said, “until you are 100 percent sure you’ve got everything signed.”


THE ADVERTISER
Tigue update: Say goodbye to the seats

Asked why that was not explained on the front end to anxious Cajuns supports who worried that renovation might not happen, Farmer called that “a great question.”

“And it’s probably one that hindsight is a whole lot clearer now than it was as we were progressing,” he said.

“Every time — and, believe me, we had probably four different times (when) were ready to go — we’d get in a room, and everyone would say, ‘Well, it’s not quite done yet; wait ’til Tuesday,' and ‘It’s not quite done yet; wait ’til Friday,’ (and), ‘It’s gonna be done next Monday; it’s gonna be done Wednesday.’

“It just kept going, and it looked every single time it was done, we were ready to go, there was something else caught and it delayed it a little longer,” Farmer added. “Obviously, that (dragged) out, and it’s easy now to look back and say we should have done some type of statement.”

As for when the stadium might actually be ready, that question remains unanswerable for now.

“The obvious answer is we probably are going to miss (some home games), but we don’t know what yet,” Farmer said. “We will work over the next five months very closely with Lemoine (the project’s general contractor) to get a very realistic occupancy date.

“Right now it’s just going be a standard ‘target’ answer. But we’ve got hurricane season coming, the rain season. Let’s get into probably November-ish, and we’ll have a much more realistic … move-in date.”


THE ADVERTISER
Chalkdust: Big move coming at The Tigue

Knowing that work could dip into the season, the Cajuns scheduled several early road games anyway.

One planned home game also is a home-and-home, and can be flipped to later in the season.

But Farmer said the Cajuns will soon look into alternate plans for home weekend series scheduled for March 3-5 against Southern Mississippi and March 10-12 against St. Peters.

The athletic director said he and UL head coach Tony Robichaux plan a visit next week to Fabacher Field in Youngsville (home of the college summer-league Acadiana Cane Cutters), where temporary seating perhaps can be added.

Farmer also said “preliminary contact” would be made with Zephyr Field, 10,000-seat home to the Class AAA New Orleans Zephrs in the New Orleans suburb of Metairie.

It also could be possible to play at The Tigue without certain parts of the project being complete.

But Farmer said that will be up to Lemoine, which has worked multiple other UL projects including the addition of seating in one end zone at Cajun Field and the school’s new Athletic Performance Center.

“They know the importance of getting this project done and not interfering with the season as best as possible,” Farmer said.
19 2016-07-29
Lafayette

Judge to consider whether 15-year court battle should continue over firing of UL-Lafayette coach


Four months after a jury deadlocked on the issue, an attorney for the University of Louisiana at Lafayette asked a Baton Rouge judge Thursday to dismiss former head football coach Jerry Baldwin's claim that the school fired him in 2001 because he is black.

But Baldwin's lawyer, who wants another trial, argued that just because one East Baton Rouge Parish jury couldn't reach a decision doesn't mean a different jury can't come to a conclusion on his racial discrimination claim.

RELATED

Mistrial declared in former UL-Lafayette head football coach’s discrimination lawsuit
Mistrial declared in former UL-Lafayette head football coach’s discrimination lawsuit
A Baton Rouge judge declared a mistrial Thursday night after a jury deliberated for more tha…
State District Judge Todd Hernandez, who presided over the March jury trial of Baldwin's claim, said he will consider the oral arguments presented to him Thursday, as well as written arguments filed in the case since the trial, and issue a written ruling. He did not give a timetable for his decision.

Baldwin, who was UL-Lafayette's first black head football coach, compiled a record of six wins and 27 losses in three seasons.

Larry Marino, one of the university's attorneys, told Hernandez that Baldwin's record was the worst in school history.

"This record was just terrible," he argued, adding that season ticket sales plummeted as a result. "The stands were increasingly empty, particularly in his final year."

Marino also said donors were refusing to give donations to the football program.

"Community support for the program was evaporating," he said.

Former UL-Lafayette President Ray Authement, who hired and fired Baldwin, "just didn't have another year to give him," Marino argued.

There is no evidence, he said, that Baldwin was fired because of the color of his skin.

"There's no connection at all," Marino told the judge. "Nothing ties this to race."

Baldwin's attorney, former UL-Lafayette football player Karl Bernard, countered that while there was no evidence of racial slurs or epithets in the case, the jury "could not agree on what actually happened."

"The jury has already spoken," Bernard argued. "Maybe we have to do a better job in presenting our evidence."

Bernard contends Baldwin inherited a bad team and was not expected to immediately turn the struggling program around.

Marino said Baldwin has had his day in court, and now it's time for Hernandez to end the long-running legal battle.

RELATED

New racial discrimination trial starts for UL-Lafayette football coach, fired in 2001 after three years on the job
New racial discrimination trial starts for UL-Lafayette football coach, fired in 2001 after three years on the job
Jerry Baldwin, the first black head football coach at the University of Louisiana at Lafayet…
An East Baton Rouge Parish jury awarded Baldwin $2 million in 2007, finding that university officials breached his contract. The panel also determined that race played a role in his firing, but was not the sole reason for Baldwin losing his job.

A state appeals court, though, threw out the verdict two years later and ordered a new trial, citing jury selection, jury verdict form and expert witness issues.

Hernandez ruled in 2011 that the school acted within its contractual rights when it fired Baldwin. After an appellate court reversed that ruling, the state Supreme Court ruled in 2014 that the university did not breach Baldwin's contract. He was fired with one year remaining on his contract but was paid for that final year.

Baldwin is a pastor at New Living Word Ministries in Ruston and principal of New Living Word school, where he coaches.


19 2016-07-29
Lafayette

The Tigue's grandstand finally demolished


Wyatt Marks saw M.L. “Tigue” Moore Field’s grandstand coming down, and what came to the University of Louisiana at Lafayette pitcher’s mind first was, “Wow.”

Wow, wow, wow.

The Tigue’s main seating section fell in a heap Thursday with the help of a demolition company’s massive concrete-crushing drill, marking a major step in what is now a $16 million renovation — $6 million more than planned — of UL’s 38-and-a-half-year-old baseball stadium.

“It’s kind of sad, but also exciting at the same time,” said Marks, a St. Thomas More High product. “There’s all the memories in that stadium.”

And now the stands, where so many Ragin’ Cajun fans watched them being made — from the 2000 team’s march to the College World Series, to those of a club that has played in the past four NCAA Tournaments — have come crumbling down.


THE ADVERTISER
Tigue Moore comes crumbling down

“It’s definitely very exciting to see it’s actually happening now,” said Marks, who stood next to teammate Brenn Conrad and longtime UL coach Tony Robichaux as Lloyd D. Nabors Demolition specialists tore into The Tigue.

“The first thing I realized: Now everybody can relax,” added Conrad, a Lafayette High product who grew up watching the Cajuns and now is their designated hitter. “Because it’s coming down, it’s getting started and, once this thing gets torn down, it’s gonna shoot up fast.”

Not long after Conrad spoke, the last pillar holding up The Tigue’s old press box, operations box and chairback seats was no more.

It all took just a few short hours.

Once the concrete is pulverized and the remaining debris is cleared, a new grandstand will rise.


THE ADVERTISER
Buy a piece of history: Tigue seats go on sale

Many Cajun fans expected demo work to start more than a month ago, shortly after UL’s 2016 season ended with an NCAA Regional at The Tigue.

But UL officials waited while working to secure a bridge loan that will ensure the entire $16 million project — beyond what’s already been raised or pledged — can be financed.

“We did have to secure funding,” UL athletic director Scott Farmer said Wednesday, “and that takes time.”

The reno work couldn’t have come soon enough for Robichaux, who sat Thursday in the excavator used to dismantle the grandstand.

Asked if he could believe what he was seeing, the Cajuns coach laughed heartily.

“It’s the story we tell our players all the time, about trying to good leaders and building something,” he said beneath the bang of breaking concrete. “It takes 30 years to build character — and in one day it can be floored.

“But that’s a good thing.”

It is, at least, in this instance.

“It’s sad to see it go down, but I’m happy at the same time, because this is home, and I’m about to get a new home,” said Conrad, a senior next season. “The whole community is about to get a new home for The Tigue.

“I’ve got to say thanks to Scott Farmer and everybody in the athletic department for getting this going,” Conrad added. “I know it took a little while, but it’s progress.
19 2016-07-28
Lafayette

Camp lets young musicians create


Louisiana Folk Roots has taught Cajun and Creole music camps to children for a decade. Many kids finish playing classic songs just like their cultural heroes.

But the young musicians have few chances to express their own creativity.

Folk Roots worked to change that this week with a new three-day, intensive camp at Angelle Hall on the University of Louisiana at Lafayette campus. Nine young musicians created new tunes based on 1934 recordings by traveling folklorists John and Allan Lomax.

RELATED:Camp teaches music is more than stardom

MORE MUSIC NEWS:Archives benefit features the Magnolia Sisters

The result was two new songs with three accordions, six fiddles, piano, an upright bass and English lyrics. Camp director Jonno Frishberg said campers were able to learn traditional music and add their own voices.

“So I knew most of these guys were steeped in that type of (traditional) learning,” said Frishberg. “But as they’re getting older, there’s a bigger world. But what about the rest of the music world, which they’re already interested in? What about writing? What about arranging? What about creativity? What about interpretation?

“In Cajun music, there’s a school that plays music exactly like they learned it from Mr. So and So. On the other side, you have people like Moise Robin who are going to do it their way and no one else’s way. There’s everything in between.”

Trey Stelli and Ludia O'Kelly-Farell play accordionBuy Photo
Trey Stelli and Ludia O'Kelly-Farell play accordion in the finale of the Louisiana Folk Roots Kids Camp performed at Angelle Hall in Lafayette July 27. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)
Musicians started the first day of camp by listening to a capella field recordings from 1934, “Le Pays des etrangers” ("Country of Strangers") by Joe Segura and “Je M’endors” (“I’m Sleepy") by Jesse Stafford. Once they learned how to sing the tunes, the campers stopped imitating and started creating.

“We tried to encourage the young people to find their own way to figure out how to do it,” said Frishberg. “How do we tune this vocal tune into an instrumental tune? How do we put guitar chords to it? Going beyond that, how do we arrange it?

“We all tried to not meddle too much and let them do as much as possible. We encouraged them to put their own spin on it, as much as they wanted to.”

The finale of the Louisiana Folk Roots Kids Camp performedBuy Photo
The finale of the Louisiana Folk Roots Kids Camp performed at Angelle Hall in Lafayette July 27. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)
The camp signaled a new partnership between LFR and the Dr. Tommy Comeaux Endowed Chair for Traditional Music at UL. The chair helped establish the school’s traditional music program.

Todd Mouton, LFR’s executive director, is pleased with their first project.

“We tried to develop a mini camp, pilot camp, experience that offered them a lot of opportunities, a lot of new directions,” said Mouton. “The students worked very hard and they were very focused.

“This is something that we’d like to grow into five days and do it every summer.”
19 2016-07-28
Lafayette

Camp lets young musicians create


Louisiana Folk Roots has taught Cajun and Creole music camps to children for a decade. Many kids finish playing classic songs just like their cultural heroes.

But the young musicians have few chances to express their own creativity.

Folk Roots worked to change that this week with a new three-day, intensive camp at Angelle Hall on the University of Louisiana at Lafayette campus. Nine young musicians created new tunes based on 1934 recordings by traveling folklorists John and Allan Lomax.

RELATED:Camp teaches music is more than stardom

MORE MUSIC NEWS:Archives benefit features the Magnolia Sisters

The result was two new songs with three accordions, six fiddles, piano, an upright bass and English lyrics. Camp director Jonno Frishberg said campers were able to learn traditional music and add their own voices.

“So I knew most of these guys were steeped in that type of (traditional) learning,” said Frishberg. “But as they’re getting older, there’s a bigger world. But what about the rest of the music world, which they’re already interested in? What about writing? What about arranging? What about creativity? What about interpretation?

“In Cajun music, there’s a school that plays music exactly like they learned it from Mr. So and So. On the other side, you have people like Moise Robin who are going to do it their way and no one else’s way. There’s everything in between.”

Trey Stelli and Ludia O'Kelly-Farell play accordionBuy Photo
Trey Stelli and Ludia O'Kelly-Farell play accordion in the finale of the Louisiana Folk Roots Kids Camp performed at Angelle Hall in Lafayette July 27. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)
Musicians started the first day of camp by listening to a capella field recordings from 1934, “Le Pays des etrangers” ("Country of Strangers") by Joe Segura and “Je M’endors” (“I’m Sleepy") by Jesse Stafford. Once they learned how to sing the tunes, the campers stopped imitating and started creating.

“We tried to encourage the young people to find their own way to figure out how to do it,” said Frishberg. “How do we tune this vocal tune into an instrumental tune? How do we put guitar chords to it? Going beyond that, how do we arrange it?

“We all tried to not meddle too much and let them do as much as possible. We encouraged them to put their own spin on it, as much as they wanted to.”

The finale of the Louisiana Folk Roots Kids Camp performedBuy Photo
The finale of the Louisiana Folk Roots Kids Camp performed at Angelle Hall in Lafayette July 27. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)
The camp signaled a new partnership between LFR and the Dr. Tommy Comeaux Endowed Chair for Traditional Music at UL. The chair helped establish the school’s traditional music program.

Todd Mouton, LFR’s executive director, is pleased with their first project.

“We tried to develop a mini camp, pilot camp, experience that offered them a lot of opportunities, a lot of new directions,” said Mouton. “The students worked very hard and they were very focused.

“This is something that we’d like to grow into five days and do it every summer.”
19 2016-07-28
Lafayette

$4.8 million for University Avenue 'gateway' improvements in city budget


Lafayette Mayor-President Joel Robideaux's 2016-17 budget presented Tuesday includes nearly $5 million to turn University Avenue into an attractive gateway to the city.

Improving the appearance of and sparking economic development along University Avenue is one of Robideaux's top priorities. The avenue is an exit off Interstate 10 that people take to reach the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

READ THIS, TOO:Robideaux discusses priorities, possible cuts

The state owns University Avenue, Robideaux told The Daily Advertiser editorial board Wednesday. He said he would be open to "taking it off the state's hands," but the road is not on the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development's "right sizing" map. Right sizing is a program in which a city can assume ownership of a state roadway in fair condition. In exchange, the city receives a 40-year maintenance credit.

Robideaux's budget, his first proposed since taking office Jan. 4, includes $3.17 million in the city's capital improvement program for the University Avenue initiative, along with $150,000 to build or improve sidewalks along the avenue.

Another $1.6 million for the University Avenue improvements is in the city's bond program, as is another $105,000 for North University Avenue sidewalks.

RELATED NEWS:LUS rate hikes included in LCG budget

No additional money to build a new animal shelter is included in the budget for the fiscal year that begins Nov. 1.

"We're not going to build it right now," Robideaux said Wednesday.

That doesn't mean the shelter idea has been abandoned. On the contrary, Lafayette recently partnered with the nonprofit Target Zero to implement policies and other changes with a goal of nearly eliminating the euthanization of animals at the shelter in part by improving adoptions and spaying and neutering cats and dogs.

Robideaux said he wants to implement new policies and procedures before committing $9 million or more to build a new shelter.

"I hope by the end of the year we'll see those (euthanasia) rates go down," he said.


19 2016-07-27
Lafayette

Renovations at ULL’s Tigue Moore Field projecting $16M, where’s the money coming from?


LAFAYETTE, La. (KLFY)— Renovations at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s Tigue Moore Field are underway. But a significant spike in construction costs has many concerned about funding

As construction crews hammer away at the old structure, school officials expect the new facilities to have that wow factor. The only issue is the “Wow factor” is going to cost more than $6-milllion more than the original $10-million budget.

When looking for answers, Sports Director George Faust first caught up with the UL-Lafayette Athletic Director, Scott Farmer on Monday in New Orleans.

On Tuesday, Executive Director of the Ragin Cajun Athletic Foundation, Jim Harris explained the increased cost.

“The initial project was around $10-million and once we started to really get into it and realize everything we wanted, what we thought the program deserved, the fans deserved and the student athletes deserve that cost did escalate to what you see now.”
The additional six plus million dollars News 10 is told, for an enhanced design, aimed at putting the baseball stadium among the best in the nation for the players, and the fans.

Harris tells KLFY, “To date, we’ve raised close to $9-million for this project and certainly, there’s still more to go. We’re going to be seeking donations, couple meetings this week even.”

Construction continues and of course, so does fundraising, but there’s no specific date for completion.


19 2016-07-26
Lafayette

Cajundome update includes new seats, interactive murals


New seating and improved concession booths are some of the features of a major renovation underway inside the Cajundome.

The renovation, which started in May, is proceeding on schedule, maybe even a little ahead of schedule, with an anticipated Dec.1 re-opening date.

While the focus is on the interior of the arena, bids should be in hand in August to resurface the roof of the Cajundome, which is mostly black from dirt and mildew.

The $21 million interior renovation is the first large-scale upgrade of the arena, which opened on Nov. 10, 1985, and hosted its first concert featuring country music legend Kenny Rogers the next day.

The bowl of the arena has been reconfigured and redesigned by Sellers Group architects.

CHECK THIS OUT: Photos of renovation groundbreaking

New seating in the 'Dome is one of the major changes visitors will notice. The old orange seats are being replaced and hand railings are being added along steps from the 200 level on up, Cajundome Director Greg Davis said.

The new seating arrived Monday, Chief Engineer Chad Pellerin said, and installation is expected to begin Tuesday. Cajundome employees removed the seating and are doing other work, such as painting, to cut costs.

First-level telescopic seating — original to the Cajundome and so old it was difficult to find replacement parts for — is being replaced and will add seats to the arena for University of Louisiana at Lafayette basketball games and events such as concerts.













h
Play Video






























































































































































































Cajundome Director Greg Davis explains plans for an interactive mural of Ragin' Cajuns basketball. Video by Claire Taylor.

During a tour of the work Monday for Cajundome Commission members, Davis said the walls along a hallway at the 'Dome will be painted with murals depicting the history of Ragin' Cajuns basketball. The murals will be interactive, so visitors can use smart phones to access details about the history depicted in each image.

Concession stands throughout the Cajundome are under reconstruction, restrooms are being improved, suites are being renovated and LED lighting is being installed in the arena.

The renovation is being funded with the sale of bonds. JB Mouton has the construction contract.

19 2016-07-25
Lafayette

UL-Lafayette professor's research focuses on American Indian tribe living on vanishing island


A shrinking island off the south Louisiana coast is serving as a laboratory of sorts for a University of Louisiana at Lafayette professor who is chronicling the history, culture and customs of the people who call it home.

Heather Stone, assistant professor in the UL-Lafayette College of Education, has visited Isle de Jean Charles periodically since April. The island is a quarter-mile-wide strip of land in Terrebonne Parish that once housed more than 300 Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw Indians.

Stone said the tribe’s existence has been under constant threat, starting with the Trail of Tears in the 1800s when American Indian tribes were driven off their land. And their descendents find themselves having to move yet again as the effects of climate change and erosion from oil drilling claim large chunks of the island — 98 percent since 1955.

“They learned how to fish, they learned to hunt on an island, they learned to grow food on an island and they were very self-sufficient,” Stone said. “Now with the climate change and all of the oil tankers and drilling that’s happened down there, they’re losing their island, which means they’re going to have to move again and reacclimate again,” she said.

Settled in the early 1800s by several tribes that were hiding for their lives, the island has dwindled to little more than 86 residents. Since 1955, the area has declined from a self-sustaining habitat to one contingent on families’ resources and location.

Tribal Chief Albert Naquin said areas that once could be used to farm and raise cattle are now either immersed in water or affected by the ground’s changing salinity.

“Gardening is almost out. You can’t raise any livestock; you can’t raise any chickens — you can’t raise anything. All you can do is live here,” he said. “Everything has changed from us being able to survive on land to you can’t survive on the land at all.”

The denizens of the now-narrow strip of land are chiefly elderly tribal members who do not know of life beyond the island. Once 22,600 acres, the community shrank to some 320 acres over a course of 60 years.

The tiny community is one of the first places to receive aid in anticipation of climate change woes. In January, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced a $1.3 billion grant split among 13 states to help communities adjust to climate change. Louisiana received $92.6 million — $48 million of which will go to Isle de Jean Charles.

The rest of the state’s funds will go toward Louisiana's Strategic Adaptations for Future Environments program, which was created to protect the state’s wetlands, storm-proof coastal cities and reshape higher-ground cities.

However, these funds come after more than a decade of resettlement efforts. In 2002, the tribe began to seek refuge in higher, more stable ground; however, that process has been allayed by legal issues surrounding land. In the meantime, Naquin said, more than 25 families that were unable to wait for relocation have regrouped in and around Montegut.

Stone said she will catalog the area’s oral histories as remaining residents leave, as well as their next migration. Her initial months on the island entailed building rapport with island residents before she touched her recorder.

Stone, who earned her bachelor’s degree in journalism at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill before earning her doctorate at LSU, said the experience sharply contrasts from that of reporting.

“You have to build trust with your narrators, and you can’t do that if they think you’re just there for one day to get the interview,” she said.

The difference, she said, was who was in charge of the narrative.

“I may ask a question like, ‘What was life like on the island?’ and I can have some narrator spend 30 minutes answering that one question. I’m not bound by time or by what I need to get the story out of it; they’re telling me their story.”
19 2016-07-25
Lafayette

‘Like marching band on steroids;’ UL-Lafayette hosts drum corps competition


A drum and bugle corps competition that’s drawing teams from around the country is about to rattle and pound its way across athletic fields at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

For those unfamiliar with drum corps, it combines music and sport and is, as Troy Breaux likes to describe it, “kind of like a marching band on steroids.”

“It is a lot faster, it is a lot louder and it is a lot more exciting,” said Breaux, who serves as director of percussion studies at UL-Lafayette. “It is more of a sport than a musical activity.”

That particular blend of entertainment will be on display Monday as UL-Lafayette hosts “Drums Across Cajun Field.” The event is a junior drum corps competition and part of the 2016 Tour for Drum Corps International.

Seven teams from across the country will compete, including teams from South Carolina, Georgia, California, Wisconsin, Iowa, New Jersey and the LOUISIANA STARS from Lafayette.

The two hour show starts at 7 p.m.

“This is a real bright spot for drums in the South,” said Eric Melley, who serves as assistant director of bands at UL-Lafayette.

“I look at these drum corps, and these are 17- to 21-year-old young men and women that spend eight hours days in the heat and are traveling from show to show and sleeping on gym floors,” Melley said. “If you are looking for optimism about America’s youth, then you are going to find it at drum corps.”

The LOUISIANA STARS is competing in its third season with Drum Corps International. Following Monday’s event, the team will spend the next three weeks competing throughout the Midwest. The group will end its swing in Indianapolis, where the national championships are being held.

The idea for creating the local team stemmed from a shared passion for drum corps between Neil Simon, current corps director, and Breaux, who also serves as the team’s percussion supervisor/designer.

“We all had to always go to Indiana, Illinois and California to perform in drum corps,” said Breaux, who graduated from Comeaux High and later LSU. “So we wanted to just provide the same opportunity and experience that we were given and make sure to keep all the talent here in Louisiana, instead of having these musicians go outside of the state to find a team.”

Tara Baker, who currently plays saxophone in LSU’s Golden Band from Tigerland, said she couldn’t pass up the opportunity to join the corps.

“I have been in marching bands since seventh grade,” said Baker, a graduate of Delcambre High. “I had seen my first drum corps show in 2012, and I have loved it ever since. When this opportunity arose, I just took it.”

The process to putting together this year’s team began last December. Audition camps were held one weekend each month for two months for any high school or college-age musician age 15 to 21.

In February, the auditions were over, and the 120 members of this year’s team were selected, including some from as far away as Oklahoma and Florida.

Though the accomplishment of making the team pales in comparison to the grind that each musician goes through to prepare for the tour, and for practicing for each show on the tour, which began on July 15 in Huntsville, Alabama.

“There are definitely times where it is difficult,” said the 19-year-old Baker, who is entering her third year with LOUISIANA STARS.

She talked about day long drills under hot temperatures, constantly working and trying to get better.

“At the end of the day your feet hurt, and you are mentally and physically exhausted," Baker said. "But it is the passion and the drive for music that keeps people coming back to it and that makes it all worth it.”

So what is like to go out on the field and perform a heavily rehearsed 10-15 minute performance against half a dozen other teams?

Pure excitement and joy.

“You are about to take the field with a 100 or so of your closest friends, and it’s just an exciting thing to do, and a little nerve racking because you want it to go as well possible,” Baker said.

For Breaux, who competed with the Phantom Regiment Drum & Bugle Corps in the late 1980s, the LOUISIANA STARS and this Monday’s event represents yet another opportunity to share his lifelong of music, in particular drumming, with another generation.

“I started in the school band like everyone else, but I immediately fell in love with playing drums and I have done nothing since the fifth grade,” Breaux said. “When I teach at UL, I know that I am preparing future music educators and professional musicians."
19 2016-07-25
Lafayette

Renovations to Ragin' Cajuns' M.L. 'Tigue' Moore Field underway, despite higher price tag


Louisiana-Lafayette’s baseball program will open the doors to a prettier, more modern M.L. “Tigue” Moore Field next season.

Exactly how and when the Ragin’ Cajuns get there is still unclear.

In an email sent to fans Friday and jointly signed by athletic director Scott Farmer, baseball coach Tony Robichaux and two members of the Ragin’ Cajuns Athletic Foundation, the university said the cost of the ballpark’s renovation has risen from $10 million to $16 million.

But UL-Lafayette is moving ahead with construction, the email said, and it will secure “bridge funding” to cover the gap.

Athletic department spokesman Matt Sullivan declined to say how UL-Lafayette is making up the difference but said the project “is a done deal. This is going to happen. We are working with the construction company on a move-in date. But we will be in it at some point in 2017.”

What’s still unknown is whether the stadium will be ready in time for the Cajuns’ home opener. The date and opponent aren’t set, but the college baseball season typically begins in mid- to late February.

Sullivan said it’s possible construction could last into the season and that UL-Lafayette is looking into contingency plans, such as alternate locations and schedule changes, if Moore Field isn’t ready.

“We hope that’s not the case, but there’s a possibility there could be,” Sullivan said. “That’s something we kind of prepared for when this project came through.”

Sullivan said UL-Lafayette and the RCAF are still actively raising money for the project.

“We’re confident that we’re going to get there,” he said. “As of right now, all of our pledged payments are up to date.”

The university originally planned to raise $10 million to renovate the Cajuns’ beloved and often-packed ballpark, which averaged 4,060 fans per game last season.

After getting more input from fans, coaches and players, however, UL-Lafayette decided on more upgrades, bringing the cost of the project to $16 million, according to Friday's email.

When construction is complete, the Cajuns will have a much more modern home for a program that has emerged as one of the best from a mid-major conference.

The Cajuns had one College World Series appearance in 2000 under Robichaux. In the past three seasons, they’ve won three straight Sun Belt tournaments and appeared in two super regionals, losing at home to Ole Miss in 2014 and to LSU in Baton Rouge in 2015.

The Cajuns finished 43-21 this season and hosted a regional, which Arizona won.

Fans have rewarded UL-Lafayette's success, showing up to Moore Field by the thousands with good food and strong voices, creating one of the better atmospheres in college baseball.

According to the NCAA’s database, the Cajuns ranked 17th this season in Division I in attendance; its average home crowd of 4,060 was second-best in the state behind LSU. Tulane was third in Louisiana with an average home crowd of 2,227.

Renovations to Moore Field will include new grandstands, a new concourse area, new suites, a new press box, more concession stands and a more modern facade. This year’s changes represent the second phase of a project that began last year, when construction crews took down light standards and moved them back, making room for the next round of upgrades.

“We anticipate the ‘Wow!’ factor will prove worth the wait and significantly benefit the Ragin' Cajuns and our fans next season and for many seasons to come,” Friday’s email said.


19 2016-07-14
Lafayette

University of Louisiana at Lafayette eyes renewable energy at Crowley research station


The water that's been used to clean shrimp at a processing plant might seem to be among the smelliest and most worthless substances in the world.

But don't tell that to the folks at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette's Cleco Alternative Energy Center in Crowley, where researchers tease energy from shrimp wastewater with tiny organisms that produce biogas as they eat up bits and pieces of organic matter in the water.

The gas could be used to fuel burners at the processing plant or, if there is enough of it, produce electricity.

"We can take their waste and offset some of their power costs," Mark Zappi, dean of the UL-Lafayette College of Engineering, said at an event Wednesday to show off research at the center.

Scientists there are exploring the same process used with the shrimp wastewater — called digestion — to assess the energy potential of the water used to wash vegetables and catfish, as well as the water used to rinse out some of big brewing tanks at a local beer company.

The technology is still under development, but it has the potential to allow businesses to make energy from waste they might otherwise have to pay to clean or haul away, said UL Lafayette research scientist Emmanuel Revellame.

"It's an expense for them," he said.

Much of the work at the Alternative Energy Center focuses on how to create energy from agricultural products, whether that be shrimp wastewater, the bagasse left over after the juice is squeezed from sugarcane or the pine trees that grow so readily in the state.

A hulking machine called a "bubbling fluidized bed gasification system" uses intense heat to turn wood chips and other materials into a gas that can be used to generate electricity.

It sits next to a "biomass torrefaction reactor" that can transform pecan shells, bagasse, bamboo and pieces of pine into charred bits to feed coal-fired power plants.

The material is considered an environmentally friendly alternative to coal because it burns much cleaner.

A large field near the energy center's main building is lined with solar thermal panels, which harness the sun's heat through mirrors that intensely focus sunlight onto a pipe to heat water that can in turn be used to create power.

Zappi said Louisiana is not in an ideal location for conventional solar energy, where electricity is made directly from the sun's rays, but solar thermal could be a viable option.

Zappi said a primary goal at the energy center is to research how Louisiana, already known as an oil-and-gas state, can tap available resources for new forms of energy.

"We have to keep Louisiana the energy state, and that's what we think we are doing," he said.

The energy center was developed in partnership with Cleco, which serves roughly 290,000 retail customers in 23 parishes.

Cleco has experimented with renewable energy on a small sale, but Cleco President and CEO Darren Olagues said the company has few doubts renewable energy will play a much larger role in the company's future.

"We certainly understand and take to heart the idea that times are changing," Olagues said.
19 2016-07-11
Lafayette

UL police investigating alleged rape at fraternity house


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette campus police are investigating an alleged rape that took place at a fraternity house.

The incident was reported May 17, and took place at the Kappa Alpha Order House on the 100 block of Glynn Abel Drive at 1:27 p.m., according to a story published in UL student newspaper, The Vermilion. Surveillance footage captured at the time of the incident shows the victim and suspect arriving in the area via UL's transportation services; however, it is not known whether the incident took place inside or outside the house at this time.

Sgt. Billy Abrams, public information officer with the UL Police Department, told The Daily Advertiser Friday that the alleged suspect was not a student at the time of the incident, which allegedly occurred in May at the Kappa Alpha Order fraternity house.

The investigation is ongoing, and officers are going through evidence at this point, Abrams said.

"I can't say what the evidence is because I don't want to prematurely jeopardize the investigation," Abrams said. "But there is evidence to help us figure out what transpired."


19 2016-07-11
Regional/National

Louisiana universities all got their state funding cut... but Louisiana-Lafayette is just fine


We talked in the past about some looming higher education budget cuts within the state of louisiana, and had also done some speculation about what such cuts could mean for some of the school with both FBS and FCS football programs within the state.

As it turns out, at least some of our fears were misplaced, and we can now take a look at how each of the various systems as well as the G5 programs fared now that the financial dust has settled somewhat.

First, let's take a look at how each system fared under the cuts.

State System 2015-16 Funding 2016-17 Funding Amount of Decrease Percent Decrease
University of Louisiana 218,601,857 213,024,999 5,576,858 2.55
Louisiana State University 373,477,242 348,303,880 25,173,362 6.74
Southern University 44,688,586 43,695,878 992,708 2.22
Community and Technical Colleges 116,084,441 115,721,328 363,113 0.31
It would appear from this table that an overwhelming majority of the budget decrease was borne by the Louisiana State University System, as they will see fully 78.4% of the total dollar reduction across all the systems combined. However, it goes further - pretty much all of that is in the form of the LSU Health Sciences Center in Shreveport having their funding reduced from $31 million to $4 million.

So basically, in terms of funding LSU's Health Sciences graduate programs were gutted, and all of their other colleges and universities combined will see about $7 million worth of funding reductions. This is certainly not positive, especially for programs that were already underfunded, but the Earth hasn't exactly caved in, either.

As it pertains to the Group of Five.... well, we're doing pretty damned alright. Here's a partial list of expected changes in annual funding for some of the U of Louisiana System Schools.


Grambling State University: - $1.3 million
Louisiana Tech University: - $29,000
Northwestern State University: - $532,000
Southeastern Louisiana University: - $1.37 million
University of Louisiana at Lafayette: + $34,000
University of New Orleans: - $1 million
Again, a school like Northwestern State can hardly afford any dollar decreases anywhere, but it will likely be easier for them to absorb a half-million decrease in funding ($100,000 of which already happened) than it will be for SELA to figure out how to close a gap almost three times that size.

Grambling State certainly was already in dire straits and is no better off with $1.3 million coming in, but they would have received an additional $1 million decrease had they not already had an earmark built in for the coming year. The swan song of their athletic department continues, and it's no surprise if Nicholls State's equally cash-poor coffers follow right behind.

Meanwhile, Louisiana Tech saw essentially no decrease (they can close a $30,000 gap by admitting a few more students) and Louisiana-Lafayette actually earned an increase. That is quite a testament to both the increased enrollment these schools have busted their butts to achieve, as well as to the advanced degree programs they now possess which other schools would be wise to emulate.

It would appear that this latest round of budget cuts is not necessarily "football ending," but when you factor in that it's just the latest in a solid decade worth of more or less continuous cuts, a lack of change will make that end point inevitable for at least a few of these schools.

19 2016-07-07
Lafayette

Locals to sell fig preserves to fund UL endowed chair


Layne Darby St. Julien discusses her non-profit, St. Julien's Goods,to create an endowed chair at UL Lafayette in honor of her late husband John St. Julien. Lee Celano

636030848587342121-figs-0136.jpgBuy Photo
(Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)
Folks from Acadiana spent the holiday weekend picking and canning figs to raise money for higher education.

Layne Darby St. Julien and a group of close friends of her late husband, John St. Julien, are launching a nonprofit to raise money for an endowed professorship honoring him in the University of Louisiana at Lafayette College of Education. And they're starting with fig preserves.

"We're not done yet. As long as there are figs to pick and people let us, we're coming after them," St. Julien said. "... Figs come in real fast for about two weeks. Unfortunately the right time is July 4. Folklore says figs are ready on July 4, and we're seeing that's true."

She was worried no one would be available to help on a holiday weekend, but many still showed up. One group picked figs a few days last week in Opelousas and some picked through the weekend.

Celeste figs picked for St. Julien's Goods, a non-profitBuy Photo
Celeste figs picked for St. Julien's Goods, a non-profit working to create an endowed chair at UL Lafayette in honor of John St. Julien, are boxed for transport in Opelousas July 2, 2016. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)
The work is being done by volunteers — from pickers to cookers to Crawfish Town USA in Henderson, which offered the use of its professional kitchen, coolers, equipment and expertise to produce this first product, St. Julien said. People even volunteered their fig trees.

Dustie Latiolais, general manager of Crawfish Town USA in Henderson, helped St. Julien and her crew get started canning Sunday. He and owners Johnny and Wendy Hebert are happy to donate the space.

"The owners here (believe in) anything we can do like that to help out, especially with a great cause," Latiolais said.

They spent all day Sunday at the restaurant canning 47 pints of fig preserves and freezing the rest. They used one of John St. Julien's recipes.

Read more: Staffing changes proposed for Moss Prep, other schools

Bev Nichols bottles figs for St. Julien's Goods, aBuy Photo
Bev Nichols bottles figs for St. Julien's Goods, a non-profit working to create an endowed chair at UL Lafayette in honor of John St. Julien, as founder Layne Darby St. Julien and Crawfish Town USA chef Dustin Latiolais chat in Henderson July 3, 2016. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)
"They were very hard-won," St. Julien said. "It was hard work and hot. We learned a lot."

She called it a "first run."

"We've been talking about this for a couple months and then fig season was upon us," she said. "This year is the learning year. ... Once the season is over and labels are made, which shouldn't take long, we plan to start selling them at farmers' markets right away."

They'll be sold under the brand St. Julien's Goods, which refers not only to goods as produce but also to the good John did for the community, his wife explained. All funds raised from the sale of figs will be used in the UL chair effort.

"Establishing this chair would help continue John's good work in education, technology and community," she wrote on Facebook in a June 30 call for volunteers.

Mike Stagg shelves freshly bottled figs for St. Julien'sBuy Photo
Mike Stagg shelves freshly bottled figs for St. Julien's Goods, a non-profit working to create an endowed chair at UL Lafayette in honor of John St. Julien, at Crawfish Town USA in Henderson July 3, 2016. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)
She and a core group of about 12 of John's friends have been meeting once a month to brainstorm fundraising ideas. They came up with figs as a "first effort" because John loved to cook and loved to experiment with fig recipes.

He thought fig trees often went overlooked in people's yards, so he wanted to organize a "community fig-pick" one day, an idea his wife and friends made a reality last week

"He just touched a lot of people around here," St. Julien said Tuesday in an interview. "He was a man of many interests, and one was cooking. We have fig trees. He loved experimenting with figs. And he was very much a community person. Everybody's got fig trees, but eventually people lose interest and the figs just fall. He always had the idea to do a community fig-pick. We thought, 'We can put out our own line of figs.'"

Read more: The latest on the Alton Sterling shooting

figs for St. Julien's Goods, a non-profit working toBuy Photo
figs for St. Julien's Goods, a non-profit working to create an endowed chair at UL Lafayette in honor of John St. Julien, at Crawfish Town USA in Henderson July 3, 2016. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)
St. Julien and the group established a fund with the UL Foundation to create the endowed professorship. They have about a decade to raise $600,000, which would be matched with $400,000 from the state to reach the $1 million goal.

They work toward that number in six steps of $100,000, she explained. Once contributions reach $60,000, the state kicks in $40,000, and so on, St. Julien explained.

They chose UL's College of Education to make the endowed chair "specially John." Although he wasn't a Ragin' Cajun himself, he taught in education departments at the University of Illinois, University of Delaware and Louisiana State University before retiring and moving to the Lafayette area in 2003.

He made a lot of connections to the Lafayette school, whether through former coworkers who now were at UL or through his various organizations, and he believed in being a part of the community in which you live, she said.

"John felt like where you live is where you needed to work, where you needed to put your energy," she said.

He also made connections in the local technology sector, she said.

Abigail Ransonet picks figs for St. Julien's Goods,Buy Photo
Abigail Ransonet picks figs for St. Julien's Goods, a non-profit working to create an endowed chair at UL Lafayette in honor of John St. Julien, in Opelousas July 2, 2016. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)
"He was always interested in where education and technology intersect," St. Julien said. "He felt like technology wasn't being used as it could be in teaching. There's a lot of work to be done there. We asked, 'What could make it specially John?' He was about technology, education and community. We wrote in the description (of the professorship) about how technology can be used in education to enhance the community."

There already is some money in the account thanks to contributions made after John's death in January, but St. Julien didn't know the current amount Tuesday. But she hopes to see that figure climb soon as proceeds from fig preserve sales come in.

The canned preserves will be at farmers' markets as soon as possible this year. She hopes to expand them into stores specializing in local products next year, she said.

For now, they'll continue to pick. Those wanting more information or to get involved can contact St. Julien at 337-739-2223.
19 2016-07-05
Lafayette

UL-Lafayette’s Wisdom Catholic Church, student center look to build, launch fundraising drive


Our Lady of Wisdom Catholic Church and Student Center is looking to move out of its 73-year-old weathered and time-worn building and into a proposed three-story, 46,563-square-foot building across the street from where it now stands.

The church and student center are perched on the corner of St. Mary Boulevard where they serve as a resource for more than 1,000 Catholic students at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

The students and Ragin’ Cajun Catholics, one of the oldest campus organizations, should have a facility that will last another century, said the Rev. Bryce Sibley, a church pastor at Wisdom.

He would also like to attract more of the 10,000 students on campus who are Catholics to the church and student center.

He said the aging building now housing the church and student center has water leaks, mold issues and cramped space for meetings and church offices.

“It’s not so much about the building as much as investing in the future of the church and investing in the students,” he said.

In pursuit of funding for a new building, the church spawned Wisdom for Every Generation, the campaign to rebuild its facilities and possibly move to the E.K. Long parking lot. The proposed new center’s estimated cost falls between $15 million and $20 million, and the goal is set at $22 million because of interest and upkeep.

“We are right now in the phase of making face-to-face asks — asking people to make five-year pledges that can be paid off as people desire or when they’re able to,” Sibley said.

The Diocese of Lafayette is helping Wisdom expand with a $5 million donation and fundraising; however, the church has been tasked with raising the rest. Sibley said the church will eventually reach out to students and recent alumni for pledges and one-time gifts.

“We want as many people to know about the good things that are happening here in the ministry — the impact it’s having — and allow them to make an investment,” Sibley said.

Sibley said students who are members of the church said they were drawn to the university by the successful Ragin’ Cajun Catholic program and the church itself.

“I’d say (our ministry) is top five, top 10 in the nation. It’s grown to be very large and we’ve had a fair amount of national recognition,” he said.

Sibley also noted that when UL Lafayette was featured in the 2014 Princeton Review’s “Best 378 Universities” college guide, it was noticed for spirituality and religious diversity.

Despite its reputation, leakage problems intermittently run throughout the facilities. Under the building are holes and empty spaces due to pipelines in poor condition that are leaving Cypress Lake Swamp — an issue that was amended for the university’s Student Union before it reopened in 2015.

“They found out that a pipe had been stopped up for probably about 30 years,” Sibley said. “That’s one of the reasons the Student Union took so long to build and was more expensive. There was washout under the whole entire building. They had to pay a half a million dollars to build it up and then put it on top of that. We had the same thing under here.”

Sibley said it is possible in one hallway for black mold to enter the lungs of anyone who stands in it for too long. The office spaces are cramped with some staff sharing desks and the break room sometimes transformed into an impromptu work space.

According to statistics provided by Wisdom, 350 students attend weekly Mass, and over 300 students participate in Bible studies. The proposal designates areas designed just for Bible studies and a series of spaces for academic study sessions.

Mary McMahon, a junior at UL-Lafayette who frequents the center, said the new designs would ameliorate space issues.

“The Bible study I’m in is held in a small office, which is fine when it’s only a few of us. But for the majority of the time, half of the girls sit on the floor because there isn’t enough room for chairs for everyone,” she said.

The initial designs for the new facility also feature a pronounced church entrance, atrium and dining area. The first two floors will house the church sanctuary, which will be able to house 600 students compared to its current seating of 450.

In addition to increased seating and recreational amenities, the new center designs include a crying room for children, which the church now lacks. With more than 600 families in the parish, Wisdom uses its café area as a space for unruly children and their parents. With the café in another building, separating families with unruly children from the sanctuary is an alienating experience, Sibley said.

“This becomes sort of like the playroom, actually, because there’s no sense of the sacred, and it gets loud in there,” he said of the café.

Moving to the other side of St. Mary Boulevard would allow growth. Sibley said the university and the church are still discussing whether moving is a possibility.

If the move fails, Sibley said, the center’s growth may be stunted due to the tree line that prevents the church from expanding.

“We have the same architects that the university does,” he said. “There was talk of potentially putting a storefront there, but there’s no specific plan for it.”

Sibley said the church will retain some of its key designs such as Latin lining the walls and the cross by the altar; however, he said some of the designs in the old church still hold a special connection with members.

“It’s not an ugly church at all. It’s just there are a lot of people who have sort of sentimental connections to the church. You gotta understand that students don’t, and we’re building it for the students,” he said.

McMahon agreed.

“With Jesus, friends and coffee all in the same room, I can’t think of a better place on campus, and I am so excited to see the growth of the student center,” she said.
19 2016-07-01
Lafayette

http://www.theadvertiser.com/story/news/2016/06/30/tea-sippers-ul-play/86554628/


The impact of “American Idiot,” Green Day’s concept album from 2004, is still being felt. A punk rock opera inspired by the Iraq war, the album charted in 27 countries, sold 15 million copies, won the 2005 Grammy for Best Rock Album and turned into a two-time, Tony Award-winning stage play.

The musical is particularly challenging for actors, who must sing and dance the entire play. There is no spoken dialogue.

But director Andrew Vincent said his cast of local actors has been training like Olympians for this 90-minute, high-energy rock opera with no intermission.

“This is probably the most dedicated cast that we’ve ever had,” said Vincent. “They were casted in the show almost a year ago. They’ve been planning and working on this show for an entire year.

“They’re so excited to tell the story. The story is so similar to things they can relate to in their own lives. They’re just very personally connected to this material.

“That helps them create the energy and push through doing a show for 90 minutes without stopping.”


The Tea Sippers’ Theatre Company and UL PerformingBuy Photo
The Tea Sippers’ Theatre Company and UL Performing Art Summer Theatre group performing “Green Day’s American Idiot” at Burke-Hawthorne Hall on the campus of UL Lafayette. (Photo: Kelly Briggs/Special to the Advertiser)


The Tea Sippers Theatre Company and students from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette Performing Arts Summer Theatre rock through “Green Day’s American Idiot” for the next two weekends at Burke Theater on the University of Louisiana at Lafayette campus. Showtimes are 7:30 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays.

“American Idiot” follows the story of three young mean wrestling with the confines of suburban life. Johnny (Joey Mills) and Tunny (Karl Ashkar) break from their parents’ restrictions while Will (Austin Boudreaux) tends to his pregnant girlfriend at home.

Tunny gives up on city life and goes off to war in the military. Johnny deals with his dark side through drugs and a lost love.

Other cast members include Dean Yarborough, Alison Lee Wood, Taylor Verrett, Katelyn Gulotta, Vegas Woods, Cy Billingsley, Parisa Memarian-Lui, Erik Schneider, Josiah Price, Brady Kidder, Trey Leger and Thomas Woods.

Vincent said the young cast, with members facing real-life decisions, shine as art imitates real life.

“It’s about self-discovery, find out about who you are and where you’re going in life,” said Vincent. “A lot of our cast members are about to graduate, go to college and get jobs.

“We’ve been together as a company for six years. Now we have a lot of changes. It’s about a lot of things going on in their lives.”

Want to go?

What: Tea Sippers, ULPFAR present "Green Day's American Idiot'

When: 7:30 p.m. Thursdays through Sundays, 2 p.m. Sundays through July 10

Where: Burke Theatre, 231 Hebrard Blvd. UL campus

Tickets: $15, $12 for students and seniors

Information: ulpfar.org

19 2016-06-30
Lafayette

Lafayette School System to experiment with the 3 R’s: reduce, reuse, recycle


A couple times a week for almost five months this year, Amanda Waddle collected paper waste from Woodvale Elementary School, weighed it on her bathroom scale, and tossed what fit into her home recycling can.

The rest she placed in public recycling containers or those belonging to her neighbors, who lent their can space to help facilitate the experiment.

The question: How much waste could the school divert from landfills by implementing a recycling program? The hypothesis: A lot.

With no district-wide recycling program serving the Lafayette Parish school system, Waddle and her fellow Woodvale mom, Catherine Schoeffler Comeaux, devised the project to show how much recyclable waste is disposed of while getting children actively engaged in practicing “The Three R’s” — reduce, reuse, recycle.

“Our goals are, in no particular order, to keep these resources out of the landfill. That is so important,” Waddle said.

MORE ON THIS TOPIC
New use for old instruments: Clarinets, guitars, flutes repaired and donated to Acadiana schools
Facing pay freezes and layoffs, Lafayette Parish School Board nixes applications for 2 more charter schools
Lafayette school board will consider opening its own charter high school
Lafayette educator association says the state, not local districts, should fund state-approved charter schools
Lafayette School Board to weigh merits of two charter applications; board has history of rejecting applications
“Our goal is also to teach children to look at garbage as resources,” she added. “Paper and boxes, steel cans and plastic: they’re all resources that can be used over and over again.”

Waddle and Comeaux are among residents encouraging the school system to adopt a recycling program as its waste contract is up for bidding.

The Lafayette Parish School Board in June issued a request for waste management proposals that include recycling costs for five initial school sites. Wednesday was the deadline.

Superintendent Don Aguillard said the district received proposals from its current provider, Republic Services, along with Waste Management, Pelican Waste and Progressive Waste Solutions. He also said he’s received “numerous” emails from residents who support a district-wide recycling effort.

Aguillard said the current recycling plan is to start with five sites and spread the program to “as many schools as possible,” pending a cost-efficient solution.

“We’re all on board wanting a recycling program. We just have to make sure it doesn’t financially burden the district,” Aguillard said.

Aguillard said he’ll bring a recommendation before the board at its July 13 meeting, with the body set to vote on the matter on Aug. 3.

Waddle and Comeaux said they’re optimistic.

“It seems like everybody is on board. It’s moving forward,” Comeaux said.

Gretchen Vanicor, director of sustainability with the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, is also encouraging the school system to move forward with a recycling program.

She said Wednesday the university has been fine-tuning its waste collection services for the past few years and has seen significant savings by implementing a large-scale recycling program.

“We were not able to achieve those sort of efficiencies until we were able to divert those (recyclable) materials,” Vanicor said.

Through the university’s current, consolidated waste management contract, recycling services cost 11 percent less than solid waste pick-ups, Vanicor said. UL-Lafayette also pays less for solid waste collection now that almost half of all waste is diverted to the recycling stream, leading to a reduced need for solid waste pick-ups.

“If you look at recycling as an addition to handling your garbage and your solid waste, then it’s going to cost more,” Vanicor said. “It can’t be an addition. You have to reduce your solid waste services and replace that with recycling.”

During their recycling experiment, Waddle and Comeaux also collected 23 cardboard boxes and about 1,700 plastic milk bottles one school week to measure how much more of the school’s solid waste could be recycled, reducing the need for solid waste pickups.

Also among the data: They collected about 2,600 pounds of paper during the entire spring semester, with students involved in the paper collection.

The conclusion: Waddle and Comeaux estimate a recycling program at Woodvale could divert hundreds of cardboard boxes, some 90,000 plastic milk bottles and 6,000 pounds of paper — the equivalent of 51 trees — from landfills.

Should such a program be implemented throughout the district, it would also teach children about sustainable practices, Waddle said.

“We think the added bonus is that the kids are actively recycling,” she said. “They’re not just learning about it in their science class or science lesson, but they’re actively engaging in what they’ve learned about the 3 R’s. That’s a huge part of it.”

Follow Lanie Lee Cook on Twitter, @lanieleecook.
19 2016-06-30
Lafayette

Necessity behind a new Wisdom church, center


Build it, they have come.

That’s the motto for the future of Our Lady of Wisdom Church and Catholic Student Center on the University of Louisiana at Lafayette campus.

And there’s a lot of truth in it, too. Just ask the Rev. Bryce Sibley, pastor and chaplain of the church.

“The Ragin’ Cajun Catholic ministry has grown so much we’ve started a capital campaign to build a new church and student center to house the ministry,” Sibley wrote in an email.

So we sent him some questions via email and he responded. Here's what we learned:

The Daily Advertiser: Why now?

Rev. Bryce Sibley: Wisdom’s current Chapel and Student Center were built in 1942, when the total student body at UL was approximately 2,200. Enrollment today is more than 19,000.

With over 1,000 students actively involved at Wisdom, our growth has accelerated the wear and tear on our 73-year old facilities. Structural problems continue to mount, including wash out under the building, severe roofing problems, and ongoing issues with our clay pipes and plumbing.

Properly addressing these issues will require extensive spending.


THE ADVERTISER
Religion over? Catholic population declining

However, the underlying challenge is that correcting these structural issues does nothing to solve our fundamental issue: we have outgrown our facilities.

This is not a “build it and they will come” scenario; the students are already here!

More than 10,000 UL Lafayette students identify as Catholic today. It is our desire to reach them, and every student on campus, with the Gospel, both now and in the future.

TDA:Where would the church/student center be?

BS: The new building will be on campus, either across the street from its current location at the corner of Girard Park Circle and East St. Mary Boulevard adjacent to Earl K. Long Gym, or at its current location.

TDA:Would the two remain united like they are now?

BS: Yes. In fact, a key functionality of the new design is to provide an alternate entry to allow students direct access to the sanctuary from within the student center.

The architects and building committee are planning to honor the rich history of our existing church in tangible ways. For example, the Stations of the Cross, several statues, altars, and the inscriptions adorning our walls near the ceiling will be carried on to our new sanctuary.

TDA: Is the Diocese involved?


THE ADVERTISER
Bishop takes issue with Pew poll on Christian drop

BS: Yes. Wisdom for Every Generation is an extraordinary fundraising effort to build a new Catholic Student Center and Sanctuary on the campus of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

Wisdom for Every Generation is being conducted alongside the Diocese of Lafayette’s Centennial Campaign by special permission of Bishop Emeritus Jarrell, Bishop Deshotel and the Diocese of Lafayette.

The Centennial Campaign is a diocesan-wide campaign timed to coincide with the centennial celebration of the Diocese of Lafayette in 2018.

It has five strategic priorities: Local Parish Initiative, Seminarian Education, Priest Retirement, Catholic Student Centers at UL & LSUE, The Needy (Catholic Outreach & Services). Our Lady of Wisdom Church will be the beneficiary of a $5 Million Dollar Lead Gift through the Centennial Campaign.

TDA: How much is needed?

BS: A three-tiered goal has been established for the Master Plan:

$10 Million Challenge Goal: Reaching our Challenge Goal of $10 million when combined with the diocesan contribution of $5 million, covers the $15 million low range projection for the master plan.

$15 Million Transformation Goal: Reaching our Transformation Goal of $15 million when combined with the diocesan contribution of $5 million, covers the $20 million high range projection for the master plan.

$17 Million Every Generation Goal: Reaching our Every Generation Goal of $17 million when combined with the diocesan contribution of $5 million, covers the $21 million high range projection for the master plan and provides approximately $1 million in seed money dedicated to operating the new Catholic Student Center.


THE ADVERTISER
Are politicians to blame for Christianity's decline?

TDA: What is size of Wisdom’s congregation?

BS: There are approximately 475 parish families, plus more than 1,000 students actively involved with the student ministry (although technically all Catholic students are parishioners), and a large number of Catholics who attend Mass at Wisdom, but who are formally registered at parishes throughout the Diocese of Lafayette.

We are here to serve all students and alumni and the are always welcome. The support of Wisdom from Catholics registered at other parish is critical because so much many of our parishioners are students who do not have the financial freedom to contribute to our weekly offertory.

Unlike a typical parish, a large percentage of our operating budget comes from external sources.

TDA:With the reported decline of Christians or believers in the U.S., is it the overall Catholic community of Acadiana that blows in the face of this decline?

BS: There is plenty of evidence to support how vibrant our Catholic community is throughout Acadiana. A leading indicator record number of priestly vocations in the Diocese of Lafayette.

That clearly blows in the face of the larger decline.

In terms of Wisdom’s impact, both Bishop Deshotel and Bishop Emeritus Jarrell recognize Wisdom’s mission to minister to today’s youth is unique in the Diocese of Lafayette.

Our mission, successfully carried out, fosters dynamic Catholic leaders and energizes the entire diocese through vocations, holy marriages, and lay evangelization.


THE ADVERTISER
What happens when a lapsed Catholic attends Ash Wednesday Mass?

As measured by student participation, key metrics clearly challenge the idea of a decline in active and engaged believers throughout Acadiana. Consider the following:

Up from 45 students in 2010, 592 attended conferences or retreats in 2016
Up from zero in 2010, six Greek houses now have Bible studies
From 2010-2016, 39 students entered vocational discernment
Even the Princeton Review of top colleges of 2016 has noticed that students that one of the reasons students choose to attend UL Lafayette is “because the Ragin’ Cajun Catholics Community is awesome and dynamic!”

Perhaps George Weigel, biographer of Pope Saint John Paul II, captured it best when he said, “The UL Lafayette campus ministry is one of the bright lights in the New Evangelization in the United States and the students who become mature Catholics there are going to change the world for the better.”

TDA: Would the name remain the same?

BS: Yes. It will remain Our Lady of Wisdom Church and Catholic Student Center. The student ministry will also remain the Ragin’ Cajun Catholics Student Ministry.

For more information or you want to get involved, visit build.ourladyofwisdom.org or call Mary Hernandez at 337-232-8742.


19 2016-06-28
Lafayette

Acadiana legislators weigh in on state budget picture


The recently completed 2016 legislative season was a grueling exercise in trying to balance the budget during three sessions — 19 weeks — as partisan politics raged in Baton Rouge, Acadiana legislators said.

New Iberia Rep. Terry Landry and Lafayette Rep. Vincent Pierre, both Democrats, said legislative efforts to undo eight years of Gov. Bobby Jindal’s cuts to higher education and health care were stymied by Republicans bent on keeping tax breaks for profitable industries and shunning tax increases on the rich.

“We were sent to (the Legislature) to represent people. We were not sent to represent special interests,” Landry told the Acadiana Press Club on Monday.

“Bobby Jindal cut the budget over eight straight years,” he said. “And he didn’t cut it surgically; he cut it with an ax.”

Jean-Paul Coussan, a first-term Republican from Lafayette, said the legislative fights reflected the priorities of those who elected them. He defended the Republicans who held the line at raising more taxes and said much of the deficit that was reported was based on financial projections, not reality.

The Louisiana Legislature ended the final of three sessions last week — two special sessions called to raise more money and the regular April-June session, where legislators, by law, couldn’t pass taxes.

According to reports, Louisiana remains $200 million short of a balanced budget for the 2015-16 fiscal year that ends Thursday and a few hundred million dollars shy of a balanced 2016-17 budget that begins Friday. Legislators did pass revenue-raising measures — such as a hike in the tax on cigarettes and a 1-cent sales tax that will go away in June 2018 — but Republicans were successful in thwarting efforts to raise taxes on wealthy individuals and cutting tax breaks for out-of-state corporations.

Coussan said much of the reporting about the budget has used figures that are estimates. He said that by August, when the 2015-16 books are closed, a clear financial picture will emerge. He also said the 2016-17 fiscal projections look better than what has been reported.

“The budget is balanced,” he said of the 2016-17 budget.

Landry said the economic climate in Louisiana these days, and especially in hard-hit, oil-dependent Acadiana, calls for reining in the tax breaks that are benefiting profitable corporations.

“I don’t think Exxon is going to pull up their pipelines” if taxes increase, said Landry, a retired State Police trooper in his second legislative term.

Landry also said Republicans, after David Vitter lost the gubernatorial election last year to Democrat John Bel Edwards, were setting the stage to win back the office in 2019 by giving Edwards resistance at every turn.

Pierre and Landry also lamented cuts to K-12 education, the first cut to primary education in decades, and the cuts to funds that were to go to private-sector hospitals that took over charity hospitals that Jindal would have closed down.

Coussan disputed much of the cuts that Pierre and Landry blamed on Republicans and said legislators worked together as best they could with a depressive economic climate hanging over their heads.

“Everybody was trying to find comprehensive solutions,” he said.
19 2016-06-20
Lafayette

Coach or Dad? Why not both? Four Ragin’ Cajuns relish the opportunity to coach their children in the college ranks


LAFAYETTE —Practice time is over, and dad time begins. They must be kept separate for this to work.

Last fall was Gunner Hudspeth’s first as a college student and as a college football player. He went through the same drills as his teammates with the same scrutiny. The difference was he may not have gotten as much praise for a job well done.

The other difference is what can be done after practice: Gunner, a freshman quarterback, and his father, Mark, Louisiana-Lafayette’s head football coach, hung around one fall evening in the indoor facility to play a casual game of catch. Time that wasn’t there before was now afforded to them, and they took advantage.

So did a few others on campus.

Not far away, senior Matt Marlin was gearing up for his lone season playing under his dad, Cajuns men’s basketball coach Bob Marlin. After completing most of his undergraduate studies at the University of Texas, he called his father last summer with a question.

“I was a little bit surprised when he called me and said, ‘Do you think I’d still be eligible to walk on? I’d like to come play every day and spend time with you,’ ” Bob Marlin said. “I thought that was exciting.”

Freshman Chelsea Lotief knocked around softballs in the indoor batting cages under father Mike’s watchful eye as some of those football practices went on. She had grown up around the softball team.

“Now it’s not much different, except she’s wearing the cleats and catching the balls,” Mike Lotief said.

Baseball coach Tony Robichaux had been through all of that. Two of his kids, Justin and Austin, enjoyed a lot of success playing under their father in college. Austin, a pitcher in the Los Angeles Angels organization, is still playing.

How did it happen that the four leaders of some of Louisiana-Lafayette’s most high-profile sports coach or have coached their kids at the college level? Is it something about the university, or perhaps it’s something about this portion of southwest Louisiana that makes it not only possible, but encouraged?

Maybe it’s both.

“Some places, they would look at that as nepotism or favoritism, or the university or fan base would maybe look at it unfavorably, but here it’s exactly the opposite,” Mike Lotief said. “We’re so much about family and we’re so much about the relationships and taking care of each other. That’s something that is welcomed.

“I never thought twice about my daughter coming to school here, that it would add any additional scrutiny to my job or that it would bring into question my integrity. I felt very comfortable with my daughter. I felt very comfortable that this is where she belonged.”

Clear lines

Mark and Gunner Hudspeth always envisioned teaming up when Gunner came of age. Whether it was in his genes or because of his environment, Gunner always gravitated toward football. Like his dad, he was a high school quarterback — and a good one, too. He had scholarship offers to some smaller schools, but this plan had been set for a while.

“Since I can remember, I’ve been wanting to come play for my dad,” Gunner Hudspeth said. “Wherever he was coaching at the time, that’s where I was planning to go to catch up and spend some time with him. It ended up being at UL, and it ended up working out really good for both of us.”

It has worked out, but that’s not to say it goes without its challenges. In those early days of summer workouts and preseason practices, Gunner felt compelled to prove he belonged.

“It was hard at first, because that was the perception when I first came in,” he said. “But I think now, especially after being in the program for more than a year, I’ve kind of grown out of that shadow for a bit. I get kidded around sometimes with the ‘coach’s son’ jokes, but for the most part I’ve grown out of it and made my own name.”

His father felt compelled to prove it in his own way, even though it’s hard to do.

He had to distance himself from being Dad when the whistle was around his neck. When Gunner’s teammates make a good play in practice, Hudspeth is there to offer vocal words of encouragement. When Gunner makes the right read of the defense or threads a spiral through a tight window, the coach finds himself restraining his inner father.

“You battle with that a little bit,” Mark Hudspeth said. “It’s not fair if he does a good job and you don’t say ‘good job’ to him, too, but that’s just part of being able to coach your son, and it’s what you have to live with. I don’t want to discourage him, either, but you don’t want people to think that you’re over-rewarding him. It’s hard to juggle that, so basically what I do is treat him like any other player. On the field, he’s one of our players. Off the field, I’m Dad.”

Yes, the community and university make coaches feel comfortable bringing their kids into the fold. But a line must exist between coach and Dad, player and son or daughter, for this relationship to work.

Both of Robichaux’s sons were solid players. Justin appeared in 44 games as a pitcher, compiling a record of 8-4 with a 2.41 ERA. Austin was the Cajuns’ Friday night starter for most of his career and went 17-5 in his last two seasons.

Even though they were good players, the line of demarcation still needed to be drawn for everyone involved to know there was no preferential treatment when his kids were on the field.

“It’s something that on the surface looks great, but there’s a lot of things that can happen once you get into it,” Tony Robichaux said. “Both parties have to be very clear. The lines cannot be skewed or foggy; they have to be very clear. You have to spend a lot of time, especially as the father, and make sure you know the lines between coach and Dad is clearly separated for this to work. If those things are handled, then I think it can be a very good situation. Not many times does a father get that opportunity.”

Bob Marlin struggled with this at times this past season. Matt usually did not appear in games until the outcome was largely decided. He finished his one season in a Cajuns uniform having played a total of 35 minutes over nine games.

“It’s challenging to coach your son,” Bob Marlin said. “It’s like raising a child: Until you’ve done it, you don’t really know. Other people can have opinions, but it’s a different situation that you put yourself in. It was a challenge sometimes — certainly from a playing standpoint. I think anyone that knows me, and I got criticized for this, being too hard on him, because I didn’t want to show that favoritism.”

There are politics in sports, and coaching your child can be like walking into a political minefield. Play your kid too much, and you’re showing undue favoritism because of their name. Don’t play your kid enough, and you’re being unfair to him or her because of a name.

It’s a challenge, sure.

But it’s so worth it.

“To be there on a daily basis as he’s still growing and turning into a young man was very satisfying,” Bob Marlin said.

Getting time back

Mike Lotief was a lawyer before he became a softball coach. The reason he left his practice is a problem familiar to those in the coaching profession.

“Believe it or not, the reason why I left practicing law was to be able to spend more time with my kids and my family,” Lotief said. “This job has afforded me that opportunity more so than when I was practicing law.”

The Lotief family life revolves around softball. Stefni Lotief was an acclaimed pitcher for the Cajuns in her athletic prime and now shares office space with her husband. Their kids, Chelsea and Andrew, share their passion for the sport. Dinnerconversations usually wind up finding their way back to softball.

But the Lotiefs’ case is a special one. The demands on a college coach’s time are enormous, and the sport often serves as the dividing line between coaches and their families. Lotief understands how lucky he is in that regard.

“It’s always tough on coaches, I think, when they have to spend so much time on their sport, and then their spouse or their kids or people around them are not interested in what they’re doing,” Mike Lotief said. “Then you have to try to find some balance between getting your job done and spending time with your family. But when those two things intersect — I’m doing my job and I’m spending time with my family, and I don’t feel guilty because they love what I love — it’s a blessing. It’s been a blessing for our family.”

The intersection of sports and family has been a blessing for his coaching brethren as well.

It still hurts Tony Robichaux that he was not able to see his sons pitch in their state championship games. It still hurts him that he missed important dates in his daughter Ashley’s life, too. But through baseball and being able to coach his sons, he was able to get seven years’ worth of experiences — four with Justin, three with Austin — that he otherwise would have been deprived of.

Bob Marlin left to coach the Cajuns when Matt was a senior in high school. He only got one year to share with his son, but he’s grateful for that opportunity.

“It’s time you don’t get back,” Bob Marlin said. “Even if it’s just for one year.”

The Hudspeths are relishing the time they get to spend with each other. Their bond is strengthened through their shared passion, and Gunner envisions being a coach like his father one day.

Football was often how they connected. Mark Hudspeth would somehow find time in his busy fall schedule to make it to Mississippi and watch his son compete in high school games.

Afterward, they’d get in the car and talk shop: what happened this week, what the game plan is for next week.

“It’s kept us close, even though I grew up so far away,” Gunner Hudspeth said. “I think it turned out as a great bridge for me and him to share.”

Now they get to share it on a daily basis.

This fall, Gunner Hudspeth will take snaps in practice as his father tries his best not to let his pride show. On the sideline, young MajorHudspeth will mimic his older brother with a miniature football, and Captain, the youngest of the Hudspeth brood, will be there, too. Hopefully, Mark Hudspeth said, his daughter, Carley, will one day be a Ragin’ Cajun too.

This is the intersection of fatherhood and livelihood.

It’s not without its difficulties, but the reward is far greater for the four Cajuns coaches who are winning the battle with time.

“I’ve been coaching since 1992. What is that — 24 years? I’ve been coaching 24 years spending every ounce of my energy on everybody else’s children,” Mark Hudspeth said. “I just feel like this opportunity to spend a little time with my child has been real rewarding. I’m glad I have the opportunity to do it.

“And I’ll be honest with you: I envision the same scenario for Major. He’s just like Gunner; he loves the game and loves being around the players. I can honestly say I think he’ll play for me one day, too.

“Who knows? Maybe Captain also. We’ll take ’em one at a time.”
19 2016-06-16
Lafayette

Armentor announces scholarship winners


The $10,000 Pay It Forward Scholarship Foundation, established by Acadiana attorney Glenn Armentor, hosted a press conference and certification ceremony Wednesday announcing the 2016 scholarship recipients.

Armentor created the Pay-It-Forward scholarship. Since its inception and first recipient in 2010, 23 $10,000 scholarships have been awarded. Born of the desire to further deepen the connection amongst the scholarship's recipients and to build leadership skills, the scholarship program has expanded to incorporate a mentorship component, as well as an annual luncheon.

To date, more than $225,000 has been donated over 6 years to provide scholarships for students attending the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, South Louisiana Community College and Louisiana State University Law School.

The $10,000 Pay-It-Forward Scholarship of Excellence is given annually to at-risk young men or women who display the spirit, work ethic and character that is deserving of a chance for a better future as well as needy adults facing exceptional hardship. The scholarships are awarded by an independent panel of community leaders based on a combination of attributes including: student performance, drive, ability, need and desire to seek a college degree from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.


19 2016-06-16
Lafayette

Raising funds with Raising Cane's


LAFAYETTE -
Eat at Raising Cane's tomorrow on West Congress from 3:30 p.m.- 9:00 p.m. and they will donate 15% of their sales to Ragin' Cajun Racing.

Mention 'Ragin' Cajun Racing' upon ordering your meal.

The UL-affiliated program is an engineering based organization that designs and builds formula race cars to compete in an annual international competition with other universities.

Ragin' Cajun Racing would like to raise roughly $30,000 to fund this year's manufacturing and travel expenses.

The program teaches students how to apply coursework and prepare them for the job market once they graduate.
19 2016-06-09
Lafayette

University of Louisiana alleges former student owes fees


GRETNA – The University of Louisiana at Lafayette claims that a former student failed to make necessary payments.

University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors through University of Louisiana at Lafayette filed a suit against Samantha T. Urrata and Christine Urrata in the 24th Judicial District Court on May 31.

According to the claim, the Samantha T. Urrata was a student at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette in 2012. The suit states that the defendant enrolled for classes on May 3, 2012, signing a contract to make certain payments for said courses. The suit further states however, that while enrolled at the university, the defendant failed to return for the spring 2013 semester, thus incurring specific fees, additionally, the defendant was indebted to the university for the fall 2012 semester.

The defendant is accused of failing to make required payments to the educational institution.

The plaintiff is seeking $1,076.90 plus interest in damages. It is represented by Wendy Ramaurine of the Louisiana Department of Justice in Baton Rouge. The case has been assigned to Division I Judge Nancy A. Miller.

The 24th Judicial District Court Case number 761524
19 2016-06-02
Lafayette

UL complex to be renamed in honor of Sonny Mouton


Legislators have given final approval to a bill that would honor former legislator Edgar "Sonny" Mouton Jr. by naming the area of the UL athletic complex, the Cajundome and the Convention Center for him.

Mouton died in March at the age of 86. Mouton was a member of the Louisiana House of Representatives and the Louisiana Senate. He served as executive counsel to Gov. Dave Treen, and also as an adviser to Gov. Edwin Edwards.

Mouton also ran for governor himself in 1979. He was the principal author of the legislation that created CODOFIL, which was a major step forward for the preservation of the Cajun heritage. He was recognized as a Living Legend by the Acadian Museum in Erath, and was inducted into the Louisiana Political Hall of Fame.

Mouton had four daughters, sixteen grandchildren and twenty-six great-grandchildren.

During his years in public service, Mouton is credited for laying a lot of the groundwork that resulted in the construction of the Cajundome and the athletics complex.

The bill, which was finally passed by the Senate on Tuesday and sent to the Governor's desk on Wednesday, would name the area between West Congress, Bertrand, Reinhardt and Souvenir Gate the Edgar G. "Sonny" Mouton Jr. Sports and Entertainment Plaza.

The buildings included are the Ragin' Cajun Athletics Complex, the Cajundome and the Cajundome Convention Center.

On Wednesday, the Senate honored Mouton's family with a framed copy of a resolution passed honoring him.

Sen. John Alario, President of the Senate, said he served with Mouton.

"I remember him as being one of the most brilliant legislators I served with," Alario said. "And in that way, he was a teacher. If you watched how he conducted himself, how he handled people, how he took are of the needs of the people, you could learn something."

Alario said Mouton had a great sense of humor, and was able to use it to bring people around to his way of thinking.

"He was one of those legislators who tried to solve problems. He didn't try to create problems or cause a lot of grief, he tried to solve problems for the people of this state," Alario said.

"He had very strong compassion for working people and for the poor. I am grateful to have had the opportunity to serve with him."

State Sen. Gerald Boudreaux of Lafayette remembered Mouton coming to his neighborhood.

"I was brought up in McComb in Lafayette. And there was a man who came into our community, who made sure the people were registered to vote, and that they exercised that right," Boudreaux said. "That man, who I knew from birth - black or white, rich or poor, you knew he cared about you."

Boudreaux said "T Mout" was someone who left a legacy of accomplishment worthy of recognition.

"He laid the foundation for us, and we're going to continue to build on it," Boudreaux said.
19 2016-05-31
Lafayette

Upgrades planned for University of Louisiana at Lafayette Student Union and unused green space Advocate photo by PAUL KIEU -- Temporary wooden barri


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette is exploring upgrades for the new Student Union and a green space project to bring life to a site where several administrative offices once sat.

Since the new Student Union’s opening in January 2015, faculty and student leaders have searched for ways to make the facility more accessible to students and student-run organizations.

Student Government Association President Kirsten Allen said during a recent meeting that plans include modifying The Brew — the union’s coffee shop that serves Starbucks beverages — and the space outside the union where Guillory Hall, the old bowling-alley-turned-cafeteria, once stood.

Both the Student Union and green space renovations are part of the university’s master plan, which guides the school’s vision for growth into 2030. Talks about revamping the coffee shop and retooling the outside space began in the early spring semester, about one year after the union reopened to the public.

For the union, the goal is to add more casual seating arrangements to the café and create a more relaxed environment.

“(Designs started) with the beginning of spring as we were communicating with SGA and students, who were wanting a more open, homey space where they can hang out,” said Dawn Miller, director of union operations.

Miller said the designs also call for more seating and acoustic improvements to absorb espresso machine noises and allow the opportunity for small musical performances.

“We’re pretty much getting close to the final drawing board, getting pricing, getting everything done,” she said. The price of café renovations has yet to be determined.

Already new to the Student Union is the installation of flat-screen televisions that can be used to watch university-related events.

As changes are developed, Miller said Student Union staff and SGA members will reach out for student feedback after designs are finalized.

“This is their space,” Miller said. “We want them to know everything we’re doing. It does us no good to try to implement something without them.”

At the same time, SGA and the president’s office are looking to find new uses for the vacant area on the intersection of Boucher Street and Hebrard Boulevard.

Buildings on the street-facing side of Cypress Lake — Guillory, Lafayette and Vermilion halls — once housed administrative offices. The university relocated those offices to the Student Union and tore down the structures in 2015.

Plans for that space include an amphitheater and a seating area covered by a trellis, projects that Haley Campbell, a sophomore majoring in secondary education, said will draw more students and organizations to host performances and events.

“Organizations could actually have their events outside,” Campbell said. “To have an amphitheater where people can actually go down and sit, you could actually put on the productions that the campus holds so dearly to their hearts.”

Other suggested ideas that aren’t on the drawing board included a walkway over the lake and a fountain.

“That’s something that we’ll have to take some time to reconsider, but that’s not in the immediate plans to do,” said Bill Crist, UL-Lafayette director of facilities management.

Crist said plans for the green space will likely come from the master plan funding.

Funding is also going toward improved overall campus lighting, as well as intramural field lighting.

In the next three to four months, plans will be finalized with Architects Southwest and sent out for contractors’ bids.

Crist said he expects to see the green space project completed around August or September in 2017.

“My goal would be to have something done by the start of the fall semester,” he said.
19 2016-05-24
Lafayette

Cajundome improvements expected to be done by Dec. 1 and provide a better entertainment venue Advocate staff photo by LESLIE WESTBROOK -- Cajundome D


The Cajundome is undergoing a $22 million makeover that will bring new and expanded seating, new lights, upgrades for concession areas and restrooms, and a clean roof.

The facelift, which was formally launched at a ceremony Monday, will be the most extensive work at the facility since it opened in 1985.

“It has never had a major renovation,” said Cajundome Director Greg Davis.

The arena is set to reopen by Dec. 1.

The original 11,500 orange and white seats will be ripped out to make way for 12,500 new black seats designed to reduce reflections and create an arena environment that disappears into the background when the lights shine on sporting events and performances, said Cajundome Operations Director Phil Ashurst.

The walls of the arena will be painted black and gray, and a new LED lighting system will allow for tightly focused beams that don’t bleed into the seating areas.

“It’s going to give patrons a much better live entertainment experience,” Davis said. “It’s going to have a theatrical live performance feel to it.”

He said lower-level seating will be re configured and expanded to allow spectators at University of Louisiana at Lafayette basketball games to push right up to the court, rather than sit on the other side of the 14-foot gap in the old seating arrangement.

The arena’s main entrance will be spruced up, and the restrooms will be renovated.

Concession area upgrades will allow for expanded food service, more points of sale and a “state-of-the-art beer distribution system” for faster service and colder brews.

“We will enhance the menu and offer higher-quality food at the concession stand,” Davis said.

Most of the $22 million in upgrades will be inside the arena, but the project also includes the re sealing of the arena’s massive roof, work that will remove the unsightly mildew that now mars the top of the Cajundome.

Davis said the improvements will give the 31-year-old arena a new lease on life and position it to aggressively compete for premium events and more customers.

“We are competitors in this business,” said Cajundome Dome Commission Chairman DeWayne Bowie.

The renovation work will be paid for with proceeds from the local hotel-motel tax.

Davis said UL-Lafayette basketball, which begins in November, will hold early season games at the nearby Blackham Coliseum.

The games are expected to return to the Cajundome by Dec. 1 or possibly earlier if the renovations are finished before then, he said.
19 2016-05-23
Lafayette

Cajuns complete sweep of ULM to claim share of Sun Belt title, top seed in conference tournament


LAFAYETTE — With his Louisiana-Lafayette baseball team struggling at the plate early in Saturday’s regular-season finale against Louisiana-Monroe, coach Tony Robichaux went ahead and let assistant Anthony Babineaux spread the news.

Babineaux went up and down the ranks and let his Ragin’ Cajuns know: Troy had shut out South Alabama 8-0, meaning the window was open — if you’re ready to step through it.

“We went and told them, and they went to work,” Robichaux said.

The Cajuns broke the game open with a five-run fifth inning to back another strong pitching performance by sophomore right-hander Evan Guillory in a 6-2 win. They clinched a share of the Sun Belt Conference regular-season title, ending the Cajuns’ one-year hiatus from the top of the final conference standings.

South Alabama raced to a 15-0 start in conference play this season but crumbled to a 6-9 finish. The Cajuns (37-19, 21-9) were 10-5 through the first half of conference play but finished 11-4, including a 5-1 jaunt over the past two weeks. They were four games out of first place last Friday.

“The big thing is how we did it, by them staying together and not falling apart when we had chances to fall apart,” Robichaux said. “We went through everything we had to go through, the losing and tough times … but the one common factor was the players deciding to stay together.”

The Cajuns are the No. 1 seed for this week’s conference tournament in San Marcos, Texas. The Cajuns are set to face No. 8 seed Arkansas State at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday.

The Cajuns on Saturday were trailing 2-1 when they came to the plate in the fifth, courtesy of a moonshot two-run homer by Danny Springer in the top half — one of just five hits by the Warhawks (20-35, 10-20) against Guillory (5-5).

Guillory started with three perfect innings, and he had allowed only one base runner before he fell into some trouble in the fifth.

“He made one mistake and it left the yard, but that was it,” Robichaux said.

The Cajuns didn’t take long to have his back. Nick Thurman started a five-run rally in the bottom half by banging a double off the fence in right, just missing his second home run of the year. Thurman was chased home by the next batter, Alex Pinero, who drilled a single into right, and the avalanche was in motion.

By the time Stefan Trosclair’s two-run homer bounced off the tops of the trees beyond the wall in left, the Cajuns had picked up three extra-base hits and five runs, taking a commanding lead that they wouldn’t give up.

Trosclair raised his batting average nearly 20 points in the final five games of the regular season, all wins, and he did it almost exclusively with big hits. He went 9-for-19 in those games, and seven of those hits went for extra bases. He drove in nine runs over that stretch.

A meeting with hitting coach Jeremy Talbot prior to Friday’s games produced some simple and fruitful advice for Trosclair.

“We just talked about staying inside the ball; it’s really the big key to me,” Trosclair said. “Sticking to my approach, not trying to do too much. It worked out for me today.”

After the Cajuns’ five-run outburst, ULM could never manage more than one runner per inning against Guillory and right-hander Chris Charpentier.

Guillory finished with six strikeouts in seven innings, and he has now won four of his past six decisions. Charpentier was pitching at home for the first time since March 19, and he looked sharp while preserving the Cajuns’ conference championship.

“The unsung hero comes off the bench and gets the last six outs for us,” Robichaux said.

19 2016-05-20
Lafayette

UL Lafayette, LSU Eunice earn kudos for partnership


LAFAYETTE, La. (University of Louisiana at Lafayette) - A partnership between the University of Louisiana at Lafayette and LSU Eunice is cited as a model in a new guide for improving transfer student success.

“The Transfer Playbook: Essential Practices for Two- and Four-Year Colleges,” profiles UL Lafayette and LSU Eunice, along with other institutions in five states that are improving outcomes for community college students who transfer to universities to earn bachelor’s degrees. The report was produced by the Aspen Institute’s College Excellence Program and the Community College Research Center at Teachers College, Columbia University.

“Our efforts have included designing the Ragin’ Cajun Bridge Program, developing 2+2 programs where students can earn UL Lafayette bachelor’s degrees on the Eunice campus, and maintaining clear communications between senior leaders at the two campuses,” said Dr. DeWayne Bowie, vice president for Enrollment Management at UL Lafayette.

LSU Eunice has two-year associate degree programs whose courses can be applied toward a bachelor’s degree at UL Lafayette.

The Ragin’ Cajun Bridge Program, established in 2014, gives students attending LSU Eunice – who plan to transfer to UL Lafayette – access to many campus benefits enjoyed by University students, such as access to Ragin’ Cajuns sporting events, Dupré Library, tutoring, career services, and academic advising.

Through the 2+2 program, UL Lafayette offers a bachelor’s degree program in elementary education that enables students to complete all four years of coursework on the LSU Eunice campus. University faculty travel to LSU Eunice to teach. “Each year, the UL Lafayette portion of the program enrolls approximately 20 students, many of whom live in Eunice and have children, which makes the hour-long commute to the UL Lafayette campus more difficult,” the report states.

A UL Lafayette academic advisor also meets with students once a week on the LSU Eunice campus to answer questions and make sure they take any tests needed to stay on track, such as PRAXIS certification exams.

According to “The Transfer Playbook,” 720,000 degree-seeking students across the nation entered community colleges in Fall 2007. Most intended to ultimately earn bachelor’s degrees. However, “only about 100,000, or 14 percent, transferred to a four-year college and earned a bachelor’s degree within six years.”

The report notes that “students who enter higher education through community colleges are much more likely than those who start at four-year institutions to be low-income or the first in their family to attend college.”

So, it continues, “the two to four year transfer process, when it functions well, represents a critical means for upward mobility across the United States."

Other partnerships between universities and community colleges featured in “The Transfer Playbook,” are:

• Colorado State University, Colorado Front Range Community College

• Eastern Connecticut State University, Manchester Community College

• Florida International University and Florida Atlantic University, Broward College

• University of Massachusetts Amherst, Holyoke Community College

• University of Washington and Western Washington University, Everett Community College.

According to the report, those partnerships have three broad strategies in common. They “make transfer student success a priority, create clear programmatic pathways with aligned high-quality instruction;” and “provide tailored transfer student advising.”
19 2016-05-20
Lafayette

UL Lafayette students recognized on Spring 2016 President’s and Dean’s lists


LAFAYETTE, La.– At the end of each regular semester, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette recognizes those students named to the President’s List and the Dean’s List. Eligible students must be enrolled fulltime.

To be included on the Dean’s List, students must earn a 3.5 GPA or better and to be included on the President’s List, students must earn a 3.8 GPA or better.

The following students are being honored for the Spring 2016 semester. An asterisk (*) denotes those students on the President’s List.

The attachment contains a list of students who have been recognized for the Spring 2016 semester.

Arts



Derek John Broussard

*Megan Elise Calhoun

Leah Leona Hoffpauir

Elizabeth Kathryn Leger

Alyssa Sarah McMurray

*Nicholas John Milton

Jacob Mouton

Benjamin James Stringfellow

*Deanna Marie Wolf



Business Administration



Amanda Victoria Bordes

Peyton Malai Bourgeois

*Kyle Montgomery Carriere

Jeff Michael Daigle

*Kristi Castille Elliott

Emma Louise Frank

*Benjamin Harrington

Corey James Hulin

*Rashel D’nae Kelly

Destiny Nichole Kennedy

*Lance Louis Leblanc

Claire Elizabeth Leger

Stephanie Martinez-Hernandez

*Jared Lee Matte

*Jade Mckenzie Olivier

*Jacob Thomas Porter

*Eric Damian Taylor

Beth M Thibodeaux

Caroline Elizabeth Vidrine

Sheena Marie Vincent

*John Edward Wagar III

*Christine R Zaunbrecher

Joe Zhengxing Zheng



Education



*Taylor Arceneaux

Jillian Boone

Kevin Matthew Broussard

Mariah A Charles

*Hannah Marie Chiasson

*Meghan Chiasson

*Stephanie Ann Curley

Mallory A Fontenot

*Whitney Marie Fontenot

*Mollie Kate Gossen

Chelsea Joan Guidry

*Megan A Guidry

Katlyn Ann Hanks

Dalel Rose Helo

*Lisa A James-Rivette

Stephanie Michele Keigley

Benjamin A Koch

*Sarah C Ledet

Abigail Lee Leger

Elizabeth Anne Legnion

*Demi Marie LeJeune

*Charles M. Mayeux Jr.

*Lacey Lynn Michaud

Ashlee Rebecca Mills

Caroline Arysse Nugier

Lauren Faith Perkins

*Rebecca Frances Ready

*Amy Margaret Reggie

*Callie Monique Reiners

*Jonese A. Roy

Kristen Alyssa Spell

*Kayla Catherine Trahan

Hope Renee Travis

Tessa Danae Vander Molen

*Stephanie Kate Zaunbrecher



Engineering



Jacob Taylor Broussard

Trenton J Elliott

Katherine Ann Foreman

John Thomas Frank

William Riley Frank

Andrew Patrick Granger

*Hogan Brian Guidry

*Jordan Kade Guillotte

*Sharon Nicole Haristy

*Lane S Istre

Zachry Jude Istre

Leighton John Killmer

Connor Andrew Kirsch

Toby Michael Menard

*Alex D Miller

Eric J Ohlenforst

Nicholas C Petitjean

Kyle Brandon Primeaux

Jared Blade Savoy

*David Lee Tautkus

Joseph William Tautkus

Ivy Joseph Thibodeaux

Andrew P Valdetero

Bryant James Venable



General Studies



Vivian Claire Cooke

*Erica Claire Didier

*Cindy Everett

Kamari Figaro

*Bryant Causby Hamic

Alana C Immel



Liberal Arts



*Catherine Elizabeth Habetz Bedel

*Amy Kathryn Boudreaux

Taylor E Boulet

Tina Louise Breaux

Therese Danielle Briscoe

Jasmine Danielle Chizer

*Shaniqua T Crosley

Duke Allan Daigle

*Genesis Andreina Dasilva

*Brittany M Domingue

*Lyska Ja’net Fogleman

*Emily Reece Fontenot

*Meagan Jada Fontenot

*Aline Marie Gossen

Morgan Vivian Graham

Haley L Hearod

Taylor Hebert

Rachel Claire Lacroix

Mamie Elizabeth Lane

*Lori Elizabeth Lapoint

Meghan Elaine Medus

Tyler Melancon

Naomi Marie Parker

*Kristen Petitjean

Alayna Christine Reaux

*Olivia Anne Reggie

*Delaney Shea Rivera

*Heidi Anne Robideaux

Jacob Daniel Rogers

Christine Marie Savoie

*Marcus Sean Venable

Emily Claire Whiting

*Waylon James Young



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Rebekah Susan Leblue

Katelyn Paige Ledoux

Alison Elizabeth Leonards

*Kristen Marie Meche

Lauren Marie Meyer

Lauren A Romero

*Tatelyn Elizabeth Tauzin



Sciences



*Audrey L Almeida

Joshua Ryan Benoit

*Blaire Simone Champagne

Colby Neil Laramore

*Kit Leblanc

Kaitlyn Marie Lejeune

*Ryan Jude Leonards

*Amelia Rose LeJeune

Drake Daniel Menard

*Hayden D Presley

Hans Joseph Prevost

*Luke Reed

*Brett Richard

*Elizabeth A Rothermel

Tori Danielle Young



Allen



Liberal Arts



Paul Jean-leon Bedel

John Franklin Guidry

Malikah Savonya Wade



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



*Giovanna Patricia Rocha



Ascension



Arts



*Nathan Allen Ford

*Brianna Casey Moran

Jacob Stanley Odom

*Sydney Ellen Prochaska

*Kentrell Marlon Wade



Business Administration



Shelby Renee Guerrero

Katherine Marie Hall

Kaylea Danielle Magee

*Madison Elise Mayeaux

Ashley Sade Miller

*John James Saxon

*Marki Sylvester



Education



Haylee Cloud

*Kara Nicole Gremillion

*Markie E Roye



Engineering



*Christopher Neil Collins

*Kylie Cheree Granier

Luke Taylor Perkins

*Paysun Wu



Liberal Arts



Bakr Abdelmajid Abbahou

Tyler Joseph Berthelot

Abbey Leigh Bueche

Rachel Anne Jarrell

*Alana Michelle Marcello

Taja Lynell White



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Katherine Elizabeth Cowart

Sydney Michelle Fuller

*Macee Nicole Gautreau

*Brady Joseph Louque

Madalyn Sanchez



Sciences



Jacob Joseph Lecoq



Assumption



Business Administration



Jacoby Devuan Williams



Avoyelles



Arts



*Blake Normand Pujol



Business Administration



Cassie Laine Dauzat

*Kristen Laborde

*Robert Wayne Robinson Jr. Jr



Education



*Amie Adair Bettevy

*Ethan Edwin Caubarreaux

Humneet Singh Sandhu



Engineering



Wyatt Lewis Beaubouef

*Hunter Trey Dixon

Rachel Nicole Ducote

Thomas Louis Lyles

Ryan Steven Taylor



General Studies



*Morgan Odile Darce

Kayla Leigh Decuir

*Elizabeth Claire Mcnabb



Liberal Arts



Jamie Elizabeth Clark

Micaela Dauzat

Courtney Danielle Dufour

*Mary Elizabeth Gauthier

*Madison Casey Grimes

Keenan Christopher Kelley



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Heather Rose Devillier



Sciences



Bryan M Burke

*Evan Alexander Juneau

Leslie Catherine Saucier



Beauregard



Arts



Jessica Renee Clay

Haley Joyce Marie Fish

Andre Maurice Lovely



Business Administration



Aaron D’von Shanks

Clayton Joseph Sills



Education



*Alisha Page Alderton

*Morgan Elizabeth Dailey

*Janee Macates Thornton

*Elton Alan White



Engineering



*Gordon Lance Guillory

*Seth Edward Shirley



General Studies



*Crockett Elmer Johnson



Liberal Arts



Kaleb Zachary Moore

*Rikeisha Brianna Spikes



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



*Tamara Ria Wyatt



Sciences

*Quincy Walker



Bossier



Business Administration



Aaron Michael Vaughn



Education



Elizabeth Ann Koestner

Haley Cheyenne Pooser



Liberal Arts



*Ashley Kelley Hughes

*Alexis Paige Lofton

*Erik Andrew Smith



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Colby Wayne Crow



Sciences



*Ryan C Davis



Caddo



Arts



*Taylor Mack

Brayden Chase Moore

*Kiana Nashe Washington

Nykendra Shanice White



Business Administration



Loasha Jacobs



Education



*Caroline Elizabeth Camden

*Elizabeth Jane Pate



Engineering



Jared Backofen

Shane David Harklerode

Mark Norgard



Liberal Arts



Faith Elizabeth Birdwell

*Leigh Ann Green

*Jenetrell Donell Oliver

*Karlie Nicole Rowley

*Annabelle Leigh Smith

Ciara Camille Snelling

*Kelly West



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Kelley Elizabeth Colgin

Elizabeth Paige Hardy

Rachel Leshay Hill

Rachael Alexandra Mitchell



Sciences



*Morgan Lee Griffin

*Hailey Lynn Hesterman

Briyanie Savoie

Bailey Reed Williams



Calcasieu



Arts



Luke Michael Habetz

Jacob Matthew Hughes

Holdton Braddock Jones

Jolene Heather Price

Elizabeth M Rountree

*Sabrina Rose Simon



Business Administration



*Madison Denae Guidry

*Kaycie Carol Kennison

*Ronald Jude Plumber

Shamikka J Townsend



Education



*Haley Brooke Campbell

Ashton Leigh Duplechain

*Georgia Ann Elliott

*Alicia Lenee George

Taylor N Godfrey

*Kyndel Paige Guillory

Jessica Rea Malbreaux

Kyrian Raquell Thompson



Engineering



Camran Reid Brindley

Joseph Carlton Burris

Javin D Carter

*Austin Ryan Doucet

*Brant Samuel Jones

Isaac Richard Omlor



Liberal Arts



*Sara D Casiday

*Jada Christine Horton

Nia Keys

*Taylee Mckay Kuykendall

Matthew Richard Lavoi

Kayla Cheyenne Semien

*Cassidy Rae Sonnier

*Carlie Brooke Stapleton

*Hannah Kate Streams

*Savanna Mary Tommasi

Nicolas Abraham Zaunbrecher



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Mallory Jean Baca

Lauren Danielle Delpapa

*Brooke Elizabeth Johnson



Sciences



Kea Alyce Bell

*Alexis Starr Blair

Wallace Lance Frelot

*Brianna Lawson

*John Paul Patterson



Caldwell



Liberal Arts



*Colton Clark



Catahoula



Education



Kalia Latisha Phillips



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Carla Suan Mcclure



Cameron



Business Administration



Courtland Renee Granger



Sciences



*Matt Richard



Concordia



Engineering

*Garrett Dylan Rehms



De Soto



Arts



Elizabeth Allen-Daigle



Education



Cody James Buchwald



Liberal Arts



Alec Nelson Andrade



East Baton Rouge



Arts



*Camille Grace Broussard

Angelle Monique Carter

*Emily Margaret Daigle

Emily Marie Frederickson

Sarah Elizabeth Garrett

*Karly Zain Hunt

*Lena Honghanh Le

Corey Edward Louque

Michael Sean Moore

Miranda Meikail Reams

*Faith Story

Tyler James Usie

*Terreze Rachelle Williams



Business Administration



*Jonathan Wesley Alexander

Imari Janae Eaglin

Keenan Wayne Jones

*Megan Marie Reid

Grant Eddis Welch

*Jacob Wharton

*Sarah Elizabeth Wilson



Education



Bailey Oakley Boudinot

Cassie Renee Dixon

Brittany Nicole Gosserand

*Sarah Elizabeth Haik

Brice G’mielle Hooper

*Sadie Elizabeth Kraft

*Julia Rose Legrande

Sedrick Christian Peck

Matthew Harris Rice

*Kate Elizabeth Thompson

*Aisha Monalisa Yesufu

*Craig T Yingling



Engineering



Kenyatta Davis

Samuel Malcom Harrison

*Anthony Ugbede Iyodo

Abigail Johnson

Lexey Lashay Lewis

Cynthia Ndulaka

*Madison Claire Neill

*Rebecca Susan Smith

Reagan Watson



General Studies



*George Wescott Brogdon

Taylor Rebekah Glover



Liberal Arts



*Elyxcus Jasmyne Anaya

*Katelyn Elyse Bayhi

*Karli Alexandra Blair

*Mallory Nicole Buuck

Briana Bernita Clay

Jamie Raechell Collins

Curtis Crenshaw

*Anna Katherine Devitt

*Sharon Dunnehoo

Jonathan C Gann

*Spencer Hamilton Goidel

Amanda Marie Hardy

Erineka Ty’rell Johnson

Christopher Dion Jones

Craig Martin Kleinpeter

*Hannah Kleinpeter

Jonathan Kneisler

Shane Thomas Manthei

*Stephanie Michelle Matt

*Taylor Sue Mayer

Margaret Mckowen

*Hanna Leigh Minnick

Julia Katharine Price

*Aleesha Danyale Rowe

Austin Paul Simoneaux

*BreAnna LaVerne Smith

Kinyetta Nicole Thornton

*Victoria Danielle Triola

*Kaitlin Aubrey Wall



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Robernesha Conella Clay

Amanda Arion Franklin

*Letitia Renae Jacques

Amanda Lennon

Olivia Blair Perego

*Alison Mary Torregrossa



Sciences



*Ryan Christopher Baird

*Mallory Borel

Salman Imranhussein Essajee

*Conor Fontenot

*Sabrina Nell Reichel

Hanna Marie Rovira

Kross Nikolaos Theriot



East Feliciana



Education



Holland Claire Crain

*Charlsey Alexandra Stark

*Nickkyra Keonte Turner



Evangeline



Arts



*Paydrian James Arvie

*Kelby John Dardeau



Business Administration



Lauren Fontenot

*Torian Paige Veillon



Education



Alaina Marie Aucoin

*Claire Alys Bordelon

Kaitlyn Lorraine Chatelain

Melanie Renee Deen

*Kelly Prejean Fontenot



Engineering



Jacob S Ardoin

Caleb Patrick Derouselle

Christopher Brett Fontenot

Olivia Lahaye

*Grant Manuel



Liberal Arts



*Samantha Nicole Ardoin

*Meredith Broussard

Savannah Leigh D’aubin

*Sami Gabrielle Faul

Benjamin Fontenot

Heather Nicole Fontenot

*Erin Nicole Manuel

*Sydney Jo Mccaulley

Jada L Richard

Kirsten Monea Richard



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



*Laura Cox Brown

Maci Alexis Fontenot

Melinda Joseph

Ashley Nicole Morgan

*Lauren Rebecca Poche

*Katherine Alexis Tregre



Sciences



Meagan Elizabeth Donovan

Sadie Lyn Doucet

Joseph Devin Alexis Fontenot

Lindsey Frederick

*Brian Joseph Maggio

Kimberly Beth Willis



Grant



Liberal Arts



*David Gerard Guillory

*Kathlena Abbigayle Mercer



Iberia



Arts

Sydni Chae Blanchard

*Page Thomas Comeaux

Julian Devillier

*Taylor Michael Hartmeyer

*Mary Harvey

Frederick Anthony Jeanlouis

*Wally B Khammany

Gabrielle Renee Lassalle

Gabrielle Storm Ledee

*Jordan M Melancon

Trent Michael Mouton

Chloe Patricia Reyes

*Jourdon M Rodriguez

Cole Matthew Romero

*Matthew Stewart Smith

Kirstin Nicole Stanberry



Business Administration



*Nicholas Paul Alfano

*Alana Marie Bacas

*Jacques Maurice Bienvenu

Krystalynn Marie Bonin

Kelsey Jenee’ Boudreaux

Alex Elizabeth Bourque

Taylor Nicole Dela Houssaye

Kody M Freyou

*Taylor Elizabeth Guillory

*Kristen Alexis Pellegrin

Alexi Mae Peltier

David Michael Prentiss

Courtney Elizabeth Robichaux

Dustin Micheal Romero

Summer R Romero

*Taryn Nicole Schexnayder

Alan Joseph Thomas

Jeremiah Thompson

*Taylor Leigh Touchet

*Anna Clare Villermin

*Charles David Zeringue



Education



*Amy Claire Bodin

*Ashley Michelle Boudreaux

*Nicholas Michael Broussard

*Mindy Buteaux

*Joshua Joseph Comeaux

*Hannah Cotone

*Jannie Thi Doan

Tori E Dubois

Gail Lanae Fontenette

*Devin Francis

*Shay Nicole Frith

*Miles Errett Gaspard

*Brianna Patricia Giroir

Kay Gisclair

*Meleah Nicole Guilbeau

Ian Marcus Guillotte

*Thomas J Hanks

*Kristen Claire Hebert

*Kimberly Clement Jefferson

Laura Mary Johnson

*Meghan Claire Magar

Tara Lynn Marceaux

*Brooke Ashleigh Milazzo

Brandy Katherine Milliman

*Allison Saunders Olivier

*Helen Marie Poe

*Marianne Elise Prados

Amanda Clair Reaux

Mary Margaret Robichaux

Chelsie Renee Schales

*Doretha Alexander Sereal

Katelyn Marie Sumrall

Brittany Angelle Betty Williams



Engineering



*Austin Alleman Anderson

Benjamin Michael Armentor

Justin Michael Bailey

*Jacob Stephen Berard

*Aaron Bird

*Hailey Elizabeth Blanchard

*Katie Elisabeth Border

*Kyle J East

Jacob William Gautreau

*Christopher Thomas Giorgio

Blake Joseph Gonsoulin

*Marie Elise Hoag

Hunter Jordan Inzerella

*Conner James Lemaire

*Braylin R Lopez

Anousack Nachampasack

James Anthony Gordon Parris

Camille Elizabeth Richard

Dustin John Romero

Nicholas Reed Romero

*Eric San

Melanie D. Sanders

*Leila Bonin Stagg

*Skyla Louise Stansbury

Hot Binh Tran

Keegan William Welker



General Studies



Monique Angelle Broussard

Mallory Elizabeth Derouen

Mindy Lynn Gaspard

*Nanette Sorrel Leleux

*Victoria Desormeaux Lemoine

Stefan Michael Lopez

*Enjulicia N Sillmon

Kylie R Viator



Liberal Arts



Bethany Rachelle Breaux-Cendejas

*Dariane Elizabeth Breaux

*Cameron Broussard

*Morgan Bulliard

*Leah Beth Cavalier

*Rebekah Rae David

Anna Elizabeth Denton

*Tiara Ford

Madison Avery Fremin

Gabrielle Anna Frith

Jasmin Lynn Fusilier

*Mary Courtney Giroir

*Drake Andrew Glatter

*Tiffany Mykel Gordon

Jordy Lee Green

*Kristina Claire Guidry

Elizabeth Elaine Harris

*Clare Renee Hitter

Christie Homratsamy

*Tiffany Kim Thuy Lam

*Ashlie Elizabeth Landry

*Heidi N LeBlanc

*Linzee Ann LeJeune

*Adelai Jeanne Lynch

*Journey Katelyn Manuel

Kristen Hannah Marcotte

*Mackenzie Elizabeth Mcanally

*Gabrielle Leblanc Mcgee

*Brianna Noemi Mendoza

*Courtney Lynn Molbert

Scotty Rachaphoumy

Alexandria Raymond

Adriel Mckay Rose

*Elizabeth K Scott

Caroline Elizabeth Segura

*Maggie Smith

Justin Landry Spears

*Josie Clare Stiles

*Cammie-jo Elizabeth Touchet

Shirden Richard Tuberville

Jazmine Nicole Walker



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



*Zoe Ainsworth

Caitlyn Elizabeth Breaux

*Caitlyn Elizabeth Buteaux

Kimberly M Duke

*Jules Derouen East

Corinne Ann Falterman

Liliana Andrea Gomez

Riley Mckenzi Gonsoulin

Samantha Josephine Guardia

Latonia Renee Harrison

Yiesha January

Breleigh Alyce Landry

Kathryn Elizabeth Landry

*Taylor M Meche

Caroline Alise Muffoletto

*Angelle Lasalle Patout

Margaret Helen Pellerin

Kelley Kathleen Perez

*Bailey Elizabeth Romero

Elvis P Siripannho

Alexandra Rene Trahan

Cristy Nicole Trahan

*Braylin Michelle Vincent

Lauren Faul Wilborn



Sciences



Matthew Paul Barrilleaux

*Alyssa V. Bienvenu

Ian Paul Boudreaux

Mariah Lynn Calligan

*Brock Jacob Comeaux

Gage Anthony Dupuy

*Louis Henry Eikel

*Tyler Michael Evans

*Ethan George Frederick

*Jamie Hartman Freyou

*Tiffany Lynn Gilbert

*Tory Adam Hebert

Dylan James Lafont

*Tommy Hung Lam

*Brad Mitchel Landreneau

Andrew Phillip Landry

Cody Jacob Latiolais

Travis Lamont Layne

D’anna Renee Leblanc

Matthew Thomas Lissard

*Juliane Gene Mahoney

Jacob Joseph Martin

*Taylor Phillip Robichaux

*Gabrielle Sanford

David John-michael Varino

*Sara C White



Iberville



Arts



Jessica Elizabeth Landry



Business Administration



*Lacey Renee Barker



Education



*Maggie Marie Blanchard

Chandrika Nechelle Casma

*Michele Watts Pania

*Carlee Elizabeth Smith



Engineering



Jake C Edwards



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Maddison Elyse Bahry

*Christa Brinae Hines

*Keri Lynn Yarbrough



Sciences



*Matthew Joseph Meyer



Jackson



Arts



Kamesha Marie Chatman



Jefferson



Arts



*Toni Carlone

Allison Claire Chartier

*Sarah Elizabeth Dileo

Corey Stephen Dupuis

Andrew Frazier

Patricka James

*Lauren Victoria Lawson

*Celeste Licciardi

*Leah Mandel

Lynne Marie Odenwald

*Cole Sheehan



Business Administration



Jezzett Anderson

Ashlynn Chirelle Besson

*Randy Boner

*Gabrielle Marie Fontenelle

Andrew John Gatzke

*Mark Martin Gibbs

Jheren Courtney Love

Jenna Elizabeth Marshall

Brandi Nicole Nelson

*Malika Cierra Taylor

*Jacob William Tonglet

*Tiara Noel Williams

*Leah Ann Williamson



Education



*Kirsten Amber Allen

*Ross Joseph Campo

Michael Henry Caputo

*Amy Augustine Conner

*Cassidy Marie Cooper

*Sarah Renee Dupont

Ashlyn Angelle Ecklund

*Malerie Elizabeth Eiserloh

Paul Allen Eiserloh

Enola Louise Farmer

Colette Elizabeth Galiouras

Jackson Nicholas Ladner

Zoie Marie Manuel

Realitee Payne

Darlene O. Scott

Shannon Elise Stringer

*Emily Christine Tagesen



Engineering



Jessica Ashmead

*Andrew William Cunningham

Jeremy Allan Desforges

*Anson Hoang Do

Darby Elizabeth Elwood

Michael Patrick Flynn

*Shawn Garrett Foster

*Katherine Emily Hutton

Alice Powers Kerl

Alexis Michelle Laurent

David Joel Mallary

*Steven Luc Nguyen

*Connor Paige Riggs

*Natalie Ciana Rome

Kyle Vincent



General Studies



*Senette Breeielle Small



Liberal Arts



Nicholas Joseph Adams

Olivia Ruth Arostegui

*Darian Michelle Bouvier

Erin Renee Caldarera

*Kai Aigner Cotton

*Jaime Lynn Evans

*Holly Kathryn Hampton

Jason Louis Milton Hauth

*Margo Alyce Kieff

*Elisia Marie Kravet

*Megan Ann Lacour

Jene Rachelle Lavigne

Allison Elizabeth Liberto

*Julissa Elizabeth Lopez

*Brendan Manning

*Rebecca Megan Melanson

*Richard Juwan Mosley

Jeremy James Narcisse

Morgan Lindsey Olasin

Gabrielle Alexis Pizzolato

Patrick James Rappold

*Nicholas Jospeh Rosato

Morgan Elizabeth Sells

Cadedra Shine

*Gillian Maureen Skupin

*Margaret Theresa Storms

*Victoria Elizabeth Terranova

Jeffrey Louis Terry

*Sydne Alexandria Amanda Thomas

*Brittney Marie Walker

Meredith Nicole Weigand

*Amanda Lynn Wortmann



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Emily Elizabeth Alexander

*Bethany Meagan Borel

Heather Marie Bradle

Jenna Elise Brewton

*Allyson Marie Dantin

Kelly Nicole Engolia

Brianna Linda Garcia

Hannah Elizabeth Gilmore

*Jessica Ann Hanna

Jennifer Lauren Hart

Kori Lee Keen

*Madison Claire Matherne

*Hunter Elizabeth Wilson

Brittany Leigh Winter



Sciences



*Marco Antonio Acosta

*Erin Nicole Boudoin

Phillip Brimer

Alex Michael Burst

*Ryan Christopher Dale

Meredith Flood

Logan Kristine Franovich

*Kristen Michelle Kernion

*Daniel Christopher Mire

*Holly Monk

*Laura Morley

*Justin Raymond Mourain

Rebecca Renee Poyner

*Candace Puleo

*Blake Louis Robert

*Matthew Patrick Shields

Alexa Mercedes Smith

*Chyna Sakora Washington



Jefferson Davis



Arts



Stephanie Lee Menard



Business Administration

*Kristi Nicole Bourne

*Victoria Cormier

Dominique Noel Juneau

*Shelby L Norton



Education



*Morgan Blair Benoit

*Hailie Jo Dugas

Hannah Rose LeJeune

*Megan Ashley Mallett



Engineering



Dillon John Huval

Dylan Joseph Oustalet



General Studies



*Stewart Wayne Krielow



Liberal Arts



*Caitlin Mckenzie Ard

Madison Sierra Barnes

Kirsten Paige Clement

Rebecca Lynn Hebert

*Becca Ann Hylton

*Logan Reed Istre

Zenetta Kyung Lee

Amanda Robinson

Sarah Nicole Watkins

Sesily Woods



Lafayette



Arts



*Gabrielle Jean Adendorff

*Jonathon Silver Ahhee

Sandra Muntaser Akroush

*Hunter Joseph Ayo

*Dylan Michael Babineaux

*Chloe Eva Barton

*Blair Elizabeth Begnaud

*Vanessa Elise Benoit

*James Billeaudeau

*Leah Michelle Boudreaux

*Morgan Lynne Breaux

Tyne Monet Brooks

Ryan Joseph Broussard

*Evan Wayne Butler

Abigail Agnes Caffery

Alexandra Marie Carr

*Brandi Lou Champagne

*Vinayak Chaturvedi

*Hannah Marie Credeur

*Austin Reed Crochet

*Ian Haozous Darrow

*Samantha Y. Degeyter

Caroline Marie Delahoussaye

Christopher Paul Denais

Ethan P Domingue

Heidi Dugas

Alexa K Fabre

Marlee Anne Fontenot

*Layne Sheridan Fridley

Brylee Meree Garcia

Kathleen Alexis Gardner

*Dominique Marie George

Carrie Grizzaffi

Benjamin Guidry

Lukas Gereaux Guilbeau

*David J Hebert

*Dylan Paul Hebert

Taylor Renee Bodin Hebert

Annie Mae Higginbotham

*Michael Patrick Hilbun

*Olivia K. Johnson

Leah Esther Kiesel

Camille P Lahaye

Glenn Adrian Lancon

Andre Etienne LaFleur

*Nicole Celeste Leblanc

*Nicolas Emilien Leroy

Tyler Lee Lokey

*Shauna Ann Martin

Kaitlin Michelle Montero

Stephanie Marie Mosing

*Christian Michael Mouisset

Ian Lucas Naquin

*Tina Cao Nguyen

*Sandra May Nunley

Miguel Angel Ochoa

Parker Stanton Oubre

Emma K Ressler

*Samuel Vincent Riehl

Lisa Louviere Rios

*Kaitlin Eve Romero

*Donnie David Roy

Lakeyn Amanda Schultz

Susan Margaret Sinitiere

Victoria Grace Toups

*Taylor Kennedy Verrett

*Emily Claire Waguespack

*Hannah Elizabeth Walters

*Ian Matthew Welch

*Ashton Grace Williams

Sarah Kathryn Wood

Grant Wooley



Business Administration



*Mary Madeleine Alexander

Ezra James Angelle

*Nicholas George Anselmo

Sarah Claire Arceneaux

*Blade Armentor

*Maureen Elizabeth Arsement

Zachary James Ashy

Alexis Marie Aubrey

*Sarah Lizabeth Autin

*Amy Elisabeth Babineaux

Samuel E Bacque

Reid Christian Barras

Brandon Micheal Batiste

*Beth Claire Bearb

*Beth Nicole Bella

Reese St Claire Benoit

Corey Bergeron

*Robert Earle Billeaud

Claire Elise Bollich

Emily Christen Bordelon

Brandon Andre` Borne

Jillian Elise Bradley

Jennie Bui

Kirstie Ann Camel

Hayden Lane Carlos

*Danielle Marie Castille

Marisa Elizabeth Clark

*Lauren Ashley Quibodeaux Clemons

Travis Cloud

Kassie Ann Comeaux

*Madeleine R Comeaux

*Christopher David Cook

*Daniel Hunter Dubuc

*Casey Marie Dugas

Emily Claire Fitch

Olivia Ava Fitzwater

*Destiny F Fordis

Mark J Foreman Jr

*Joseph Baron Freeman IV

Annelise Marie Gerami

Brant Keipher Girard

Jason Paul Goodyear

Ashley Erin Grand

Madison Lilly Guidry

Abbigail Hays

Wendy Faye Hebert

*Kathryn Claire Hernandez

*Sarah E Hollier

*Christian Davis Hurst

*Ethan Stagg Istre

*Amanda Lynn Kelehan

*Andrew Kreamer

*Abhimanyu John Lakhotia

*Morgan Elizabeth Landry

Tyler Thomas Lane

Allan Jared Bentley Lanphier

*Zachary Michael Lewis

*Chelsea Renae Lotief

*Brittany Louviere

*Lauren Louviere

*Kathryn Claire Mayer

Kalyn Renee Mayfield

*Margaret Clare Mayo

Brooke Lauren McMichael

John Howard Melancon

Emily Claire Migues

Brian Miller

Jay Sterling Miller

*Joshua Miller

*Mallory Morrow

*Patrick H Mouton

Jude Wafai Mseis

Nicholas Frederick Neumeyer

Leslie Tuyet Nguyen

My Kim Nguyen

*Uyen Le Nguyen

*Natalie Perroncel

*Hannah Leigh Richard

Lakyn Richard

Ripley Roane

Allison Kate Rockett

*Andrea Kristen Anderson Rogers

Brandon James Romero

*Thomas Lane Rowe

*Charles Nicholas Saloom

*Chase Savoie

*Lauren Alexandra Schoeffler

*Thomas Brian Shannon

Cesalee A Simon

*Argelia Skero

Christine Marie Smith

*Kaitlyn T Sonnier

*Jacob Paul St Julien

*Courtney Faye Stutes

*Justin James Suire

*Leilani Lynn Theriot

Timothy James Theriot

*Rachel Christine Thibodaux

*Bryan Joseph Thibodeaux

*Michele Kristianne Touchet

*Macy Angelle Toups

*Da’Jana A Turner

*Demi Lee Venable

Blair Kyle Vidrine

Pamela Maria Wakefield

Michael James Waters

*Britani Taylor Webre

Chantel Janae Williams

*Jordan Angela Williams

*Tyria Tatyanna Williams

Allyson Claire Wimberly

*Michael Wolf

*Devon Nicole Zimmermann



Education



Katelyn Elizabeth Abshire

Jenee’ Michelle Allemond

Amber Vanessa Arellano

Kyle Aufderhar

*Jordan Elizabeth Auzenne

Taylor Elise Barras

Michael Stephen Baum

Ashley Elizabeth Beadle

*Rebecca Lynn Beasley

Madison S Bellah

*Drew K Bergeron

*Claire Elizabeth Black

*Katelyn Blanchard

Katie Michelle Bodoin

*Madison Rae Bolgiano

Brianna Renee Bond

*Katie Nicole Borah

Kellie Ann Boudreaux

Spencer Thomas Boudreaux

*Taylor E Bourliea

Katelyn Ann Brewer

Christopher George Brewster

Jamie M Broussard

Elizabeth Yvette Brown

Brianna R Bulcroft

*Sara Callais

*Blake A Chachere

Alisa Claire Chataignier

*Adam Kenneth Christrup

*Danielle Elizabeth Clewis

*Morgan Kathryn Comeaux

*Christine Anne Conques

Josie Marie Cook

Terrilyn M Cormier

Kaitlyn Culotta

*Latoya D’arcel Davis

*Emily Louise Derouen

*Kristin Rose Derouen

Brittany Nichole Dietz

*Shannon Leigh Dionne

*Savana L Dohmann

*Mary Elise Domingue

*Katelyn Renee Donlon

*Tyson Nicholas Dooley

Taylor Brooke Dorsey

Tabitha Lynn Duckworth

*Elizabeth Dufour

*Sarah Mae Dugas

*Kelli Marie Duhon

Marisa Claire Eskine

*Jessica Mckenzie Fairburn

Jacob Paul Faulk

*Matthew Charles Fleming

*Haley Nicole Fontenot

*Rheanna C Fontenot

Morgan Claire Fremin

Cristina R Gannard

*Jennifer K Garrett

*Joshua Paul Gary

*Ryan Christopher Groh

*Celise Guidry

*Justin Michael Guidry

McKenzie Shannon Guidry

Kyle L Haberer

*Heather Marie Hamilton

Zachary James Hardy

Hogan A Harris

Brittlyn Paige Hebert

*Angela D Holland

Jillian Sherain Jolivette

Rex Randall Jones

*Kadie Jumonville

Morgan Rose Kenner

*Raegan Elizabeth Kleinpeter

*Alexandra Jean Lane

Ellen M Langlinais

*Tai H LaVergne

*Michael Tyler Leatherman

*Carolyn Ann Leblanc

Laynie Michele Leblanc

*Alyssa Claire Leger

*Kori Renee Leger

*Annette Broussard Lewis

Ronald Fitzgerald Manning

*Sarah Elizabeth Martin

Sarah Elizabeth Matherne

Layna Nichole May

*Ashley Mays

*Erin Christine Mccarthy

Sarah Harper McMillan

Andrea Claire Melancon

Karen Elise Melton

Hannah Claire Menard

*Hannah Nicole Morales

*Isabella Maria Musso

*Robert Connor Lee Navarre

Ryan Alberto O’banion

*Holly Monroe Olivier

*Julie Anne Ortego

*Rosebeth Lurlyn Pacheco

*Susanna Claire Patterson

*Brittany Pierre

*Kyle Matthew Price

Lauren K Primeaux

Jacob A Raggio

*Jillian Claire Ray

Jennifer L Reed

*Danika Lee Richard

*Emily Claire Richard

*Lisa Ann Marie Richard

Michael Ross Richard

*Shelby Isabella Richard

*Devyn Rouly Roberts

*Brittany A Robin

Ashley Nicole Roger

*Sierra Nichole Sapp

*Jennifer Lauren Shotwell

Alexandra M Sides

*Kara Elizabeth Smith

*Stephanie Snack

*Amanda Ruth Sphar

*Mary Stanford

Raven Elise Tauzin

Jaymi R Theriot

Jordan James Theriot

Kirby M Thibeaux

*Brooke A Thibodeaux

Cassandra Ann Thomas

*Patti Elizabeth Thomas

*Madeline Trcalek

*Brodie Turner

*Gerard Malcolm Viator

*Katelyn M Ward

*Matthew Aaron Wells

*Melissa Beth Wilson

*Richard Thomas Yongue



Engineering



Douglas Reese Adams II

Oladapo Samuel Adegbamigbe

*Mohamed Khaled Al-saikhan

*Samuel Scott Anderson

Jeffrey John Autin

*Nicholas Adam Baudoin

Matthew James Begneaud

Barron J Bellard

Rebecca Angelle Bercegeay

*Luis Alberto Blanco

*Jason R Bollich

*Michael Paul Bourgeois

*Derek Matthew Boutin

*Devin G Boutin

Michael Thomas Broussard

*Logan Joseph Carriere

*Mary Katherine Chiasson

Nicholas Chu

Dean Anderson Cole Jr

*Lance T Collazos

*Benjamin Brady Como

Hannah Michelle Cormier

Kyle Mathieu Daigle

*Ethan John Davidson

Derrian Derouen

Jacob Paul Deshotels

Adrian Daniel Ducote

Ben Michael Eldarragi

Tyler Wendel Emert

Brady Joel Fabacher

*Kyle S Farmer

Nikolaus Jude Faul

*Harrison Fisher

Kane Jacob Fontenot

Katherine Elizabeth Fruge

*David James Furka

*Tyler Garner

Christian Michael Gary

*John Edward Gooding

Halie Catherine Green

Adam Paul Guidry

*William Guidry

Camille Elise Guillory

*James Curtis` Guillory

*Meghan Lee Harrelson

*Michael Anthony Hicks

*Sebastian Robert Hillis

Sheila Hughes Holmes

Joshua Hans Hritz

*Hannah Catherine Hymel

*Hitomi Homma Jaojoco

*Blake Allen Johnson

Blake W Johnson

Milton Harold Junker

*Simisola Motunrayo Kajogbola

Jacob R Kaltenbach

*Andrew William Keys

Jonathan Paul Kirk

*Bennett Lamotte

Kaitlyn Michelle Landry

Landon Jude Latiolais

Brett Richard Laughlin

Julia Elizabeth Lavefalk

*Hunter Harrison Lavine

*Jacob Jude Leblanc

*Catherine Claire Ledet

Marc Jordan David Ledoux

*Kyle Leleux

Dominique Lorentz

*Justin Charles Louis

Nicholas Scot Marcil

Luis Marin

*Jarad Anthony Matis

Jonathan Edwards Matthysen

*James Michael Mcbride

Jacob E Medus

*Brandon P Melancon

*Jhess Mathieu Menard

Gunner Anthony Miguez

Cory Jacob Miller

Ryan Joseph Millett

Thomas Joseph Mizelle

Christopher Moore

*Michael Jess Morvant

Katelyn Michelle Musumeche

Jacob Alex Neu

*Frank Alexander Novak

Jeremy L Owers

Katie Lynn Parr

Andre Christopher Perrin

Kshitiz Pokhrel

*Christopher Day Primeaux

Jonathan Michael Primeaux

Mamdoh Bilal Qamhieh

*Jacob Hunter Randall

Barry Mitchel Rizzolla

*Andrew Jeffrey Roesch

*Jeremy Paul Roy

*Reed Rudasill

*Elizabeth D Rutledge

*Ryan Saucier

*Brody Allan Schneider

Mariem A Seibi

*Hunter David Sonnier

*Alec Stanford

*Richard Hunter Sudduth

Taylor Renee Terracina

Daniel Terry

Joshua Allen Tharp

Alex Matthew Theriot

*Jennifer Nicole Thibodeaux

Cassie R. Tilley

Virginia Christin Townsend

*Jonathan Michael Trahan

*Elliott Thomas Trepagnier

*Andrew Trosclair

*Madison B Viator

Jynaly Franck Wanang Fomenou

*William Joshua Wheeler

Jennifer Michelle Whipple

Eric Charles Whitney

Joseph Wolf

*Kyle Edward Zappi



General Studies



Luis Felipe Bayuelo-Asmar

Kariah Danielle Bellard

*Mary Margaret Billeaud

Thomas Larsen Billeaud

*Miranda Bowling

Jordan Matthew Boykin

Jean- Pierre Marcel Catrou

*Desiree Cook Celestine

Amber P Chinsky

*Richard Cameron Coatney

*Brody Cockrell

Aaron Matthew David

Marshal Hill Deaton

Cynthia Deville

Andrew Micheal Duhon

*Guy Cleveland Dunning

Haley Fox

Destiny Michelle Gary

*Emilie Lauren Hoffpauir

*Stacy Johnston

*Deirdre Faye Jolivette

Pamela M Landry

*Mia Simone LeBeouf

Quenton James Mcconnell

Katy Marie Melancon

Jorden Ray Melton

*Cain Warner Menard

*Matthew Gentry Netterville

*Brooke Abigail Nickel

Alexandra Theresa Rabalais

*Patti Jo Reed

*Blaise Rudolph Restovic

*Alainie Ross

Keagen Ryder

Brittany Sinegal

Tony Lafalen St.Julien

*Ralem Shea Strong

Lauren Leigia Tezeno

Connor Davis Toups

Brandy Megan Wadsworth

Madeline Paige Weber

Elizabeth Adelle Weiss

Andrea Willey



Liberal Arts



Maria Aguirre-Sotelo

Ardajah Alexander

Lauren Danielle Alvarado

*Ashtyn Blaire Arabie

Brianna J Arnaud

*Catherine Marie Ashy

*Brianne Faye Augustine

*Jamie Todd Augustine

*Anne C Barry

Kayla Marie Bauerle

*Jillian Alyssa Bearb

*Kaitlyn Marie Begnaud

Allyson Rebecca Bergeron

*Madeiline Gayle Bergeron

Christy Ann Bilke

*Courtney Rene Bodin

Eric Louis Bospflug

*Camille Clare Boudreaux

Gabrielle Alysse Bowden

*Jennifer M. Breaux

*Madeleine Elise Breaux

*Monique Germaine Breaux

Kathryn Claire Briggs

*Dallas P. Brister

Markeisha Antoinette Brooks

Aimee Elizabeth Broussard

Hannah Elizabeth Broussard

Hannah Marie Broussard

Jasmine Broussard

*Madi Paige Budde

*Kevin Thanh Bui

*Teddi Nicole Buller

*Madison L Burns

Meloney Jerese Caesar

*Cassie Victoria Caillouet

Brittani Elizabeth Carnevale

Brendan Carr

*Claire Angelle Carriere

*Sydney A Carriere

Emma Claire Castille

Taylor Brian Castille

Janee Marisol Castillo

*Nadia Charles

*Darius Chassion

Olivia Elisabeth Chatman

Ashley Marie Clement

*Kimberly Ann Coe

*Danielle Eden Cointot

Brandi M Comeaux

Madison Rae Comeaux

*Mia Renee Comeaux

Taylor Renee Constantine

*Emily Nicole Covington

*Mallory Melane Credeur

*Caitlin T Daigle

*Victoria Louise Darby

*Laurent Fabrice De Prins

*Jacob Jude Delahoussaye

Allison Ruth Didier

*Ngoc-Lan K Dinh

*Bobby J Domengeaux

Ashley Ann Dronet

Dustin Dronet

Danni Justine Duck

*Dylan Payne Duck

*Jamila Dugas

*Morgan Taylor Duhon

*Amy Lynn Dupuis

*Bailey C Dupuis

Dana Rae Dupuis

*Hunter Maegan Euchaski

*Madeline Camille Evans

*Reed A Everette

Joshua Martin Firmin

*Ashley Michelle Fisher

*Stephanie Leigh Fontenot

*Marie Elise Fournet

*Lindsey M Franz

*Austin Ray Freeman

*Philip Charles Fremin

Cheyne Lynne Galan

*Daniela Garcia

*Timothy Sebastian Gaspard

James Aaron Gates

Tabatha R Grebinger

Emile Baudoin Griffard

*Claire Elise Guedry

*Jeanne Guilbeau

Jenna Hardy

Stephanie Brianna Hartley

*Rachel Elizabeth Harvey

*Emily A Hawkins

Alison Emalie Hayes

Malcolm Lawrence Haynes

Celeste Marie Hebert

*Ashley Lynn Henry

Miajah Henson

Christina M Hernandez

*Briley Rose Higginbotham

*Ross Naumann Higginbotham

*Nicholas Alexander Hollier

*Erica Rose Howard

Mary Kathryn Huval

*Chandler E Jackson

*Nia Angaline Jackson

Taylor McHugh Jacobs

*McKenzie R Jennings

Mary E Jock

*Kirsten Johnson

*Barrett Michael Kallam

William Todd Keller

Kayla Kennerson

*Rachel Kesel

Kacy L. Kessinger

Alaina Rose Kiefner

Joseph Michael Kishbaugh

*Hailey Michelle Landry

*Amie Therese Leblanc

Ryan James Leblanc

Christina Angelle Leday

Sara Anne Leece

*Alyssa Paige Leger

Ashley Renee Legnon

*Demi Jean Leleux

Leah Nicole LeBlanc

Elizabeth Anne LeVasseur

*Brooke Nichole-coho Loiseau

Mark Lawrence Mallory

Olivia Rose Manceaux

Ashley Nicole Mandella

*Celeste Gabrielle Manuel

*Mark Mcgowan

Natalie J Menard

Teresa Marie Miguez

Zachary Thomas Miller

*Alexandra M Mire

*Emily Alyse Montgomery

*Marisa Mary Moon

*Gabrielle Alexandra Moreland

*Abigail Gatzy Morton

*Ariel K Morvant

*Claire Mouton

*Lexie Ranae Mouton

Matthew Jonathon Mouton

Gloria Kristine Newman

*Steven Nguyen

*Michelle Nicole Noel

Katherine Norris

Jacob Benjamin Paramore

Jessica Celeste Pizzeck

*Mackenzie Blair Plunkett

*Joseph Victor Henry Pons

*Katie Sofia Quattrone

Ariel Anna-shea Quibodeaux

Daniel Alejandro Quiroa Tercero

Cheyenne Makaila Ramey

Scott Raymond

*Heidi Leigh Ann Redd

*Jolie Nicole Reese

Karina Love Reinhold

Jacob Thomas Remel

Talyn Marie Resweber

*Steve Joseph Richard

Benjamin Trey Ripp III

Michael Ray Roberts

*Jenna Lynn Robichaux

Kate Rogers

*Nicholas Roszczynialski

*Emily Erika Roy

Heidi E. Roy

Hayley Marie Rummel

Jacob Robert Rummel

*Michael Joseph Sarver

Wesley Gayle Saucier

Ethan Michael Schulze

*Abigail Grace Scott

*Hoby Serrette

*Victoria Earlene Shanahan

*Cody James Sibille

*Lane W Simon

*Lauren Nicole Simon

*Michelle Renee Simon

Katherine Nicole Sinitiere

*Angeline C Smith

Whitney Elizabeth Smith

Christine Clemencia Soileau

*Desiree Denay Sonnier

Lexi Jae Sonnier

*Hannah Joyce Steinmetz

Kylie Nicole Stelly

*LaQuinta Renee’ Stevenson

*Lisa Stokes

Rebekah Stoute

Ashley Bess Stutes

Patrick David Swinney

Precious Marie Talbot

Samary Taylor

*Dailey Martin Thibeaux

Claire Michaelle Thibodaux

*Marc Andre Thibodeaux

Tyler James Varisco

Brianna Veillon

Frank Patrick Venable

Mayci Alyse Venable

*Samantha Marie Viator

*Kayla M Vincent

*Ryan Voorhies

John Logan Walters

*Aleya Marietta Washington

Pauline T Welch

Haylie Michelle Werger

Josie Wiley

*Laura L Williams

*Maria Nicole Williams

Stephen Sean Williams

Takara Rose Williams

Paul Andrew Williamson

Sarah Elizabeth Williamson

*Erin Leigh Wilson

Abby Alyssa Wimberley

Apollonia Rosetta Woods



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Kirsten Lyric Auzenne

Allison Katherine Bolgiano

*Magdalen Louise Bonin

*Adrienne Louise Boudreaux

*Colleen Elizabeth Bowen

Emily Kay Bratcher

*Bianca L Broussard

Brayton Broussard

*Rebecca L Brown

Kellie Elizabeth Bull

Danielle Campbell

*Katherine Michelle Cart

Emily Katherine Carte

Hannah Lauren Champagne

Julie Claire Comeaux

*Tanner M Cordick

Christina Casas Cummins

Molly Marie Dauterive

Erin Nicole David

Ellen Fleck Domingue

Nakayla Mariah Dugas

Abby Dayle Duhon

Grace Isabelle Duhon

Sydney Brooke Elston

Peyton Shaye Faul

Kylin Marie Fernandez

Escarlet Ester Fiallos

Sylvia Foreman

Nicole Kathryn Granger

Constance Inez Groff

Lauren Michelle Grossie

Jamie R Guidry

Taylor Lauren Hamilton

Emily Rae Harper

Claire Elizabeth Holbert

Auriel Ashley Hulin

Meagan Joseph

*Leah Judice

*Lantz Michael Lafleur

Janine Michelle Leblanc

Hailey Marie Leger

Mary Grace Leger

*Megan Elizabeth LeBleu

Victoria Camy Lu

*Kevin Thomas Malone

Suzanne Mccloskey

Brooke Mcneely

*Courtney D McLean

Skye Leigh Mier

Andi Diannah M Hekmat Mikhael

Jonathan Brent Musemeche

Lauren Letrise Page

*Anthony Pascual

*Carmen Boudreaux Rachal

*Billie S Richard

*Austen Charles Sallinger

*Sarah Morgan Sherwood

*Brittany M’liss Sibille

Courtney Daigle Slaughter

Kami Marie Smith

Brittany Sonnier

Alexis Patrise Strunck

Amanda Lee Terry

*Jade Theriot

Taylor Ann Till

Tabitha Underwood

Sarah K Veillon

*Jessica Gray Wallace

Julie Greaves Wilcox

Weipan Zheng



Sciences



Victoria Michelle Abshire

Mone’t Alyse Alexander

Russell Joseph Alleman

Trevor James Anderson

Timothy Paul Andries

*Seth William Andrus

*Dwayne Gerard Angelle

*Maximillian E Bacque

*Stephen Paul Bakeler

*Autumn Kate Baker

*James William Baker

*Joshua Stephen Barnes

*Jacob Beasley

*Connor James Bejsovec

Alexis Brielle Bentley

Brennan Paul Bergeron

*Kathryn Dianne Bernard

Patrick Joseph Bernard

*Kaitlyn Marie Blacha

*Alex Blanchard

*Emilie A Bollich

*Daniel I Bowen

*James Brandon Bradshaw

Aaron Tyler Brasseaux

Abigail Kathryn Breaux

*Adam Broussard

*Brannon W Broussard

*Jesse Aaron Broussard

Libertie Larae Broussard

Victoria A Brown

Branson Michael Cambre

*Allison Rose Campbell

*James Patrick Cassidy

*Melissa M Cavanaugh

Laini Nicole Chaisson

*Conner Harrison Chaney

*Zoe E. Chatman

*Kurt Byron Chopin

*Stephen Scott Clark Vo

*Cassie Marie Clark

*Remi Leigh Coco

Kaitlyn D Collins

*Eleanor Anne Cook

Caden Anthony Cunningham

*Jaden Matthew Danos

Ashley Dauphin

*Brooke Elizabeth Davidson

*Jagruti Dilip Depan

*Dylan Paul Derouen

*Max R Domingue

*Ashley Angelle Duhon

Tucker Jay Dunand

Byron Clayton Ebner

Brandon English

*Fatima Fazal-ur-Rehman

*Benjamin George Fuller

*Zachary P Fuselier

Monica Gamboa

Stephanie Garcia

William Winston Gardiner

*Katy Clair Gaspard

James Andrew Sayle Gentry

*Taylor M Girouard

Evan Michael Greeson

Andre Paul Guidry

*Brennan Paul Guidry

Tamim T Haq

Arik Mitchell Hartmann

Kyle Michael Hebert

*Michelle Aline Hendrick

*Blake E Hightower

*Nina Marie Hoffpauir

Sasha Annette Hudson

Daniel Raymond Huval

*Bao Thai Huynh

*Anna Kaufman

*Dahlia Taha Khalifa

Disha Khanna

*Peter William Kishbaugh

Grant Alexander Kleiner

Madison Elise Lambert

*Dane Michael Lantier

*Madison Faia Lanza

Elizabeth P Latiolais

Shay Michael LaPorte

*Kobe Lee Ledet

*Nikki Lentini

*Keyvus Joseph Leon

Lauren Angelle Leonpacher

Kathryn Louise Loomis

Victoria Esteves Maia

*Victoria Elizabeth Marcil

*Anthony Sterling Martin II

Danielle Marie Mauldin

*Brenna E May

David Thomas Maynor

*Alyse Marie Meaux

*Kelsie K Melancon

*Kathleen Monica Menard

Adam Michael Mier

Emily C Musso

*Cody Alan Nash

*Hunter Colton Neumann

*Rip Scott Neumann

*Hanh Nguyen

Rich Trieu Nguyen

*Cameron Lee Nice

*Zachary Roderick Oge’

*Sommer Yousef Osman

Farid Ouedraogo

Imaan Abdoul Ouedraogo

*Charles Eugene Padgett

Sui T Par

Megan Michele Parfait

Molli Elizabeth Pellegran

*Wil Perkins

Peyton Marye Perron

*Delena H Phung

Elisabeth Helena Pigott

*Zachary Duane Pitre

*Sierra Michelle Poirier

*Hayley Juliana Redrick

*Alex D. Richard

Jeriet Isaiah Richard

*Alida C Robin

*Sasha A Rodriguez

Lily Kay Romero

Ashley Elizabeth Roy

Ashton N Roy

Brittany Marie Roy

Jacob Alexander Roy

*Gavin Joseph Royer

Pablo Eduardo Sanchez

*Marae L. Schexnayder

Amalia Fay Shaik

*Michael J Sides

*Kimberly V. Smith

*Nicholas Reed Smith

*Kelsey Elizabeth Soileau

*Tori Amber Spindler

Emily L Strenge

Lisa H Tanh

David Andrew Teter

Bailey Ann Renee Thibodeaux

Rithika Marumagan Thirumal

Matthew Scott Thompson

Diana Han Tran

*Kieu Anh Ha Tran

*Phuong Duy Tran

*Brandon James Vallot

Ethan Paul Venable

*Diem Vo

Kaitlynn Elysse Walker

*Catherine Rose Weber

Cole Martin Weber

Zachary Windham

Andrew Ronald Young

Krista Kyra Zabicki

*Alexandra Marie Zamora

*Joseph Gabriel Zeik



Lafourche



Arts



Emily Morgan Blanchard



Business Administration



*Kristen Louise Ber

Brittany Gayle Kilgen

Colleen Nicole Schales

Bryce Jacob Stogner



Education



Mallory Babin

Raine P Curole

Taylor Naquin



Engineering



*Lauren L Badeaux

Roger James Blanchard

Samantha Abril Bonilla

*Michael John Charpentier

*Christopher Connell

Joel Dempster

Andrew Joseph Gautreaux

Chandler Paul Lagarde

Felix Walter Lanier



Liberal Arts



*Nicole Renee Bell

Nicolette Brown

Brooke Elizabeth Curole

*Samantha Nicole Izaguirre

Ashley Marie Melancon

Rianna Christionne Reed

Natalie Ann Richard

*Camille Schwaner

Brianna Verdin



Sciences



*Hannah June Autin

*Carlie Michelle Callais

Nicholas Alexander Esteve

Destyn Anthony Kiger

Savannah Plaisance

Vinh Quach

Jordan Michelle Rotolo

*Hayden Torres



Lasalle



Education



*Courtney M Wilkinson



Livingston



Arts



*Hannah Lane Boutwell

*Aaron Christopher DePino

Erin Ashton Gray



Business Administration



*Carolyn Renee Williams



Education



*Blake Commodore Bello

*Kylie Lyn Bourque

*Kaitlyn Elisabeth Craven

Micah Scott Gill

*Kristyn Taylor Tallo

*Tori Gerice Vincent



Engineering



Hugh James Passerini

Shelby Joanne Stewart

Jacob James-daniel Tuminski



Liberal Arts



Chloe Felise Brady

Bailey Rose Lemoine

Ciara Nicole Marlow

Shanquel Antonet Mckay



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



*Matthew Liptak

Raegan Michel Sweet



Sciences



*Katie Baudoin

Kevin Thomas Morgan



Madison



Education



Anne Marie Post



Morehouse



Liberal Arts



Jalijah Savoyae Wheeler



Sciences



Pierre Deion Coleman

Alexicia Jashon Thomas



Natchitoches



Business Administration

John William Methvin



Education



Hunter Dubois

*Gabrielle Jenet Gallien

Kaleigh Lenee Webb



Liberal Arts



Daishia D’andera Holland

*Haley Mollece Simpson



Sciences



Madison Claire Ackel

Tyler Dalton Nealy

*Laramie Augusta Williams



Orleans



Arts



Evan John Martinez

Devin Christopher Minix

Erica Marie Moore

Madison Camille Rolig



Business Administration



Jonne Elizabeth Porter

Bryce Justin Washington

Mikel Shanta Wells

Mark Wayne Woods



Education



Victoria Marie Barnes

Anthony Thomas Bertrand

Genay Ayanna Boudouin

Katrika Shantrell Brinston

*Loreal Andrea Chambers

*Rebecca Shannon Czerniak

Janei Rene Dykes

*Wilmer Antonio Gomez

Sierra Nycole Green

*Danielle Johnson

*Olivia Larkins

Scott Eliss Mccarty

*Amara Salaam



Engineering



*Catherine Hill Bailey

Jack T Burk

Ryan Kristopher Mixon

Peter Mcinerny Murphy

*Aspen Tavareus Rodriguez



General Studies



*Amelie Dorothy Bower

Demi Angelle Varuso



Liberal Arts



Wesley Henry Alexander

An’shalai Semaj Anthony

Brianna Ariel Bailey

*Grace Rebecca Bailey

*Abbey Caroline Dixon

*Tyrone Jeffrey Johnson

Yariell Espree Jones

*Allyson Margaret Langhoff

Samantha Adele Miestchovich

Devin Dorian Parker

*Elisabeth Roark

Alysha Briana Smith

Jada Cymone Washington



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Mollie Denise Shoemaker

Brooke Rebecca Simmons

*Ty’nyria Juanita Smith



Sciences



*Shira N Baksh

Vashti Price

Gregg Allen Putnam

*Robyn Mika’l Smith

Viche Stevenson



Ouachita



Arts



*Layne Mccarthy Strode

Brianna Jodee Ulven

Samantha Loralyn Ulven



Business Administration



David Michael Haas

*Kristen Nicole Roberson



Education



*Lori Ann Guillory

*Haley Hunter Hayden

*Makenzie Rae Jones



Engineering



*Troy D. Black



Liberal Arts



Allison Nicole Evans



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Haley Skylar Antley

Elena Catherine Flynn

Sperry Ellen Hale



Plaquemines



Business Administration



*Mary Taliancich

*Caleb Wooton



Education



Gabrielle Denise Davis

Gabrielle Raymonde Lee

Mackensie Lynn Lindner

*Theresa M Phillips

Ranada Marie St Ann

Haley Marie Turpin



Engineering



*Darren Anthony Encalade

Steven Reid Farris



Liberal Arts



*Tyler Jordan Euper

Katherine S Randolph

*Joshua Theard



Sciences



Gage Tanner Shorten



Pointe Coupee



Education



Aaron Matthew Bellelo

*Lyndsy A Bradley

Corey Michael Canezaro

*Chelsea LeBlanc Craig

*Kathryn Davis Niland



Engineering



*Steven Paul Aguillard

Chase Bergeron

*Christian Ray David

*Andrew Micheal Debetaz

*Kayla Renee Garrett

Eric Russell Guerin

*Lauren Elizabeth Meaux

*Owen Vaughn Newton



Liberal Arts



*Ian James Labatut

*Tyler Marie Laurent

*Claire Patrice Roy

Madeline Elizabeth Spustek

Sydney Welch



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



*Emily Katherine Benedict

*Kelsi Quinn Carruth

Katelyn Angelle Dupre

Scarlette Serena McClain



Sciences



Ida Terese Bachmann

*Rachel Marie Fulmer



Rapides



Arts



Anna Marie Campbell

Celicia Nicole Ducote

*Jessica Ann Gullatt

*Raeven Janique Thomas



Business Administration



*Kelsey Renee Cooley

Shelbi Diane Hargis

Souphansa Alicia Keohavong

*Allison Nicole Lawrence

Robert Taylor Starling

Sandy Paola Vargas

*Aaron Leigh Vaughan



Education



Ashley Anne Abrusley

Andre Tyler Arceneaux

*Robin Ann Bergeron

Julia Katherine Jones

*Kathryn Marie Sayes



Engineering



*Spencer E West

*Zachary Thomas West



General Studies



Reotta Danielle Gaulden



Liberal Arts



*Olivia Baker

*Sarah Elizabeth Chatman

*Jorden Danielle Frankell

Keiko Groom

Jenna Louise Harris

*Matthew Lee

*Midori Kolohe Mickel

Briann Marie Perkins

*Haitham Salam

*Madison Blanch Stewart

*Kathryn Elizabeth Tison

*Marcus Dante Webster

*Thomas Quincy Wilmore



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Mi Mi Dinh

Matthew James Lachney

Essence Nichole Montgomery

Alexia Lynn Rachal

Hollie Marie Ryland



Sciences



Trent Michael Guillory

Gerald Wayne Huffman

*Allison Thien Thanh Le

Hunter Walker Mansour

Ray Reich



Red River



General Studies



*Kallie Robyn Bethard



Sabine



Education



*Ashlyn Hilarie Rivers



Liberal Arts



Alice Nicole Guidry



Saint Bernard



Business Administration



Zeke Thomas Keirsey



General Studies



Sidney Bienemy



Liberal Arts



Leo Patrick Murphy



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



*Lainey Elizabeth Gioia

Alexis Ray Robin



Sciences



Luciano Miserendino



Saint Charles



Arts



Reiana Jenette Brown

Hannah Louise Songy



Business Administration



*Kaylie Anne Fabre

Elizabeth Gilmore

Cameron Norfleet

*Bria Marie Vial

*Darion Marie Walker

*Sarah Elizabeth Young



Education



Abbey Facko

Macy Poplin

Jenidza Noelle Rivera

Lauren Claire Simar

*Alyssa Smith

Breana Chrischelle Williams



Engineering



*Bradley Christopher Aucoin

Braden Murray Billot

*Chad Anthony Donohue



Liberal Arts



Chloe Christine Babineaux

*Courtney Marie Bergeron

*Kristal Marie Breaux

*Kayla Danielle Ceaser

Justin David Guidry

*Shelbie Guidry

*Rachel Lynn Huber

Jason Matthew Quigley

*Beau Spencer Robinson



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Jessica Marguerite Becnel

Whitney Aline Chauvin

Paisley Alexandria Cureaux

Blaise Nichole Kenney

*Brianna Elizabeth Schiro

*Kailey Marie Unger

*Cali Marie Zeringue



Sciences



Courtney Anne Carrier

*Erin Elizabeth Picou

*Kayla Melissa Sosa



Saint James



Business Administration



Allana Grace Marshall



Education



Destiny Michelle Kliebert

Kassidy Ann Zeringue



Liberal Arts



Essence Monet Johnson



Saint John



Business Administration



*Jeffrey Paul Selig



Education



Ambria Keira Major

Garrett Tyler Washburn



Engineering



*Bradley Joseph Jouty

Nicholas Joseph Roussel



General Studies



*Dominick Kenneth Jones



Liberal Arts



Saige Angelle Brady

Toni Nicole Cambre

Tia Nicole Giles

Jordan Anthony Mckendall

Tori Alexis Press

*Hayley Lynn Terry



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Angeric Creshe Cockerham

Brittany Anna Mader

*Paige Elizabeth Maurin

Brooke Ashley Tregre



Sciences



*Danielle Larea Harbor

*Sabrina Wadhwa



Saint Landry



Arts



*Jennifer Baham

Allexus Dronet

*Kayla Nicole Dugas

Lacie Kae Dugas

Thomas Aaron Mcmillan

Wileesha Janae Stevenson



Business Administration



*Natalie Deneige Berzas

*Randolph Joseph Blatcher

Lauren Elizabeth Bourque

*Justin Breaux

*Lauren Anne Cormier

*Cody J Darbonne

Dwayne Anthony Declouette

*Denise G Deville

Jacob Louis Duplechin

Willie Durio

*Molly Shannon Fontenot

*Ryan Christopher Fontenot

Logan Frederick

*Derek Paul Godeaux

Rebekah Marie Hargroder

Jasmine Hebert

*Katelyn Monique Hebert

*Katlyn Brooke Johnston

Gabrielle Elizabeth Karam

Shelbi Helen King

Leah Marie Knott

*Julia Elizabeth Larcade

*Caitlin Maddie

Leslie James Miguez

Mia Kade Quebedeaux

*Kyle Jacob Robichaux

*James Patrick Ryan Jr.

Taylor Lynn Stanford

*Emily Danielle Stoute

Chelsea Marie Vidrine



Education



*Jill Christ Artall

*Brittany Ann Aune

Jules Cherie Blevins

*Alycee Monae Briley

*Tonya Broussard

*Samantha Paige Brown

Hannah Kay Buller

*Brenna Marie Carriere

*Jonty Neville Coco

Hailey Delaine Devillier

*Hallie Danielle Dodge

Alyssa Nicole Ezernack

Katelyn Rae Friou

Gabrielle D Gobert

*Bailey Hagan

*Shay R Hardin

*Donna S Henry

*Cayla Raven Hoback

*Brooke Maria Lafleur

*Emma M. Lafleur

*Tanya Lagrange

*Gina Louise Lanclos

Hannah Louella Landry

*Emily Marie Laporte

Mary Elizabeth Lavergne

*Ashley Taylor Lyons

Amber Marie Meaux

*Abagail Ann Meche

Hannah Elizabeth Moreau

Maggie Blanche Parks

*Tranquella Shaney Roberson

*Tiffani Satriano

Brittany Dominique Savoy

*Stephanie R Savoy

*Brennan Kent Sibille

Courtney Lyn Smith

Peyton Alysse Soileau

Zachery Dale Standiford

Sarah Elizabeth Stelly

Dylan David Tabb

Skyla Paige Thibodeaux

*Baylor Thompson

*Natalie Anne Tuminello

*Kendi Glenn Wyatt

Alyssa Nicole Zeringue



Engineering



*Sydney Elise Ardoin

*Addison Arlene Beaver

Brian Troy Boivin

*Eric R Credeur

Gerald Griffin Eaglin

Lane G Elder

Bailey J Fils

*Kaleb Joseph Gautreaux

Nicholas Andrew Green

Aaron Bryan Hadley

*Richard Charles Hessler

Laudun Landry

Jacques LeDee

*Brian Charles McManus

Jacob Joseph Moreau

Joshua David Murphy

*Michael Allen Pellerin

Siera Lynn Quebedeaux

*Paige E Robichaux

Joseph Shamp

Blaine Paul Smith

*Theobert George Venable

Landon David Vidrine

Leagan Michael Vidrine

*William K Wartelle



General Studies



*Joseph C Baute

*Michael L. Eastin Jr

*Rico Scott Meche

Rachel Olivier

*Chase Connally Shields

Darrian Soileau



Liberal Arts



*Ashley Elizabeth Bernard

Talliyah Breyonne Biagas

Amber Clark

*Chase Anthony Cormier

*Lane Rene Courvelle

*Blacin Drew Doucet

*Jada Catherine Doucet

Ana Alisha Fontenot

*Brian J Fuselier

*Allison Nicole Gerard

Mary Ann Hawkins

*Elizabeth Michelle Hollier

*Michela Hollier

Leah Ilene Jeffers

*Rachel Elizabeth Johnson

Hailee Rene Lagrange

*Erica Ruth Lee

Amber Dawn Lintzen

Bethany Ann Matt

*Emily Anne Meche

Benjamin Lane Messner

*La’quinta Ivory Payne

Crystal Nicole Pefferkorn

Lacey Brook Pitre

Stephanie Louise Rabeaux

Taneisha Riggs

Daisy Melinda Smith

Kimberlyn Nicole Smith

Kelsey Yvonne Soileau

*Adrienne Frances Wheaton



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Holly Beth Andrus

*Christian Nicole Bernard

*Morgan Elizabeth Boone

Brooke Erin Brasseaux

Jenee Marie Calais

*Kristen Nicole David

*Makenzie Elizabeth Duplechain

Devontae Guidry

Rainey Elaine Guidry

Benjamin Hayes Hargroder

*Molly Jeane Johnfroe

Kandice Brooke Kidd

Melissa Ann Lafleur

Mia Agnes Landry

Allison Nicole Lavergne

Erin Montgomery

Nita B. Stelly

*Katherine A’lice Thibodeaux



Sciences



*David Anthony Carron II

*Kalee Marie Checker

*Jensen Brody Cochran

Clint Crail

Cullen O’neal Dejean

*Celeste Marie Flanagan

Frank Bernard Higgins

*Raymond Paul Kidder

Mark Andrew Kimble

*Elizabeth Nicole Lacobie

Brock Michael Lanclos

*Taylor David Lanclos

*Chloe Belle Letulle

John Miller

Caitlin Ann Ortego

*Daniel Richard

Jarrett James Richard

Steven Ray Ryder

*Abbie Elizabeth Savoie

Brandi Aleyce Sibley

Leah Monette Simmons

*Paul A Smith

Tyler James Soileau

*Courtnie Marie Stelly

*Spencer Stelly

Cayman Anne Stephen

Fabian R Strauss

*Alix Laya Tromblay

Cade W Wyble



Saint Martin



Arts



*Hillary Lucille Bonhomme

Sadi Marie Brasseaux

Angelle M Broussard

Halie Victoria Hebert

*Kaitlyn Marie Kidder

*Danielle Nichol Krause

*Matthew James Orphe

*Jacqueline Marie Perry

Garret Mckenzie Wood



Business Administration



Taylor Albert

*Elizabeth Angelle

Kelly L Blanchard

*Adam Joseph Dauphine

Ashley Inez Hulin

Danielle M Latiolais

Torey Jake Leblanc

Adrien Noel

*Rebekah Lynn Poche

Camille Elise Quebodeaux

*Alyce L Ransonet

Jessica Ann Reed

*Emily Lynn Robin

*Taylor Danielle Serrette

Seth Michael Sonnier

*Zachary Wells



Education



*Hannah Elizabeth Arnaud

*Antoinette Marie Borel

*Jensie Michele Borel

Joseph An Cao

*Katey Lynn Champagne

*Brittlyn Cormier

*Megan M Dumatrait

*Katie Ann Guidry

Madison Claire Guidry

Faye Elizabeth Hebert

*Julianna Marie Hebert

*Johnny V Hodge

*Trinitey Paige Johnson

Morgan Rae Laviolette

Britney Nicole Leleux

Abbie Lynn Morgan

Allie Lynn Morgan

Ali Christian Romero

*Shannan C Schexnayder

Shelby Lynn Theriot

Alex Thomassee Touchet

*David A Venable



Engineering



*Ian Gerardo Andrepont

Adam Christopher Angelle

*Kelsey Matthew Angelle

*Tramaine Charles

Jonah Dru Cormier

Jude Anthony Frederick

Derrick Gage

*Justin Hebert

*Sully Michael Hulin

Drew Christopher Lalanne

*Jean-Paul Andre Lancon

Christopher L LeBlanc

*Hunter Daniel Malorin

Ethan Joseph Poche’

*Matthew J. Prilliman

*Kobie Dee Renard

Ross Jude Robin

*Sydni K Talley

Hunter Michael Theriot



General Studies



Nicole Faye Bourque

Jonathan Brasseaux

*Margaret Elizabeth Dore

*Hannah E Martin

Cody F Menard



Liberal Arts



Zachary Michael Angelle

*Tyler James Berard

Kayla Nicole Bergeron

*McKenzie Antoinette Billeaudeaux

*Catherine Adele Blanchard

*Alex Marie Boudreaux

*Camille Elfleda Carloss

*Callan C Castille

Kaitlin Champagne

*Michael Champagne

Kaliyah Renee Demouchet

*Morgan Kate Duplantis

*Amanda Estrada

*Sidny Thibodeaux Frazer

Allyson St Marie Gary

Brentney Nicole Harrison

Emily Rae Johnson

Jane D. Labbie

*Anna Elizabeth Lagrange

Jessi Lynne LaSalle

*Blake Leblanc

*Channing Lyn Mcbride

Kirsten Marie Meche

*Harley Rae Melancon

*Jon Philip Melancon

Ali Morgan Noel

*Katherine Adair Read

*Macy Anne Rougeaux

*Mallory Kate Soileau

Nicole Marie Strickland

Victoria Tauzin

Jacob Ian Trail

E’Llise Marie Trosclair



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Ali Michelle Angelle

*Amiee Camille Baudoin

Kaitlyn Claire Blanchard

Anastacia Boulden

*Angele Aimee Bulliard

Darian Elizabeth Buras

*Brooke Alayna Capritto

Erin Darby

Allison Theresa Daspit

*Katie-oline Marie Douet

*Lauren Irene Fuselier

*Latoya Marie Gray

*Loni A Guidry

Kristen B Hamilton

Haley Hoskins

Kelsey Rae Hulin

Carmen Alexis Miller

*Megan Ann Pete

*Noelle Guidry Prados

*Madison I Proctor

Alexis Rene Randle

Jake Kellan Savoie

Sabrina Ann Scriber

*Allison K Theriot

Erin Elyse Theriot



Sciences



*Christopher Allen Boudreaux

*Shelly A Boulet

Derek James Broussard

*Brittany Nicole Burrow

Lyndsy Caillier

*Kristin Ann Champagne

Lexi Nicole Dauphinet

*Amber Marie Dugas

*Misty L Ellis

*Brooke Gillespie

Tyce Hebert

Alexander Charles Lear

Jennie Lynn McLeod

*Courtney Poirier

*Vanel Porter

*Johnathon Michael Theriot

*Jenci Maria Trahan

*Chase Michael Valadez



Saint Mary



Arts



*Brittny Ann Giroir



Business Administration

Andrew Michael Albritton

*Elle Victoria Arcemont

*Erica June Hahn

Jennifer Latrice Lockett

Matthew Dale Lorenzo

Austin J Luke

Aleisha Savoy

Matthew John Skelton



Education



Brooke Elizabeth Baudoin

Mallory Elizabeth Chiasson

Nia E’delle Madise

*William James Marcotte

*Kaitlyn Marie Percle

Hollie Simmons

Abigail Elizabeth Suitt

*Alexis Michelle Vaughn

*Jennifer Kim Vu



Engineering



*Beau Michael Ancona

Nathan Christian Tyler Baumgartner

*Callie R Breaux

Kerie Cathryn Clements

Brandon E. Gorman

*Clint Joseph Guillory

Andrus Fitzgerald Lecompte

*Marcel Louis Marquette IV

*Angelique Theresa Oncale

Lee Anthony Rhodes

Diana To Nhu Tran



General Studies



Brianna Natalisha Gray

*Lisa Marie Harrison

Vu Thanh Nguyen



Liberal Arts



*Evan David Boudreaux

*Deja Chanell Brown

*Bethany Marnae Darnell

*Carley Francis Fitzgerald

Alexandra Anne Hebert

*Taylor Marie Hebert

Alexis Mariah Izaguirre

Alyson Nicole Keenze

Omar Eduardo Ledezma

*Levi Porter

*Sarah Kayann Rentrop

*Aaron Joseph Scully



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



*Kalyn Elizabeth Adams

*Emily Nicole Lipari

*Evelyn Marie Pontiff

Katie J Simmons

*Macie Sinitiere



Sciences



*Johnny Ha

Kyle Anthony Landeta

*Shannon Claire Theriot



Saint Tammany



Arts



Adam Joseph Cicero

*Ronnie Uhle Coniglio

Allison Claire Gilbert

*Tyler Owen Hanson

*Lauren Elizabeth Lambert

Casey Jude Lemoine-johnson

Dylan Anthony Oster

Maria Bernadette Pizzati

*Brandon M Radecker

*Luke Anthony Rizzotto

*Victoria Louise Roux

Jasmyne White

*Melissa Rachel Williams



Business Administration



*Claire Lea Allen

Jamie Elizebeth Amore

John Paul Beter

*Ericha Marie Emile Chaney

*Demario Bryce Clark

*Salvadore Joseph Crifasi

Riley Elizabeth Frank

Blake Amelie Gassen

*Cody Kevin Gourgues

*Bria Antionette Johnson

*Brianna Ariel Miller

Kameron Nicholas Newton

*Megan Elizabeth Richardson

*Stacey Anne Webb



Education



Mollie Breanne Allen

Kaylee Brooke Annello

*Austin Dean Barr

Kathryn Ann Bianchini

Angelle Christine Bolt

*Kaitlin Simone Davis

Courtney Le`thi Flettrich

Madison Elaine Hahn

Megan J Holmes

William Harris Kenyon

Carter Thomas Knight

*Madelyn Claire Noel

Madelyn Anne Toups



Engineering



*Harry Dylan Clay

*Jeremy Michael James

*John Patrick Larson

Travis Maddux

*Larry Newby

Christian Thompson

*Beth Madelyn Watson



General Studies



John Fairfax Bernard

Christopher Mark Corcoran

*Alaina Catherine Freeman



Liberal Arts



Mark Ross Allbritton

*Emily Jean Alleman

Rachel Marie Austin

Raymond Cornelius Bissel

Amy Elizabeth Boraks

*Diamond Marie Bridges

*Sabrina Taylor Buelle

Ashton Butler

*Mary Elizabeth Cormaci

*Jake Charles Crifasi Jr.

Holly Eva-marie Duchmann

Madeline Rose Edwards

*Baileigh Parmer Evans

*Madeline Renee Forstall

*Joshua Franszczak

Margaret Lindsey Freshley

Alexis Brooke Gajan

Shelby Kay Gunter

Cameron Waleed Haddad

Catherine Elizabeth Lange

Robert Thomas Lenahan

Candace Lashay Myers

*Alissa Renee Netto

*Kristen Neville

Peter M Newton

Bryce Michael Perez

*Courtney Elizabeth Randolph

Austin Michael Satter

*Lauren Short

*Carter Thomas Simoneaux

*Katelynn Maritza Sprague

Nicole M Taylor

Alexandra Michelle Ward

*Ryan Watts



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Olivia Scout Drake

Ashley Marie Ferrara

Madison Elizabeth Guidry

Krista Nicole Mancuso

Connor Patrick O`shaughnessy

Madison Lynne Pastorello

*Theresa Catherine Sapera

*Amber Wilberg

Madison Susann Wyatt



Sciences



Nicholas Anthony Barreca

*Christian Paul Bergeron

*Emily Rochelle Bruce

*Joseph Cyle Chapman

*Elizabeth Clark

*Kalli Alyse Dubois

*Brianna Ashley Ennis

Chad Dawson Galloway

*Cory Jacob Hillard

*Taylor Reet Jeansonne

*Zachary John Kirby

Claire Lanclos

*Keegan Christopher Lange

*Ross Evan Ledoux

*Rainey Jude Lyons

Carly Lynn Maassen

Ashley L Ramirez

*Ada Francesca Tusa

*Blake Philip VanCourt

*Kristen Terre Woods

Andrew Sei Yoshimura



Tangipahoa



Arts



*Lauren Fay Joiner

Maya Angelle Loving

*Dani Catherine Majeau

John Thomas Rohner

*Cindy Truong



Business Administration



*Remi Lane Leblanc



Education



Thomas Henry Jospeh Boudreaux

*Paxton L Cantrell

*Ashley K Cotton

Milen Matthews

*Sarah Rachal Ryals

Alexandra Lee Seale

*Valen Tracie

*Steven Wronkoski



Engineering



*Jon Morgan Pevey

*Patrick Claiborne Quin

Mason Joseph Settoon



Liberal Arts



*Joseph Arthur Giavotella

*Paul Martin Givens

*Miranda Lynn Howes

*Danielle Nicole Vidrine



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Agueda Elena Bragg

*Mary Ellen Gambel

Tessa Faye Hill

*Carey Ann O’rourke



Sciences



*Gabe Ethan Marcus

Kimmi Lynn Perkins



Terrebonne



Arts



*Tanner Matthew Cole

*Sarah Catherine Fanguy



Business Administration



*Cullen Joseph Bergeron

Lerin T Bergeron

*Taylor Raye Bowen

Nicholas Bridges Caletri

Francisco Stanley Call

*Clarence A Granger

Christopher Aaron Rome

*Erin Marie Snyder

Thomas Michael Trahan



Education



*Emily Marie Authement

*Konnori Dain Battee

*Allyson Claire Domangue

*Tyler James Fanguy

*Morgan Doane Spence

Matthew John Walling



Engineering



*Coby Michael Authement

*Matthew James Fanguy

Brenton Michael Hebert

*Minh Ho

Jacob Paul Lapeyrouse

Gustave Anthony Marie

*Cameron Campbell Moen

*Codey Bryston Peeler

*Laura Elizabeth Pellegrin

*Cobey Charles Perrin

Sarah Frances Pippen

*Garrett Michael Thibodeaux

Nicholas Joseph Trosclair



General Studies



*Hunter Marie

Kevin John Neil



Liberal Arts



*Jacob Michael Authement

Christian Bergeron

*Maria Antonia Bilello

*Kassidi Kaye Blanchard

Alaina Claire Bonvillain

*Victoria Lynn Boudreaux

*Kaily Beth Bourg

Carly Jo Ellender

*Kimberly Michelle Grasso

Darrin Wayne Guidry

Alora Marie Mccormick

*Mary Frances Mcmahon

*Sarah Kathryn Ourso

*Melinda Marie Sevier

*Savannah Jane Stevens

*Sophie Rae Trosclair



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Cherish Crockett

Nicole Renee Guidry

*Jahel Osornio

Jane M. Weekly



Sciences



*Macy Lynn Fazzio

*Joey James Naquin

*Ny Ngoc Pham

*Lauren Elizabeth Robichaux



Vermilion



Arts



Samantha Broussard

*Gabrielle E Davis

*Jeane Louise Derouen

Trevor Joseph Guidry

Hailey Alaine Hutchinson

*Beth Lovell

*Alina Kim Nguyen

*Trenity Peyton Villejoin



Business Administration



*Morgan E Bergeron

Brittany Sue Bertrand

*Mary Kirsten Broussard

*Lane Christopher Campbell

Morgan Courville

*Hannah M Dardar

*Claire Nicole David

Allissabeth Dunbar

*Kayla Marie Hebert

*Glenn Anthony Istre

Alexander Steven LeBlanc

Kourtney S LeBlanc

Mary Ruth Minjoe

Kane Phuoc Khanh Nguyen

*Brandon Alexander Petry

*Bethany Ray Roper

Morgan J Savoy

*Melana Michelle Schexnider

*Amber Cordelia Sims

Maurice Anthony Solet Jr

Wayne Curtis Talbot

*Kayli M Thibodeaux



Education



*Kaylen Nicole Bourgeois

Alyson Claire Broussard

Lauren R Choate

Angelle Marie Domingue

Madison N Duhon

Kate Marie Faulk

Joshua Allen Harrington

*Drew C Hoffpauir

*Henry A. Holmes

Malani C Husband

*Kansas Istre

*Ellen Broussard Landry

*Erika A Laviolette

Ridge L LaSalle

Alex Leigh Leblanc

Jill Ann Leblanc

*Mallory Elyse Leboeuf

Suzanna Lynn Lege

*Emily Paige Leonard

*Mikel A LeBlanc

Haley Brooke Luquette

*Taylor Lynn Manceaux

*Stephen Douglas Meaux

*Katie Lynne Robichaux

*Megan Victoria Simon

Steven Ferrell Sparkman

Kalyn B Stephen

Hannah M Suire

*James Russell Suire

Austin J Touchet

*Hannah L Trahan

*Nicole Rung Trahan

*Alexander Blaise Vallot

*Rebekah Leigh Vallot

*Halie A Wright

*Austin Dominic Zaunbrecher



Engineering



*Grant G Baudoin

Michael John Boudreaux

Kyle Mitchell Broussard

Gregory J Cameron

Gabe Janson Derouen

*Jacob E Duhon

Ross Anthony Duhon

Brennan J Gallet

Macade Alexander Husband

Jacob J Irwin

*David Francis Lacour

Shayna Fynn Lasalle

*Anh The Le

*Ridge Michael Leblanc

*Tyler Andre Lege

*Connor James Menard

Khai M Nguyen

*Huy N Pham

Trevor Picard

*Evan C. Rineholt

Zachary John Romero

Matthew Brennan Spell

Sloan Reagan Trahan

Phu Minh Tran

Nicolette Christine Ware

*Joshua Alexander Wilson

*Matthew G Wilson



General Studies



Jacob William Benoit

Valerie Nicole Benson

Simone Mire Cavalier

Laura Elizabeth Couvillon

Peggy Alaina Hebert

Christian M Umphries



Liberal Arts



Rhea Jade Abshire

*Jacob Joseph Ambrose

Davonte J Augustus

*Eric Paul Baquet

*Michael Benoit

*Amber Nicole Bourgeois

*Chance Keith Bourgeois

Olivia Elise Bourque

*Brittany Desormeaux Broussard

*Phillip Jude Broussard

*Natalie Rose Camel

Kaitlan Paige Darby

*Elizabeth A Daspit

*Samantha D David

*Amelie Elizabeth Desormeaux

*Lauren R Duncan

*Gretchen Lee Grant

*Anna E Hebert

*Emily Kathryn Husband

*Andrew V Kieu

*Ryan C Luquette

Emily Nicolle Meaux

*Madilyn Faith Meaux

*Emma E Noel

*Meagan Nicole Perkins

Jacie D Petty

Joshua Paul Pillette

*Shalanda Plowden

Emily Renee Roper

*Olivia Spallino Savoie

*Sadie Marie Schoeffler

Jardian Bryce Sellers

*Kaitlyn S Thompson

*Marina J White



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Ebonie Jana Baudoin

Nicholas Christopher Berthelot

Anna L Dartez

Andrea M Delhommer

*Caitlin M Domingues

*Catherine Louise Domingues

Whitney Renee Freeland

Kaitlyn P Goutierrez

*Drake S Hoffpauir

*Brooke N Langlinais

Jennifer L LeBlanc

Katelyn M. Meaux

*Darian C. Mire

*Alix M Puyau

Shantell Marie Richard

Kellie Marie Roy

Bailey F Strother

*Mattalyn A Suire

*Destiny Touchet



Sciences



Thomas James Bergeaux

Haley Jenise Bourque

Lanie C Breaux

Caitlyn S. Broussard

*Lauren Christine Broussard

*Gage Matthew Desormeaux

Joseph P Faulk

*Pete Cameron Folse

*Katie Marie Frith

*Austin Wayne Gaspard

Quentin S Harrington

Edward Hutchinson

Hung Q Le

Victoria Thuy-Anh Nguyen

Sandra T Pham

April Nicole Rabassa

*Sarah Elizabeth Saunier

*Lindsey Claire Schexnailder

*Nathaniel L Silar

*Adam Joseph Trahan

Russell Carl Trahan

Ana Leah Tribaldos

Antoinette M Watson



Vernon



Business Administration



*Sunny Jeanne Roberts

Porsche Nikole Shepherd



Education



Chenyce Antoinette Porche

*Kirsten Rheanna Raines



Liberal Arts



Sarah Kathleen Koller

*Kassandra Ruth Mcallister

Seaira Leshawn Powell

Jade Ayinde Rouchon

*Bailey Williams



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Michelle Renee Freshley



Sciences



Joshua Cornelius Cecil



Washington



Education



Donovan Andrew Alonzo

*Logan Brian Seal

*Hannah Jean Simmons



Engineering



Adam Chance Boyd

*Zachary Schilling



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Emily Danielle Jenkins



Sciences



*Andrea Ivey Lee



West Baton Rouge



Business Administration



Abby Beary



Education



Tabitha Renee Bolds

Keeley Celeste Martin

*Danielle Renee Spath

*Allie Nichole Voiselle



Liberal Arts



*Taylor John Dizor

Jaylyn Leshay Woods



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Darion Sierra Smith



Sciences



*Katelyn Marie Loupe



Webster



Arts



*Michael Frederick Becker



Business Administration



Quincy Dorwin Hicks

Paige Leann Teague



Liberal Arts



*Tori Pesses



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



Gabrielle Nicole Headrick

*Cheyenne Nicole Rogers



West Feliciana



Arts



Haley Ellen Lavergne



Business Administration



*Ashton Elizabeth Gibbon



Education



Sasha Tarshan Davis

*Melinda Kathleen Walden



Liberal Arts



Brenna Lane Mccann

*Mallory Elizabeth Metz

Reid Harris Sanchez

Thomas William Stevenson



Winn



Sciences



*Hannah Victoria Delaughter

*Tori Lynn Johnson



Out of state



Arts



*Erika Alice Avery

*Hannah Elizabeth Bauerschmidt

*Erin Gabrielle Bennett

Natalie Bodkin

Marissa Lynn Boulet

*Natalie Connohr Boyle

Erica Alexis Feagin

Tyenne Alyse Fulton-crosson

Susan Ann Gottardi

*John Duncan Isiminger

Tyler Matthew Katsarelis

*Jael Jacinta Lee

*Caitlyn Nicole Manfre

*Riley William Mccallum

*Nathan Pierce

*Hannah Claire Rossler

Carson Hutton Smith

*Kiana Laniece Vincenty

*Shelby Patricia Wanzer



Business Administration



*Michael Alan Billand

Brandon Richard Burgess

*Healy Ann Carden

*Evan Christopher Carver

Chloe Clifton

*Emerald Danielle Desjardins

Shelby Desrochers

*Kyla Imara Fleming

Jacob Roderick Grasch

Lindsey Nicole Helkenn

*Thomas William Krushinskie

Natalie Kathleen Lebamoff

*Jonathan Lundy

David Allen Mcbride Jr.

*Dane Mechler

John Hugh Newman

Brittany Kristina Nollkamper

David Nicholas Saines

Thomas Xavier Strandemo

Lexus Sierra Taylor



Education



*Ediben Avak

Gabrielle Lelia Bergeron

*Courtney E Broussard

*Karima Clark

*Mary Elizabeth Danforth

*Heather Nicole Delay

*Monica Donann Groce

*Leah Hope Hayes

Abbie Estherline Heath

*Broderick Martez Hodo

Gunner James Hudspeth

*Marie Kathleen Hughes

*Stacy A Imagbe

*Sarah Ann Kozlowski

*Luke Lemings

*Laura Loustalot

Kelli Martinez

Alyxis Rae Mayeaux

*Savannah Joy Milligan

*Yazmin Carolina Montoya

Natalie Marie Newman

*Monica Nicole Ourada

*Alison Renee Randazzo

*Ethan Ray Rosenbalm

*Elizabeth Ann Ruehl

*Claire Nicole Ruehle

*Stacey Marie Sams

*Macey L Smith

*Alexyia Danielle Turner

Mary Monaghan Walters

Michelle Rene White



Engineering



*Ahmed Hayder Algalban

Suliman M Alqahtani

*Dylan Scott Ashlin

*Jonathan Jiashan Au

*Stephen Jiachun Au

Basil Neumann Baldauff

*John-paul Christopher Bergeron

Sabrina Diane Bradley-Powell

*Melissa Leigh Burckhartt

*Clifford Obara Bwondara

*Landon Chase Carroll

*Jennifer Choi

*Kreitz Dhyrel Condalor

*Morgan Elyse Costlow

*Paul Allen Cummins

Gregory Lawrence Davis

*Jordan Dallas Eades

Mohamed I Elagamy

Miranda Ferrer

*Erin Marie Fisher

*Sydney Garrett Foreman

*Matthew Joseph Furka

Alexander Scott Golden

Travis Gottstine

*Imran Khan Haniff

Sawyer Harms

*Kyle Adam Hill

*Claire Olivia Hodges

*Johnathan Nicholas Jarrett

Cameron Johnson

*Jack Austin Kenney

*Mark Kossowski

*Joseph Kravets

Kelsey Anne Lambert

Matthew Mark Lasseigne

*Jacob Earl Lawson

Austin Ley

*Miranda Gioia Maggiore

Patrick Dennis Morton

*Stephen Odhiambo Owoko

*Holly Paden

Michael John Parks

*Paul Jack Perry

Shea Aaron Price

*Brandon Lee Salazar

*Gregory Steven Salazar

Aaron James Seman

*Jonathan Patrick Snyder

Logan Christopher Thompson

*Zachary A Trampel

Brittney Alexa Vega

*Joshua Hunter Wade



General Studies



*Eric Rowe Carter

Brooke Ashley Dugas

Alexandrea Kenedie Elkins

Zachery Tyler Jones

*Colton Stacey Lee

*Anjelica Lisauckis

Richard Madison Manuel

*Gregory Milhorn

Sara Elizabeth Mossakowski

Alexis Rabalais

Jasmine Simpson



Liberal Arts



*Anna Bulatovna Akhmetova

*Sydney Michelle Andrews

Jessica Katherine Bartczyszyn

*Lindsay Michelle Brammer

*Kendall Anne Brechtel

Tiffany Brown

Megan Paige Cox

Libby Alison Deckert

*Brittney Lynn Dennis

*Sarah Janelle Diaz

Keithen Mark Domingue

Hailey Marie Dugas

Timothy Nathan Harper

Melanie Klin

Matthew Brian Koesy

*Teddi Jo Kolarich

*Lindsay Ann Lagarde

Ryan Matthew Mackowiak

Alisha Marie Mccool-kelley

Portia Lashae Meyers

*Dylan Moore

*Mario Andre Osborne Jr

Samantha Kaye Rink

Madison Marie Schneider

*Ellen Safford Skidmore

*Jorgie Elizabeth Smith

*Maryelizabeth Frances Torres

Katherine Elizabeth Voitier

Teresita Maria Walters

*Aislinn Christine Williams



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



*Brianna Baker

*Laini Briley

Danielle Alexis Chauvin

Julie Devenoge

*Denice Emokpae

*Leslie A Fields

*Layne Renee Frey

Abigail Ruth Harper

Michelle Renee Hayes

Julia Anne Lang

*Taylor Price

*Lauren Nicole Stigler

*Charlene Daniel Thompson



Sciences



Alexandra Ashley Crowley

*Nathaniel Patrick Dungey

*Kacee Leigh Greenhaw

Gabriel Pierre Griffard

*Austin Philip Hansen

Elizabeth Marie Hesse

*Jeremy Michael Huene

Justin Michael Leblanc

Cody William Maddux

*Buddy Paul Martin

*Seth Payne Miley

Sagar Patel

John Rizer

Bailey Ross

Alexandra Nicole Stewart

*Aro Marie Terrell

Nidja Simone Thomas

Eric Allen Udick

Kevin Wayne Vaughan

Kayla Donna Wappel

Shaunda Leshea Whiteside

John Patrick Williams

*Andrew James Wise

Lauren Nicole Wise



International



Arts



Natalia Barlabe

*Quoc Minh Dang

Francisco Javier Farrera Galindo

Luis Gustavo Henriquez Godoy

*Sami Abdul Rahman Jaber

*Taisiia Olehivna Kolisnyk

*Nataly Kruh



Business Administration



Marwan Issam Abdo

*Tahia Alam

Kevin Almaraz

Larissa Maria Altamirano

*Arthur Boittiaux

*Giannina Farina Bonnemann

*Dragana Dana Brankovic

*Anh Quang Bui

Lorena Maria Castro

*Juliette Clement

*William Thomas, Henry Huyton

*Michael Kritzinger

*Tung Son Le

Yixian Lim

Anh Thi Thuc Nguyen

*Hiep Vu Nguyen

*Ngoc Anh Nguyen

Dat Pham

Xiang Xiang Phung

*Irene Reyes

Elena Gratiela Sava

Angus William Sinclair

*Jesus Enrique Suadi

Quynh Xuan Van

*Christian Verrougstraete

*Hanh Kim Vu

*Charlotte Elizabeth Wharton

*Jake Raymond Wynan



Education



*Suzzane Valentine Asembo

*Bartul Basic

Kelly Dawn Drew

*Alena Hrusoci

Benjamin Wei Haw Lim

*Annika Nadine Schmidt

Benjamin Stadlbaur



Engineering



*Makarios George Abader

Suhail Abualfaraj

Andres Rafael Acevedo Ortega

Ayodamola Chisom Ajala

*Oluwakemi Abike Ajala

Abdulaziz Amur Al Abri

*Mohammed Habib Al Balushi

*Tamim Mohammed Al Balushi

*Fahad Khamis Al Hosni

*Majid Hilal Al Mamari

*Halima Said Al Maqbali

*Ibrahim Al-abdali

*Mohammed Saleh A Al-ghamdi

Ibrahim Khalid Al-naim

*Raghada Al-riyami

Abdullah Mohammad Al-sayed

Ahmed Mohamed Al-Abri

*Haitham Mohsin Al-Bahri

*Saif Said Al-Dhayabi

*Tariq Sulaiman Al-Hamasi

Abdullah Ali Al-Hinai

*Mohammed Hamood Al-Jahmani

Ayoub Mohammed Al-Kharusi

*Abdullah Al-Mamari

*Mohammed Salim Al-Rawahi

*Hanan Ali Alghasra

Ali Aljishi

Younis Mohammed Alkasbi

Najeeb Almarhoon

Jasem Ahmed Alqassab

Marwan Hamed Alsiyabi

*Tariq Salim Alsiyabi

Eqab Saeed N Alzubadin

Muhannad Yaser Badr

*Jose Enrique Balderrama

Janete D Cavaleiro

*Maria Luisa Cepeda

*Ying Chian Chin

Ioannis Constantin Cartsounis

*Nabaladiomon Zakaria Coulibaly

*Fathi Derbel

*Waleed Abdulaziz Dokhon

Haussohou Daniel Edi

Clarissa Gallardo

Prateek Gurnani

*Chouaib Huda

*Alou Ismael Keita

*Vladyslav Kramarov

Edgar Legorreta Lopez

Shashank Mishra

Phung Thi Kim Ninh

*Arafat Noor

*Joshua Oduro

*Adeoluwa Timothy Olotu

Modupeoluwa Ayomide Oni

*Anuoluwatobi Arinola Osibo

*Abdulrahman Qoqandi

*Jesus Alberto Rodriguez Romero

Maria Jose Rojas

*Bimi Shrestha

Richard Sohou

Kai Song Tan

Dana Tayyib

*Deena Mohammed Tayyib

Sarah Aminata Traore

Marta Gomes Umba

*Lou Toua Carine Vi

*Khoa Le Vu

Khoi Vu

*Yihui Wang

*Emmanuel Marie Pierre Yangue

*Te Faye Yap

*Lenissongui Yeo

*Wenqiongzi Yin



General Studies



*Ka Weng Chan



Liberal Arts



Reem Al Ansari

Tarfa Abdullah Al-Busaidi

*Joseph Cammeron Burgess

Wai Ying Chan

*Taryn Faye Grant

*Sofiyat Aderonke Ibrahim

Ivanna Olivares

Madeline Omana

Jayna Sanjay Patel

*Jaseong Pyun

*Brendan Tobing



Nursing and Allied Health Professions



*Siau Yen Wong



Sciences



*Andrew Jaret S. Bull

*Zhuo Cen

*Abhinav Bahadur Chand

*Peace Chinazo Eze

Ragnar Mar Gardarsson

Nuriya G Khamidullina

*Anna Kovalenko

Chai Hui Ling

*Matilda Jonna Mostrom

*Hoang Hai Pham
19 2016-05-19
Lafayette

37 UL student-athletes receive degrees


Thirty-seven UL Ragin’ Cajuns student-athletes were among a record 1,676 UL Lafayette graduates that took part in Spring 2016 Commencement ceremonies last Friday.

Members of all 16 Division I programs were included in the graduation ceremonies, including baseball’s Eric Carter, who was named the Outstanding Graduate for University College, and softball’s Marie Hoag, who graduated with degrees in both chemical engineering and chemistry.

The Ragin’ Cajuns football team had nine athletes earn their degrees, including current letterwinners Allen Cummins, Eddie Gordon, Dominick Jones and Al Riles. They were joined by Tyren Alexander, Remaine Douglas, Sherard Johnson, Mykhael Quave and Blain Winston.

Carter was one of three members of the Ragin’ Cajuns baseball team to receive degrees, joining current teammate Nick Zaunbrecher and 2014-15 letterwinner Greg Milhorn. Hoag was one of four softball players to earn their degree and was joined by current member Gabrielle Felps and 2015 letterwinners Linzey Cifreo and Taylor Meaux.

Kasey Shepherd and Steven Wronkoski of the Ragin’ Cajuns men’s basketball team received their degrees along with women’s basketball players Jasmin Mills and Keke Veal. Omari Davis, Kenneth Nassar, Corbett Ourso and Cody Nickel represented the Ragin’ Cajuns men’s track and field team and were joined by women’s track and field graduates Jasmin Fusilier, Alex Harrell and Stacy Imagbe.

Four members of the Ragin’ Cajuns golf team — Ross Davis, Haraldur Magnus, Thomas Strandemo and Christian Verrougstraete — received degrees with women’s soccer student-athlete Claire Ruehle, volleyball’s Mandy Gavin and Sara Mossakowski, men’s tennis players Coleman Wahlborg and Jake Wynan and women’s tennis student-athlete Juliette Clement.

19 2016-05-18
Lafayette

CGI’s ‘official’ tech center opening in Lafayette draws top corporate officials, government leaders


CGI officially opened its $13.1 million information technology center in Lafayette on Tuesday, a 50,000-square-foot facility that now serves as the workplace for 250 of the company’s employees, many of them home-grown and locally educated.

CGI plans to hire another 50 employees this year and an additional 100 by 2019 to bring the employee count to 400.

The Lafayette facility is CGI’s fourth and newest technology center in the U.S. Although the grand opening was Tuesday, employees relocated from a temporary facility in downtown Lafayette to the new building in February.

The occasion was marked by the presence of high-ranking state and local government officials, economic development and CGI brass, including Tim Hurlebaus, president of CGI Federal, a subsidiary that serves the U.S. government’s civilian, defense and intelligence sectors.

Hurlebaus joined Louisiana officials including Gov. John Bel Edwards, Lafayette Mayor-President Joel Robideaux and Joseph Savoie, president of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, where a world-renowned computer science program is training current and future staff for CGI.

Also there was Lafayette Economic Development Authority chief Gregg Gothreaux, who said one of the inducements that prompted CGI and other high-tech firms to set up shop in Lafayette was the state’s tax credits for industry, particularly the incentives for digital media companies. Those incentives are on the chopping block as Edwards and legislators try to narrow a yawning state budget deficit.

Off to the side, Edwards later told reporters that tax incentives are not in budget-cutters’ cross-hairs so much as the “tax giveaways” that require the state to write checks to industry.

According to a news release from LEDA, Lafayette Sen. Page Cortez said he, other legislators and state officials are having to “make tough choices in tough times about incentives.” He said digital media tax incentives are “working well to secure business investment and job creation in Louisiana.”

“I am pleased that CGI and its 400 employees will occupy this beautiful building in my district,” Cortez said. “This is what Lafayette needs at this time in our history.”

Louisiana’s tax incentives were just part of the draw. Also luring CGI and other tech firms were the Lafayette-based institutions of higher learning — UL-Lafayette and South Louisiana Community College.

The package Lafayette and Louisiana has to offer companies also has pulled in others.

In 2014, CGI was one of three tech firms that announced they were establishing a presence in Lafayette. Perficient, a software development firm, recently completed renovating its Lafayette headquarters in a downtown building, the former Jefferson Street Market. And software developer Enquero has set up shop temporarily at the Louisiana Immersive Technology Enterprise building.

All three firms are located within a few miles of each other, with CGI and Enquero situated a few steps apart in UL-Lafayette’s Research Park near the Cajundome.

Many of CGI’s 250 employees took part in the opening Tuesday, looking and listening from the second floor or the lobby floor. When it was over, they adjourned to a crawfish boil under a big tent on the CGI campus.

Many of the future employees the company plans to hire are current computer science majors or studying other disciplines at UL-Lafayette, which is enhancing its research programs.

“While attracting one of the world’s most successful information technology companies, we also are building research capacity in an exciting way for one of our leading higher education institutions, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette,” Edwards said.

Hurlebaus said CGI defines its service centers as “onshore” to differentiate from the way other companies have established “offshore” centers in foreign, faraway lands. The Lafayette facility joins other CGI service centers in Lebanon, Virginia; Troy, Alabama; and Belton, Texas.

CGI is a publicly traded company based in Montreal, with annual revenue in excess of $10 billion. CGI and Louisiana officials estimate the Lafayette operation will generate an economic impact in the parish of $93 million a year.
19 2016-05-18
Lafayette

CGI’s ‘official’ tech center opening in Lafayette draws top corporate officials, government leaders


CGI officially opened its $13.1 million information technology center in Lafayette on Tuesday, a 50,000-square-foot facility that now serves as the workplace for 250 of the company’s employees, many of them home-grown and locally educated.

CGI plans to hire another 50 employees this year and an additional 100 by 2019 to bring the employee count to 400.

The Lafayette facility is CGI’s fourth and newest technology center in the U.S. Although the grand opening was Tuesday, employees relocated from a temporary facility in downtown Lafayette to the new building in February.

The occasion was marked by the presence of high-ranking state and local government officials, economic development and CGI brass, including Tim Hurlebaus, president of CGI Federal, a subsidiary that serves the U.S. government’s civilian, defense and intelligence sectors.

Hurlebaus joined Louisiana officials including Gov. John Bel Edwards, Lafayette Mayor-President Joel Robideaux and Joseph Savoie, president of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, where a world-renowned computer science program is training current and future staff for CGI.

Also there was Lafayette Economic Development Authority chief Gregg Gothreaux, who said one of the inducements that prompted CGI and other high-tech firms to set up shop in Lafayette was the state’s tax credits for industry, particularly the incentives for digital media companies. Those incentives are on the chopping block as Edwards and legislators try to narrow a yawning state budget deficit.

Off to the side, Edwards later told reporters that tax incentives are not in budget-cutters’ cross-hairs so much as the “tax giveaways” that require the state to write checks to industry.

According to a news release from LEDA, Lafayette Sen. Page Cortez said he, other legislators and state officials are having to “make tough choices in tough times about incentives.” He said digital media tax incentives are “working well to secure business investment and job creation in Louisiana.”

“I am pleased that CGI and its 400 employees will occupy this beautiful building in my district,” Cortez said. “This is what Lafayette needs at this time in our history.”

Louisiana’s tax incentives were just part of the draw. Also luring CGI and other tech firms were the Lafayette-based institutions of higher learning — UL-Lafayette and South Louisiana Community College.

The package Lafayette and Louisiana has to offer companies also has pulled in others.

In 2014, CGI was one of three tech firms that announced they were establishing a presence in Lafayette. Perficient, a software development firm, recently completed renovating its Lafayette headquarters in a downtown building, the former Jefferson Street Market. And software developer Enquero has set up shop temporarily at the Louisiana Immersive Technology Enterprise building.

All three firms are located within a few miles of each other, with CGI and Enquero situated a few steps apart in UL-Lafayette’s Research Park near the Cajundome.

Many of CGI’s 250 employees took part in the opening Tuesday, looking and listening from the second floor or the lobby floor. When it was over, they adjourned to a crawfish boil under a big tent on the CGI campus.

Many of the future employees the company plans to hire are current computer science majors or studying other disciplines at UL-Lafayette, which is enhancing its research programs.

“While attracting one of the world’s most successful information technology companies, we also are building research capacity in an exciting way for one of our leading higher education institutions, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette,” Edwards said.

Hurlebaus said CGI defines its service centers as “onshore” to differentiate from the way other companies have established “offshore” centers in foreign, faraway lands. The Lafayette facility joins other CGI service centers in Lebanon, Virginia; Troy, Alabama; and Belton, Texas.

CGI is a publicly traded company based in Montreal, with annual revenue in excess of $10 billion. CGI and Louisiana officials estimate the Lafayette operation will generate an economic impact in the parish of $93 million a year.
19 2016-05-18
Lafayette

Governor makes it official for CGI


The message is succinct and compelling, especially in this Francophone region of the state:

"Vivre à l'echelle locale. Travailler à l'echelle mondiale. — Live locally. Work globally."

That's what adorns one wall at the CGI Federal building at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette Research Park, a call that has beckoned 250 members to work for the information technology and business process services company.

Gov. John Bel Edwards helped dedicate the building Tuesday and lauded the teamwork that went into both attracting Montreal-based CGI here and supplying it with "members" — that's what the employees are called — to Lafayette. In fact, more than 60 percent of the members are from here.

E. Joseph Savoie, president of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, noted that 40 percent of that workforce graduated UL.

Governor John Bel Edwards speaks to local dignitariesBuy Photo
Governor John Bel Edwards speaks to local dignitaries following the opening ceremony for the CGI Onshore IT Delivery Center in Lafayette. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)
Edwards: Charting a better future

Edwards said luring companies like CGI to Louisiana is part of the plan to "chart a better future" for the state and its people. Gazing at the diverse members who gathered for the ceremony, Edwards noted that the workforce "looks like Louisiana."

The governor focused on Louisiana's efforts to entice CGI here, which included building the $13 million facility where CGI is housed — it rents for $1 a year to the company — and training the workforce. In fact, UL, which will launch a master's in infomatics master's program this autumn, already has the state's largest department for information technology and intends to triple the number of graduates within a decade.

"We can't guarantee outcomes," he said. "But we can guarantee opportunity."

Edwards said Louisiana's government must focus on offering incentives that provide a return on investment.

CGI and UL students work in a first-floor lab at the site where they share ideas and pursue projects. The governor said CGI is helping develop curriculum to prepare UL students for the workplace.

READ MORE: Jindal says CGI is reason to come home.

Gov. John Bel Edwards cuts the ribbon as, left to right,Buy Photo
Gov. John Bel Edwards cuts the ribbon as, left to right, UL President Dr. Joseph Savoie, CGI Federal President Tim Hurlebaus and Mayor-President Joel Robideaux look on during the opening ceremony for the CGI Onshore IT Delivery Center in Lafayette. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)
Company moved here in 2015

CGI Federal announced it would locate here in 2014, moved into temporary quarters downtown the following year and construction was launched on the new, permanent headquarters and was completed in early 2016 at UL Research Park. Employees moved in in February.

READ MORE: A host of Louisiana leaders were on hand.

The company expanded its initial operations with about 40 employees, called "members" because most invest in the company, to about 250. Eventually, the company will employ about 400 people here — there will be 300 by year's end — with an average annual economic impact of $93 million in Acadiana, $929.8 million over the first decade.

READ MORE: CGI Federal seeks ambitious staff.

Will LaBar, vice president and executive in charge at the site, has said the company hired aggressively from UL and other Louisiana universities. The company also provided an opportunity for former Lafayette residents to return home for high-paying information technology and business process services jobs, and has given UL, its faculty and students opportunity to work within the company structure through an in-house lab.

Some 60-70 percent of the employees are from here, LaBar said.

By the numbers:

50,000: Square footage of the CGI onshore delivery center

$13.1 million: Cost of the CGI building

143 acres: Size of the Research Park.

$4.5 million: Cost of state-funded higher-education initiative to triple undergradutes in School of Computing and Infomatics

1976: Year CGI was founded

65,000: Number of professionals employed worldwide by CGI
19 2016-05-18
Lafayette

Ragin' Cajuns ale wins Southern Living award


The Ragin' Cajuns Genuine Louisiana Ale has won a 2016 Southern Living Food Award and will be featured in a special section of the magazine that hits newsstands this week.

Southern Living Magazine's June issue, on newsstands May 20, will feature the Ragin' Cajuns craft beer with other Southern-made products chosen by the magazine's editors.

"Over the past year, our editors have canvassed the South, from Atlanta to Austin, sipping and sampling hundreds of artisan-made products," an article on the Southern Living website said. "We've finally narrowed it down to one delicious list."

ICYMI: Monthly subscription box to deliver Cajun products

The Ragin' Cajuns Genuine Louisiana Ale won a 2016
The Ragin' Cajuns Genuine Louisiana Ale won a 2016 Southern Living Food Award. (Photo: Submitted)
Created by Arnaudville's Bayou Teche Brewing in partnership with the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, the Ragin' Cajuns brew is a Kolsch-style beer made from Louisiana rice, barley and German-noble hops.

"Brewed with Louisiana-grown rice that keeps it snappy and slightly sweet, it's a must-serve at your next crawfish boil," the Southern Living article states.

Celebrate: Acadiana offering many events for American Craft Beer Week

The craft beer was launched on tap in September and in bottles in October. Part of the proceeds from the craft beer are used to support the University's academic, research and athletics programs.

It quickly became Bayou Teche's bestselling beer, and the brewery is expanding its facility to keep up with customer demand.

Ragin' Cajuns Genuine Louisiana Ale is now on tap.
Ragin' Cajuns Genuine Louisiana Ale is now on tap. (Photo: Doug Dugas for UL)
Bayou Teche President Karlos Knott expressed gratitude for the award.

"It was a huge shock at first because it was completely out of the blue," Knott said. "But we're also very pleased and proud. Southern Living has tried beers from across the South, and to be selected was a huge honor."

Did you hear? New steakhouse coming to River Ranch

Knott describes the Ragin' Cajuns beer as a "magnificent balance of hop bitterness, taste and aroma" and an "easy-drinking beer perfect for tailgating in our hot and humid climate."

Although light and refreshing, the ale actually is one of the most difficult beers for the brewery to produce.

"The Ragin' Cajuns beer is the hardest brew we do," Knott said. "The hardest beers to make are the easiest ones to drink because there's no place for a mistake to hide."

Poirier's Cane Syrup of Youngsville also won a food award from Southern Living.

"Straight from bayou country, drizzle Charles Poirier's small batch, liquid bronze syrup on cornbread," the magazine wrote.

To be eligible to compete for a 2016 Southern Living Food Award, a product must originate or be made in the South — defined by the magazine as Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia.

Learn more or view the complete list of 2016 Southern Living Food Awards at southernliving.com/food/2016-food-awards.
19 2016-05-17
Lafayette

Alligator shows up for UL-Lafayette graduation, makes it to library before it was captured


Cypress Lake, one of the most defining features of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s campus, may be home to a reptilian Houdini who has repeatedly escaped from its enclosure over the past two months.

Friday, as students were donning their caps and gowns for graduation, this alleged repeat offender — a more than 5-foot-long alligator — pulled off its greatest caper yet. The scaly escape artist went on a 200-yard jaunt from the Student Union to the Edith Garland Dupré Library before being apprehended by university police.

“We got a call that an alligator got out and was by the library,” said Sgt. Billy Abrams, public information officer for the campus Police Department. “We caught it and put it in the back of a pickup truck and returned it to the lake.”

The gator had its picture taken as it was captured outside the library.

That picture was posted to Facebook by the library staff and received more than 700 likes and more than 500 shares.

Police believe it may be the same alligator that escaped from the lake on four previous occasions: March 17, April 14, April 25 and April 26, but hard evidence is lacking.

University Police Sgt. John Carter told Raginwire.com the gator in the April 25 incident returned to the lake on its own after he ran the catchpole over its back.

Carter said he thinks the gator had been caught before and “knew what was coming.”

Students also reported an alligator sunning itself outside the Student Union near the lake last week.

“I was going to the union to get the mail,” said Garrett Ohlmeyer, a sports management major, on Monday. “Then I saw (University Police) coming up with the stick and watched the gator jump back in the lake when he saw them.”

As to what students think about the rash of reptilian runaways, it appears they aren’t too worried.

“There were about 10 people watching the alligator and taking pictures,” Ohlmeyer said. “It’s happened so much I’ve actually started looking to see if they’ve escaped. I’m not afraid, so I guess I’m used to it. It’s funny.”

Officials at UL-Lafayette are aware of the problem and said they are working to remedy it.

“We’re going to be constructing a 10-by-10 floating platform to offer the alligators a place to sun in their natural habitat,” said Carl Taz Wininger, assistant safety director for UL-Lafayette’s Office of Environmental Health and Safety. “We believe that this will tremendously decrease the escapes we’ve currently been seeing because they have been mostly escaping to sun themselves.”

Wininger said the university has contacted the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries for help.

The university is planning to put the platform in the lake near the Burke Hall Annex, one of the locations where the gators appear to be escaping from and finding their way onto the campus.

Another location, a breach in the hurricane fencing around the lake, is now being repaired, Wininger said.

Due to conflicting stories as to whether it’s the same alligator or different gators escaping, the university is not planning on removing them at the moment, he said.

The number of alligators in Cypress Lake is unknown.

“Our goal is to protect the gators within their natural habitat, while at the same time keeping the scenic beauty that attracts people from all over the state and country,” Wininger said. “But our priority is our students and keeping them safe. If this solution doesn’t remedy the issue, we will look at other solutions in the near future.”

19 2016-05-16
Houma/Thibodaux

Houma heart doctor receives honorary degree


A Houma heart doctor has received an honorary doctorate degree from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

Dr. Craig Walker, founder and medical director of the Cardiovascular Institute of the South, received the honorary doctorate Friday in nursing practice during the university's spring commencement in the Cajundome.

“In addition to his many achievements as a physician, Dr. Walker has been committed to nursing education on many levels,” ULL President Joseph Savoie said.

“Throughout his career, he has provided educational opportunities to other physicians and health care professionals," Savoie said. "He has supported UL Lafayette's nursing faculty and nursing students. And, he has helped high school students interested in health care attend an annual cardiovascular conference.

When UL Lafayette's first class of nurse practitioners graduated, Walker hired the first ones in cardiac clinics in the Lafayette region, the university president said in a news release.

The Cardiovascular Institute continues to employ graduates of the school's nursing program.

Walker, a Houma native, has been a pioneer for new techniques for the treatment of coronary and peripheral vascular disease and has served as principal investigator for numerous trials. He founded one of the largest cardiovascular conferences in the nation, New Cardiovascular Horizons, to advance the field by educating doctors and nurses.

Started 30 years ago in Houma, the Cardiovascular Institute of the South now employs 35 doctors and 500 staff members in 14 cities throughout south Louisian
19 2016-05-16
Lafayette

Graduates told path to success a lifelong marathon, not a sprint


Hopes for a bright future met the reward for years of hard work Friday at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s spring graduation for the Class of 2016 at the Cajundome.

A record-breaking class of 1,679 undergraduates and 32 doctoral students received degrees.

The commencement speaker, Dr. Craig Walker, founder, president and medical director of the Cardiovascular Institute of the South, told graduates their degrees are far more than just a piece of paper.

“It’s testimony to your commitment, your discipline, your intelligence, your willingness to embrace change and your ability to sacrifice now to achieve tomorrow’s goals,” Walker said. “It’s something that can never be taken away from you.”

Walker emphasized the need for hard work to achieve success in today’s society, which he called the “most competitive world ever.”

He noted that the Internet has destroyed traditional boundaries and “we must compete with the whole world.”

“The path to ultimate success is not a sprint,” Walker said. “It’s an ultra-marathon that lasts until the end of your whole life. … Please, never give up on your dreams because others tell you they cannot be achieved.”

UL-Lafayette President Joseph Savoie spoke to the class and stressed the importance of their graduation for society as a whole.

“We are bombarded every day with challenges we face as a society,” Savoie said. “The good news is that we have people like you with the knowledge and skills to help us with those challenges.”

UL-Lafayette graduates seemed ready to take the words to heart, saying they are eager to put their degrees to use.

“I’m excited to be done,” said Meagan Pefferkorn, 23, an elementary education graduate. “It was a good experience, but I’m ready to go out into the real world.”

Some students said they weren’t too worried about a weakened local economy affecting their prospects of finding work after college.

“I’m not dealing with oilfield work, and I’m looking to possibly move out of state to a better economy,” said Carter Knight, 23, a sports management graduate. “I’ve had a few interviews with professional and collegiate teams. I’m feeling very successful right now.”

UL-Lafayette’s Golden Graduates, students who graduated 50 years ago and were inducted into the UL-Lafayette Alumni Association’s Golden Ambassadors Society, were recognized at Friday’s graduation ceremony.

“I am so proud of my school and how it has come along and developed over the past 50 years,” said Patricia LeBlanc, 72, a nursing graduate from the Class of 1966. “The Alumni Association has been marvelous. They’ve done it all and exceeded our expectations. I look at this as a thank you to us for being students, coming back and supporting our university.”

Walker, along with being the commencement speaker, also received an honorary doctorate in nursing practice from the university.

Academic awards and doctorate degrees were received at the general assembly. Individual colleges had their own ceremonies throughout the day.
19 2016-05-16
Lafayette

UL Lafayette awards degrees at Spring 2016 Commencement ceremonie


LAFAYETTE, La.– The University of Louisiana at Lafayette awarded degrees to 1,676 graduates during Spring 2016 Commencement ceremonies on Friday.

The graduates are part of the largest graduating class in the history of UL Lafayette.

Bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees were conferred at ceremonies held at different campus locations. Bachelor’s degrees were awarded to 1,436 graduates. Master’s degrees were awarded to 197 graduates. Thirty-two graduates received doctoral degrees. Seven graduates received graduate certificates, and four were awarded post-baccalaureate certificates.

Dr. Joseph Savoie, University president, addressed graduates during the General Assembly. He told them that their time at the University has provided them with critical thinking skills and chances to serve others. It has also broadened their view of the world through their interactions with people from other countries and cultures.

“We are bombarded daily with news about challenges that we face as a society. The good news is that there are people like you in the world, who offer new ideas and different perspectives. I am confident that you will become problem solvers and responsible citizens, ” Savoie said.

Dr. Craig M. Walker, an interventional cardiologist, received an honorary doctorate of nursing practice from the University

Walker, who is founder, president and medical director of Cardiovascular Institute of the South, also delivered the Commencement speech. He urged graduates to become “visionaries.”

“Visionaries share common traits of independent thought, an inspiration to which they are fully committed, the ability to lead and inspire others, the willingness to take chances, a continuing desire to learn and improve, and tremendous work ethic. Visionaries occur in all fields of endeavor. Every one of you has the potential to one day be referred to as a visionary.”

Ashley Duhon, a biology major, was named UL Lafayette’s Outstanding Graduate.

Tim Shane, who received a master’s degree in geology, was recognized with the Outstanding Master’s Graduate Award.

Seven students who received bachelor’s degrees were recognized as summa cum laude graduates for achieving perfect 4.0 grade point averages.

They are:

Katie Elisabeth Border, who majored in chemical engineering and chemistry;
Chance Keith Bourgeois, who majored in moving image arts;
Ashley Angelle Duhon, who majored in biology;
Catherine Claire Ledet, who majored in chemical engineering and chemistry;
Lauren Elizabeth Meaux, who majored in chemical engineering and chemistry;
Katherine Alexis Tregre, who majored in nursing; and
Amy Michelle Windham, who majored in elementary education.
19 2016-05-16
Lafayette

Edwards to help CGI launch operations


For CGI Federal, Tuesday's 3 p.m. ribbon-cutting will give a ceremonial launch to the global communications company's Lafayette operations.

For some native Louisianians, it will mark a welcome home.

READ MORE: Building completed

Gov. John Bel Edwards will highlight a host of state and local leaders who will help CGI celebrate its opening here. Mayor-President Joel Robideaux, University of Louisiana at Lafayette President E. Joseph Savoie, Louisiana Economic Development Secretary Don Pierson and CGI Federal President Tim Hurlebas will attend.

READ MORE: 3 companies move downtown

In a sense, welcoming CGI Federal to Lafayette seems almost belated. The company announced it would locate here in 2014, it moved into temporary quarters downtown the following year and construction was launched on the new, permanent headquarters that same month. The building was largely completed in early 2016 at UL Lafayette Research Park and employees moved in in February.

Over that time, the company has expanded its initial operations from about 40 employees — they are called "members," because most invest in the company — downtown to about 250 now. Eventually, the company will employ about 400 people here, with an average annual economic impact of $93 million, $929.8 million over the first decade.

Company has focused on hiring locally

Will LaBar, vice president and executive in charge at the site, said the company has been aggressive in hiring from UL and from other Louisiana universities. The company has provided an opportunity for expatriated Lafayette residents to return home for high-paying communications jobs, and has given UL, its faculty and students opportunity to work within the company structure through an in-house lab.

READ MORE: CGI coming, Gov. Jindal says

Labar said some 60-70 percent of the employees are from here. "We are giving people the opportunity to live and work at home," he said.

Members are doing federal, state and local government work as well as commercial jobs, he said.

Among the projects that CGI professionals and UL students are tackling in the in-house lab are software creation to address tasks in healthcare, bicycle paths, storm tracking in the Gulf of Mexico and lead contamination.

LaBar said he was "incredibly impressed" with the quality of work done in the lab.

The event will last about an hour, followed by a crawfish boil with a Cajun band playing.
19 2016-05-16
Lafayette

UL Softball Hosting Regional For Third-Consecutive Year


The 9th-ranked Louisiana Ragin’ Cajun softball team will be at home this weekend, as they play host to the Lafayette, Louisiana Regional at Lamson Park.
Louisiana, who is the top seed in the event, will be playing host to the Texas Longhorns, the Texas A&M Aggies, and the Boston Terriers in the four-team double-elimination regional, which is scheduled to be played Friday-Sunday.
The Cajuns will play their first game on Friday at 6 pm against Boston (28-22), with the winner facing the Texas (37-14)/Texas A&M (37-18) winner on Saturday.
Louisiana, who won the regular season Sun Belt Conference championship, as well the league’s postseason tournament, will be making their 18th-consecutive NCAA Regional appearance, and 26th in the last 27 years.
The only year since 1990 in which Louisiana failed to appear in a regional was 1998.
The Cajuns, who are the #14-overall seed, are one of only 9 programs to appear in an NCAA Regional every year since 2000, joining Alabama, Arizona, Florida St., Michigan, Notre Dame, Oklahoma, UCLA, and Washington.
Louisiana, who is 43-7 on the season, will be playing host to a regional for the third-consecutive year, and for the 12th time in program history.
The Cajuns hosted for three-straight years, from 1990-1992, then for four-consecutive years, from 1994-1997, before hosting in 2002, 2012, and now for a third-straight year.
Louisiana, should they win the Lafayette, La. Regional, would advance to Super Regional play, and take on the winner of the Norman, Oklahoma Regional, which will feature Oklahoma, Wichita St., Tulsa, and Ole Miss.
Florida, Michigan, Oklahoma, and Auburn are the top four seeds in the tournament.
The other nationals seeds are Oregon, Alabama, James Madison, and Florida St., at 5-8, respectively.
Those 8 teams will also host Super Regionals, if they win in the opening round.
Kentucky, LSU, Washington, and UCLA are seeded 9-12, while Tennessee, Louisiana, Missouri, and Georgia are the 13-16 seeds.
View the complete NCAA softball bracket here.


Read More: UL Softball Hosting Regional For Third-Consecutive Year | http://espn1420.com/ul-softball-hosting-regional-for-third-consecutive-year/?trackback=tsmclip
19 2016-05-16
Shreveport

Louisiana teen to graduate high school, college in the same day


INGGOLD, LA (KSLA) -
A Ringgold teen will be celebrating 2 graduations Friday evening, one from high school and the other from college.

Azariya McClendon, 17, will get her associates degree from Bossier Parish Community College at 2 p.m. Then, at 6:30 p.m., she will graduate from Ringgold High School.

According to the superintendent for Bienville Parish school system, Azariya is the first to accomplish this goal.

"Honestly it's still kind of hard to believe," McClendon said. "It hasn't really set in yet but I'm excited."

Azariya was in a dual-enrollment program and took classes from BPCC while in high school. She said she started taking college classes as a freshman and finished her high school curriculum as a sophomore.

"I played basketball, softball and I was a cheerleader. So when I wasn't doing any of that, I was studying," said McClendon.

She says her school counselor, Timothy Williams, was there to help her every step of the way. Williams says it was the plan since day 1 to graduate high school with the associates degree.

But that plan changed a bit after Azariya was in a bad car crash on her way to BPCC campus the first day of school. Right after the accident, she called her mother.

"That's my only baby," her mother, Chanequal Murphy said. "So for me, the only thing I could think of was Lord let my baby be okay."

Azariya suffered from a broken hand and had to have 3 surgeries and rehab therapy. But after the accident, her mother said her injuries were the last of her daughter's concerns.

"The only thing she could think of was, 'mama I don't know if Mr. Williams is going to be mad at me. We have a plan, mama, we have a plan.'"

Mr. Williams said, "She said, 'is this going to throw us off?' I said 'we have this. We're going to get this.'"

Azariya had to re-learn how to eat, write, type and basically use her right hand. Despite her set backs, Azariya was able to achieve her goal right on time.

She said she couldn't have done it without the support from her family, who was there to support her the whole time.

Azariya plans on attending the University of Louisiana at Lafayette to major in biology, and hopes go to medical school at LSU-S afterward to become an OBGYN.

Ringgold counselor Mr. Williams says there are several students who hope to follow in Azariya's foot steps. He says there are some sophomore's who are half way there with 30 college credits.

Copyright 2016 KSLA. All rights reserved.
19 2016-05-13
Lafayette

Lafayette cardiologist to receive UL honorary doctorate


A Lafayette cardiologist will receive an honorary doctorate of nursing practice from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette during its spring commencement Friday.

Dr. Craig Walker, who is founder, president and medical director of the Cardiovascular Institute of the South, will be honored at the general assembly at 11 a.m. at the Cajundome.

RELATED: Meet UL's Spring 2016 Outstanding Graduates

“In addition to his many achievements as a physician, Dr. Walker has been committed to nursing education on many levels,” UL President Dr. Joseph Savoie said in a press release. “Throughout his career, he has provided educational opportunities to other physicians and health care professionals. He has supported UL Lafayette’s nursing faculty and nursing students. And, he has helped high school students interested in health care attend an annual cardiovascular conference.

“When UL Lafayette’s first class of nurse practitioners graduated, Dr. Walker hired the first nurse practitioners in cardiac clinics in this region. Cardiovascular Institute of the South continues to employ graduates of our program.

THIS WEEK: Mass for UL grads is Thursday

“We are pleased to acknowledge his long history of helping others by presenting him with an honorary doctorate of nursing practice.”

In 1973, Walker earned the Pre-Medicine Award and received a degree after only two years at Nicholls State University. In 1977, he went to medical school at Louisiana State School of Medicine in New Orleans. He conducted his internship at Lafayette Charity Hospital from 1977 to 1978 and also completed his residency at Lafayette Charity from 1978 to 1980.

In 1982, Walker earned a Cardiovascular Fellowship at Ochsner Foundation Hospital and a Research Fellowship and Clinical Instructor in Cardiology and Medicine at Harvard’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston in 1983.

19 2016-05-12
Lafayette

Meet UL's Spring 2016 Outstanding Graduates


Eight students will be honored during Spring 2016 Commencement ceremonies as the University of Louisiana at Lafayette Alumni Association’s Outstanding Graduates.

Every spring and fall semester, deans from eight academic colleges each nominate a student as an Outstanding Graduate, based on leadership, scholarship and service. An Alumni Association selection committee interviews the candidates and selects one to receive the overall award.

The overall Outstanding Graduate will be announced during the Spring Commencement General Assembly on Friday, May 13, at the Cajundome.

Here’s a look at this semester’s Outstanding Graduates.

Celeste Licciardi is the Outstanding Graduate for the College of the Arts.

She is a visual arts major, with a concentration in painting. Licciardi has a 3.91 GPA, and has been on the President’s and Dean’s lists. She received the UL Lafayette Centennial Scholarship and a TOPS scholarship.

Licciardi is a member of the Sigma Alpha Lambda and the Alpha Lambda Delta honor societies.

An accomplished artist, her paintings were featured in two recent exhibitions. Three were displayed at Gallery 333 during ArtWalk in February. Galleries and studios in downtown Lafayette host free exhibits as part of the monthly event. Two works were featured in the University’s 2015 Juried Student Art Exhibit sponsored by the College of the Arts.

Licciardi is active in the Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship. She has attended its leadership training conferences and participated in mission trips to universities in Texas and Mississippi to support Chi Alpha organizations there.

Following graduation, she plans to apply for artist residencies that will help her evolve as an artist.

She is the daughter of Michael and Nancy Licciardi of Harvey, La.

PHOTOS: Customized Mortarboards of UL Graduation

Philip McMahon is the Outstanding Graduate for the B.I. Moody III College of Business Administration.

He is an insurance and risk management major with a 3.83 GPA. McMahon is a member of Beta Gamma Sigma, Alpha Lambda Delta, and Order of Omega Greek honor societies.

McMahon was a national Spencer Educational Foundation Scholar and participated in the national 2015 Spencer/RIMS Risk Management Challenge.

McMahon was one of 14 students in the country selected for the National Association of Professional Surplus Lines Offices Internship Program; he earned a trip to the association’s conference in San Diego.




















Get your full year subscription for as low as


$19.99/year


for a LIMITED TIME only


Unlock my $19.99 offer

He was a business senator for the Student Government Association, vice president of communication for the Interfraternity Council, treasurer of Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity and president of the student chapter of the Risk Management and Insurance Society. He also served on the Dean’s Advisory Council.

He performed community service for groups such as St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Faith House of Acadiana, Toys for Tots, United Blood Services, and Miles Perret Cancer Services.

McMahon will complete a post-graduate internship with Price Forbes, an exclusive Lloyd’s of London broker.

He is the son of Philip and Lynn McMahon of Houma, La.

RAGIN' CAJUNS: UL recognizes student-athletes of the year

Gabrielle Gallien is the Outstanding Graduate for the College of Education.

A kinesiology major, with a concentration in exercise science, she has a 3.47 GPA. She earned an honors baccalaureate after completing an honors thesis.

An article she wrote was published in the “International Journal of Endocrinology.” She presented papers at two National Strength and Conditioning Association conferences.

In 2015, she earned the Outstanding Undergraduate Student Research Award from the NSCA.

Gallien was the College of Education’s Sophomore of the Year. She received numerous scholarships and was a member of the University’s Honors Program.

Gallien was active in many student organizations, including the Student Government Association, Student Leadership Council, Association of Future Alumni, Kinesiology Professional Association, UL Triathlon Club and Ragin’ Cajun Catholics.

She participated in University intramural softball and was a member of the “L’Acadien” yearbook staff.

Gallien performed community service for more than a dozen organizations or events.

She plans to become a physical therapist and work with wounded military veterans.

Gallien is the daughter of James Gallien of Campti, La. and Tara Gallien of Washington, N.C.

MUST-READ: Phi Mu's first special needs sister pledged at UL

Catherine Ledet is the Outstanding Graduate for the College of Engineering.

A double major, in chemical engineering and chemistry, she has a 4.0 GPA.

Ledet’s research was published by the “Royal Society of Chemistry” journal. And, she won the 2015 Senior Chemical Engineering Plant Design Project Competition judged by UL Lafayette professors and industry representatives.

Ledet was president of Omega Chi Epsilon, an honor society for chemical engineering majors, and a member of the University chapter of Tau Beta Pi Engineering Honor Society. She was president of the student affiliate of the American Chemical Society and a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and the Louisiana Engineering Society.

An accomplished dancer, she auditioned for the Radio City Rockettes. The dance company invited her to a second audition that will be held in August in New York City.

She tutored high school and college students. Other community service included working with Habitat for Humanity, St. Pius X Catholic Church, Girl Scouts of America, and Prevent Child Abuse America.

She will work as a research and technology engineer with the Albemarle Corporation in Baton Rouge, La.

Her parents are Rene and Anne Ledet of Lafayette.

Emily Covington is the Outstanding Graduate for the College of Liberal Arts.

A public relations major, she has a 3.98 GPA.

Covington was a member of the UL Honors Program, and the Alpha Lambda Delta honors society.

Her scholarships include the James Devin Moncus Honors Scholarship, the Louisiana Pipeliners Association Scholarship, the Dr. Ben and Clare Roy Thibodeaux Scholarship, a SEACOR Scholarship, and a TOPS Honors Scholarship.

Covington traveled to Florence, Italy, to participate in the University’s Study Abroad Program.

She was a founding member of UL Lafayette’s Alpha Delta Pi sorority.

Covington was a member of the Student Orientation Staff and its leadership team, as well as a peer mentor for the Office of First-Year Experience. She also served on the Student Leadership Council.

Covington developed, planned, and helped execute UL Lafayette’s first Community Service Fair. She performed community service for Ronald McDonald House, Susan G. Komen Foundation, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Acadiana, and United Way of Acadiana.

Covington will begin pursuing a master’s degree in public relations and international communication from UL Lafayette this fall.

Her parents are Julie Darce Mire and Kurt Covington of Church Point, La.

Jake Savoie is the Outstanding Graduate for the College of Nursing and Allied Health Professions.

He is a nursing major, with a 3.34 GPA.

Savoie was a senator in the Student Government Association and was named SGA Senator of the Month in November 2015. He was also a peer mentor for the Office of First-Year Experience and represented students on the Dean’s Advisory Council.

Savoie was inducted into Sigma Theta Tau, the international honor society of nursing.

He has performed community service for the Big Event, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, PHI Thanksgiving Family Food Drive, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and the Jacob Crouch Foundation.

He helped implement a community health fair in Crowley, La.

In fall 2015, Savoie was a member of a collaborative research team that sought evidence-based methods to improve the safety of medication administration in neonatal intensive care units.

Savoie would like to work as a registered nurse for several years, working in the maternal/newborn or acute care specialty areas, then return to UL Lafayette to pursue a terminal degree in nursing practice.

His parents are Mona and Boyd Savoie of Breaux Bridge, La.

Ashley Duhon is the Outstanding Graduate for the Ray P. Authement College of Sciences.

She is a biology major with a 4.0 GPA.

Duhon was vice president of the University’s chapter of Alpha Lambda Delta and a member of Phi Kappa Phi honor society, and the UL Lafayette Honors Program. She also was a member of Rho Lambda and the Order of Omega leadership and honors societies for Greek students.

In 2015, she received an honorable mention in the UL Lafayette Honors Essay Contest.

Duhon was a maid on the University’s Homecoming Court, and was nominated for 2015 UL Greek Woman of the Year.

She was treasurer of Phi Mu Fraternity and of the University’s Pre-Professional Society. Duhon also was president of CampusCats, an animal rescue organization.

She served as senator for the College of Sciences in the Student Government Association.

Her community service work includes working with Lafayette Community Health Care Clinic, Children’s Miracle Network, and the American Heart Association.

Duhon will enroll at the LSU Health Sciences Center School of Medicine in New Orleans in the fall.

She is the granddaughter of Terrie Tycer of Lafayette.

Eric Carter is the Outstanding Graduate for University College.

He is a General Studies major with a concentration in behavioral sciences.

Carter has a 3.83 GPA, and has been on UL Lafayette’s President’s and Dean’s lists.

He was a member of the Phi Kappa Phi academic honor society and the University’s Pre-Professional Society.

He is a pitcher for the Ragin’ Cajuns baseball team.

Carter is also an Eagle Scout.

He has performed community service work for Helping Hands natural disaster volunteer efforts. He helped clean up following Hurricane Isaac in 2012.

He also has read to elementary school children, and helped to clean and paint a day care center. He participated in the Greater Acadiana Heart Walk, and the Walk to Defeat ALS. He was a Young Men’s Duty to God Award coordinator and Sunday school teacher for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

Carter plans to apply to medical school, with a goal of becoming a physician’s assistant.

His parents are Kim and Kristine Carter, of Santa Clara, Utah. He is married to Jessica White Carter.

19 2016-05-09
Lafayette

Graduate and wait? Oil, gas jobs rare


Fernando Barboza is closing in on graduation but he's not counting on a paycheck yet.

Barboza, president of the Student Association of Professional Landmen at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, isn't due to complete his studies until December, but he's keenly aware that the oil and gas industry has been downsizing since late 2014 and that new jobs for "land men" are scarce.

Classmates who'll graduate the Professional Land and Resources Management program offered through the B.I. Moody III College of Business are scrambling for work, Barboza said; he was in no hurry to leave higher education this month. Better to toil away in school, and graduate nearer to a time of energy industry recovery.

Fernando BarbozaBuy Photo
Fernando Barboza (Photo: Ken Stickney, The Advertiser)
Jobs scarce? Keep studying

In fact, Buster LeBlanc, who heads up UL's land management program, said this spring's handful of program graduates may be pursuing alternate plans to entering the workforce, opting instead for graduate or law school, where they might grow their skills while the energy industry workforce shrinks.

"It's a darn good time to be in school," he said. "Students going to grad school, law school, are doing a smart thing.They will be more highly regarded when the industry turns around."

READ MORE: SLCC offered oil, gas courses

At UL's petroleum engineering department, students held little hope for employment opportunities, at least for now.

"Oil and gas is really in bad shape," said Abhijeet Chodankar of India, an engineering graduate student. He said he attended a career fair in the spring but prospects for work or even for internships were few. "It will be better, but 'when' is the big question."

READ MORE: Job fair this week

He said he intends to pursue his doctorate in petroleum engineering and stay in academia, which he calls his passion.

Moath Salam of Alexandria, a junior, said internships were too scarce to land this year, although he knows some experience would be helpful. He's headed back to Alexandria this summer, where his parents own gas stations. Next year, he'll focus on more networking; he'll send out resumes next semester and try to use family connections to find work.

Recruiting companies change

Ryan LaGrange of Lafayette Economic Development Authority said some oil- and gas-related companies have been recruiting in Acadiana but in diminishing numbers. In 2014, when oil was selling for more than $100 a barrel, the LEDA spring job fair drew 19 oil and gas companies to recruit for workers. Last year, there were seven. This year, few if any.

READ MORE: Area led in job losses

He said Cameron Parish and Calcasieu Parish companies dealing with liquefied natural gas or in petrochemicals have recruited, but the big recruiter numbers at this week's job fair will be health care, information technology, retail, food services and more. The job fair shifts, year to year, he said, as workforce needs change.

"Some of the companies will be looking for skills that are transferable from oil and gas," he said. For example, CGI, an information technology company, may need business system analysis skills that land management graduates hold.

With unemployment higher than usual — 6.2 percent in Lafayette Parish — LaGrange expects to see heavier traffic at this year's fair, including new UL graduates.

No job? Be proactive

Kim Billeaudeau, UL's director of career services, said recruitment for UL graduates from oil and gas companies has tapered off this year. But other majors are doing well: health care, information technology, education.

READ MORE: Chase analyst has hope

She said when the energy industry is in a down cycle, students must start earlier to prepare for the job search. She said her office makes initial contact with students when they are freshmen; underclassmen attend job fairs, write and hone their resumes, and learn to network. She said counselors help them narrow their interests, pick academic majors, prepare them for getting a job.

"Students are coming in to have their resumes reviewed and to get help with interviews," she said. But students seeking employment in oil and gas must be proactive on the job search while exercising patience and planning for a slow entry into their fields.

Her office can help students, including those in energy-related majors, to identify what skills they've gleaned that might transfer to other fields where jobs are available. If a job isn't immediately available, she said, they might identify and pursue ways to broaden or deepen their skills or ways in which they might volunteer — anything that will make them "learn and grow."

Ready when jobs open

Angelica Oubre of Thibodaux, a junior in the land management program, said land management professionals can work in fields outside energy. Through classwork and through an internship, she's learned how to do title searches and done some analyses.

She'd prefer to pursue an oil and gas career, she said. To that end, she has developed contacts within the industry through her internship and through extracurricular affairs and will attend more job fairs next year. She's willing to travel for work, she said.

Despite a lean job market, she said she's optimistic she'll find work. That comes from meeting instructors and industry professionals who have survived industry downturns in the past.

Things will come back, she said, and she will be ready when they do.

"I'm taking their word for it," she said. "They've been there."

Prepping for Employment

If your professional job search is slow, here's what UL Career Services advises:

Stay positive.
Enhance skills. Pursue graduate studies, volunteer or try another industry.
Self assess. Determine your strengths and skills and how they might benefit other companies.
Utilize resources. Network. Volunteer. Make connections.
— Kim Billeaudeau, director
19 2016-05-09
Lafayette

No one told her she couldn’t, so she did


Ramona Hebert has five children. Brooke is the baby.

Ramona told me that being Brooke’s mother has taught her how to love all of her children without condition. It’s also taught her the importance of taking some things with a grain of salt and how to be patient and let dreams happen.

“She taught all of my children that, in fact,” Hebert said. “At her brother’s rehearsal dinner he said something to each of us. When he got to Brooke, he said, ‘And you taught me how to love.’”

Twenty-five years ago, Brooke was born with Down syndrome. Her dad, Warren Hebert, told me that when Brooke was born, the poem “Welcome to Holland,” by Emily Perl Kingsley, quickly found its place in his and his wife’s hearts. The poem explains that even though you expected and planned to go to Italy, you’ve landed in Holland. You have to buy different guidebooks and learn to appreciate different sights and experiences than you expected.

READ NEXT: Acadiana High prom highlights bond between students

“But after you’ve been there for a while and you catch your breath, you look around… and you begin to notice that Holland has windmills… and Holland has tulips. Holland even has Rembrandts.”

The whole Hebert family ended up embracing the trip to Holland that Brooke offered. Ramona told me that she just stopped worrying. She wasn’t sure how things would work out, but she knew they would. Years ago, when Brooke started talking about wanting to go to college, her parents didn’t have the hearts to tell her the dream was impossible. They just kept encouraging her.

Two years ago, the impossible became a reality when the University of Louisiana began offering its LIFE (Learning is for Everyone) program. Brooke was accepted as one of the first four students in the program.

On her first day on campus, she met Natalie Richard, from Thibodaux. Richard, now 21, majoring in sociology and having just completed sophomore year, said that on her first day on campus she went to Cypress Lake to feed the turtles. Brooke and her classmates were feeding the fish. They struck up a friendship. Richard asked the LIFE program coordinator if she could volunteer.

GOOD READ: Student's lemonade stand ends up giving to others

“I started volunteering the next week — twice a week, I would help the LIFE students with their math skills at first,” Richard said.

Then she began auditing classes that Brooke wanted to take — including ballroom dancing, aerobics and more.

“It was a no-brainer to re-arrange my schedule for them,” Richard said. “Every day I spent with them was automatically a great day.”

After a year under her belt as a college student, Brooke decided she was ready to embrace college’s social life. She wanted to go through Greek recruitment, otherwise known as Rush. Once again, her mother wasn’t sure how things would work out for Brooke.

She needn’t have worried.

In the fall of 2015, Brooke pledged Phi Mu. Since then, her Phi Mu sisters have embraced her.

IMG_0006
Brooke Hebert, front and center, poses with three of her Phi Mu sisters. (Photo: Submitted)
“Having Brooke here has definitely been unique — in the best way possible,” said Taylor Girouard, Phi Mu’s UL chapter president. “She’s just brought so much love and happiness to our chapter.”

Girouard said her favorite Brooke moment of the year was when one of their sorority sisters was having a meeting with Brooke’s new pledge class. In the middle of her speech, Brooke walked up to her with a giant bouquet of flowers and thanked her for all she was doing for the pledge class.

And the socials? “Brooke is dancing. She never stops dancing,” Girouard said.

Phi Mu sister, Natalie Istre, a freshman year from Lafayette, works with Brooke every week and admires the Heberts’ parenting skills.

“There is pure love there. There’s a different relationship with a parent and a child with special needs and a parent and a quote-un-quote normal child,” Istre said. “It takes something special to raise a child like Brooke with the grace that they’ve had. That’s a good word — graceful. That’s what the Heberts are.”

Brooke’s experience at UL has opened all sorts of doors her parents never dreamed possible. Brooke told her mom, “Now, I have friends who don’t have Downs syndrome and friends who do.”

ART SMARTS: Local artist with Down syndrome has gallery show

Ramona said her goal for Brooke is for to maintain relationships and become more independent.

“Get a job. Live in an apartment maybe,” Ramona said. “Would I miss her? I would miss her like crazy. But when you love your child, you don’t want to rob her of something. I have high expectations of her.”

Talking with the Heberts is like having a parenting intensive. Since my own daughter is graduating high school in a few weeks and heading off to college in the fall, I asked Brooke for any advice for a successful college experience.

“Be nice,” she said. “And study.”

And that pretty much sums it up, doesn’t it?

Happy Mother’s Day to Ramona Hebert and all the other special moms out there! Thanks for enriching all of our lives and making the world a better place.

Jan Risher writes a weekly column for The Daily Advertiser. Reach her at janrisher@gmail.com.
19 2016-05-05
Lafayette

UL recognizes student-athlete of the year


LAFAYETTE — Louisiana Ragin' Cajuns baseball pitcher Dylan Moore and women's basketball guard Kia Wilridge were each honored on Wednesday as they were named the University of Louisiana at Lafayette Male and Female Student-Athletes of the Year during the athletic department's annual Student-Athlete of the Year Luncheon at the UL Student Union.

Shellie Landry (softball) and Steven Wronkoski (men's basketball) were each awarded as Silver Medalists. Also honored as Student-Athletes of the Year for their respective sports were: Lindsay Brammer (women's soccer), Melissa Burckhartt (women's tennis), Anna Katherine Devitt (women's track and field/cross country), Beau Robinson (men's track and field/cross country), Edgar Lopez (men's tennis), Haraldur Magnus (men's golf), Stacey Reilly (women's volleyball) and Dominique Tovell (football).

Moore, a political science-pre law/Spanish major, currently holds a 4.0 GPA and has been named to the UL President's List and the Sun Belt Conference Commissioners List over the last two years of his academic career. Athletically, he has set the school record with saves in a season with 13 and holds the school record for career saves with 17. In his freshman season, he was named to the All Sun Belt Conference Second Team, 2015 Louisville Slugger Freshman All-American Team, 2015 NCBWA Freshman All-American Team and the Sun Belt Conference All-Tournament Team. Moore serves as a representative for baseball to the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee and has volunteered his time with the Big Event, American Heart Association, collecting shoes for Soles4Souls, Christmas Adopt-A-Family, the Buddy Walk and many other causes.

Wilridge, an exercise science major, has been named to the Sun Belt Conference Commissioner's List and the UL President's and Dean's lists. She has been a part of the two Women's Basketball Invitational Championship teams and named to the WBI All-Tournament team in 2015 and 2016. Wilridge has been recognized at the conference level as well as she was named to the All-Sun Belt Conference third team in 2015 and the All Sun Belt Conference Second team in 2016. She has volunteered her time with the Buddy Walk, Dreams Come True of Acadiana, Special Olympics and with the basketball skills clinic for Down Syndrome children.

Landry, an exercise science major, has been named to Who's Who Among College Students, UL's Dean's List, Sun Belt Conference Honor Roll and Sun Belt Conference Commissioners List. She has volunteered her time at Reading in Red, hospital visits and Buddy Ball in which she helped children with disabilities share in the joy of sports. As part of the nationally ranked Ragin' Cajuns softball team, Landry is a standout. She was named to the All-Sun Belt Conference second-team as a freshman and was a first-team All-SBC pick the last two seasons. In her junior year, she ranked in the top 20 in the NCAA in home runs and in the top 50 in slugging percentage and RBI per game.

Wronkoski, an exercise science major, is also a member of Kappa Alpha Fraternity. Wronkoski has given his time over his career as a Ragin' Cajun volunteering with the Boy's and Girl's Club, Reading in Red and the Special Olympics. He also holds the UL men's basketball record as the all-time leader in games played (136).

Each student-athlete was nominated by their respective head coach and met the criteria of embodying the highest qualities of being an all-around student-athlete through their success in academics, athletics, leadership and community involvement.
19 2016-05-05
Lafayette

UL Lafayette Spring 2016 Commencement ceremonies set for Friday, May 13


Undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral degrees will be conferred during the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s Spring 2016 Commencement ceremonies on Friday, May 13, at the Cajundome and Convention Center.

The General Assembly will be held at 11 a.m. at the Cajundome. Doctoral candidates will be hooded at this session. All graduating seniors and faculty members will attend, wearing full academic regalia.

Dr. Craig M. Walker, an interventional cardiologist, will give the Commencement speech. Walker is founder, president and medical director of Cardiovascular Institute of the South

The General Assembly will be broadcast on the Internet via a live stream.

The live stream can be accessed for free via computer, smartphone or tablet. Users can create an account or log in with their Facebook account information at

Master’s and bachelor’s degrees will be conferred at ceremonies for each academic college. A schedule and locations are below.

Cajundome

8 a.m. College of Education
1:30 p.m. B.I. Moody III College of Business Administration
4 p.m. College of Liberal Arts
Cajundome Convention Center – Festival Ballroom (2nd floor)

8 a.m. College of the Arts
1:30 p.m. Ray P. Authement College of Sciences
Cajundome Convention Center – Exhibit Hall B (1st floor)

8 a.m. College of Nursing and Allied Health Professions
1:30 p.m. University College
4 p.m. College of Engineering
Parking for the general public will be available at Cajun Field; motorists are encouraged to enter through Gate 4 on West Congress Street.

Security measures will be in place at the Cajundome and Convention Center. University Police officers will examine the contents of purses, bags, and packages of attendees. Extremely large bags or oversized packages won’t be permitted inside the Commencement venues.

Social media posts tagged with the #RaginGrads hashtag will be displayed on screens throughout the Cajundome between 7:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. Find the University’s page dedicated to the hashtag at Ragin’ Grads Tagboard.

Learn more about Spring 2016 Commencement at commencement.louisiana.edu.
19 2016-05-04
Associated Press

From Lab to Sanctuary: 220 Research Chimps Being Relocated


All 220 chimpanzees at a Louisiana university's research lab in New Iberia will be moving to a new sanctuary in north Georgia, the university said Monday, in what appears to be a first for a non-federal lab.

The great apes owned by the University of Louisiana at Lafayette will be moved monthly in social groups of about 10 animals to the sanctuary in Blue Ridge, Georgia, starting in June, said Sarah Baeckler Davis, co-founder of the nonprofit Project Chimps.

A joint announcement Tuesday by the university and Project Chimps said it was the first time a non-federal research program has arranged to release all of its research chimps.

The Humane Society of the United States confirmed it.

"I know there have been some chimps here and there, but nothing on this scale," said Kathleen Conlee, the Humane Society's vice president for animal research issues. "So this is truly momentous."

Michael Budkie, executive director of an animal rights group called Stop Animal Exploitation Now, was less effusive in his praise.

"It is high time that the 220 chimps at the University of Louisiana are retired, and it is a positive step that ULL is shouldering at least part of the financial burden for these primates," he said in a prepared statement. "But what about ... the other 5,000 primates at ULL?"

USDA records show the New Iberia Research Center also has 4,818 rhesus monkeys, 621 vervets, 349 crab-eating macaques, 308 pigtailed macaques, and 20 capuchin monkeys, Budkie said in an interview.

University spokesman Charlie Bier did not respond directly, saying the university was referring all questions to its news release and frequently asked questions webpage about the chimpanzees.

The groups said the university and the Humane Society are contributing to the effort, and Project Chimps is soliciting donations. Baeckler Davis said they've spent about $3 million so far, and expect that when the sanctuary reaches full capacity expenses will be about $5 million a year.

"We estimate it will probably be an $80 million project over the course of its lifetime," she said.

The facility was formerly a sanctuary for gorillas that could not be kept in zoos. It was built for a dozen or more gorillas but never held more than three, founder Steuart Dewar said in an email. One of those, owned by the zoo in Birmingham, Alabama, died of old age; the other two returned to Zoo Atlanta in 2014, he sa