11/14/2018
ULS NEWS ARTICLES

Today's News

University of Louisiana System

18 2018-08-31
Baton Rouge

These are the new, Louisiana-born beers we can't wait to try this football season


At long last, football is back. After an eight-month drought, the pigskins are once again flying, which means tailgate season is here, too. And since tailgates mean beer, a couple of local breweries have released beers to mark the occasion.

Baton Rouge’s Tin Roof Brewing and Hammond’s Gnarly Barley Brewing are two among a handful of Louisiana breweries that brew officially licensed collegiate beers for their respective hometown universities. Tin Roof has tweaked the recipe for its Bayou Bengal pale lager, which was recently released just in time for football season. This year’s version is lighter, more drinkable and slightly easier on the wallet.

Similarly, Gnarly Barley released this year’s Lion Up, a collaboration with Southeastern Louisiana University, in mid-August. This American wheat ale is refreshing and features floral and citrus notes from the use of Amarillo hops. An easy drinker at 4.5-percent alcohol by volume (ABV), Lion Up is available at the brewery’s taproom and around Hammond.

Since LSU is hosting Southeastern in its football home opener on Saturday, Sept. 8, the two breweries naturally decided to create a collaborative beer. Since big cats are the mascots at both schools, the obvious name of the beer was a combination of the two — Liger. This juicy pale ale weighs in at 5.5-percent ABV and was brewed with Galaxy, Mosaic and Citra hops. Liger was brewed at Tin Roof and will be released on Friday, Sept. 7, in the taproom, with another party planned for gameday Saturday.

Friday’s festivities get underway at 4 p.m. with music from Kirk Holder and Chuck Pierce, as well as food from Barbosa’s Barbecue and Rock Paper Taco. It’s also Family Friday, with inflatable bounce houses and face painting to occupy the kids. The taproom will open at 10 a.m. on Saturday with music from Delta Revelry beginning at 2 p.m. The football game will be shown on a projector on the patio, as well as on the televisions inside the taproom.

Straight to Ale beers arrive
Huntsville, Alabama’s Straight to Ale brews are now available in south Louisiana. Founded in 2009, Straight to Ale has become one of the largest breweries in the state of Alabama.

Among the beers available here are Monkeynaut IPA, Brother Joseph’s Belgian Style Dubbel Ale and He Ain’t Heffe, a German-style Hefeweizen.

Look for Straight to Ale beers in cans at your favorite specialty grocer and bottle shops around town.
18 2018-06-26
Baton Rouge

State budget approval ends third special session of 2018 three days before deadline


BATON ROUGE – The third special session of the Louisiana legislature ended Sunday night after the Senate and House approved sales tax measures to prevent deep cuts to vital state services.
The $32.8 billion budget for the 2019 fiscal year now awaits the signature of Gov. John Bel Edwards after House lawmakers voted 88-7 retain 45 percent of the one-penny sales tax which expires when the current fiscal year ends June 30.
“Our fiscal cliff is finally in the rearview mirror,” Gov. Edwards said in a press conference at the close of the session. “What we saw over the last few days is a legislature that found the courage to compromise and a strong desire to put Louisiana first – and Louisiana will benefit from that.”


The 0.45-cent renewal, sponsored by Baton Rouge GOP House member Paula Davis, passed the House 74-24 Friday and breezed through the Senate 33-6 Sunday. All three Livingston Parish senators – Dale Erdey, Eddie Lambert and Mack “Bodi” White – supported the bill.
The new sales tax amount will remain intact until June 30, 2025.
Approval of the bill Sunday night capped the third and final session. Legislators have been in session a total of 15 weeks, dating back to Feb. 19.
Lawmakers headed into the third extraordinary session of 2018 after the second session ended June 4 without revenue to fill a $583 million budget gap that would take shape once the two-year sales tax falls off the books on June 30.
The renewal will keep $463 flowing through state coffers – roughly $500 million less than the full penny generated. The bill will also scale tax breaks for large companies and reduce the exemption on business utilities.
Gov. Edwards recommended renewal of half a penny. Republican lawmakers led by Alexandria Rep. Lance Harris pushed for a 0.33-cent renewal, while other GOP House members opposed any renewal attempt.
The revenue falls about $100 million short of what Gov. Edwards sought from legislators.
“The plan the House approved is not perfect, but that’s the nature of a compromise,” Gov. John Bel Edwards said after the vote.
The bill spares cuts to higher education and TOPS. State universities faced $96 million in budget cuts – including $21 million for the flagship Louisiana State University.
TOPS would have taken an $88 million hit and would have left scholarship recipients to fork out 30 percent of the tuition costs effective with the fall semester.
The budget also keeps the axe from falling on state parks, district attorneys, and child welfare. It would also ensure continuation of the food stamp program.
“We saved a lot of vital services, but the TOPS, higher ed and K-12 were the most important,” said state Rep. J. Rogers Pope, R-Denham Springs, who supported the budget.
Students who attend college on the TOPS program would have faced a $2,200 out-of-pocket expense had the 30 percent cut taken effect, he said.
Full funding of TOPS marked a victory for a large chunk of Livingston Parish students, who attend college at LSU, Southeastern Louisiana University, Southern and other area colleges, Pope said.
“In my district alone, we have 846 students attend college on the TOPS program,” he said. “Consider that we have four House districts in this parish, and you have a lot of students who rely on this program.
“Students who earned the TOPS award were promised full funding, just as we’ve done for the incoming seniors headed into this school year,” said Pope, a former Livingston Parish School Board superintendent. “The state needs to honor its share of the deal.”
Fellow Livingston Parish lawmakers Valarie Hodges of Denham Springs, Sherman Mack of Albany and Clay Schexnayder of Gonzales – all Republicans – opposed the tax bill.
“I think in the end, in the coming year, you’ll see a big surplus of money left over, and a lot of people, departments especially, were pushing very eagerly to get their funding for their departments, which weren’t fully funded in the first House bill,” Schexnayder said. “Everybody had to make their votes for their district, but in the end, we’ll have a big surplus of money being spent where it shouldn’t have been spent.
“In the end, everyone had to make their vote,” he said. “We have to move forward and go from there.”

Hodges said the bill continues to support the growth of government and a waste of taxpayer dollars.
“This is the largest budget in the history of our state, and yet we were told that failure to pass it would result in nursing homes closing, district attorney’s offices closing and other things that probably wouldn’t have happened,” she said. “We have 2,200 job vacancies being funded, and the governor did not cut one of those positions.”
Hodges expects another budget surplus, but she does not think it will necessarily be good news for Louisiana taxpayers.
“Do you think we ‘ll give it back to taxpayers next year? Of course not,” she said. “It will be used for more spending and the budget will grow even more.”
The final passage brought an end to the third and last session of 2018. It marked the seventh special session since Gov. Edwards took office in 2016.
Each special session costs taxpayers $60,000 per day.
State Rep. Clay Schexnayder expressed disappointment over the outcome and time it took to reach the decision.
“We spent a lot of tax money and spent too much time to come to a decision like this,” said Schexnayder, R-Gonzales. “We may have a surplus this year, but we’re going to run into the same problems again and again until we see fiscal reform, and that just didn’t seem too interest many people during this session.”
A different aspect of the session bothered Pope.
He believes the increasingly divisive nature of state politics has hampered the decision-making process for the state.
“You have Republicans and Democrats getting into ugly name-calling and you’re starting to see it within the parties, as well,” he said. “We’re seeing Washington politics spill down to the state level, and I blame that on the special interest groups that don’t really care what happens to our state.
“We’ve become too extreme,” he said. “We no longer seem willing to compromise, which only comes when everyone meets in the middle – not just Republicans, not just Democrats, not just Independents. I’m really sorry to see what’s happened in our legislature.”
18 2018-05-15
Hammond

Southeastern Louisiana University confers degrees on more than 1,000 students


Southeastern Louisiana University conferred degrees on 1,098 graduates during the university’s spring commencement ceremony on Saturday, May 12.

During the ceremony, former Southeastern Louisiana University President and life-long educator Sally Clausen was honored with the Southeastern Lifetime Achievement Award.

Recognized as one of the nation’s most dynamic and effective leaders in education, Clausen began her career as a classroom teacher and has been a constant champion of education and student success. She served as the 12th and first female president of Southeastern from 1995 until her appointment in 2001 as head of the University of Louisiana System.


Prior to coming to Southeastern, Clausen served four years as Louisiana’s Commissioner of Higher Education, a role she reprised in 2008, making her the only person to serve as Louisiana’s Higher Education Commissioner twice. She also served as Louisiana’s Secretary of Education from 1992 to 1995.

Candidates for associate, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees were honored, including 134 from Livingston Parish (19 Master’s Degrees, 114 Bachelor’s Degrees, and one Associate’s Degree).

In his welcome, Crain noted that the 1,098 individuals being recognized at commencement included 406 men and 692 women who were receiving 15 different degrees; and representatives from 20 states and 20 countries.

The university awarded its highest academic honor, the President’s Medal for Academic Excellence, to seven students with the highest cumulative grade point average in the university’s five colleges. Kathryn Olivia Bokun of Walker represented Livingston Parish.

Medal recipients were:

College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences — psychology major Hayden Shane Kimball of Morganza, 4.0 gpa; and criminal justice major Carlee Larue Newman of Franklinton, 4.0 gpa.

College of Business — finance major Kathryn Olivia Bokun of Walker, 4.0 gpa; and finance major Elizabeth Diane Hunter of Bakersfield, Calif., 4.0 gpa.

College of Education — elementary education major Danielle Marie Bourg of Marrero, 4.0 gpa.

College of Nursing and Health Sciences — kinesiology/exercise science major Madina Vorotnikova originally from Moscow, Russia, 4.0 gpa.

College of Science and Technology — computer science/pre-MBA major Daniela Raygadas Dominguez originally from Mexico, 4.0 gpa.

Students from Livingston Parish who received associate, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees were:

Masters Degrees

Albany — Kelsi K. Darouse, Communication Sciences & Disorders; Elizabeth M. King, Nursing

Denham Springs — Myia E. Bozeman, Nursing; Kimberely N. Calhoun, English; Anna M. Chandler, Executive MBA; Nicole R. Cook, Counseling; Drew L. Dykes, Nursing; Aimee E. Harris, English; Tara D. Hymel, Music; Margaret W. Rodrigue, Special Education; Nicole M. Schweitzer, Executive MBA; Mary M. Stoner, Business Administration; Whitney G. Sullivan, Nursing

Holden — Yvette M. Langlois, Educational Leadership

Livingston — Crissy D. Devall, Nursing; Megan B. Wilson, Executive MBA

Springfield — Cerissa D. Morse, English

Walker — Emily C. Guercio, Communication Sciences & Disorders

Watson — Summer L. Bunch, Nursing

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Bachelor’s Degrees

Albany — Willie L. Chaney, General Studies; Katie M. Delaneuville, Business Administration; Joseph E. Duplessis, Management; Micah C. Thornton, Engineering Technology; Ashley B. Turner, Nursing; Brice W. Wagner, General Studies

Denham Springs — Dara J. Abbott, General Studies; Ivy A. Ainsworth, Kinesiology; Anna R. Arceneaux, English; Kyle D. Arceneaux, Kinesiology; Remy J. Blaize, English; Jesseca D. Bonvillain, English; Lindsey K. Callender, Biological Sciences; Brittany E. Chedraui, Accounting; Payton C. Cook, Nursing; Logan G. Cormier, Management; Leonard G. Crider, Social Work; Lakyn R. Domiano, English; Julian C. Ellis, Engineering Technology; Alexis R. Fairbanks, English; Blake A. Farlow, Accounting; Claire N. Fournier, Communication Sciences & Disorders; Brooke A. Gonzales, General Studies; Kristopher M. Guedry, Nursing; Madison L. Guidry, Communication Sciences & Disorders; Brianne N. Hall, Criminal Justice; Bradley C. Harris, Accounting; Matthew C. Heil, General Studies; Bailey J. Hennesy, Criminal Justice;

Also, Hunter W. Holmes, Nursing; Kaitlyn A. Jackson, Psychology; Reanna L. Lanoux, History; Kyu I. Lee, Kinesiology; Taylor J. Lilley, Early/Childhood Education Grades PK-3; Abbie C. Manuel, English Education; Mary Katherine E. Melfi, Family & Consumer Sciences; Hanna E. Mikesell, Middle School Education Grades 4-8; Laney R. Miley, Health Systems Management; Lindsey M. Oufnac, Family & Consumer Sciences; Koral A. Pattison, Nursing; Gage M. Pickett, General Studies; Celena C. Plaisance, Psychology; Neila T. Polk, Nursing; Karson R. Pope, Communication Sciences & Disorders; Matthew B. Rayburn, Industrial Technology; Matthew A. Richard, Finance; Ashton C. Risher, General Studies; Kylie N. Roberson, Art; Rachel A. Sanders, Social Work; Zachary A. Stephens, Management; Tanner J. Swain, General Studies; Jennifer H. Thevenot, General Studies; Tyler Troxclair, Physics; Justin S. Webb, Kinesiology; Morgan M. Welch, General Studies; Patrik A. Zachary, Nursing

French Settlement — Kayla R. Andrews, Early/Childhood Education Grades PK-3

Holden — Fabian H. Edwards, English; Lauren A. Jones, Mathematics; Taylor A. McLean, Psychology

Livingston — Kaleb D. Brock, Industrial Technology; Selena E. Brown, Biological Sciences; Benjamin W. Cutrer, Industrial Technology; Emily A. Duffy, Nursing; Jake A. Frelich, Occupational Health, Safety, and Environment; Matthew D. Hardy, Management; Brittney E. Hayden, Elementary Education Grades 1-5; Mallorie A. Sanders, Communication; Colton C. Smith, General Studies

Maurepas — Britany M. Webber, Family & Consumer Sciences

Springfield — Heart D. Faust, Biological Sciences; Michael K. Fontenot II, Information Technology; Ashlee E. Guess, General Studies; Miranda J. Lobell, Biological Sciences; Jennifer L. Secrest, Kinesiology; Carly L. Shields, Criminal Justice; Madison M. Smith, Business Administration; Paige N. Wheat, Nursing; Wade W. Wheat, Biological Sciences; Robert C. Winn IV, General Studies

Walker — Bailey L. Armstrong, Nursing; Morgan J. Arthur, History; Kathryn O. Bokun, Finance; Taylor F. Bushnell, Nursing; Madeline C. Collins, Early/Childhood Education Grades PK-3; Branden J. Coniglio, Accounting; Karen A. DiBenedetto, Accounting; Sydney A. Elbert, Social Work; Karly G. Garrett, Elementary Education Grades 1-5; Brianne M. Guidroz, Sport Management; Kristopher K. Howell, Criminal Justice; Amy S. Jeanice, Elementary Education Grades 1-5; Madison L. Lane, Art; Matthew S. Lee, General Studies; Quentin M. Lewis, Communication; Randi L. Major, Art; Lauren M. Montes, Nursing; Meredith A. Moore, Elementary Education Grades 1-5; Rebecca B. Nickles, Nursing; Kara A. Norris, Elementary Education Grades 1-5; Lianet Perez, Family & Consumer Sciences; Brittanie R. Pevito, Criminal Justice; Jessie B. Ratliff, Psychology; Jeannine C. Rupp, Psychology; Sara E. Rushing, Nursing; Rachel H. Russin, Management; Theresa R. Saltamachia, Communication; Bailey M. Williams, Family & Consumer Sciences

Associate Degrees

Denham Springs — Dylan P. Lavergne, Industrial Technology


18 2018-05-14
Baton Rouge

Baton Rouge, New Orleans, Lafayette area Business Briefs for May 13, 2018


Business center plans messaging seminar
A free seminar titled “Clarify Your Message So Customers Will Listen: How the Power of Story Can Grow Your Business” is being held by the Louisiana Small Business Development Center at Southeastern Louisiana University from 10 a.m. to noon May 17 in the Livingston Parish Library, 20390 Iowa St., in Livingston.

The seminar is co-sponsored with the Livingston Parish Library and Dixie Business Center.

Seating is only guaranteed for preregistered attendees. Information and registration are at (225) 664-6638 or lsbdc.org.
18 2017-08-30
Baton Rouge

Southeastern names 1,031 to summer 2017 honors list


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University has named 1,031 students to its honors list for the summer 2017 semester.
The honors list is divided into three academic levels. To be named to the President’s List, students must have earned a 3.50 or better grade point average. Students on the Dean’s List have earned a 3.20 - 3.49 grade point average, and Honor Roll students have earned a 3.00 - 3.19 grade point average. Honors list students must be full-time undergraduates carrying at least six credit hours and have no grade below a “C.”
Southeastern provides a website to view students receiving academic honors for the current semester and past semesters at http://www.southeastern.edu/admin/rec_reg/academic_honors/index.php .
Students named to the honors list are:

Louisiana
TANGIPAHOA PARISH
Amite -- (President’s List) Sydni F. Casanova, Heather A. Courtney, Jacob Cruse, Christopher A. Koster, Baylee M. Smith, Ivy W. Wall, Mark C. Wright
(Dean’s List) Mykala D. Foster
(Honor Roll) Jenna A. D’Antoni, Wylie Foster Jr, Provence R. Hatfield, Brittany Morgan, Arnold Strawder Jr

Hammond -- (President’s List) Allyson L. Alfaro, Weston E. Arnold, James Bailey, Charles M. Barcia, Nischay Bist, Faith A. Bolling, Grace Borcherding, Tracy M. Boudoin, Jennifer M. Brescher, Rachel E. Cadis, Nathan S. Callahan, Gregory J. Cefalu, Jared W. Chancey, Poonam S.
Chaniara, Savankumar M. Chaniara, Nikki A. Chrisman, Autumn N. Collins, Bryce J. Cothern, James E. Currington, Damodar Dahal, Devin M. Dauzat, Michael C. Davis, Natalie A. Davis, Courtney Dawsey, Taylor E. Deakle, Taryn N. Dixon, Sara G. Duffard, Jocelyn Forrest, Thomas
Gordon, Victoria Guarino, Theresa M. Harriford, Megan C. Harris, Mary Danse Jarratt, Reaghan L. Jarreau, April Johnson, Jonetta A. Kaiser, Savannah D. Laborde, Tanner C. Leblanc, Kristopher S. Lee, Molly C. Lesage, Andrea V. Mena, Cecilia M. Mercier, Benjamin N. Moore,
Also, April A. Mullins, Ladashea Muse, Chad L. Notariano, Tyler J. Nunez, Faith A. O’Brien, Molly O. O’Krepki, Jacob R. O’Neill, James M. Ostarly, Christopher M. Rhodes, Kaylan R. Richardson, Brandon Robertson, Marina N. Rodriguez, Kaziah Rolle, Meghan G. Russell, Yashmin Sainju, Matthew A. Salas, Megan Savoy, Cassandra L. Schwiebert, Aakriti Shrestha, Hannah E. Sibley, Sarah A. Silk, Justin J. Sims, Wade E. Smith, Thomas A. Smith, Amanda Soley, Charles I. Squires, Kerry Taylor, Morgan S. Teal, Nhu Teresa N. Vasquez, Ronniqua T. Webb, Karla L. Weir, Sarah A. White, Alexis Williams, Jessica J. Wong
(Dean’s List) Donald G. Cooper, Byronesha A. Jackson, Courtany N. Mitchell, Delana P. Perkins, Sandeep K. Shrestha, Tiffany E. Stitt, Joseph E. Treadaway
(Honor Roll) Sita Aggarwal, Randy Alphonso, Rod’Neishia L. Brumfield, Anthony B. Calmes, Layne S. Carroll, Adrianna Dalton, Scott M. Depaula, Lauren S. Domiano, Breona J. Donahue, Brooke Duhon, Katelyn D. Ennis, John M. Fontenot, Michelle M. Gurley, Blaike L. Hammel, Zaveral J. Jackson, Sarah Kubricht, Jacob R. Lanning, Seul Lee, Brandon C. Loper, Peter J. Manale, Christopher Miley, Sh-Kaia Mosely, Jon R. Oliver, Todd L. Oller, Tiara M. Panyanouvong, Kriston Pauley, Elise M. Phares, Earl D. Poole, Anthony L. Reeves, David T.
Richardson, Hannah E. Scott, Megan M. Simmons, Sameer J. Thapa, Osha B. Weary, Chamaria White

Husser -- (President’s List) Laura E. Calabresi, Sarah J. Calabresi, Eric C. Chapman
(Dean’s List) Patrick M. Plummer

Independence -- (President’s List) Jenna L. Anzalone, Avery C. Foster, Lyndsee C. Goodwin, Hillary M. Jarreau, Jasmine S. Miller, Chad D. Moore, Christina M. Navarra, Donald R. Vicknair
(Honor Roll) Frankea D. Labee, Kayla S. Petitto, Chealse C. Sibley

Kentwood -- (President’s List) Dalton H. Brabham, Haley E. Brister, Jeramie W. Garafola, Matthew C. Lea, Tatyanna Robinson, Hannah R. Simeon
(Honor Roll) Timothy Chandler

Loranger -- (President’s List) Monique T. Burris, Jennifer A. Gravette, Lyman A. Mizell, Ashley R. Nelson, Katelyn M. Parrish, Timothy P. Sander, Billie N. Snyder
(Dean’s List) Brandy M. Baham, Alaina Wimbish
(Honor Roll) Brandyn L. Baham, Stephanie Garcia Marquez, Chelsi A. Simpson

Natalbany -- (President’s List) Samantha N. Balfantz, Rashetta S. Williams
(Dean’s List) Kathleen Babin, Royah A. Wheat
(Honor Roll) Shiri D. Lindsey

Ponchatoula -- (President’s List) Steven C. Allen, Nicole M. Bailey, Mariah L. Benson, Sarah M. Bitner, Kyle M. Brown, Matthew Bruhn, Catherine J. Crayton, Leah M. Dahmer, Allison K. Davis, Kristen E. Duhe, Maranda M. Ernest, Toby D. Everett, Lauren A. Griffin, Kayla A.
Guerra, Amanda E. Hamilton, Coleden M. Heckmann, Nicole L. Hornsby, Emily A. Mahlie, Paula J. McIlrath, Kayla M. Migliore, Paul H. Mitchell, Maci Muscarello, Amy J. Oncale, Brittany L. Palmer, Adele K. Peer, Jordan D. Perez, Katlyn R. Rivet, Miguel A. Rodriguez, Jeremy L. Russell, Stephanie M. Stafford, Nathaniel W. Stone, Ricardo H. Tenorio, Amber N. Wise
(Dean’s List) Danielle N. Bergeron, Jessica L. Blackwell, Faith L. Lee, Connie D. Rezentes, Alison G. Sante, Victoria C. Wells, Tykacchii J. Williams
(Honor Roll) Tara L. Barbe, Joseph B. Bourn, Skylar A. Compton, Megan E. Dettwiller, Kathleen S. Flynn, Piper E. Hampton, Douglas R. Meyer, Jeffrey M. Meyers, Kacey R. Sheridan, Talicia X. Smith

Robert -- (President’s List) Ashton M. Brady, Braie L. Peterson, Kyle Rordam

Roseland -- (Honor Roll) Tiffany B. Bel, India R. Foskey, Tervante’ T. Robertson

Tickfaw -- (President’s List) Shelly Bailey, Paola E. Dheming, Adam J. DiBenedetto, Bianca L. Duplessis, Randy Hatten, Tomas R. Herrera, Brad Johnson, Sherman M. McGary, Caleb Moll
(Honor Roll) Brenna C. Ard, Thomas J. Hlubin, Ben V. Peco, Brittany L. Ridgel, Amanda P. Tallia

SAINT TAMMANY PARISH
Abita Springs -- (President’s List) Victoria Cantelli, Dayna M. Celino, Lauren M. Gros, Caitlyn A. Leblanc, Elizabeth J. Manuel, Ginger W. Morel, Etienne J. Sequeira, Gretchen P. Watson
(Dean’s List) Tiana L. Walker
(Honor Roll) Matthew T. Dyson

Bush -- (President’s List) Brooke L. Perrera, Michael J. Sharpe

Covington -- (President’s List) Jennifer D. Aldana, Alison Alvarez, Steven Arias, Amy D. Atchison, Allison Ballinger, Jeffery Bardwell, Amelia Barker, Clayton Barker, Sydney D. Betbeze, Matthew Y. Blair, Jena M. Boudreaux, Richard G. Boyce, Renee M. Broussard, Kathy Burns, Victoria E. Cabirac, Holly E. Cefalu, Daniel P. Cousins, Clifford A. Darby, Hunter R. Davis, Farrah Daws, Andrew M. Decker, Corinne R. Dennison, Nina P. Duckworth, John F. Duplantier, Abbey G. Fauntleroy, Kristen N. Fayard, Tori N. Fowler, Lisa E. Galloway, Abigail M. Gaudet, Elisa T. Gauthreaux, Hayley E. Gilson, Jacob C. Glazner, Amelie A. Gremillion, Cliff R. Hall, Aaron J. Healy, Richard P. Hebert, Samantha D. Hood, Cameron P. Keim, Amanda M. Kitch, Brett J. Labasse, Sydney E. Lentz, Mitchell C. McHugh, Patsy M. McNeil, Laura
Mendoza, Kaitlyn M. Morales, Gabriel Morse, Marie Motahari, David J. Osbourn, Madison Parkinson, Alex J. Price, Hunter T. Rodwig, Kelsey A. Spruill, Victoria Vollentine, Clinton J. Walker, Hannah R. Weiskopf, Lindsay Wilson, Mark T. Young, Frank J. Ziegler
(Dean’s List) Garyn E. Ball, Elise G. Candies, Jessica L. Osborn, James N. Schwabe, Ryan T. Sharpe, Rachel L. Traylor
(Honor Roll) Robert A. Bedey, Deonne L. Coner, Kyle P. Connell, Candice C. Crespo, Brett Ashley W. Custer, Patrick Gandolfo, Rene D. Gandolfo, Julian J. Hamler, Cassidy N. Hanson, Samantha B. Husser, Kacee C. Kidder, Joshua P. Lennie, Heidi C. Lombardo, David S. McGehee, Millie B. Milton, Paige E. Nurdin, Alexis Petry, Parker E. Richerson, Joel N. Skidmore, Cole R. Westenhiser, Destanee A. Wood, Shelby G. Zeringue

Folsom -- (President’s List) Patrick Bossetta, Marshall L. Core, Ashle M. Harris, Brylee R. Laird, Taylor M. Taylor, Megan L. Thibodaux
(Honor Roll) Kattie N. Bennett, Kayla S. Chaisson

Lacombe -- (President’s List) Theresa J. Carollo, Amanda M. Dorsey, Michael D. Hutto, Kerri Parker, Brandon J. Penton
(Dean’s List) Morgan Age, Phoebe B. Castro, James M. Wallace
(Honor Roll) Kelci Belson, Stephanie Cole

Madisonville -- (President’s List) Alan T. Amato, Olga R. Brewster, Jamie H. Collins, Kaitlin A. Cooper, Kelsey A. Gabourel, Abigail J. Haik, Bethanie A. Holder, Gavin N. Miller, Justin C. Mishina, Jessica A. Noullet, Alex M. Ponthier, Jordan S. Rauch, Logan M. Schiro
(Dean’s List) Ragan E. Benton, Emilee Brown, Annette E. Fogle, Caleb J. Rivers, Shaun C. Vanderhoff
(Honor Roll) Windy M. Alessi, Preslee J. Lones, Reid M. Markham, Tyler A. Pathoumthong

Mandeville -- (President’s List) Juan Amaya, Karley N. Bordelon, Giovanna M. Bosco, Diana M. Branton, Jared Broussard, Emily R. Chase, Elizabeth L. Clark, Andrew J. Collins, Anna C. Crawford, Yvette M. Crist, Matthew C. Doyle, Madison L. Dugger, Marie-Maude Dumontet,
Abbey M. Edmonston, Kelly A. Erp, Christina N. Ferrando, Abi G. Feske, Charlotte Ganucheau, Madison J. Grapp, Angela J. Griffitt, Galen Guillot, Richard Guillot, Kathleen Harmon, Christopher L. Harrington, Hunni D. Harrington, Regan M. Higgins-Lang, Abigail Horst, Dominic Iovenitti, Casey L. Keen, Bailey R. Kelly, Caroline M. Ledet, Sadie R. Lemoine-Johnson, Minerva S. Lesky, Erik M. Malick, Helen M. Minkin, Taylor E. Nox, Mei-Lan Ordone, Trent G. Pechon, Taylor T. Pratt, Andrew W. Rhodes, Ryan Rossi, Hanaa Shaheen, Abel H. Shelby, Christen W. Smith, Sarah M. Taravella, Christopher R. Tate, Chelsey S. Tyson, Nekabari G. Vareba, Christopher Webb, James M. White, Lauren Young, Wesley A. Zebrick, Lydia A. Zuniga
(Dean’s List) Haley A. Marquette, Martina E. Mayer, Mac R. McGuire, Jorie-Brae C. Morgan, Jacob A. Treadway
(Honor Roll) Ryan J. Alfred, Robyn Barrios, Lindsay A. Barrosse, Tanner R. Bemis-Henry, Jonathan T. Dollar, David J. Fiegel, Charlotte K. Geisler, Christian J. Hansen, Leanne E. Jenkins, David R. Landry, Julia A. Meyers, Helena M. Palmisano, Jaclyn C. Scholvin, Grace L. Terrio, Jody Workman

Pearl River -- (President’s List) Kayla E. Petone
(Honor Roll) Olivia J. Cooperider

Slidell -- (President’s List) Brianna M. Bates, Jennifer L. Bovingdon, Kristian R. Burns, Harper E. Cannella, Kristina T. Carrone, Richard O. Davis, Sarah C. DeQuay, Kristina Duncan, Amy Ellis, Marissa A. Garfias, Camille M. Gelis, Selena Gordon, Tyler J. Hall, Claudia C. Holcomb, Caitlin F. Hotard, Joseph P. Kahrs, Madeline K. Kelly, Teaira S. Lewis, Erin M. Maggiore, Joshua M. Manguno, Misty D. McFadden, Gabrielle T. Napolitano, Hope A. Ruegsegger, Cecilia A. Ruiz, Nicole M. Sicomo, Kayla E. Smith, Jesse M. Strecker, Jessica N. Thonn, Tyrielle A. Ward, Sarah L. Watson, Carlin E. Woods, Emily M. deQuay
(Dean’s List) Lynsey M. Alvarez
(Honor Roll) Onjel B. Adams, Janell S. Barnhill, Autumn R. Hand, Rebekah Kisiah, Cameron M. Le Beau, Robert A. Maddox, Lauren McGehee, Courtney S. Mitchell, Racquelle Morsch, Taylor V. Nichols, Megan E. Richter, Joseph W. Schenck, Benjamin J. Strahan, Bre’Zall R. Warren

LIVINGSTON PARISH
Albany -- (President’s List) Dylan L. Glascock, Joshua P. Madere, Maria E. Sanchez, Kristie R. Steadman, Kashish Wadhwa, Brice W. Wagner
(Honor Roll) Cara J. Blanchard, Tramaine D. Keith

Denham Springs -- (President’s List) Dara J. Abbott, Kindra N. Aime, Grace M. Atwell, Jessica A. Aubin, Hailey M. Bonvillain, Seth B. Crnko, Elliot A. Crosby, Tiffany T. Deville, Logan J. Dykes, Kurt M. Evans, Joshua L. Ford, Lisa K. Friedrich, Ray W. Fuller, Amanda C.
Gann, Emily C. Garafola, Cody D. Graphia, Bailey J. Hennesy, Emilee Hickman, Megan M. Hull, Faith M. Jackson-Nixon, Ashley Jones, Jacob M. Lajaunie, Reanna L. Lanoux, Dylan P. Lavergne, Tony J. Licciardi Jr, Diana C. Lopez, Kelsey A. Lougon, Sarah J. Magliolo, Zachary C. Matherne, Nicole E. McCarter, Brittney Meek, Marykatherine E. Melfi, Alexis J. Montgomery, Randi L. Murphy, Candace M. Nall, Genni L. Nicholson, Lillian K. Robinson, Austin T. Rogers, Dylan A. Stanley, Zachary A. Stephens, Taylor A. Swain, Rachel E. Wallace, Georgette T. Williams
(Dean’s List) Ashton T. Leblanc, Brenna A. Perez, Spencer J. Suggs
(Honor Roll) Anna M. Brown, Alexis R. Fairbanks, Michael A. Gardner, Adaline J. Griggs, Brianne N. Hall, Danielle S. Hebert, Chad E. Kannady, Lecarlsha Reed, Michelle L. Trammell, Amanda D. Vallot, Janna Williams

French Settlement -- (Honor Roll) Cory J. Oliphant

Holden -- (President’s List) Amy V. Ballard, Ashleigh R. Humphrey, Megan D. Lanoy
(Honor Roll) David Cambre, Aaron T. Carlton, Anthony Page, Ashleigh E. Spears

Livingston -- (President’s List) Gabrielle L. Achord, Ashleigh Balfantz, Sean Balfantz, Kaleb D. Brock, Kara M. Broussard, Matthias Fowler, Erin E. Lavergne, Whitney L. Lobell, Ashley E. Martin, Jeremiah D. McMorris, Jennifer Miller, April L. Sigrest
(Honor Roll) Emily Ballard, Cody J. Sager, Mallorie A. Sanders

Maurepas -- (Honor Roll) Tyler M. Delatte, Skylar R. Simoneaux

Springfield -- (President’s List) James C. Egle, Madison M. Paulus, Taylor M. Picou, Rachel L. Sullivan
(Dean’s List) Robert C. Winn
(Honor Roll) Caraline D. Abels, Tarez A. Cowsar, Michael S. Paulus, Crystal Z. Rowell

Walker -- (President’s List) Victoria Barnes, Evan B. Bergeron, Jessica L. Cantu, Carmen N. Coon, Emily J. Fink, Shelby L. Hano, Hillary D. Johnson, Kortney K. Lee, Brittney K. Martello, Emily B. Mayfield, Meredith A. Moore, Rebecca B. Nickles, Shelby R. Phillips, Maggie B. Robinson, Rachel H. Russin, Kyron M. Scott, Ashley A. Smith-Schenk, Paige V. Sprague, Madeline C. Waddell, Kayla L. Walker
(Dean’s List) Amy S. Jeanice
(Honor Roll) Victoria M. Blanchard, Raechel L. Brown, Sydney A. Elbert, Chandler M. Elvir, Samuel T. Gordon, Amanda D. Lewis, Seth J. Oufnac, Sara E. Rushing, Kaylee Thibodeaux

Watson -- (President’s List) Jessica A. Bowen

18 2017-08-30
Hammond

SLU sponsors part-time job fair for students Thursday


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University’s Office of Career Services will sponsor a special job fair on Aug. 31 to help students locate part-time jobs while they complete their studies.

Scheduled from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., the event will take place at the Student Union breezeway.

“The fair offers an opportunity for students to connect with approximately 30 local employers,” said Director of Career Services Ken Ridgedell. “Employers’ representatives will be on hand to accept job applications from currently enrolled Southeastern students.”

Ridgedell said the part-time job fair is a casual dress event for students to drop by between classes.

Career Fair 2017, Career Services’ annual job fair for upperclass students and recent alumni looking for full-time placement, will be held Sept. 21 from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Pennington Student Activity Center.

For additional information about the part-time job fair or Career Fair, visit southeastern.edu/careerfair or call 985-549-2121.

18 2017-08-30
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN’S COLUMBIA THEATRE ANNOUNCES NEW SEASON


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University’s Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts launches its 2017-18 season, offering everything from live music to dance to theatre.

The season also boasts entertainment from campus ensembles, said Roy Blackwood, director of the Columbia Theatre and Fanfare, Southeastern’s annual festival of the arts, humanities and social sciences. Performances will be scheduled throughout the season. Dates and additional information will be available soon at columbiatheatre.org.

The Columbia Theatre curtain officially opens Oct. 5 with Southeastern Opera/Theatre Workshop’s presentation of “A Night on Broadway,” a concert with an on-stage orchestra that will consist of approximately 25 Broadway solo songs and ensembles.

The production is scheduled on Oct. 5 at 7:30 p.m. General admission tickets are $21, adults; $18 faculty/staff and seniors, $8 for children 12 and younger. Southeastern students are admitted free with university ID. Tickets are available at the Columbia Theatre box office, located at 220 E. Thomas Street in Hammond, on line at www.columbiatheatre.org, or by calling 985-543-4371.

Next on tap is a concert from the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra, which begins its series of performances at Columbia on Oct. 13 at 7:30 p.m. with “An Evening at the Cinema.” The program includes Verdi in “Overture to La forza del destino;” Beethoven in “Overture to Egmont;” Bock in “Fiddler on the Roof for Violin and Orchestra;” J. Strauss in “On the Beautiful Blue Danube;” Barber in “Adagio for Strings;” and Tchaikovsky in “Suite from Swan Lake.”

Additional LPO concerts include the Yuletide Celebration, a fun program of holiday musical favorites for the entire family featuring local student choirs, on Dec. 1 and the “Beethoven Meets the Wild West” on Feb. 16. Both concerts are scheduled at 7:30 p.m.

On Oct. 18, Columbia Theatre presents “The Heart Behind the Music” a group of entertainers who come together to perform a one-time concert, at 7:30 p.m. Every show is unique because each performance is composed of different musicians.

“Since 2011 ‘The Heart Behind the Music’ has been bringing to the stage some of the world’s best singers and songwriters who share the meaning and music behind their hit songs,” Blackwood said. “This show provides an up close and personal insight into some of the greatest music ever written and performances by some of the industry’s most talented musicians.”

Artists who have performed in the past under the umbrella of “The Heart Behind the Music” include Sam Hunt, Kim Carnes, Linda Davis, John Ford Coley, Will Champlin, Lee Roy Parnell, Marty Raybon of “Shenandoah,” Larry Stewart of “Restless Heart,” Richie McDonald of “Lonestar,” Teddy Gentry of “Alabama,” Deana Carter, Bill Champlin of “Chicago,” John Berry, and many more.

The Ultimate Michael Jackson Experience starring Joby Rogers is scheduled on Nov. 3.

“As the mirror image of Michael Jackson, Joby Rogers is both entertaining and electrifying,” Blackwood said. “This full stage, high energy production is a tribute to the music and dance of the world famous star. Joby Rogers’ stunning resemblance to Michael Jackson, combined with the intricate dance moves of the genius himself, presents an exciting performance preserving the legacy and spirit of this entertainment icon.”

On Dec. 8 and 9 at 7 p.m. Columbia Theatre will present Hammond Ballet Company’s “The Nutcracker.” The classic holiday ballet features professional guest artists and excellent all-star local dancers.

Missoula Children’s Theatre will make a return visit the week of Dec. 11 - 16 with a production of “Gulliver’s Travels” for area youth. Upon their arrival Dec. 11, Missoula will hold auditions and cast approximately 50 to 60 area children. Rehearsals will begin that day, and a full scale production will be presented Dec. 16 at 2 p.m. Blackwood said the production is also a Columbia Theatre Pajamas and Play presentation designed to make theater performances especially accessible and appealing for children. Kids are invited to wear their pajamas, robes and slippers to the 60-minute performances, no matter the time, and will be given cookies and milk as an added treat. For additional information, contact the Columbia Theatre administrative office at 985-543-4366.

Also in the theatre category is Aquila Theatre presenting “Hamlet,” one of Shakespeare’s greatest plays, on Feb.24. Directed by Desiree Sanchez, Aquila’s “Hamlet” will seek to shed new light on this tragic story. Blackwood said the production will use movement, design, sound and superb acting to vividly explore the depths of rage, madness, love and death brought about by a culture of obsessive personal ambition.

Rounding out the season is a performance by Mummenschanz on April 18 at 7:30 p.m. Mummenschanz is an experimental troupe formed in Switzerland. The group is made up of performers whose techniques include acting, puppeteering, expressive dance, and other forms of artistry.

A compliment to the Columbia Theatre season, Fanfare will feature many “home-grown” artists. Fanfare will once again showcase music, theater, dance, lectures, children’s events, and art exhibits, highlighting the myriad of talent university faculty and students have to offer in Fanfare’s 32nd season. The complete Fanfare schedule will be posted soon and updated regularly at southeastern.edu/fanfare.

For Columbia Theatre season or individual ticket information, contact the administrative office at 985-543-4366 or log on to columbiatheatre.org.

PHOTO:
GIANT PUPPETS TO TAKE THE COLUMBIA THEATRE STAGE – Mummenschanz, an experimental troupe formed in Switzerland, is just one of the programs included in Southeastern Louisiana University’s Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts’ 2017-18 Season. The group, scheduled to perform April 18, is made up of performers whose techniques include acting, puppeteering, expressive dance, and other forms of artistry.

18 2017-08-17
Hammond

'Welcome Week' in full swing at Southeastern Louisiana University


HAMMOND, LA (WAFB) -
This is "Welcome Week" at Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond.


Officials said it's a chance for new and returning students to get their hands on various programming and information to help them in transitioning to the university.

They added the activities are designed for the whole student.

Click here for more
18 2017-08-17
Hammond

Three Southeastern students receive Emmy scholarships


HAMMOND – Three Southeastern Louisiana University students received prestigious Emmy scholarships.

The students work for the Southeastern Channel and study television in the electronic media concentration of the Department of Languages and Communication. The three are the first-ever students attending a Louisiana university to receive scholarships by the Suncoast Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

Junior Amanda Kitch of Mandeville and senior Courtney Bruno of New Orleans each won $5,000 scholarships for the upcoming academic year. Dylan Domangue, a freshman, of Houma was awarded a $3,000 stipend.

The Suncoast Chapter offers scholarships to eligible high school seniors and university students who reside within the Suncoast Region, comprised of Louisiana, Florida, Georgia, Alabama and Puerto Rico.


18 2017-06-29
Hammond

Gallery presents exhibit on light and shadow


For its summer exhibition, the Southeastern Louisiana University Contemporary Art Gallery presents "Alex Crosson: The Four Pointed Triangle," a collection from the sculptor based in Austin, Texas.
The exhibit is free and open to the public. The gallery is open during the summer from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday.
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Crosson, who earned his Master of Fine Arts from the University of Texas, has accepted a sculptor position at Tulane University. His exhibit will be on display until Aug. 18, with the closing reception to be held Aug. 17 at noon.
Interim Fine and Performing Arts Department Head, Professor of Sculpture and Gallery Director Dale Newkirk said the pieces on display are provocative interplays of light, shadow, wires and metal. Admirers would do well to consider that everything they see is by design, and that the very gallery they stand in is also part of the exhibit, he said.
"How the light affects the space, their luminosity and even the different bulbs were selected by him to affect the space within the gallery," said Newkirk. "He changed the lighting and configured the walls specifically for this exhibit."
Other pieces illuminated in magenta light are less stark, Newkirk added. Made up of collected knick-knacks that would likely be discarded as trash by a less creative mind, these arrangements are more like snapshots of specific times and places, he said.
"These are found objects that are arranged like haiku," said Newkirk. "These are objects that Crosson finds to be aesthetically dynamic and interesting; they're kind of fun."
In addition to the sculptures, Crosson also has several photographs on display. Upon entering the exhibit, Newkirk said, visitors will be greeted by a sizeable reverse negative of Lake Pontchartrain, though it could easily be confused for a moonscape of some kind. Some of Crosson's more abstract pieces are the pitch black rectangles printed on glossy paper.
"I like how raw the photographs are; even the paper is curled at the edges, and they look like they've been in the back of a truck for a while instead of a studio," said Newkirk. "They're reverse negatives, so the whites are blacks and the blacks are whites. That makes them reflect all of the beautiful light patterns that make a different kind of design on the paper. These photographs are actually, in many ways, sculptures in and of themselves."
For more information on this exhibit and others, contact the Contemporary Art Gallery at 985-549-5080.

18 2017-06-29
Hammond

SLU's annual Fine Arts Showcase held at President's Residence


Hammond photographer Phillip Colwart discusses his photo of Oak Alley Plantation in Vacherie with Josie Mercante, of Hammond, at Southeastern Louisiana University’s recent Fine Arts Showcase held in the President’s Residence. The annual event highlights painting, sculpture and photography from nearly 40 Louisiana artists.


18 2017-05-04
Hammond

University taps Sutton to speak at graduation


The president and chief executive officer of North Oaks Health System in Hammond will address Southeastern Louisiana University graduating students at commencement ceremonies May 13.
Michele Kidd Sutton, a Southeastern alumna and 28-year veteran of North Oaks, will speak at the event scheduled for 10 a.m. at the University Center.
The university will confer approximately 1,100 degrees on students who are graduating with bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees.
18 2017-05-02
Hammond

RETIRING SOUTHEASTERN CONDUCTOR PERFORMS FAREWELL CONCERT TUESDAY


HAMMOND – The Southeastern Louisiana University Chamber Orchestra will perform its annual spring concert on Tuesday, May 2, at 7:30 p.m. in the Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts in downtown Hammond.

Titled “Farewell Concert,” the program will be the final concert at Southeastern under the direction of retiring Professor of Violin Yakov Voldman. The concert, which will feature classic pieces by Wagner, Bach, Mozart, Tchaikovsky and others, will include a number of alumni musicians performing with the student orchestra.

General admission tickets are $10 for adults; $5 faculty, staff, seniors, and non-Southeastern students. Southeastern students are admitted free with their university ID cards. Tickets are available at the Columbia Theatre box office at 220 East Thomas St. or at the door on the night of the concert. Call 985-543-4371 for ticket information.

The evening’s program will open with Prelude to Act III from the opera “Lohengrin” by Wagner and will also include Bach’s “Brandenburg Concerto No. 6 in B-flat major BMV, and two pieces by Mendelssohn: “Concerto in D minor” and “Violin Concerto in E minor op.64.” The program will also include such well-known pieces such as Suppe’s “Light Cavalry Overture,” Tchaikovsky’s waltz from “Swan Lake,” and will conclude with Rossini’s “William Tell Overture.”

“This is a major life event for Professor Voldman and his family. We thank him for his years of teaching and dedication to Southeastern and the Hammond community,” said Dale Newkirk, interim head of the Department of Fine and Performing Arts. “We will witness the final concert under the direction of Professor Voldman, who will retire after 24 years of dedicated service to Southeastern and his students. There have been many memorable concerts throughout the years, and this concert performed by his students from the past and present will be a memorable event.”

“I am sad that I will no longer be a part of the cultural landscape of this community and Southeastern,” said Voldman, who will be moving with his wife, pianist Raisa Voldman, to Colorado to be near his son. “I am eternally grateful that 24 years ago I was given the opportunity to serve Southeastern, and I thank all the people who believed in me and trusted in my ability to create the string program and build an orchestra from scratch.”

Voldman said the concert leaves him with a bittersweet feeling in his heart.

“I am overwhelmed with joy seeing so many of my former and current students, who are now accomplished musicians and exceptional individuals, come together for this performance. I am honored, proud and grateful to have been a part of their growth as musicians and to have witnessed and rejoiced in their successes.”

A native of Moldova in Eastern Europe, Voldman studied violin at the Moscow Conservatory. In 1990 he moved to the United States, -- “the land of opportunity,” as he says – to raise his son in a free nation. After a few years of menial employment – him stocking shelves in a liquor store, his wife washing dishes in a restaurant -- both he and his wife became proficient in English and were able to find work in their fields of music.

The family moved to Hammond in 1992, where he joined the music faculty and organized the string program which had few students at Southeastern. He said Southeastern then did not have a strong string program, and focused primarily on teaching music education majors the fundamentals of stringed instruments. Voldman said he turned to his contacts throughout the world to recruit musicians from Eastern Europe, Asia, South America and other regions to help build the string program at Southeastern.

“Since there were no strong string programs to speak of in our area, I knew that if I was going to recruit talented string performers I would have to look elsewhere,” he explained. “Southeastern could not compete with schools such as Julliard, the Eastman School of Music, Indiana University and others in recruiting the top talent within the United States. What we could do is recruit talented students who could not afford to go to those institutions but who wanted to come to the United States to study. And that led to the recruitment of other musicians, such as pianists and other instrumentalists, because of their friends who came to study strings.”

Voldman finds teaching students with raw talent one of the most fulfilling aspects of his life in music. Teaching applied music, he said, is as much art and intuition as it is science.

“An applied music instructor is like a coach in sports. He gives direction, but in the end it is the student’s own natural talent, drive and determination that produce results. Sometimes your role is to be demanding when the student is not giving it his or her best efforts. At other times, it’s important to comfort and reassure the student when he or she is clearly putting in the effort. There is no ‘one size fits all’ solution to every problem.”

Voldman measures his success as a teacher by the success of his students. The majority of Southeastern’s string majors are able to find positions in professional orchestras before graduating.

“I feel the pride of a proud parent when I survey the achievements of my former students,” he said. “While they have achieved great things already, I know that some of them are destined for even greater successes I can’t wait to witness their achievements.”

PHOTO:
MUSICALLY SPEAKING – Retiring Southeastern Louisiana University Professor of Music and Conducting Yakov Voldman will conduct the Chamber Orchestra Concert in its performance, “Farewell Concert,” scheduled May 2 at the Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts in Hammond.
18 2017-04-27
Baton Rouge

SLU’s Columbia Theatre to present ‘The Boy Who Cried Wolf’


Younger fans of Southeastern Louisiana University’s Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts will get an extra treat this month with the Pajamas and Play presentation of “The Boy Who Cried Wolf.”

The performance will begin at 7 p.m. April 29 in the downtown Hammond theatre.

“What if no one believed what you told them, even if it was the truth,” asked Roy Blackwood, Columbia Theatre and Fanfare director. “In this Pajamas and Play presentation, a boy learns an important life lesson about integrity, honesty and the consequences of ‘crying wolf’ in this musical retelling of a classic tale.”

Blackwood said Pajamas and Play is a feature tailored for children and designed to make theater performances accessible and appealing to them.

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“All children love bedtime stories. That’s what this is — only live,” Blackwood said. “Kids are invited to wear their pajamas, robes and slippers to the 60-minute performance. We even plan to send the kids home with cookies and milk. Parents, all you’ll have to do is tuck them in.”

Tickets for “The Boy Who Cried Wolf” are on sale at the box office, 220 E. Thomas Street, or call (985) 543-4371. The box office is open Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and one hour prior to performances.

For information, contact the Columbia Theatre office at (985) 543-4366 or visit columbiatheatre.org.
18 2017-04-21
Hammond

SLU PROFESSOR RE-CERTIFIED AS MASTER JOURNALISM EDUCATOR


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University boasts the only Master Journalism Educator in the state upon Professor Joseph A. Mirando recently receiving notice of his certification renewal from the Journalism Education Association.

Having first earned the certification in 2007, Mirando successfully earned his five-year re-certification. Only 179 teachers nationwide earned the certification.

“Journalism certification recognizes those teachers who have achieved national standards of preparation to teach journalism classes and advise student publications,” said Lucia Harrison, head of the Department of Languages and Communications. “Joe has achieved national recognition and joins an elite group of Master Jouralism Educator teachers nationwide who regard journalism as an academic subject and recognize the importance of having a highly qualified instructor in the journalism classroom.”

Mirando has taught for 35 years at Southeastern. He received an associates degree in liberal arts in 1975 from Corning Community College in New York; a bachelor of arts degree in journalism in 1977 from St. Bonaventure University, also in New York; a master of arts degree in journalism in 1979 from the University of Alabama; and a doctorate in communication in 1992 from the University of Southern Mississippi.

In addition to passing a written essay exam, the certification commission requires each applicant to demonstrate an ability to contribute to the development and enhancement of scholastic journalism education by submitting a project, such as a publishable article, research, a survey, a textbook or booklet, or a teaching unit.

Mirando will be recognized at the spring JEA/NSPA national convention in Seattle.
18 2017-04-20
Baton Rouge

Sims Library’s Kelsey recognized by Louisiana Library Association


Paul Kelsey, of Southeastern Louisiana University’s Linus A. Sims Memorial Library, has been recognized by the Louisiana Library Association as a recipient of its Article of the Year Award.

Head of acquisitions at the library, Kelsey was honored for his article, “Demand Driven Acquisitions: Perspectives from a Second Year Pilot,” which was selected by the award panel based upon its technical merit and educational value to Louisiana librarians.

Published in “Louisiana Libraries,” the official journal of the Louisiana Library Association, the article presents guidelines, suggestions and perspectives regarding the practice of demand-driven acquisitions, which is now an established ebook acquisitions model in many academic libraries. The project detailed in the article is entering its third year at SLU.

“I am delighted that Paul Kelsey is the recipient of this year’s Article of the Year Award from the LLA,” said Sims Library Director Eric Johnson. “Our academic librarians wear many hats, one of which is that of scholarship, and Paul definitely exemplifies the scholarly aspect of our role. His article was well deserving of the award, and we're proud of his success.”
18 2017-04-20
Baton Rouge

Southeastern students participate in annual Big Event


Southeastern Louisiana University students put in a day of community service in Hammond and nearby communities on April 8 as part of the university’s The Big Event.

Sponsored by the Student Government Association, The Big Event is intended to give students the opportunity to help the communities and organizations that support SLU, said senior Myranda Triche, of LaPlace, student coordinator for the project.

“The Big Event is an opportunity for Southeastern students to say thanks to the city of Hammond and other area communities for the support they show for our university,” Triche said.

This is the seventh year the SGA has sponsored The Big Event.

Sending the group out with a “Lion Up” sign of encouragement, SLU President John L. Crain told the students that their efforts send a message that SLU cares and seeks to make the communities a better place to live.

The students included individual volunteers and representatives of student organizations, fraternities and sororities. They worked at sites such as the Iowa Neighborhood Association, several fire stations, St. Vincent DePaul Thrift Store and Holy Ghost Catholic School.

Jobs included beautification and landscaping projects, cleanup efforts in downtown Hammond, cleaning and polishing the city’s fire engines, sorting materials and conducting inventory for nonprofit organizations.

“This is the first time we’re part of The Big Event, and it’s wonderful seeing these students working to help their community,” said Kristen Rimmer, manager of the Fuller Center ReUse Store, a faith-based organization that recycles construction supplies, building materials, and other items and depends heavily on volunteer help. “The students have helped us organize our rooms and are helping with some of the painting.”
18 2017-04-20
Hammond

Southeastern Theatre Society preps 'Jungle Book' on tour


The Southeastern Louisiana University chapter of Alpha Psi Omega National Honor Society is preparing a touring production of "The Jungle Book" to be presented to children's audiences next year from Baton Rouge to Bogalusa.
In support of the effort, the university's chapter of the APO theater organization has received the first Frankie Day Chapter Advancement Grant in the amount of $1,000 from the national honor society, named after the late APO professor.
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"The inaugural award was given to the Alpha Epsilon Psi Chapter at Southeastern to support taking a production of 'The Jungle Book' on tour to schools in small towns around Louisiana," said APO national President Richard Jones of Stephen F. Austin State University in Nagadoches, Tex.
"In many cases, the kids exposed to this production will never have seen live theater before. The national officers are proud to be able to support this mission and are thrilled to have such a perfect example of what this grant is intended for as the inaugural grantee."
"The chapter has a proven record of success in bringing children's shows to the area, enriching the lives of many children who might not have this opportunity otherwise," said Karen Fontenot, Dean of the College of Arts, Humanities.
"The shows not only promote theater, but make story book characters more vivid than they have ever been."
Associate Professor of Theatre Jim Winter said the current academic year is the first time in five years that Southeastern's chapter was unable to produce a touring show in the region due to many communities still recovering from the fall floods of 2016.
"We're looking forward to bringing a show to the communities along the I-12 corridor. It is our way of giving back to those communities for the support they provide to Southeastern," said Winter.
He said the grant will be used for construction and acquisition of props, costumes and set pieces to be used in the 2018 production.
A new script for "The Jungle Book" is being prepared by Tommy Jamerson of New Jersey, an award-winning playwright known for his adapted children's plays such as "Choose Your Own Oz," "Alice the Brave and Other Tales from Wonderland," and "Once Upon a Pine: The Adventures of Pinocchio."
18 2017-04-20
Hammond

SLU Chorus to perform on April 30


The Southeastern Louisiana University Chorus, Concert Choir and Women's Chorale will join the Northshore Choral Society for "Cherubini Requiem," a performance at St. Joseph's Abbey, 74376 River Road in St. Benedict on Sunday, April 30.
The concert will also include performances of Jonathan Dove's "Seek Him That Maketh the Seven Stars" and Gustav Holst's "Two Psalms."
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Sponsored by the Department of Fine and Performing Arts, the free performance is scheduled for 2:30 p.m. Conductors include Southeastern Director of the University Chorus/Northshore Chorale Brian Martinez and Director of Choral Activities Alissa Mercurio Rowe, who will direct choirs with the assistance of Amy Wilt Prats, graduate conductor.
For more information on the concert, contact the Department of Fine and Performing Arts at 985-549-2184.

18 2017-04-20
New Orleans

Southeastern won't raise tuition if students graduate in 4 years


Southeastern Louisiana University is issuing a promise to incoming freshmen not to raise their tuition, if they commit to completing their degree in four years. University President John Crain says they’re seeing students taking longer and longer to earn a bachelor’s degree, and the Southeastern Promise encourages students to graduate in four years.

“So if the students take advantage of that and they complete essentially a quarter of their degree program each year, that’s 30 credit hours, then we will promise to freeze their tuition and most of their mandatory attendance fees for up to four years,” Crain said.

Crain says as part of the Southeastern Promise the university will guarantee that students have access to required courses to enable degree attainment within four years. He says by guaranteeing that a student’s tuition will remain the same, it gives students and their families the ability to budget the exact cost of higher education for four years.

“We think that there are a significant number of students who will be motivated to do that. They’ll recognize, they and their families, that this is an opportunity to help control the cost of higher education,” Crain said.

Crain says this ground-breaking program is the only one of its kind of Louisiana and it will help with student recruitment and retention. He calls the Southeastern Promise a game-changer in Louisiana.

“It’s a win for the state because if the students get their degree in a more timely manner, that saves the state money, and it also means those students will be graduating and entering the workforce more quickly,” Crain said.
18 2017-04-19
Hammond

'Southeastern Promise' promises incoming 2017 freshmen no tuition increase guarantee


HAMMOND, La. —
A groundbreaking program unveiled Tuesday at Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond guarantees 2017 incoming freshmen no increase in tuition during their college career if they complete their four-year degree program on time -- no matter what the state Legislature does.


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It's called "The Southeastern Promise." It is an opt-in program in which students must make the commitment to finish in four years.

"We will effectively freeze their tuition and fees for the four-year period," Dr. John Crain, SLU's president said. "That's going to reduce the cost of attaining the degree and move those students into the workforce more quickly."


After 18 consecutive state budget cuts to universities since 2009, forcing tuition increases, the Southeastern Promise offers this group of incoming freshmen and their parents a degree of stability.

"This will help these students and their families hopefully plan a little bit better for funding their higher education," Student Government Association President Erin Fernandez said.

"Students are excited about it, but they are a little worried about the scheduling," said Larshell Green, a communications student as SLU. "We see it all the time. Classes fill up and especially coming up with graduation, you know, you're worried about will you graduate on time."

That is SLU's part of the promise: Southeastern will assure advanced advising and degree-mapping to make sure students get the classes they need when they need them.


"Students and their families have been faced with increasing costs, uncertainty about state funding, uncertainty about TOPS and other things, so we see this as a balance of the risk with the students. If they agree to complete in four years, I think it's a risk worth taking," Crain said.

In recent years, Southeastern Louisiana University has relied less and less on state funding, now only about 18 percent of its total enterprise. The university succeeds with consistent student enrollment and retention.

"They'll come in with a plan to finish in four years," Crain said. "That saves them money. It saves the state money. It's win-win for everybody."


This first phase only affects the 2017 incoming freshmen, but Crain hopes to see the effort be successful and expand in coming years.

The Southeastern Promise is the only program of its kind in the state of Louisiana.

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18 2017-04-13
Baton Rouge

Loved ones remember those lost at SLU Golden Silence ceremony


Members of the Kinnison family, of Hammond and Baton Rouge, joined others April 3 at Southeastern Louisiana University’s Golden Silence ceremony held on campus.

The annual event is a remembrance ceremony in honor of members of the SLU family — students, faculty, alumni, staff and friends of the university — who died the previous year.

The Kinnison family was there in tribute to the late Jimmie G. Kinnison, of Hammond, a former accounting professor at SLU.


18 2017-04-13
Baton Rouge

LSMSA foreign language students compete at festival


Students from the Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts in Natchitoches competed at the 35th annual Foreign Language Festival hosted by the Department of Languages and Communication at Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond on March 31.

LSMSA was recognized as Best School Overall Tier 2 (fewer than than 600 students) in Spanish and French, for which the students earned a trophy.

Individual student results included Elyse Duplantier, a sophomore from Zachary, first place in French Poetry Level 2; Hannah Miller, a junior from Baton Rouge, first place in French Poetry Level 3; Colt Crain, a sophomore from Zachary, first place in French Prose Level 2; Grace Fields, a sophomore from Prairieville, second place in French Extemporaneous Speaking Level 1; Claire Lucas, a junior from Baton Rouge, first in French Extemporaneous Speaking level 2; Jaci Templet, a junior from Gonzales, first place in Spanish Extemporaneous Speaking Level 2; and Rachel Schnadelbach, a sophomore from Hammond, second place in Spanish Poetry Level 1.

Other competitors included Juan Cecchini, a sophomore from Denham Springs; and Jordan Byrd, a sophomore from Denham Springs.


18 2017-04-13
Hammond

Southeastern to host camps for spring break, summer


Southeastern Louisiana University’s Department of Recreational Sports and Wellness is hosting 11 weeks of Camp Rec this summer.

Created for children ages 5 to 13, the camp is an option for parents who want their children to have fun and be physically active while developing social skills, confidence and independence, according to a news release.

Camp Rec is offered weekly beginning May 29 and ending Aug. 4. Scheduled from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day, the camp will take place in the Pennington Student Activity Center, corner of University and General Pershing avenues.

Dollie Hebert-Crouch, director of Recreational Sports and Wellness, said each week’s focus is intended to improve a child’s health and fitness and build self-confidence through activities that include outdoor adventures, field day games, arts and crafts, health and fitness talks, relay races, swimming and field trips.

“We are committed to creating an unforgettable summer camp experience in a safe and supportive environment,” Hebert-Crouch said. “The Camp Rec experience is fun, exciting and filled with challenging activities that teach the campers the values of trust, friendship and teamwork.”

A $25 reservation fee that is credited to the total for that week is required to reserve specific weeks of camp. The weekly fee of $145 for campers and $140 for siblings includes breakfast, lunch and afternoon snacks as well as a T-shirt. Walk-up or late registration fee is $160.

Early hours from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. and after care from 4:15 p.m. to 5:45 p.m., are offered at the rate of $15 per week for one and $30 per week for both. Registration for Camp Rec is $50 per family and is waived for Pennington Student Activity Center members and families who previously registered for Camp Rec: Summer 2016.

For those looking for activities for children during spring break, Recreational Sports and Wellness offers a weeklong camp April 17-21 and is taking reservations.

To register or for information, contact Kathy Cusimano, assistant director of field experience and youth programs, at (985) 549-2353 or kathy.cusimano@southeastern.edu.


18 2017-04-13
New Orleans

Staff, students share excitement over major alumni investment at SLU


HAMMOND, La. -- SLU Biology professor Dr. Erin Watson-Horzelski takes pride in seeing her Entomology classes filled with a majority of young women.

But she wants to see even more.

"The interest has always been there, we just have to make the availability, and in early years, get females, get little girls interested in math and science," she said.

Pre-med Sophomore Reagan Church is one of those girls who caught the STEM, or "Science, Technology, Engineering and Math," bug early.

"It's something that is going to grow forever," she said, "I mean, there's jobs constantly coming up. It's a growing field, job security is great."

That's why both women were over the moon to hear that 1953 Southeastern business graduate Seth Ryan bequeathed $10 million to the university's Endowment program, with instructions to use it toward scholarships for female students seeking STEM degrees. He made the gift in honor of his wife, who wanted to earn a degree, but never attended college.

For Cell Biology and Animal Development Professor Dr. Mary White, the money could be a way to boost the number of female students in the STEM program.

Right now, that number is at 15 percent on a campus that's 60 percent female.

"Obviously, all over the country, we need more people in STEM fields, but particularly since women seem to be under-represented, this is just such great news," she said.

This is more than just an opportunity to grow the female presence in STEM programs, and to highlight STEM programs, this is also an opportunity to highlight Southeastern's growth, in general.

"There's really nothing in this that was to point to him, it was about helping others and honoring others and that's really kind of the Southeastern spirit," said SLU President Dr. John Crain, "It's about doing for others and caring for our students and their future success."

It's a success that's now looking brighter than ever.

The criteria for this scholarship is still being developed and the foundation hopes to start offering the awards, fully, in the 2018-2019 school year.

© 2017 WWL-TV


18 2017-04-13
New Orleans

St. Tammany College Notes for April 12, 2017


SLU COMMUNICATIONS: Maria Goddard, of New Orleans, a student television news reporter at Southeastern Louisiana University, has been honored with the first Billy Pilgrim Scholarship in Creative Services, presented by the Louisiana Association of Broadcasters. WDSU-TV established the $1,500 scholarship in honor of Pilgrim, an award-winning creative services director for WDSU who died last summer. Goddard is an anchor-reporter for the Southeastern Channel’s student newscast, “Northshore News."


18 2017-04-12
Hammond

Little town, big fraud: guest speaker discusses role of ethics in business


Rita Crundwell made national headlines in 2013 after her arrest for stealing more than $53 million over a 20-year period from the city of Dixon, Ill., where she served as city comptroller.
Thursday night she was the subject of discussion again, but for Southeastern Louisiana University business students during the College of Business Ethics Lecture.
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Dixon is a small town of about 15,000 residents, according to the 2010 census. Guest speaker Dr. Kelly Richmond Pope, associate professor of DePaul University in Chicago, said this fraud case was the perfect example to the students that big fraud can happen in unexpected places.
"I think that Dixon can represent a lot of different organizations. It's very unexpected and there are a lot of lessons that I can you can learn as a result if you understand that if it can happen in Dixon, it can happen anywhere," Pope said. "And that's a very powerful message."
During the presentation, Pope showed clips from her in-progress documentary, "All the Queens Horses," which explores Crundwell's crime and its aftereffects. The documentary was selected to participate in the 2016 Tribeca Film Institute Industry Market forum, according to the event's program.
"I think they learned trust is never an internal control ,and I think they learned this can happen anywhere," Pope said of Thursday's audience. "We all have a duty to protect our communities or our organizations against fraud."
Crumdwell was found guilty of her crimes and was sentenced in 2013 to serve 19 years and seven months in prison. She could have been sentenced a maximum of 20 years, according to Pope. It was discovered she had created a secret account and had been syphoning money from the city's legitimate accounts into the secret account by using false invoices.
Pope is a board member of the Illinois CPA Society, Economic Club of Chicago, serves on the finance committee for Mercy Hospital and is serving a three-year term on the Governing Council of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.
She is recognized as a forensic accounting expert and has had seminars worldwide for universities, governmental entities and other organizations.
Her research and articles has been published in Behavioral Research in Accounting, Journal of Business Ethics, Forbes.com, The Washington Post, and other journals and news sources.

18 2017-04-12
Hammond

Southeastern hires its first director of alumni relations


Michelle Biggs will join Southeastern Louisiana University in the new role of executive director of alumni relations in the Division of University Advancement, university officials announced.
She will report to campus for her first day of work May 1.
Biggs brings to the position over 25 years of experience in strategic planning, many of which she obtained during her work within the non-profit realm, according to a statement from the university.
A graduate of Louisiana State University, Biggs currently serves as communications and administrative officer at the St. Tammany West Chamber of Commerce. Previously, she served as associate director for Southeastern's Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts.
Biggs is a 2015 graduate of the Institute of Organization Management, a four-year educational program focused on non-profit management, sponsored by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.
"Michelle's past experience will be an asset as we implement new initiatives directed at ensuring increased engagement from a diverse alumni community," said Vice President for University Advancement Wendy Lauderdale. "We look forward to having her return to work once again within the Southeastern Family."
As executive director of alumni relations, Biggs will be charged with providing strategic vision to define and implement best practices and innovations that engage Southeastern alumni in lifelong, progressive relationships with the university.
"It is an honor to be selected as Southeastern's first executive director of alumni relations," Biggs said. "I very much look forward to working with all members of the Lion Nation to build on the prior successes of the alumni program and to continue to strengthen the university's alumni network."

18 2017-04-12
Hammond

Southeastern receives $10 million bequest


Southeastern Louisiana University has received the largest single donation in its 92-year history, a bequest totaling $10 million, the university announced Tuesday.
Seth W. Ryan, a 1953 Southeastern business graduate, died March 1 and bequeathed a significant part of his estate to Southeastern's foundation in the name of his wife, Thelma McNamara Nicaud Ryan.
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Over 15 years ago Southeastern was approached by Ryan's attorney about the potential bequest. Ryan's identity remained anonymous until his recent death.
Ryan's bequest will become part of the Southeastern Louisiana University Foundation Scholarship Endowment. In honor of his wife, who was unable to attend college, Ryan outlined that income from his donation be used for scholarships for female students in specific academic disciplines.
"Seth Ryan's deep generosity will benefit female students in perpetuity. In honoring his wife, Thelma, he has established a legacy that will provide generations of women with the opportunity to benefit from strong careers and better futures," said Southeastern President John L. Crain.
Vice President for Advancement Wendy Lauderdale said the donation significantly bolsters one of Southeastern's strategic initiatives - to increase the number of women enrolled in STEM programs.
"Southeastern's student population is over 60 percent female, but women only account for approximately 15 percent of STEM majors," she said. "These scholarships will encourage and aid women to enter these high demand, well paying disciplines."
Lauderdale said the scholarships will also be used in the areas of nursing, business and education for female students.
"Nationwide fewer women are entering STEM programs and careers," Crain said. "With so much demand for graduates, Southeastern looks forward to leading the way in providing more financial assistance to women considering these careers."
In fulfillment of Ryan's wishes to honor his wife with this gift, Lauderdale said, Southeastern will name the current biology building in her honor, subject to approval of the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors.
Officially, it will be renamed the Thelma McNamara Nicaud Ryan Science Building. The building façade will have the name "Thelma Ryan Science Building" upon its dedication, which is anticipated this summer. All programs housed within the building will offer scholarships under the Ryan gift.
"We are so honored that Mr. Ryan saw the potential in Southeastern as a steward of his estate. He saw that this university could make a difference in so many lives by using the estate that he spent a lifetime building. I know his wife would be both proud and satisfied," Lauderdale said. "Having Mrs. Ryan's name on our building will forever remind us of the kindness and vision of Mr. Ryan and his legacy of helping others."

18 2017-04-12
New Orleans

SLU receives largest donation in 92-year history: $10 million


Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond has received the largest single donation in its 92-year history, a bequest totaling $10 million. The university announced Tuesday (April 11) that Seth Ryan, a 1953 Southeastern business graduate who died March 1, bequeathed a significant portion of his estate to Southeastern's Foundation in the name of his wife, Thelma McNamara Nicaud Ryan.

The $10 million will become part of the Southeastern Louisiana University Foundation Scholarship Endowment. In honor of his wife, who did not attend college, Ryan outlined that income from his donation be used for scholarships for female students in specific academic disciplines, the university said.

"Seth Ryan's deep generosity will benefit female students in perpetuity," Southeastern President John Crain said. "In honoring his wife, Thelma, he has established a legacy that will provide generations of women with the opportunity to benefit from strong careers and better futures."

Wendy Lauderdale, the university's vice president for advancement, said the donation significantly bolsters one of Southeastern's strategic initiatives: to increase the number of women enrolled in science, technology, engineering and mathematics programs. She said Southeastern's enrollment is more than 60 percent female, but women account for only about 15 percent of STEM majors. The scholarships also will be used in the areas of nursing, business and education for female students.

"Nationwide fewer women are entering STEM programs and careers," Crain said. "With so much demand for graduates, Southeastern looks forward to leading the way in providing more financial assistance to women considering these careers."


18 2017-04-10
Hammond

Sims library announces three events


Southeastern Louisiana University's Sims Memorial Library is inviting the public to special events during National Library Week, today through Thursday.
The annual book sale will be held in the library lobby Tuesday and Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Thursday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., said Outreach Librarian Angie Balius.
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A wide variety of hardcover and paperback books, videos, CDs and record albums will be available, she said. Hard cover books and DVDs will cost $2 each, paperback books $1-2, and CDs $1. Transactions will be cash only.
On Tuesday, the library will celebrate "Readings at Sims Library" on the third floor of Sims Library. Participants will hear selections from original works by many talented writers in the community.
Readings will be led by librarian and local author Dayne Sherman and begin at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments will be served.
"Overdue Book Amnesty Days," when library users can bring back overdue books without having to pay fines, will be today through Thursday.
"Be aware that amnesty does not apply to all library fines and fees," Balius said. "It applies only to books from the circulating stacks and does not include any of the following: outstanding fines, such as unpaid overdue fines from books returned in the past, lost book replacement fees, damaged books, reserve books, or equipment, such as laptops or audio recorders."
Call the library at 985-549-2027 for details.

18 2017-04-07
Hammond

SLU Faculty Senate wants survey on faculty morale


Southeastern Louisiana University's Faculty Senate plans to propose a comprehensive survey of faculty members conducted by the Southeastern Office of Institutional Research and the senate jointly.
The body approved a resolution Wednesday, saying a comprehensive faculty survey is needed to get faculty feedback.
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Faculty morale has been a subject of discussion by the senators, many of whom say the university is seeing qualified faculty members leave the university for better opportunities.
Another concern that has been expressed at meetings is over salary compression. The issue of how faculty members are paid for teaching summer courses is also a concern, said Faculty Senate President Dayne Sherman.
That topic is expected to be addressed by a future resolution. Basically, professors' pay for teaching summer courses is affected by whether they meet a minimum enrollment in that class. If the class does not have enough students, pay is pro-rated based on enrollment, Sherman said.
Enrollment during the summer months has suffered in recent times, he said, which he is hoping will be helped by the university's new retooled summer semester, Summer Smart.
The retooled semester has expanded high demand courses, a reduced cost of attendance for the average undergraduate student and more online and hybrid courses, according to an earlier press release.
Sherman said higher enrollment during the summer would not only help faculty with their pay, but also the university in general.
"Having a robust summer school is good for everybody," he said Thursday.
The faculty senate resolution states Southeastern has seen "a large outmigration of highly qualified and talented faculty within recent years" and says a survey can provide data that can benefit faculty, students and staff.
The survey could measure the level of engagement and satisfaction of faculty, establish benchmarks to track progress in the future, provide assurance of the quality and consistency of management throughout the university, identify areas of strengths and best practices as well as opportunities for improvement, identify faculty members' understanding of the university's values and objectives, measure the success of programs and policies, identify needs when it comes to training, job enhancement and career advancement of faculty and provide qualitative and quantitative data for a better understanding of variations and similarities among departments and colleges, it states.
Sherman said he plans to send a final draft of the resolution to SLU President John Crain for his consideration.
18 2017-04-06
Baton Rouge

SLU grad student combines love of horses with award-winning research


Kalie Beckers, of Loranger, who loves horses and her academic field of biology, has found a way to combine the two interests into award-winning research.

Beckers, a graduate student in biological sciences at Southeastern Louisiana University, recently received the R.J. Strawinski Memorial Research Award, presented by the South Central Branch of the American Society of Microbiology in recognition of outstanding presentations by graduate students.

Beckers’ award recognized her efforts to develop a solid methodology to collect fecal samples from horses and related species so that wider and more consistent research can be conducted, a news release said.

“Kalie has accomplished a lot in a short period of time. She proves it helps to work on projects that you love,” said SLU Biological Sciences Professor Gary Childers, who supervised her work.

Beckers, who will enter veterinary school in the fall, said, “We were looking for a standard method to collect samples so that potentially I can crowdsource."

She said crowdsourcing allows scientists to obtain information through "the enlistment of services by a wide group of people.”

“I love horses and work with them all the time at home," Beckers said. "I wanted to research something I was interested in while working in Dr. Childers’ lab. He studies bacteria, so we met in the middle — horses and their intestinal bacteria.”
18 2017-04-06
Baton Rouge

SLU Marketing Breakfast to feature media adviser for Trump campaign


A Baton Rouge marketing and advertising professional from Baton Rouge who served as a media adviser for President Donald Trump will serve as the guest speaker at Southeastern Louisiana University’s annual Marketing Breakfast on Tuesday.

Jay Connaughton, founder and partner of the firm People Who Think: Innovative Advertising, Innovative Politics and Fridge, will speak at the 8 a.m. event in the SLU Student Union Ballroom. The breakfast is sponsored by the Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management, the Southeastern Marketing Association and G. Dean Brunson, CPA, of Richmond, Virginia.

The program is open to students and the public. Tickets are $10 and can be ordered and prepaid online at tinyurl.com/marketingbreakfast2017 or at the door.

A native of Louisiana and graduate of LSU, Connaughton was selected to serve as a media adviser to the Trump campaign based on his work over the last 20 years on campaigns. His firm has earned numerous awards, including more than 100 Addy Awards.

For information, call (985) 549-2277.
18 2017-04-06
Baton Rouge

SLU Wind Symphony to present 'Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed and a Lot of Blue'


“Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed and a Lot of Blue,” a concert by the award-winning Southeastern Louisiana University Wind Symphony, will be presented at the Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts in downtown Hammond on Thursday.

Featuring a variety of music from various composers, the concert will be at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are adults $10; faculty, staff and seniors $5; and students are admitted free. SLU students must present their student IDs to receive tickets. Tickets are available at the Columbia Theatre box office at 220 E. Thomas St. or by calling (985) 543-4371.

Interim Director of Bands and Director of Athletic Bands Derek Stoughton said additional guests to perform include Robbie Malbrough, of Gonzales, and Lindsey Poret, of Luling, undergraduate clarinet students of professor Victor Drescher who were the winners of this year’s Southeastern Concerto Competition. Also featured will be SLU professor of piano Henry Jones, who will perform George Gershwin’s famous “Rhapsody in Blue.”

For more information, call (985) 549-2184.
18 2017-04-06
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN REMEMBERS DECEASED LIONS AT GOLDEN SILENCE


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GOLDEN SILENCE HELD AT SOUTHEASTERN -- Members of the Kinnison family of Hammond and Baton Rouge join others at Southeastern Louisiana University’s Golden Silence ceremony held on campus Monday evening (April 3). The annual event brings the campus community together for a remembrance ceremony in honor of members of the Southeastern family – students, faculty, alumni, staff and friends of the university – who died the previous year. The Kinnison family was there in tribute to the late Jimmie G. Kinnison of Hammond, a former accounting professor at Southeastern. Pictured are, from left, brother-in-law Dwayne Miller, widow Ruth Kinnison, granddaughter Taylor Kinnison, daughters Kathy Kinnison and JoAnn Kinnison Cook, daughter-in-law Shonda Kinnison, and son David Kinnison. Golden Silence is sponsored by the Southeastern Alumni Association.
18 2017-04-06
Hammond

SLU TAPPED AS SOLE IB CERTIFICATION UNIVERSITY FOR TEACHERS


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University is now the only university in the Gulf South authorized to offer courses leading to the International Baccalaureate (IB) Educator Certificate in Teaching and Learning.
The university is one of only 36 IB authorized certification institutions in the United States. The certification – which is granted by the International Baccalaureate Organization – prepares teachers to use advanced academic techniques in the growing number of IB schools. IB programs offer students in elementary through high school a comprehensive, demanding curriculum of advanced studies for highly motivated students.
“This is an excellent reflection of the quality of programs offered at Southeastern, not just for those students aspiring to become teachers, but to established teachers as well who are looking to improve their skills and knowledge,” said Shirley Jacob, interim dean of the College of Education.
“IB programs are increasing in number as more schools look to add the highly respected program that offers very high standards for teaching and a rigorous curriculum for students,” said Cherissa Vitter, IB coordinator for the university’s Department of Teaching and Learning and IB coordinator.
At present there are 10 schools in Louisiana, including two in Tangipahoa Parish, that offer the IB program, with most offering strictly the IB Diploma program. Some also offer IB programs in primary and middle schools and an IB career program, said Vitter, who serves as the director of the Louisiana Association of IB Schools.
The IB program started in 1968 as a diploma program in the United Kingdom, France and the United States as educators looked to develop an academically-challenging program to fully prepare students for success at the university level and beyond. IB programs are now offered worldwide at schools that meet the rigorous IB standards.
“The IB is pleased to welcome Southeastern Louisiana University into our network of higher education institutions that offer the IB educator certificates,” said IB Global Professional Development Director Anthony Tait. “This international symbol of excellence shapes educators into reflective practitioners and teacher researchers. It acknowledges teachers’ global mindset and commitment to teaching and learning in an international context. It is a testament to Southeastern that it has made this commitment to its teacher education program.”
“IB courses are designed to teach students how to learn, how to question and how to research,” Vitter said. “It takes a different approach for teachers than that used in advanced placement or honors courses.”
She said students enrolled in IB must take six different courses over two years that include language and literature, language acquisition, humanities, science, mathematics, and the arts. In addition, all students study philosophy, conduct research and complete a community service project. Each student is expected to engage in independent research in one of the selected areas and then write an extended essay on the topic.
“All the subjects are interdisciplinary and are designed to encourage students to think beyond a specific subject; for example, a student may be required to write an essay in response to a math question,” she said. “It requires a different kind of teacher.”
Teachers enrolling in Southeastern’s 100 percent online program can also take additional courses that lead to a Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction. Current teachers completing the program and a practicum that can take place at the candidate’s current school will earn a Certificate of International Education.
For more information on the certification program, contact Vitter via email at cherissa.vitter@southeastern.edu or call the Department of Teaching and Learning at 985-549-5248.
18 2017-04-02
Hammond

Trump campaign media adviser to speak at SLU


A Baton Rouge marketing and advertising professional who served as a media adviser for President Donald Trump will speak at Southeastern Louisiana University's annual Marketing Breakfast on April 11.
Jay Connaughton, founder and partner of People Who Think: Innovative Advertising, Innovative Politics and Fridge, will speak at the event at 8 a.m. in the Southeastern Student Union Ballroom.
The breakfast is sponsored by the marketing and supply chain management department, the Southeastern Marketing Association and G. Dean Brunson, CPA, of Richmond, Va.
The program is open to students and the general public. Tickets are $10 and can be ordered and prepaid online at tinyurl.com/marketingbreakfast2017 or at the door.
A native of Louisiana and graduate of LSU, Connaughton has a wide range of experience in corporate and political brands across multiple industries.
He was selected to serve as a media adviser to the Trump campaign based on his work over the past 20 years on campaigns for Republican U.S. senators, congressmen and other elected leaders at all levels of state government.
His firm has earned numerous awards, including more than 100 Addy Awards.
Call (985) 549-2277 for more information.
18 2017-03-31
Baton Rouge

Science on Tap presents “Designer Babies’


Reproductive technologies and their relationship to science fiction will be the topic of Southeastern Louisiana University’s next Science on Tap presentation on Tuesday.

Sponsored by the Department of Biological Sciences, the presentation titled “Designer Babies: Is Science Catching Up with Science Fiction?” by Professor of Biological Sciences Mary White, will be at 7 p.m. at Tope La Catering, 113 E. Thomas St. in Hammond. The lecture is free and open to all ages. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

Advances in reproductive technology will be discussed, including genome modification, so-called three-parent babies and progress on “uterine replicators,” as named by science fiction’s Lois McMaster Bujold.

“In 1932, Aldous Huxley’s ‘Brave New World’ introduced us to a future where babies were grown not born. Cloning and genetic/developmental modifications were commonplace, and children had no concept of parents,” White said. Such reproductive technologies probably seemed completely outrageous 85 years ago, White added.

“While we can’t yet grow human fetuses without mothers, in vitro fertilization has become commonplace, genetic modification of embryos is occurring, and cloning is certainly a possibility,” White said.

For information on this or future Science on Tap presentations, call the Department of Biological Sciences at (985) 549-3740.
18 2017-03-31
Baton Rouge

Southeastern Alumni Association plans Golden Silence ceremony April 3


The Southeastern Louisiana University Alumni Association will host its annual Golden Silence ceremony to honor deceased SLU alumni, students, faculty and staff or their family members on April 3.

The event will be held at 6 p.m. in the Pottle Performance Circle on Ned McGehee Drive in Friendship Circle on the SLU campus in Hammond.

“We invite the campus and the public to let us know if someone from the Southeastern family, such as students, faculty and staff or graduates, has passed away during the past year so that they can be honored at Golden Silence,” said Interim Alumni Association Director Julie Perise.

Perise added that the association also hosts its Eternal Chapter online, which memorializes all deceased alumni on an ongoing basis. The website can be accessed at southeastern.edu/alumni.

For more information, call (985) 549 2150 or (800) SLU-ALUM, or email slualumni@southeastern.edu. The event is free and open to the public.


18 2017-03-31
Baton Rouge

Southeastern Theatre presents ‘The Last Days of Judas Iscariot’


If Judas Iscariot, the Christian world’s incarnation of selfishness and betrayal, were put on trial today, what would transpire?

The answer to that question will be played out on Southeastern Louisiana University’s Vonnie Borden stage in Stephen Adly Guirgis’ “The Last Days of Judas Iscariot,” running at 7:30 each night April 4-7.

Admission is free for Southeastern students. General admission is $5. Tickets are available one hour before the performances at the ticket booth in D Vickers Hall.

Jessica Bouquet, adjunct theater professor, will make her directorial debut with the play, which she says is less about religion and more about forgiveness on a human level.

“If you think this production is about religion, it’s not,” she said. “It is a different perspective on who Judas Iscariot was as a human being and all the flaws that come with being a human. It also shows the power of forgiveness — not just forgiveness from a higher power but forgiving ourselves and participating in our own salvation or fate.”

Baxter Francis, of Baton Rouge, plays the lead role of Judas Iscariot, while Neal Eli, of Luling, plays Jesus of Nazareth. Other cast members and their characters include Alexis Durante, of Hammond, Fabiana Aiza Cunningham; Taylor Sinclair, of Hammond, Usef El-Fayoumy; Colin Ross, of Baton Rouge, Judge; Thomas Murphy, of Hammond, St. Peter and Caiaphas the Elder; Ben Norman, of Hammond, Butch Honeywell and St. Thomas; and Tyler Meyer of Prairieville, St. Matthew and Sigmund Freud.

For more information, call (985) 549-2184.
18 2017-03-30
Baton Rouge

SLU vocalists claim awards at Louisiana competition


Six Southeastern Louisiana University vocal performance students were finalists — including four first-place winners — at the recent Louisiana Chapter of the National Association of Teachers of Singing competition held at Northwestern State University in Natchitoches.

Receiving first place were Sara Cage, of Baton Rouge, sophomore in the women’s division; Lauren Gibson, of Walker, senior women’s division; Alfred Harper, of New Orleans, freshmen men’s division; and Cody Sires, of Chalmette, older student adult women and men’s division.

Other students recognized were William Dopp, of Independence, a student in SLU’s Community Music School, second in high school men’s division; and Michelle Guillot, of Slidell, second in younger advanced women’s division.

The auditions were judged by voice teachers from the NATS Louisiana Chapter. Students participated in lectures and master classes as part of the one-day conference.

Members of the SLU voice faculty who contributed to conference events included Kristen Marchiafava, Joy Ratliff, Alissa Rowe and Stephen Rushing.


18 2017-03-29
Hammond

Southeastern begins voting for mascot makeover



HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University fans will start voting Tuesday to decide between two makeover choices for the university’s lion mascot.

According to SELU, a committee of students, alumni, staff and stakeholders narrowed down the selections to two. Voting for "Roomie's Makeover" began Tuesday and will be open for one week until April 4.

“Perodically [sic], Roomie gets a facelift to keep up with changing trends,” Erin Cowser said. “It is time for an update, which will be revealed in the fall in time for football season. We’re going to Lion Up and change it up a bit.”

The university notes that there will be “final tweaks” made to the winning design including color and clothing changes.

Click here to cast your vote.
18 2017-03-29
Hammond

Science on Tap to present 'Designer Babies' Tuesday


Reproductive technologies and their relationship to science fiction will be the topic of Southeastern Louisiana University's next Science on Tap presentation on Tuesday, April 4.
Sponsored by the Department of Biological Sciences, the presentation titled "Designer Babies: Is Science Catching Up with Science Fiction?" by Professor of Biological Sciences Mary White, will be held at 7 p.m. at Tope La Catering, 113 East Thomas St. in Hammond. The lecture is free and open to all ages. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
White said advances in reproductive technology will be discussed, including genome modification, so-called three-parent babies and progress on "uterine replicators," as named by science fiction's Lois McMaster Bujold.
"In 1932 Aldous Huxley's 'Brave New World' introduced us to a future where babies were grown not born. Cloning and genetic/developmental modifications were commonplace, and children had no concept of parents," White said. "'Mother' was a dirty word. Science fiction has since given us similar scenarios in books and movies as diverse as 'Boys from Brazil,' 'Dune,' 'Tomorrow's Child,' 'Gattaca,' and even an episode of 'Star Wars.'"
White said such reproductive technologies probably seemed completely outrageous 85 years ago.
"While we can't yet grow human fetuses without mothers, in vitro fertilization has become commonplace, genetic modification of embryos is occurring, and cloning is certainly a possibility," White added.
For information on this or future Science on Tap presentations, contact the Department of Biological Sciences at 985-549-3740.
18 2017-03-29
Hammond

Students learn about different career options


Five speakers gave seventh graders insights about potentila future careers last week at Lucille Nesom Middle School.
The speakers included Diane Rabalais, nurse practitioner; Dr. Eric Summers, Southeastern Louisiana University vice president of student affairs; Valerie Young, Southeastern instructor; Lemar Marshall, Hammond City Council president; and Mia Marshall, artist and art teacher.
"We have come here to talk about what they want to do when they grow up," Professor Celina Echols said. "I don't think many of them have thought about college."
The presentation is an aspect of her brainchild, the Lions Up Leadership Academy, Echols said. The academy focuses on selected students from at-risk schools who have academic potential.
In a previous Lion Up Leadership Academy meeting, the students were taken to Southeastern to tour the campus, see the dorms, academic buildings and dining halls.
The students will meet again Thursday for a second line. Echols said music education students at Southeastern will be volunteering their time and talents to help encourage and motivate the students to do well on their standardized tests.
Echols said she doesn't want to count her "eggs before they hatch" but is she hoping to receive a grant to help fund the program so it can continue to provide services to its children in future years.
This is the first round of students to participate in the Lions Up Leadership Academy, she said.
18 2017-03-28
Hammond

SLU MEDIA PROFESSORS WEIGH IN ON ISSUE OF "FAKE NEWS"


HAMMOND – Anyone plugged in, especially if they’re on Twitter, has likely heard the term ‘fake news’ lately, but many questions surround this resurgence of partisan journalism.

Members of the communication faculty at Southeastern Louisiana University tackled these questions at a panel discussion sponsored by the university’s Sims Memorial Library and Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society.

Participants in the panel, held Tuesday, March 21, included four Southeastern communication experts on the topics of media and research: Claire Procopio, Joe Burns, and Joe Mirando; and Stephen Sanders of the library’s Reference Department.

Mirando, who has a strong background in newspaper reporting, said that while fake news may seem like something new to most people, it is anything but.

“When you take a look at the kinds of things we hold dear -- like the Constitution, the First Amendment, and the ideals behind us becoming a country and a democracy during the American Revolution -- these were all put together by people who were manipulating how we perceive the truth,” he said. “If you study the journalism of that period, it was based on partisan politics, church concerns, etc. Truth was basically considered to be ‘what best serves us.’”

In the late 1800s, Mirando said there was a shift in reporting in which journalists began to embrace a style based on investigation and observable evidence. Conversely, the old style fell into disfavor and even ill-repute. Mirando fears, however, that with the advent of virtual reality and artificial intelligence technologies, the old style of advocacy journalism will return and the trend of fake news production will rise to new extremes.

With a background in radio and web technology, Burns also shares this concern. He pointed to technologies such as Photoshop and Voco as examples. Currently in the beta phase, once completed Voco will allow users to take a voice recording of a person and, simply put, create a voice identical to theirs, he explained.

“I can literally erase the words she spoke and use her voice to say whatever I want ‘her’ to say,” he said. “Fake news is going to go through video, audio, and within a year these things will exist. If you would like to see me riding a unicorn to work and yelling something like ‘I shall teach how to run through a plate glass window today,’ you can do it; and it sounds like me saying it.”

So what are people to do in this brave, new “Orwellian” world? Procopio, who specializes in public speaking and rhetoric, said consumers will have to take on a more “buyer beware” attitude, while citizen watchdogs groups and reporters will face more pressure than ever before to keep media and officials honest. But she warned against the average news consumer becoming jaded from the deluge of propaganda and hoaxes.

“Our temptation as consumers, I think, is to shut down, and to say ‘I don’t care anymore, this doesn’t really affect my day-to-day so I’m going to quit being a significant news consumer,’” she said. “I think the reaction one needs to have is the opposite. You need to consume lots of news so your ‘detector’ will be able to go off and say ‘this feels off to me.’”

Sanders, who served decades as a chaplain in the National Guard, offered a perspective taken from the pages of postmodernism, which holds that truth is often determined by the most powerful.

“I think the answer is that the people who don’t have power want it, and they use fake news to reach for it,” he said. “There are also those who use fake news to protect and defend those with power from others trying to take power from them. This makes it very difficult to sort out when you’re trying to listen to both sides. When you begin to look at it from this dynamic it becomes, I think, easier to understand what’s really going on.”
18 2017-03-28
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN HOSTS UL SYSTEM’S ACADEMIC SUMMIT


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University will host the sixth annual Academic Summit sponsored by the University of Louisiana System and its nine member institutions March 30-31.

The summit features a wide range of activities, including a performance art showcase, art exhibition, presentations on undergraduate student research, and a faculty service learning conference.

“For several years now, we have gathered annually to celebrate and showcase the academic excellence that thrives throughout our nine universities,” said Jim Henderson, president and chief executive officer of the University of Louisiana System. “The presentations and co-curricular activities that include service learning, undergraduate research, and artistic expression exemplify the mission of the system, which is to emphasize teaching, research and community service to enhance the quality of life for Louisiana’s citizens.”

“Southeastern is pleased to be the host institution for the system’s Academic Summit, which showcases the diversity and strength of the UL System,” said Southeastern President John L. Crain.

The program kicks off Thursday afternoon from 4-5 p.m. in the Pottle Auditorium with the Performing Arts Showcase, which will include performances and a reading by students from Grambling State University, McNeese State University, Nicholls State University, Northwestern State University, Southeastern, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, and the University of New Orleans. The art exhibition and reception will follow at 5 p.m. in the Southeastern Contemporary Art Gallery, and will feature art in a variety of media by students from nearly all of the UL System institutions.

Both the Performing Arts Showcase and the art exhibition are free and open to the general public.

Featured speakers at the summit on Friday include Southeastern Professor of Philosophy Barbara Forrest, whose keynote presentation is titled “From Plato to Public Service.” Educator and architect Brad Deal, an adjunct instructor at the Louisiana Tech University School of Design, will discuss a partnership between the university and MedCamps of Louisiana, a non-profit organization that provides free summer camp experiences for children with chronic illnesses and disabilities.

The summit will also include faculty presentations on service-learning projects created and developed at their respective campuses that demonstrate the educational opportunities and learning experiences gained through such courses and projects.

In addition, undergraduate students will present 80 oral and poster presentations on a wide range of topics throughout the duration of the summit.

Additional information, including a detailed schedule, can be found on the Academic Summit website at southeastern.edu/resources/academic_summit/.

The University of Louisiana System is comprised of nine member universities: Grambling State, Louisiana Tech, McNeese State, Nicholls State, Northwestern State, Southeastern, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, the University of Louisiana at Monroe, and the University of New Orleans. It is the largest higher education system in Louisiana, enrolling more than 90,400 students.
18 2017-03-28
New Orleans

Roomie the lion to get new look; see the choices


Roomie, the lion mascot of Southeastern Louisiana University, will undergo a general makeover based on an online vote by students, faculty, staff and fans. One of two new looks is to be selected.

"Perodically, Roomie gets a facelift to keep up with changing trends," said Erin Cowser, executive director of public and governmental affairs at the Hammond university. "It is time for an update, which will be revealed in the fall in time for football season. We're going to Lion Up and change it up a bit."

A university committee of students, alumni, staff and stakeholders narrowed the possible selections to two. Interested individuals may vote online between Tuesday (March 28) and April 4 at southeastern.edu/roomiemakeover; everyone is one vote.

According to the university, Southeastern first chose the lion as its mascot in 1931. The mascot was nameless until the university acquired a live lion in the early 1960s.

In a 1963 election Lobo was selected as the lion's name, creating a rather awkward situation: Southeastern had a lion whose name was Spanish for "wolf." In 1964 the name was changed to honor the late Hollis "Roomie" Wilson, a beloved biology professor and fervent Lions fan.
18 2017-03-24
Baton Rouge

From grad to mayor on the same day


TANGIPAHOA — For Trashica Robinson, Dec. 10, 2016, is a day that will forever stand out in her memory. It was on that day when she accomplished a feat that few, if any, will every experience: graduation from college and election as the mayor of her hometown.

Robinson remembers that she went from graduation ceremonies at Southeastern Louisiana University, where she had just been awarded a bachelor’s degree in marketing, to her home in the Village of Tangipahoa to await the results of the runoff for mayor. When all the returns were in, Robinson learned that she had pulled off a major political victory that few expected.

“It was a life-changing experience for me. When I decided to run for mayor, no one gave me a chance, she said. "I was running against the incumbent mayor, Brenda Nevels, and Michael Jackson, a former National League Football player.

"I was just a local girl. … I had no family and no financial backing. All I had was my desire to become mayor of Tangipahoa and find ways to improve my hometown,” she said.

The newly elected mayor said she also credits college for inspiring her to run for office, with one instructor in particular.

“One of my instructors, Anna Bass, always shared a ‘quote of the day’ with the class before getting started. One in particular stood out to me,” Robinson said. “It was something like ‘Every day we should stop and appreciate everything around us.’ One day, I did that in my community, and I decided to make the wrong things right and make the right things better."

“I was so impressed when Ms. Robinson brought up in a class discussion in my business strategy class that she was running for mayor of her hometown,” said David Wyld, professor of management and business administration, in a news release from Southeastern. “We talk so much about getting young people involved in the political process and in making real change happen in our communities, and she’s a wonderful exemplar of this.

"I’d like to think that some of what she learned in my class — how to better communicate, how to think more strategically and how to effectively lead change in organizations — will serve her well in office," Wyld said. "All of us at Southeastern should be so proud of her and use her story as an example for future students on how to take what they have learned here and work to make a difference.”

Robinson said that as graduation approached she had resigned herself to whatever the outcome of the mayor’s race might be.

“When I started thinking about running for mayor, I wasn’t sure if that was for me," she said. "I would have been content to take my degree and enter the corporate world. But my desire to help my hometown kept driving me on. The odds were against me, but I trusted in God and I prayed that he would elevate me for a special time in my life like this one.”

The Village of Tangipahoa, located just south of Kentwood on U.S. 51, counts an official population of 748 residents. Robinson said about 60 percent of the registered voters cast ballots and that she won in the runoff against Jackson with 58.7 percent of the votes.

A college degree and the position of mayor are crowning points in Robinson’s life. The mayor, 37, and the mother of a 19-year-old daughter, Bianca Robinson, said that her life has not always been easy.

Trashica Robinson's mother, Bernadine Robinson, was killed when struck by a vehicle when Trashica Robinson was only 13 years old. Her father, Ralph Coleman, who lived in New Orleans, died recently.

Trashica Robinson, who was reared in Tangipahoa by her grandparents, attended O.W. Dillon Elementary and Kentwood High School and said she yearned to earn a college degree at some point in her life. She has worked for five years for the Southeast Advocates for Family Empowerment, in Hammond and said the directors and staff of that agency supported her plan to earn a college degree. That support has continued since her tenure as mayor began in January, she added.

“Over and over again, the same thoughts keep coming back to me. … I want to give back to my community. I decided to stay home, in this village, so that I can make a difference for my people. Tangipahoa is a special place. We are all family. … We all know each other, and we all need to support each other. I want to be a part of making this a better community,” she explained.

Trashica Robinson said she knows she faces challenges ahead. The position of mayor of Tangipahoa is a part-time one, but she said she has had to work full time to try and accomplish all the needs of her village.

The new mayor said she has reached out and solicited the support of members of the town council, including Sheila Martin, Ricky Coleman and Debra Cyprien, in an effort to resolve a multitude of challenges faced by Tangipahoa.

“I tell everyone that this is going to be a team effort. I can’t do this job alone. I need everyone’s help to accomplish the things that need to get done. I am going to emphasize the work team during my time as mayor,” she said.

She said that her first task is to bring Tangipahoa “into the 21st century.” She said she is working to organize the village’s management system so she and the few city employees can better serve the village’s residents.

The most important need, at this time, is finding help for Tangipahoa’s only police officer, Chief Darrell Martin.

“We have got to find a way to get the chief some help. He is on call 24 hours a day, and he just cannot do this alone. He can’t keep going on without some much needed help,” she said.

Trashica Robinson said two unsolved murders are on the village’s books and that the illegal use of drugs is becoming a problem.

“I have a special care for people with addictions. If I had a million dollars, I would build a detox and treatment center for those with addictions. My mother had a drinking problem but she still helped me and she loved me. She did not intend to become an alcoholic. I treat those with addictions the same way I would treat CEOs of a major corporation. We are all God’s children, some of us just need extra help and care,” she said.

A major challenge facing Trashica Robinson is a lack of finances. The village is supported by a small sales tax and does have an ad valorem, or property taxes, to support its activities. Tangipahoa owns and maintains its own water and sewer systems, but Trashica Robinson said many residents are in arrears in payment for water and sewer services and so she is working on a plan so residents can catch up on their overdue bills.

"We have only two village workers, and they are responsible for the water and sewer system. I have already heard that the village is not cutting the grass. …How can just two workers keep our water and sewer system going and do all the other things people want? My priority is to provide clean water and a safe sewer system. Again, we need more help in our maintenance department,” she said.

The Village of Tangipahoa was one of the hardest hit communities in the August flooding, and Trashica Robinson said about 50 percent of the permanent population is now living in temporary mobile homes in Hammond and elsewhere. The new mayor wants to bring those residents back to the village.

“I want to bring my people home…this is where they belong. If we can get the people back, maybe out financial situation will improve and we can start to accomplish the things I want to accomplish,” she said.

Trashica Robinson also wishes that more employment opportunities were available in Tangipahoa. “People tell me, ‘I need a job…help me find a job.’ I wish I could find more jobs locally but that will take some time. Most people who live here have to go elsewhere to find employment,” she said.

She said she wants to tackle the problem of blighted housing and buildings in the village and provide better recreational opportunities for the village’s young people. Tangipahoa has no school and local children attend the schools in Kentwood.

But despite the many problems and challenges, Trashica Robinson said she is optimistic about the future.

“If nothing else, I want to create a sense of pride in our community. I was raised by my grandparents and we were poor … but we had a sense of pride and a sense of love that meant more than riches," she said. "We must come together as a family; it’s going to take all of us. But I believe that we can do this. I get up early every morning and either walk or drive through our neighborhoods and I see the possibility if we all work together. I’m optimistic, I’m full of hope, I have a passion and a dream and I want to share that with my people that I love."

Trashica Robinson said she has been blessed to have the services of Lakeishia Briggs, who was the owner of a local beauty salon but who has dedicated her services to the village as clerk and office manager.

She said that one source of strength in Tangipahoa is the churches. “We have five churches in our corporate limits and they are the backbone of the community. We look to the leadership that is provided by the churches to help us remedy our problems. We are in a dark place right now, but I’m hoping that things will turn around and that we will come together the way that we should. I pray every day and I meditate and ask God to give me the strength I need. I pray that I can just be an instrument of positive change…just a member of the team that it will take to make our home a better place for all,” she said.

Trashica Robinson said that when a visitor comes to Tangipahoa, she tells them, “ride around and take a look at where we live … and then I want you to promise to come back a year from now and ride around again and took at our village. I guarantee you that it will look better a year from now. That’s my pledge, and I’m going to do all I can to see that I life up to that pledge.”
18 2017-03-24
Hammond

SLU HOLDS 4TH ANNUAL TECH-CONNECT CAREER FAIR


PHOTO:
CONNECTING STUDENTS WITH EMPLOYERS – Nick Curry, right, a senior mechanical engineering technology major from Covington, discusses a possible career at Entergy with Eric Arteaga, an Entergy representative at Southeastern Louisiana University’s Department of Computer Science and Industrial Technology’s fourth annual Tech-Connect Career Fair held Wednesday (March 22). Over 30 employers participated in the fair this year, which was co-sponsored by Southeastern’s Office of Career Services.
18 2017-03-23
Baton Rouge

SLU reduces costs, adds courses to summer semester


Southeastern Louisiana University is re-tooling its summer semester by reducing net cost for a three-credit hour course to less than $900 and expanding high demand offerings.

Re-imagined as “Summer Smart,” the semester also will include an increased number of online and hybrid courses.

“We took another look at our summer semester after listening carefully to the needs of our students,” said Southeastern Interim Provost Tena L. Golding. “More students can now benefit from summer courses that will advance progress toward their degrees in a more timely manner and at the same time reap significant financial savings.”

New summer offerings such as Marketing 205: Social Media and Personal Branding, as well as additional sections of required and elective courses such as Psychology 101 will be among the offerings available.

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“With new courses, additional sections and an infusion of more online or hybrid courses, our goal is to make summer semester as easily accessible to as many of our students as possible,” SLU President John L. Crain said. “Using scholarships, waivers and other methods to reduce the net cost of attendance for the typical student is an additional incentive for them to attend and enhance progress toward graduation.”

The early deadline to apply for summer semester is May 1 with an application fee of $20. Students also may apply during the late application period that concludes June 1 with a late fee of $50. For current students, priority registration opens March 27, and open registration begins April 3.

For more information, visit southeastern.edu/summersmart or email the Office of Records and Registration at records@southeastern.edu.


18 2017-03-23
Baton Rouge

SLU’s Columbia Theatre to present Eisenhower Dance


Southeastern Louisiana University’s Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts will present Eisenhower Dance at 7:30 p.m. Saturday in the downtown Hammond theater.

“Eisenhower Dance has spent the last 25 years giving life to the repertoire of internationally known choreographers, as well as the highly acclaimed work of Artistic Director Laurie Eisenhower,” said Theatre Director Roy Blackwood. “Established in metro Detroit by Eisenhower in 1991, the company presents an annual subscription series and tours internationally.”

Tickets for Eisenhower Dance are $26 in the orchestra or balcony or $40 in the loge. Tickets can be purchased at the Columbia Theatre Box Office at 220 E. Thomas St., Hammond, which is open 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday-Friday, online at columbiatheatre.org, or by phone at (985) 543-4371.

All SLU faculty, retired faculty or university staff with ID may purchase one ticket and receive one ticket at half price.

For more information, contact the Columbia Theatre at (985) 543-4366.
18 2017-03-23
Baton Rouge

LSBDC to hold seminar on starting, financing a business


The Louisiana Small Business Development Center at Southeastern Louisiana University will hold a free seminar Tuesday designed to help residents interested in starting a business.

Co-sponsored with Northshore SCORE, the seminar titled “Starting and Financing Your Business Idea” will take place from 9 a.m. to noon, at the Southeast Louisiana Business Center located at 1514 Martens Drive, Hammond.

“This workshop is highly recommended for all individuals interested in determining the feasibility of their business ideas and for those planning to start or who have recently started a small business. It would also be helpful for anyone seeking a small business loan or wanting to learn more about business planning,” said Sandy Summers, assistant director of the Small Business Development Center.

Topics to be covered include writing a business plan, sources of funds for start-up and expansion, small business resources, and required licenses.

Brandy Boudreaux, of Louisiana SBDC at Southeastern, is the scheduled guest speaker.

Although there is no cost to attend, seating is only guaranteed for pre-registered attendees. To register or for more information, call (985) 549-3831. Online registration is also available at lsbdc.org.
18 2017-03-23
Hammond

No mumps here yet


Local health experts advise people to stay vigilant about protecting against germs to avoid the mumps that has been found in students at Louisiana State University.
Neither Southeastern Louisiana University nor North Oaks Health System has seen cases of mumps.


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Louisiana Office of Public Health issued a clinical advisory March 11 after it found several LSU students caught the disease at the Baton Rouge campus. The Office of Public Health requested health care providers in the Baton Rouge area to be alert for the contagious disease, which is caused by a virus.
The office reported that at least 12 mumps cases have been found in Louisiana as of March 15. There was a large outbreak of mumps in Arkansas earlier.
Pamela Vaccaro, North Oaks Health System's infection prevention director, said while the local hospital had a few patients who suspected they had mumps, none have been diagnosed with it.
Vaccaro said the disease is most characterized by swollen cheeks caused by blocked saliva glands by the ear or jaw. Other symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, aches and loss of appetite, which are harder to pinpoint to mumps. Too often, people do not realize they have the mumps until it is too late, she said.
"That's why it spreads so easily," she said.
Vaccaro said universities and colleges are common sites for cases of mumps since campuses have many people in one area, sharing the same spaces for a prolonged time. In dormitories, students may share from the same eating utensils and other personal items, which can spread contagious illnesses, she said.
However, she said mumps can happen anywhere, so everyone should exercise caution. For example, people should be vigilant about washing their hands throughout the day, avoiding drinking after someone, avoiding sharing eating utensils and cups and covering their mouths when coughing and sneezing.
It is important for someone who has mumps to isolate themselves from others to prevent spreading the disease, she said.
Andrea Peevy, director of Southeastern's University Health Center, has put together a fact sheet about mumps for students. She has not seen any cases at the health center and is not aware of any faculty, staff or students being diagnosed with mumps.
The fact sheet includes information on the disease, its symptoms, which typically last 7-10 days, and ways to avoid it. The fact sheet states "unvaccinated people are nine times more likely to get mumps than people with two doses of MMR vaccine."
It also states that for most children, mumps is typically mild. However, it can cause lasting problems, including meningitis, deafness and swelling of the brain, among other serious issues. In rare cases, it can lead to death.
She and Vaccaro emphasized the importance of getting vaccinated against mumps, which is typically done to children. It is recommended that children be vaccinated against mumps twice. Vaccaro said people should consult their doctors on testing to see if they are immunized against mumps and how to get the vaccine if needed.
In its clinical advisory, the Office of Public Health states the mumps vaccination is 88 percent effective. Therefore, mumps should be suspected in individuals meeting the clinical case definition even if they have been vaccinated.
The advisory states that if health care providers suspect mumps, a buccal swab should be collected for testing. If a patient is clinically diagnosed with mumps, regardless of laboratory testing, the case must be reported immediately to Office of Public Health by calling 800-256-2748.
18 2017-03-23
Hammond

Motivated to become extremists: Suppressed women more likely to find roles in terrorist groups


Women in the western world may take for granted their basic rights to own property, drive and own a bank account whereas in other societies these rights are limited to none.
Professor Margaret Gonzalez-Perez of Southeastern Louisiana University spoke at the Hammond Kiwanis Club meeting Tuesday about the extreme measures some women in suppressed societies take for equal rights - terrorism.
Between domestic terrorism and international terrorism, Gonzalez-Perez said women are more likely to join, and have a larger presence or authority in, domestic terrorist groups because of the groups' objectives or targets.
Domestic groups target citizens and governments of their own states, whereas international terrorist groups target "nebulous hard to define concepts" outside of their borders such as the western world, capitalism or other broad concepts.
Domestic terrorist groups in Latin America are often comprised of roughly 40 - 60 percent women, she said. This is because the women in the groups are often trying to overthrow the restrictions of women's roles by overthrowing the society that is restrictive toward them.
"If women are second or 10th class citizens that tends to give them a lot more motivation to move into these terrorism organizations," Gonzalez-Perez said. "The terrorist organizations have kind of a symbiotic relationship with the women because the terrorist organizations have to be willing to accept them into policy-making roles, leadership roles and even combat roles."
In international terrorist groups, she said women are generally in supportive roles, rarely in combat roles and never in leadership roles.
In some instances, the government under attack would come together and offer negotiations because they want peace with the powerful terrorist organization, she said. This, she said, has resulted in several instances where a former terrorist would become a member of parliament such as former Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff. Rousseff was impeached in 2016 but has a "Marxist guerrilla" background, according to other media reports.
Gonzalez-Perez believes observing and understanding the motives behind terrorism can potentially be an important lesson on policy. She said if the wome in suppressed societies had better or more opportunities, then they may be less inclined to result to terrorism to be heard, to make change.
"Sometimes we kind of get bogged down in religion or are they leftists, are they right-wing, or are they fascists or communists, but really when you look at what they do and why they do it, that you can get down to the nitty gritty of the cause of a lot of these groups," she said. "I think that can help create policies to try and stop some of these terrorist movements."
Gonzalez-Perez expands more on this topic in her book Women and Terrorism: Female Activity in Domestic and International Terror Groups. She will present a free public lecture today at 2 p.m. in the Southeastern Student Union Theatre on women in science.
18 2017-03-23
Hammond

SLU ALUMNI ASSOCIATION PLANS GOLDEN SILENCE PROGRAM APRIL 3


HAMMOND -- The Southeastern Louisiana University Alumni Association will host its annual Golden Silence ceremony to honor deceased Southeastern alumni, students, faculty and staff or their family members, on Monday, April 3.

The annual event will be held at 6 p.m. in the Pottle Performance Circle on Ned McGehee Drive in Friendship Circle.

“We invite the campus and the public to let us know if someone from the Southeastern family, such as students, faculty and staff or graduates, has passed away during the past year so that they can be honored at Golden Silence,” said Interim Alumni Association Director Julie Perise.

Perise added that the association also hosts its Eternal Chapter online, which memorializes all deceased alumni on an ongoing basis. The web site can be accessed at southeastern.edu/alumni.

For more information, contact the Alumni Association at 985-549 2150, 1-800-SLU-ALUM or slualumni@southeastern.edu. The event is free and open to the public.
18 2017-03-23
Hammond

Southeastern’s Science on Tap presents "Designer Babies"


HAMMOND –Reproductive technologies and their relationship to science fiction will be the topic of Southeastern Louisiana University’s next Science on Tap presentation on Tuesday, April 4.

Sponsored by the Department of Biological Sciences, the presentation titled “Designer Babies: Is Science Catching Up with Science Fiction?” by Professor of Biological Sciences Mary White, will be held at 7 p.m. at Tope La Catering, 113 East Thomas St. in Hammond. The lecture is free and open to all ages. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

White said advances in reproductive technology will be discussed, including genome modification, so-called three-parent babies, and progress on “uterine replicators,” as named by science fiction’s Lois McMaster Bujold.

“In 1932 Aldous Huxley’s ‘Brave New World’ introduced us to a future where babies were grown not born. Cloning and genetic/developmental modifications were commonplace, and children had no concept of parents,” White said. “‘Mother’ was a dirty word. Science fiction has since given us similar scenarios in books and movies as diverse as ‘Boys from Brazil,’ ‘Dune,’ ‘Tomorrow’s Child,’ ‘Gattaca,’ and even an episode of ‘Star Wars.’”

White said such reproductive technologies probably seemed completely outrageous 85 years ago.

“While we can’t yet grow human fetuses without mothers, in vitro fertilization has become commonplace, genetic modification of embryos is occurring, and cloning is certainly a possibility,” White added.

For information on this or future Science on Tap presentations, contact the Department of Biological Sciences at 985-549-3740.

PHOTO:
DESIGNER BABIES – Southeastern Louisiana University Professor of Biological Sciences Mary White will deliver the next Science on Tap presentation titled “Designer Babies: Is Science Catching Up with Science Fiction?” on April 4 at 7:30 p.m. at Tope La Catering.
18 2017-03-21
Baton Rouge

Author Danielle Evans will take part in SLU program


Danielle Evans, who wrote the popular short story collection “Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self,” will visit Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond on Monday, March 20, as part of the institution’s Common Read program.

Evans, who teaches fiction at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, will meet with students and the public throughout the day.

Sponsored by the Department of English and the Southeastern Writing Center, Common Read provides students and community members the opportunity to read selected works and then meet a contemporary author.

Events include student presentations on the author’s work at 9:30 a.m., an 11 a.m. question-and-answer session with the author, and a 6:30 p.m. public reading by Evans followed by a book signing and reception. All events are open to the public and will be held in the Student Union Theatre.

Evans is known for her stories that reflect the experiences of being in settings where she was the only African American, explained David Hanson, head of the Department of English. The sense of discomfort of not belonging is a common theme in her work, and her feelings on race are reflected in her stories, he added.
18 2017-03-21
Hammond

COLUMBIA THEATRE PRESENTS EISENHOWER DANCE MARCH 25


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University’s Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts will present Eisenhower Dance in one performance only on March 25, at 7:30 p.m. in the downtown Hammond theatre.
Praised by critics as one of the nation’s premier contemporary dance companies, Eisenhower Dance has received overwhelming critical acclaim along with enthusiastic audience support, said Columbia Theatre Director Roy Blackwood.
“Eisenhower Dance has spent the last 25 years giving life to the repertoire of internationally known choreographers, as well as the highly acclaimed work of Artistic Director Laurie Eisenhower,” said Blackwood. “Established in metro Detroit by Eisenhower in 1991, the company presents an annual subscription series and tours internationally.”
Eisenhower Dance has performed works by choreographers Edgar Zendejas, David Parsons, Lar Lubovitch, Ron de Jesus, Gina Patterson, Lauren Edson and Harrison McEldowney, to name a few. The company’s concert schedule has included tours across the United States, as well as Europe and Russia.
The company has received numerous grants and awards for its work, including support from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Kresge Foundation, the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan, the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, the Knight Foundation, the National Dance Project and many others.
Tickets for Eisenhower Dance are $26 in the orchestra or balcony and $40 in the loge. Tickets can be purchased at the Columbia Theatre Box Office at 220 East Thomas Street in Hammond, which is open 11 a.m. – 4 p.m., Monday-Friday, online at columbiatheatre.org, or by phone at 985-543-4371.
All Southeastern faculty, retired faculty or university staff with ID may purchase one ticket for the production and receive one ticket at half price. Both tickets must be purchased in the same transaction and for the same price at the Columbia box office. For more information, contact the Columbia Theatre at 985-543-4366.

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EISENHOWER DANCE– Southeastern’s Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts will present Eisenhower Dance on March 25, at 7:30 p.m., in the downtown Hammond theatre. Tickets are available at 985-543-4371 or online at columbiatheatre.org.
18 2017-03-20
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN VOCALISTS CLAIM AWARDS AT LOUISIANA COMPETITION


HAMMOND – Six Southeastern Louisiana University vocal performance students were finalists – including four first place winners – at the recent Louisiana Chapter of the National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS) competition held recently at Northwestern State University in Natchitoches.
Receiving first place nods were Sara Cage of Baton Rouge, sophomore in the women’s division; Lauren Gibson of Walker, senior women’s division; Alfred Harper of New Orleans, freshmen men’s division; and Cody Sires of Chalmette, older student adult women and men’s division.
Other students recognized were William Dopp of Indpenenence, a student in Southeastern’s Community Music School, second in high school men’s division; and Michelle Guillot of Slidell, second in younger advanced women’s division.
Vivian McCalman of Mandeville and Rachel Denton of Jena also advanced to the final round, both competing in the senior women’s division. In all 17 Southeastern music students competed in the competition.
The auditions were judged by voice teachers from the NATS Louisiana Chapter. Students participated in lectures and master classes as part of the one-day conference.
Members of the Southeastern voice faculty who contributed to conference events included Kristen Marchiafava, Joy Ratliff, Alissa Rowe, and Stephen Rushing.

PHOTO:
SOUTHEASTERN STUDENTS WIN ACCOLADES AT COMPETITION – Southeastern students who were honored at the recent Louisiana Chapter of the National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS) competition included, from left, William Dopp, Independence; Cody Sires, Chalmette; Sara Cage, Baton Rouge; Michelle Guillot, Slidell; Lauren Gibson, Walker; and Alfred Harper, New Orleans.
18 2017-03-20
Hammond

SLU REDUCES COST, ADDS HIGH DEMAND CLASSES FOR SUMMER


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University is re-tooling its summer semester by reducing net cost for a three-credit hour course to less than $900 and expanding high demand offerings. Re-imagined as “Summer Smart,” the semester will also include an increased number of online and hybrid courses.
“We took another look at our summer semester after listening carefully to the needs of our students,” said Southeastern Interim Provost Tena L. Golding. “More students can now benefit from summer courses that will advance progress toward their degrees in a more timely manner and at the same time reap significant financial savings.”
Students spoke and Southeastern responded. New summer offerings such as Marketing 205: Social Media and Personal Branding, as well as additional sections of required and elective courses such as Psychology 101 will be among the hundreds of offerings available.
“With new courses, additional sections and an infusion of more online or hybrid courses, our goal is to make summer semester as easily accessible to as many of our students as possible,” Southeastern President John L. Crain said. “Using scholarships, waivers and other methods to reduce the net cost of attendance for the typical student is an additional incentive for them to attend and enhance progress toward graduation.”
“Summer Smart” savings will result in reduced net cost of attendance for typical undergraduate students. With an anticipated net cost of less than $900 for a three-credit hour course, Southeastern’s summer semester will provide the highest education value with the lowest cost of four-year colleges in south Louisiana. Summer semester terms range from four to eight weeks.
Hybrid courses combine face-to-face and online instruction for students, which is embraced by traditional and non-traditional students alike who are able to schedule their time around fewer physical trips to campus.
“While we designed these changes based on the needs and demands of our current students, we also provide enhanced opportunites for high school students and welcome students currently attending other universities who are interested in getting a head start on the upcoming academic year,” added Golding.
The early deadline to apply for summer semester is May 1 with an application fee of $20. Students may also apply during the late application period that concludes June 1 with an additional late fee of $50. For current students, priority registration opens March 27, and open registration begins April 3.
For more information on Southeastern’s summer sessions, visit southeastern.edu/summersmart or contact the Office of Records and Registration at records@southeastern.edu.
18 2017-03-17
Baton Rouge

SLU conference gives boost to women in business


The Louisiana Small Business Development Center at Southeastern Louisiana University, with Tangipahoa Professional Women, will host Women Mean Business 2017 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 23 in the Student Union Ballroom in Hammond.

“The Women Mean Business conference will provide high impact strategies to help women of all ages survive and thrive individually and professionally,” said Sandy Summers, assistant director of the LSBDC. “This full-day event will be jam-packed with knowledge, tools, resources and connections.”

Women Mean Business presenters include international speaker and leadership coach Dima Ghawi and President and CEO of North Oaks Health System Michele Sutton.

The event also will address wellness issues for women. Panelists include Dr. Kimberly Guillory, of Magnolia OB/GYN; Paige Moody, of Southeastern’s Health Center; and Dr. Denise Rollette, of Rollette Chiropractic.

A new feature will be the Business and Career Success Panel, which will concentrate on growth and success for female business owners and professional women. Panelists include Ghawi; Danielle Munro, of Home Instead Senior Care; and Tammy Earles, of Edward Jones.

Table, vendor and ad sponsorships are available for businesses interested in participating in this event.

Cost to attend the event is $35 in advance, $45 on event day and includes lunch; SLU students may attend at no charge with code WMBLIONUP, but advance registration is necessary.

To register or for information about sponsorships, visit tangipw.org/wmb, call (985) 549-3831 or email lsbdc.slu@lsbdc.org.
18 2017-03-16
Hammond

AUTHOR EVANS FEATURED IN SLU’S COMMON READ PROGRAM


HAMMOND – The author of the popular short story collection “Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self” will visit Southeastern Louisiana University Monday, March 20, as part of the institution’s Common Read program.
Danielle Evans, who teaches fiction at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, will meet with students and the public throughout the day.
Sponsored by the Department of English and the Southeastern Writing Center, Common Read provides students and community members the opportunity to read selected works and then meet a contemporary author.
Events that day include student presentations on the author’s work at 9:30 a.m., an 11 a.m. question and answer session with the author, and a 6:30 p.m. public reading by Evans followed by a book signing and reception. All events are open to the public and will be held in the Student Union Theatre.
Evans is known for her stories that reflect the experiences of being in settings where she was the only African-American, explained David Hanson, head of the Department of English. The sense of discomfort of not belonging is a common theme in her work, and her feelings on race are reflected in her stories, he added.
Evans, who previously taught at Missouri State University, received her undergraduate degree in anthropology from Columbia University in New York and a master of fine arts degree in fiction from the Iowa Writers Workshop.
“For several years now, we’ve sponsored the Common Read program, featuring a prominent, contemporary author, and it always serves as an exciting experience for our students,” said Hanson. “By meeting and talking with an author who they’re studying in class, students gain a rare opportunity to see deeply into an author’s life of writing.
18 2017-03-10
Hammond

SLU faculty pass new resolution


By LAUREN LANGLOIS staffwriter@hammondstar.com | 0 comments
Southeastern Louisiana University's Faculty Senate wants the administration to include faculty input when deciding to discontinue any future degree programs.
The body passed a resolution Wednesday, stating the administration should institute a policy that appoints at least two Faculty Senate members or proxies to any committees set up to consider program cuts in the future.


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The senate also passed a resolution to stand with the Southeastern Student Government Association in opposing any further cuts to higher education.
The resolution on deciding program discontinuation points out the university has been on the American Association of University Professors' censure list for more than four years. The university joined the list over the firing of French tenured professors in 2010 when their degree program was cut.
The Faculty Senate has been pushing for the administration to work toward removing the university from the list, saying it hurts SLU's reputation, and therefore its faculty, staff and students. Getting SLU removed would improve the image of the university and thereby help increase student enrollment and retention, as well as help with faculty recruitment and retention, senators argued.
"The concept of collegiality, which involves a recognition that administrators and faculty members are united in a common purpose and respect each other's abilities, places top priority on keeping the lines of communication open among faculty and administrators on proposed major changes in the curriculum," the resolution continued.
The senate formed a committee to specifically address the AAUP censure.
In the resolution to stand with the SGA, senators say any further cuts to higher education would only worsen current issues facing colleges and universities and will further "diminish the economic, social, cultural and intellectual potential in the state of Louisiana."
In particular, faculty senators have noticed the impact on the university's funding reductions on students, who have seen tuition raised drastically since 2008. One senator said at a previous meeting that students have told them they can no longer afford to stay enrolled.
According to the resolution, tuition has doubled from $4,000 in 2010 to $8,000 in 2017. On top of tuition hikes, the state scholarship program TOPS has taken a hit, being only partially funded this school year. The resolution states that over the past nine years, colleges and universities have lost $800 million in state aid due to cuts. The funding cuts at Southeastern has resulted in less course offerings and a reduction in faculty and support staff, as well as tuition increases.
18 2017-03-09
Baton Rouge

SLU dedicates exhibit to Charles Emery Cate


One of the developers of Hammond, Charles Emery Cate, was recognized with a permanent exhibit of photos, writings and artifacts recently in Southeastern Louisiana University’s Sims Memorial Library.

“Charles Emery Cate was one of the most storied and important citizens in the early development of the city," Southeastern President John L. Crain said. "This exhibit demonstrates the alignment of the missions of Southeastern and the City of Hammond."

At the ribbon cutting ceremony were Suzanne Graham, Cate’s great-great-granddaughter, Emery Cate Reymond, his great-great-great-great-granddaughter, other members of the family and SLU officials.

The exhibit is in the Sims Library and is open to the public 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and 9 a.m. to noon on Fridays.

“This is a special day for the Cate family,” Graham said. "This is what my mother wanted, and we are truly honored.”

Professor emeritus of history Howard C. Nichols addressed the group.

A native of New Hampshire, Cate came from a family engaged in brick-making and shoe manufacturing, Nichols said. In 1852, he moved to New Orleans and worked as a shoe salesman, later purchasing tracts of property and establishing a shoe manufacturing plant in what would later become the town of Hammond. Later, he would build a saw mill, a grist mill, leather cutting facility and other businesses.

Among the reminders of his influence on Hammond are the site of his first home, now Cate Square, and the Cate Teacher Education Center at SLU.

The exhibit demonstrates “only a fraction of what this man meant to Hammond,” said Leon Ford Chairman and professor of history Samuel C. Hyde, director of the Center for Southeast Louisiana Studies.

Hyde oversaw the development of the exhibit and gave credit to the Cate family for its financial support and donation of materials and to the individuals at SLU who worked to make the exhibit a reality.
18 2017-03-09
Hammond

Hyde dives back into parish's bloody history


One question that has nagged local historian Sam Hyde about Florida Parishes' bloody history was why did people during those days accept their violent corner of the state where juries were loath to put murderers in jail.
That question is what he seeks to answer in his new work that has not yet been named but is scheduled to be published in the Spring of 2018 by LSU Press. It examines the region between 1810 and 1934, but instead of just relating the despicable crimes, Hyde offers in the book a way to challenge violence in present times.
Speaking to the Hammond Kiwanis Club Tuesday, Hyde discussed his follow-up to "Pistols and Politics: The Dilemma of Democracy in Louisiana's Florida Parishes," a book about the region's violent crimes in the 19th century.
The director of the Center for Southeast Louisiana Studies at Southeastern Louisiana University said he did not originally want to delve back into the subject of "Bloody Tangipahoa," but he felt there was more to the story. He recalled how one person told him "Pistols and Politics" was like a "funeral" for many because it provided closure to murders that were never brought to justice.
So over three and a half years, he set out to write a follow-up that originally was going to explain how stability eventually settled on the Florida Parishes. However, he found that violence did not slow down in the region, despite an improved economy and new technologies (including indoor plumbing) that improved the standard of living.
"In fact it got worse, dramatically worse," he said.
He believes outrageous acts of violence persisted because the justice system remained broken. There was, for instance, two murderers who were able to break out of jail from the same window another murderer used to escape because no one fixed the window. Juries were often too terrified for their lives to bring back a guilty verdict in violent cases, he added.
Hyde said the famous Hatfield and McCoy feud has nothing on the region that saw about 133 feud-related murders during that same period. His new book covers gory incidents that readers of "Pistols and Politics" may be familiar with. The Ball Town Riot in Washington Parish, the mass hanging of six Italians over the murder of one man and the ethnic cleansing attempted against Italian immigrants are just some of the more disturbing moments in Florida Parishes' history, he said.
There was political-motivated violence too, he said, including physical suppression of independent political movements and unions.
"As I'm getting more and more in to this, I'm going 'My God, how can anybody live here'," he said. "How can people live that way."
That is when he decided to re-focus the book to address how people could come to accept their violent reality. Hyde came to the conclusion that people in those days reached "a negative state of equilibrium," where it was safer to not speak up and challenge the violence.
"It was safer for the mass population to accept that's just the way it is," he said.
Hyde looked at more recent data on criminal statistics and found that not much has changed when it comes to rural rates of homicide in this region. He believes people are still used to the violence that they read about or see, though violence now seems to center more around drugs than family feuds.
His next question was, how do people snap out of this acceptance and move toward seriously challenging crime rates. Hyde argues that the best route is education, accountability and resources. If people promoted more education in crime-ridden neighborhoods, held themselves accountable by having the courage to testify against crime they know of and "pony up" to invest more in law enforcement and the courts, violent crime rates would drop, he said.
If the compliance in the region continues though, so will the killings, Hyde said.
"Something that I thought came to an end in the 20th century is alive and well with us today in the 21st," he said.
18 2017-03-09
Hammond

LSBDC to hold seminar in Hammond March 28


The Louisiana Small Business Development Center (LSBDC) at Southeastern Louisiana University will hold a free seminar in Hammond March 28 designed to help individuals interested in starting a business.
Co-sponsored with Northshore SCORE, the seminar titled "Starting and Financing Your Business Idea" will take place from 9 a.m. to noon, at the Southeast Louisiana Business Center located at 1514 Martens Dr.


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"This workshop is highly recommended for all individuals interested in determining the feasibility of their business ideas and for those planning to start or who have recently started a small business. It would also be helpful for anyone seeking a small business loan or wanting to learn more about business planning," said Sandy Summers, assistant director of the Small Business Development Center.
Topics to be covered include writing a business plan, sources of funds for start-up and expansion, small business resources and required licenses.
Brandy Boudreaux of Louisiana SBDC at Southeastern is the scheduled guest speaker.
Although there is no cost to attend, seating is only guaranteed for pre-registered attendees.
To register or for more information, call (985) 549-3831.
Online registration is also available at www.lsbdc.org.
18 2017-03-08
Hammond

LSBDC to hold seminar in Hammond March 28


The Louisiana Small Business Development Center (LSBDC) at Southeastern Louisiana University will hold a free seminar in Hammond March 28 designed to help individuals interested in starting a business.
Co-sponsored with Northshore SCORE, the seminar titled "Starting and Financing Your Business Idea" will take place from 9 a.m. to noon, at the Southeast Louisiana Business Center located at 1514 Martens Dr.


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"This workshop is highly recommended for all individuals interested in determining the feasibility of their business ideas and for those planning to start or who have recently started a small business. It would also be helpful for anyone seeking a small business loan or wanting to learn more about business planning," said Sandy Summers, assistant director of the Small Business Development Center.
Topics to be covered include writing a business plan, sources of funds for start-up and expansion, small business resources and required licenses.
Brandy Boudreaux of Louisiana SBDC at Southeastern is the scheduled guest speaker.
Although there is no cost to attend, seating is only guaranteed for pre-registered attendees.
To register or for more information, call (985) 549-3831.
Online registration is also available at www.lsbdc.org.
18 2017-03-06
Hammond

Free tutoring returns to Miller Memorial


Tutors and students work quietly inside the Miller Memorial Library Family Resource Center of the Tangipahoa Alcohol and Drug Abuse Council at 108 S. Pine St. in Hammond.
They are participating in TADAC's free math tutoring program, "AfterSchool Achievement Program."
ASAP began in 2008, though those in charge of the program say people may not be aware of the service, which was brought back this semester after being suspended in the fall.
Program Specialist Wendy Coleman, a former teacher herself, said ASAP began in February that year with a grant that bought manipulatives and other start-up supplies. Students in grades 1-6 are paired up with education majors from Southeastern Louisiana University, who are required to do the tutoring for one of their math courses, she said.
The program is free because of the arrangement with Southeastern, as well as the donations the nonprofit agency gets, she said.
The program was not offered last semester while TADAC went through board changes. Executive Director Vickie Smith, who was hired in April 2016, said there were three board members who resigned in September. The board decided to suspend the tutoring program and other services in part because of the devastating August flood, she said.
"Basically everything went on pause," Coleman said.
When Smith was hired to help revitalize the agency, the board numbered five people and the by-laws required that there be 12. After the three board member resignations in September, the board took on new members and now is made up of seven people, with more coming, Smith said.
Board members are Board President Ron Abel (who has been involved with the agency since its inception), Kimberly Caruso, Priscilla Coleman, Vic Couvillion, Lynn Hoover (former staff member), Calvin Kaul, Jr, (original board member since its inception) and Patti Johnson.
For some time, the agency was not providing the full services it should have been offering to the community, Smith explained, which is why the agency has been working to revitalize important programs like free tutoring, as well as prevention programs in schools, such as the LifeSkills Training program, and the Summer Fun program.
"After a bump in the road... we are moving forward," she said. "We remain a vital part of the community."
Tutoring is available to any students in grades 1-6. All families have to do is call or come in person to register and get the details about when to attend sessions.
"Any parent who would like their children to have extra help are welcome," Coleman said.
Sessions are held Mondays through Thursdays from 4 p.m. to 4:45 p.m. and 5 p.m. to 5:45 p.m. Scheduling is built around Southeastern's time, so the tutoring is offered for eight weeks per semester.
For more information, call (985) 345-5493 or email to tadac@tadac.org.
18 2017-03-02
Baton Rouge

SLU’s Chefs Evening to feature variety of cuisine, beverages


Southeastern Louisiana University’s Chefs Evening is a reflection of the culinary offerings from around the area, providing a “taste of the north shore.”

Regional restaurants are on board for Chefs Evening scheduled from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. March 12 at the SLU Student Union Ballroom. The event will offer a variety of cuisines, beverages and wine tastings.

Restaurants and beverage companies participating include: Acquistapace Covington Supermarket, Benedicts Plantation, Cate Street Seafood Station, Champagne Beverage, Cocoa Bean Bakery and Café, Crescent Bar, Don’s Seafood, Eddie’s Frozen Custard, Gnarly Barley, Hammond High Culinary, Jacmel Inn, Jim Carey Distributing, Santiago’s Cuban Bar and Grill, Southern Catering, The Boston Restaurant, Tope La, Trey Yuen, Truck Farm Tavern and more.

Tickets are available for Chefs Evening or to both Chefs Evening and the President’s Toast, hosted by President John Crain at the president’s residence. To order individual tickets, patron tables or for more information, call (985) 549-2239, email chefsevening@southeastern.edu or visit the website southeastern.edu/chefsevening.
18 2017-03-02
Baton Rouge

SLU’s Chefs Evening to feature variety of cuisine, beverages


Southeastern Louisiana University’s Chefs Evening is a reflection of the culinary offerings from around the area, providing a “taste of the north shore.”

Regional restaurants are on board for Chefs Evening scheduled from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. March 12 at the SLU Student Union Ballroom. The event will offer a variety of cuisines, beverages and wine tastings.

Restaurants and beverage companies participating include: Acquistapace Covington Supermarket, Benedicts Plantation, Cate Street Seafood Station, Champagne Beverage, Cocoa Bean Bakery and Café, Crescent Bar, Don’s Seafood, Eddie’s Frozen Custard, Gnarly Barley, Hammond High Culinary, Jacmel Inn, Jim Carey Distributing, Santiago’s Cuban Bar and Grill, Southern Catering, The Boston Restaurant, Tope La, Trey Yuen, Truck Farm Tavern and more.

Tickets are available for Chefs Evening or to both Chefs Evening and the President’s Toast, hosted by President John Crain at the president’s residence. To order individual tickets, patron tables or for more information, call (985) 549-2239, email chefsevening@southeastern.edu or visit the website southeastern.edu/chefsevening.
18 2017-03-02
Baton Rouge

LSBDC to hold workshop on social media


The Louisiana Small Business Development Center at Southeastern Louisiana University will host a free workshop March 7 titled “Drive New Business with Social Media.”

Scheduled from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., the workshop will be held at the Southeast Louisiana Business Center, 1514 Martens Drive, in Hammond. The program is co-sponsored by the Greater Hammond Chamber of Commerce and will focus on the use of social media to drive more new and repeat business for organizations.

“You know you should be on social media for your business or nonprofit, but do you know why?” asked Sandy Summers, assistant director of the Small Business Development Center. “Do you know which social media platform will have the biggest bang for your buck? And when you start your profile, do you know what to say and how to grow your following?”

Summers said the session will answer those questions and more. Participants will be able to determine the platform that’s right for them and their organization; announce their presence and build a network; create and share content that encourages action; understand social media advertising and learn about options; and convert social media into potential customers by growing an email list.

Guest speaker for the event is Kim Walker, of 5 Stones Media in Hammond.

Participation is guaranteed only for preregistered attendees. For information or to register, call (985) 549-3831 or visit lsbdc.org.


18 2017-03-02
Baton Rouge

Science on Tap presents 'Stealth Talk' by SLU physicist


The fact that many students and the public fail to show up for scientific presentations — thinking the title, speaker or subject isn’t of any interest to them — will be the topic at Southeastern Louisiana University’s next Science on Tap presentation on Tuesday.

Sponsored by the Department of Biological Sciences, the free presentation titled “T.B.A.” by Associate Professor of Physics David Norwood will be held at 7 p.m. at Tope La Catering, 113 E. Thomas St., in Hammond. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

Norwood contends that simply considering the subject or speaker can be short-sighted, even for someone with decades of experience in science.

“The most memorable talk I ever heard was about milk; the second most memorable was about the rings that are left when a water spot evaporates,” Norwood said. “I recently heard a great lecture about salamanders, which you may think would have little interest for a physicist.”

So now Norwood, an experimental physicist who works in the “fuzzy area” where physics and chemistry overlap, has decided to present what he calls “stealth talks.” Moving forward, many of his presentations will be on topics unknown to attendees until they attend. “You’ll have to be there to learn the topic,” he said.

For information on this or future Science on Tap presentations, call (985) 549-3740.
18 2017-03-02
Baton Rouge

SLU celebrates 2017 Women's History Month with events


The Southeastern Louisiana University Department of History and Political Science will observe Women’s History Month throughout March with a series of free presentations.

“Women’s History Month will feature a variety of interesting topics that focus on an interdisciplinary approach to women’s history,” said William Robison, head of the Department of History and Political Science and coordinator of the series. “We are pleased that colleagues from other institutions and departments are joining us in providing a diverse program throughout the month.”

All of the programs are open to the public and will be held in the Student Union Theatre.

Who’s Got Natural Rhythm? Racial and Gender Stereotypes in the Music World: 2 p.m., March 7. The lecture by Robison will discuss stereotypes about the supposed differences in the ability of men, women and various ethnic groups to play particular kinds of music.
Cooking with Demons: 2 p.m., March 15. The lecture by LSU Associate Professor of History Leslie Tuttle will probe the social expectation that women feed others, and the fear that witches used food as a vehicle for harm or possession.
Pretty Smart: Women in Science: 2 p.m., March 22. Lecture by SLU Professor of Political Science Margaret Gonzalez-Perez.
“From Fascist to Duchess: The Tangled Relationships of the Mitford Sisters” 12:30 p.m., March 28. The lecture by SLU Assistant Professor of English C. Denelle Cowart will address ways in which six aristocratic British sisters were interwoven with many of the most important events of the 20th century.
For more information, call (985) 549-2413 or email wrobison@southeastern.edu.


18 2017-03-02
Hammond

District Literary Rally, Rock 'N Roar Fest draws thousands to SLU


HAMMOND — Thousands of high school students from throughout the Florida Parishes and the New Orleans areas gathered on the campus of Southeastern Louisiana University on Saturday for the District Literary Rally and the accompanying Rock ‘n Roar, a celebration that showcases the university’s appeal to potential students.

The major focal point of the day was competition in 42 different academic disciplines that measure a high school student’s competence against his or her peers. Participants in the rally were directed to campus classrooms in six different buildings by SLU student volunteers who also used the occasion to discuss Southeastern with the visitors.

This year’s fest drew a record number of students, according to Julie Perise, interim director of the SLU Alumni Association. She said about 3,500 students from more than 80 high schools were on campus for the literary rally.

Perise said the annual literary rally in the New Orleans area was canceled this year and the 21 schools that participated in that rally were sent to Southeastern.

In addition to the students, many parents, relatives and high school teachers accompanied the scholars to the SLU campus, Perise added.

While testing for academic excellence was on the minds of most of the high schoolers, the SLU Alumni Association and campus student organizations added an entertaining experience to the literary rally.

Rock ‘n Roar was inaugurated 31 years ago, Perise said, when leaders of the alumni association saw the day as an occasion to introduce area students to Southeastern and demonstrate what the university had to offer.

“It just grew from there. Rock ‘n Roar is the fun side of the literary rally. Our young visitors are given the chance to purchase food items, to play games, to participate in workshops, meet our student leaders, and just have a great day on our beautiful campus,” Perise said.

The booths that lined one side of SLU’s new, expansive, Student Union Center also afforded campus organizations the opportunity to raise funds for their activities.

Visiting students could also participate in cheerleading, dance spirit performance, art and baseball camps. The campus radio station, KSLU, provided music throughout the day’s activities.

Perise said many students chose to participate in tours that afforded the visitors the opportunity to visit many of the buildings and facilities on the campus.

SLU graduate Terry Brown, who is treasurer of the African-American Chapter of the SLU Alumni Association, said he enjoys manning the soft drink booth at Rock ‘n Roar every year. “This is a great day for SLU. We get the chance to meet so many wonderful high school students and we enjoy telling them about all that Southeastern has to offer. At the same time, our booth raises money that we put into a scholarship fund. Rock ‘n Roar is a positive effort for our university.”

Live Oak High School senior Alexis Boyd, who was at the literary rally to compete in Agriculture II, said literary rally participation was important to her because it allowed her to measure her knowledge against other students from a wide area. “Literary rally brings high school students together in one community and that’s great. You get to meet other students and you find out how advanced you are in your subject area,’ she said.

Mallory LaBorde, also a Live Oak senior, was at SLU to compete in Art II. She said literary rally allowed her to learn more about how her artistic skills measured up against students her age in other schools.

“This is a special day for our students, alumni, faculty and our thousands of visitors. It is something we look forward to every year and something that we think greatly enhances the Southeastern experience,"
18 2017-03-02
Hammond

SLU’s Chefs Evening to feature variety of cuisine, beverages


Southeastern Louisiana University’s Chefs Evening is a reflection of the culinary offerings from around the area, providing a “taste of the north shore.”

Regional restaurants are on board for Chefs Evening scheduled from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. March 12 at the SLU Student Union Ballroom. The event will offer a variety of cuisines, beverages and wine tastings.

Restaurants and beverage companies participating include: Acquistapace Covington Supermarket, Benedicts Plantation, Cate Street Seafood Station, Champagne Beverage, Cocoa Bean Bakery and Café, Crescent Bar, Don’s Seafood, Eddie’s Frozen Custard, Gnarly Barley, Hammond High Culinary, Jacmel Inn, Jim Carey Distributing, Santiago’s Cuban Bar and Grill, Southern Catering, The Boston Restaurant, Tope La, Trey Yuen, Truck Farm Tavern and more.

Tickets are available for Chefs Evening or to both Chefs Evening and the President’s Toast, hosted by President John Crain at the president’s residence. To order individual tickets, patron tables or for more information, call (985) 549-2239, email chefsevening@southeastern.edu or visit the website southeastern.edu/chefsevening.
18 2017-03-01
Hammond

Southeastern dance to present 'Untitled' concert


Southeastern Louisiana University's resident student dance company, Dance Performance Project, presented "Untitled" on Feb. 22 and 23 at 7:30 p.m. in Vonnie Borden Theatre located in D Vickers Hall on campus.
The production was directed by Director of Dance Skip Costa.


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"Dance Performance Project's concert 'Untitled' is intentionally named, as all dances remain nameless so that the audience makes their own interpretation of the choreography being presented," said Costa.
Dancers performing in the production include Forrest Duplantier, Covington; Hayley Jordan, Baton Rouge; Alexis May and Brianna Denmark, Denham Springs; Morgan Georgetown, Baker; Fonzy Vasquez, Marrero; Sophia Miano, Garyville; Shelby Johnson, Houma; Cierra Calloway, Houma; Ireiell Hawkins, New Orleans; Demi Wells, Amite; Ashley Barbarin, White Castle; and Alaura Cervini, Metairie.
Tickets for "Untitled" are $8 for students, seniors and children, $10 general admission, and will be available in the D Vickers box office the evening of each performance.
For more information, contact Costa at kcosta@southeastern.edu.
18 2017-03-01
Hammond

Southeastern celebrates Women's History Month


The Southeastern Louisiana University Department of History and Political Science will coordinate Women's History Month throughout March with a series of free presentations.
"Women's History Month will feature a variety of interesting topics that focus on an interdisciplinary approach to women's history," said William Robison, head of the Department of History and Political Science and coordinator of the series. "We are pleased that colleagues from other institutions and departments are joining us in providing a diverse program throughout the month."


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All of the programs are free and open to the public and will be held in the Student Union Theatre.
Robison will open the series at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, March 7, with a lecture that bridges Black History Month and Women's History Month. Using audio and video examples, his talk - "Who's Got Natural Rhythm? Racial and Gender Stereotypes in the Music World" - will shatter common stereotypes about the supposed differences in the ability of men, women and various ethnic groups to play particular kinds of music, whether it be classical, jazz, blues, gospel, country, rock or hip hop.
The schedule for Women's History Month also includes:
Wednesday, March 15, 2 p.m., LSU Associate Professor of History Leslie Tuttle, who teaches courses on the history of magic and witchcraft and the history of food, will speak on "Cooking with Demons."
"The lecture will probe the connections between the longstanding social expectation that women feed others and the fear that witches, with the aid of their demonic helpers, used food as a vehicle for harm or possession," she said. "The logic of the connection was sustained by folk and expert knowledge about the effects of food in the body."
Wednesday, March 22, 2 p.m. Southeastern Professor of Political Science Margaret Gonzalez-Perez will present "Pretty Smart: Women in Science."
"Over the last century, enormous advances have been made in science and technology, and the women responsible for many of these achievements have gone largely unnoticed," she explained. "Female physicians have developed treatments for cancer and revolutionary heart surgery. Women chemists have decoded molecular structures and expanded our knowledge of genetics, while female biologists have identified significant developments in our environment that impact human society. Women mathematicians are even responsible for helping develop the space program. Using the power of their intellect, these women not only overcame the scientific challenges of their disciplines, but also overcame the societal restrictions placed on women in male-dominated fields."
Tuesday, March 28, 12:30 p.m., Southeastern Assistant Professor of English C. Denelle Cowart will address "From Fascist to Duchess: The Tangled Relationships of the Mitford Sisters," discussing ways in which the lives of six aristocratic British sisters, spanning the years 1904 through 2014, were interwoven with many of the most important events of the 20th century.
"Two of the sisters were indeed Fascists and were close friends with Hitler. Another emigrated to the United States, where she first became a member of the Communist Party and later a muckraking journalist," Cowart said. "The oldest was one of Bright Young Things of the Roaring Twenties and later a bestselling novelist, while the youngest became Duchess of Devonshire. All the Mitford sisters were gifted writers, and their published works, as well as their letters, tell a fascinating story of their interactions with each other as well as with famous figures ranging from Winston Churchill to John F. Kennedy."
For additional information about Southeastern's Women's History Month, contact the Department of History and Political Science at 985-549-2413 or wrobison@southeastern.edu.
18 2017-02-22
Hammond

FOOD PERSONALITY POPPY TOOKER SPEAKS AT SLU’S SIMS LIBRARY


HAMMOND – Poppy Tooker, food activist and writer, will be the featured speaker at the annual Friends of Sims Library’s Marjorie Morrison Memorial Members’ Tea on Saturday, March 4, at 2 p.m. at Southeastern Louisiana University’s Sims Memorial Library.
Guests will enjoy a variety of teas and a selection of delectable sandwiches and pastries.
Tooker is the host and executive producer of the weekly NPR radio show “Louisiana Eats!” and a regular food personality on WYES-TV’s weekly “Steppin’ Out.” Her book, “The Crescent City Farmers Market Cookbook,” received a Tabasco Cookbook Award and was named “Cookbook of the Year” by “New Orleans Magazine.”
Her other books include “Tujague’s Cookbook: Creole Recipes and Lore in the New Orleans Grand Tradition;” “Louisiana Eats!: The People, the Food, and Their Stories;” and “Madame Begue’s Recipes of Old New Orleans Creole Cookery.” She was recognized by the “Times-Picayune” as a “Hero of the Storm” for her work reviving New Orleans restaurants and food providers following Hurricane Katrina.
The International Association of Cooking Professionals recognized Tooker’s rebuilding efforts at their annual conference in April 2008, with their first-ever Community Service Award. For over 25 years, her cooking classes have centered on history and tradition as well as the food science behind her preparation.
The tea is free to members of the Friends of Sims Library. Non-members may reserve a seat for $25, which includes a one-year individual membership in FOSL. Unlimited mimosas will also be available for $10.
Reservations must be received by Wednesday, March 1. To reserve a seat or to find out more about FOSL, please call Janie Branham at 549-2186 or email FOSL@southeastern.edu.

18 2017-02-22
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN’S LOUTH RECEIVES 2017 LITERACY AWARD


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University Professor of English Richard Louth was selected as recipient of the 2017 Light Up for Literacy Award by the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities.
It is the second LEH award Louth has earned. He was recognized in 2001 with the LEH Special Humanities Award.
As director of the Southeastern Louisiana Writing Project, an initiative he founded in 1992, Louth is devoted to improving the teaching of writing at all academic levels. The SLWP is part of the National Writing Project, a network of “teachers teaching teachers” about writing in all grade levels and disciplines. The program works with teachers through annual summer institutes, as well as through workshops, writing retreats, and writing marathons held each year.
Louth is also founder of the New Orleans Writing Marathon, where participants under his guidance write across the city in small groups for hours or days at a time. New Orleans-style writing marathons now take place in schools, cities, and National Writing Project sites across the country, and have been an annual feature at the Tennessee Williams Festival in New Orleans for four years.
A member of the Southeastern faculty since 1978, Louth is a recipient of the Southeastern President’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, one of the highest honors the university presents to faculty. He also received the College of Arts and Sciences’ award for Teaching Excellence the first year it was offered in 1991 and served as Southeastern’s Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences from 1997 to 2000.
The LEH is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing educational opportunities for all residents in the state. The award will be presented April 13 at the 2017 Bright Lights Award Dinner at the Shaw Center for the Arts in Baton Rouge. The event is sponsored by Lt. Governor Billy Nungesser and Entergy Louisiana.

18 2017-02-22
Hammond

NEW GRADUATE OF SOUTHEASTERN IS ALSO NEW MAYOR OF TANGIPAHOA


VILLAGE LEADER – Trashica Robinson left her commencement ceremonies at Southeastern last December to learn she was elected mayor of the Village of Tangipahoa. The recent graduate of the College of Business says the skills she learned at Southeastern have prepared her to meet the challenges facing the village.


FROM GRADUATION TO THE MAYOR’S OFFICE: SOUTHEASTERN ALUMNA SERVING AS MAYOR OF TANGIPAHOA

HAMMOND – Graduation Day for most students is a chaotic and exciting time, but for Southeastern Louisiana University marketing major Trashica Robinson, it was especially so. Hours after walking across the stage at Commencement last December, Robinson, 37, learned she had won the office of Mayor for her hometown, the Village of Tangipahoa.
“After graduating I was stuck in traffic, trying to get back to the village to make sure people were getting out to the polls,” said Robinson. “When I got back, I was told that I wasn’t going to win, but it turns out those people were only looking at absentee ballots. When I found out the actual results, I was numb, but I knew my perseverance had paid off.”
A non-traditional student who works for the non-profit organization Southeast Advocates for Family Empowerment, Robinson – along with other Southeastern students – had an admittedly rough final semester. She had lost everything during the Great Flood of 2016 and worked full-time while managing her courses at the university. It was a burden that would have broken many students, but she credits her success to her “amazing” support system.
“I want every student at Southeastern to understand that it doesn’t matter where you come from, what you’ve done, or who you are. If you have the right support, you can excel, and your dreams can become reality,” she said. “If it wasn’t for my family, friends, and my professors, I wouldn’t have made it as far as I have.”
Robinson credits Southeastern’s College of Business with her success in the classroom and in the real world. She said it not only gave her the technical knowledge she needed to graduate, but also encouragement and emotional support during a very trying time.
“The College of Business is, as far as I’m concerned, the best on the campus,” she said. “They make sure that by the time you leave the classroom, you’re world-ready. Even outside the classroom they do everything they can for you. I was almost positive I wouldn’t be graduating because I was dealing with losing my home to the flood, but my professors sat down with me, calmed me down and help me figure out a plan.”
The newly elected mayor also credits the college for inspiring her to run for office, one instructor in particular.
“One of my instructors, Anna Bass, always shared a ‘quote of the day’ with the class before getting started. One in particular stood out to me,” said Robinson. “It was something like ‘every day we should stop and appreciate everything around us.’ One day, I did that in my community, and I decided to make the wrong things right and make the right things better.”
“I was so impressed when Ms. Robinson brought up in a class discussion in my business strategy class that she was running for mayor of her hometown,” said David Wyld, professor of management and business administration. “We talk so much about getting young people involved in the political process and in making real change happen in our communities, and she’s a wonderful exemplar of this. She faced long odds in her run for mayor – running against an ex-NFL player and more factors – and yet she took that brave step forward and actually won!”
Wyld added: I’d like to think that some of what she learned in my class – how to better communicate, how to think more strategically, and how to effectively lead change in organizations – will serve her well in office. All of us at Southeastern should be so proud of her and use her story as an example for future students on how to take what they have learned here and work to make a difference.”
Robinson campaigned on the idea of collaborating with surrounding communities and small businesses to bring her small town into the 21st century. The Village of Tangipahoa, located in the northern part of Tangipahoa Parish, is home to less than a thousand people. Because it is so small, internet providers have not invested in infrastructure there, making it difficult to connect with the outside world. Clean water and proper drainage are other big challenges faced by the community. Robinson is confident that her newfound business acumen can help create the partnerships the village needs to help her neighbors and constituents.
“My immediate hope is that we can show our neighboring communities what we’re willing to do in order to grow, and hopefully they will help us along the way,” she said.
18 2017-02-20
Hammond

Southeastern Louisiana University names 4,155 to fall 2016 honors list


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University has named 4,155 students to its honors list for the fall 2016 semester.

The honors list is divided into three academic levels.

To be named to the President’s List, students must have earned a 3.50 or better grade point average. Students on the Dean’s List have earned a 3.20 - 3.49 grade point average, and Honor Roll students have earned a 3.00 - 3.19 grade point average.

Honors list students must be full-time undergraduates carrying at least 12 credit hours and have no grade below a “C.”

Southeastern provides a website to view the names of students receiving academic honors for the current semester and past semesters at http://www.southeastern.edu/admin/rec_reg/academic_honors/index.php.

Livingston Parish students named to the honors list are as follows:

Albany

•President’s List: Ariel B. Cook, Fabein Disedare, Keri Disedare, Steven A. Gayle, Emily G. Leeper, Jamie Mayeux, Kayli E. Payne, Madison C. Peters, Makayla B. Peters, Rachael A. Portier, Brooklyn M. Starkey, Shadinea Whittington

•Dean’s List: Hannah R. Cardaronella, Alison C. Carroll, Connor A. Glascock, Schuylar M. Ramsey, Savannah B. Thompson, Micah C. Thornton, Ashley B. Turner

•Honor Roll: Cara J. Blanchard, Katie M. Delaneuville, Joanna R. Foster, Erin J. Hermann, Kyle A. Richert

Denham Springs

•(President’s List) Carleigh C. Adams, Monica N. Alford, Anna R. Arceneaux, Rory J. Avant, Jason G. Ballard, Parker J. Berthelot, Christian M. Beter, Kimberly D. Bordelon, Alexis J. Bourgeois, Katie D. Brignac, Shelton C. Brown, Karisa M. Buxton,

Also, Nicholas M. Byrd, Lindsey K. Callender, Angelique Carter, Amber L. Charbonnet, Brittany E. Chedraui, Danielle G. Coniglio, Zoie B. Cook, Robbin L. Corkern, Evan T. Cranford, Leonard G. Crider, Regan V. Davis, Brianna J. Denmark, Tiffany T. Deville, Nicholas S. Dolan,

Also, Savannah M. Douglas, Darian B. Drude, Brynne L. Dugas, Emily R. Duvall, Logan J. Dykes, Robert Ellis, Breanna G. Erwin, Amber N. Ferguson, Jensen R. Firmin, Jared S. Forrest, Claudio V. Franc, Hallie M. Fuentes, Amanda C. Gann, Kristyn M. Gary, Annie J. Goodman, Samantha N. Graves, Bethany Gray, Ashton G. Griggs, Shiela F. Gros, Carl D. Guidry, Devin Guidry, Madison L. Guidry, Victoria L. Guidry, Natalie S. Gunter, Savannah L. Hall, Bradley C. Harris, Bailey J. Hennesy, Spencer R. Herring, Emilee Hickman, Megan M. Hull, Martin A. Hutchins, Courtney J. Hutchinson, Fallon M. Hutchinson, Kaitlyn A. Jackson, Faith M. Jackson-Nixon,

Also, Journey M. James, Haley D. Johnson, Gabrielle T. Kling, Ainsleigh C. Lacombe, Ryan K. Lafleur, Lauren A. Lambert, Nerole’ C. Larmond, Brice N. Larson, Madison R. Larson, Kyu Lee, Alexandria A. Leigh, Celena C. Long, Natalie N. Lorena, Meghan L. Ma, Morgan L. McClendon, Rachel McCrory, Marykatherine E. Melfi, Austin J. Menier, Hanna E. Mikesell, Leah B. Miller, Luke W. Millet, Madison P. Mincey, Brady A. Morris, Brennan L. Morris, De’Ja D. Murray, Tiffany A. Nevels, Madison C. O’Neal, Justin W. Olivier, Lindsey M. Oufnac, Katie F. Patterson, Gage M. Pickett, Katie L. Pierce, Haley M. Porter, Holli A. Portier, Jessie M. Quantrille, Matthew A. Richard, Madelyn L. Richardson, Courtney S. Richoux, Kylie N. Roberson, Carrigan J. Robinson, Makayla C. Rodriquez,

Also, Dantrayl R. Sanders, Krista N. Schelter, Kaisey N. Seegmiller, Brooke E. Settoon, Jacob S. Shaffett, Dylan A. Stanley, Sarah D. Starkey, Sterling M. Suggs, Casey Tessmer, Blayne Threeton, Michelle L. Trammell, Joseph P. Trosclair, Hans J. Troxclair, Courtney L. Vidrine, Kelsi D. Walker, Justin Webb, Christopher M. Williard, Robin A. Wilson, Daniel E. Wingate, Heidi Zuelke

•Dean’s List: Heath A. Arnold, Grace M. Atwell, Lauryn O. Bagley, Dakota L. Ball, Jenna L. Barrilleaux, Kaitlyn R. Brent, Anna M. Brown, Gabrielle C. Brown, Lauren A. Carpenter, Kaitlyn M. Collier, Ashlyn M. Cooper, Logan G. Cormier, Seth B. Crnko, Elliot A. Crosby, Luke T. Dalberg, Dakota C. Davis, Courtney R. Dillard, Carli A. Dilorenzo, Claire A. Dimaria, Miranda J. East, Brittany N. Faller, Blake A. Farlow, Michael A. Fitzgerald, Claire N. Fournier, Breeann R. Fowler, Ray W. Fuller, William A. Geoghagan, Mattie E. Gibson, Larsen L. Glover, Paige E. Green, Aaron J. Guidry, Brianne N. Hall, Ashleigh E. Hanna, Heath T. Harvey, Amy L. Havard, Jensen L. Henderson, Margaret R. Hinson, Ciara Hunter, Avory N. Johnson, Megan E. Jones, Clayton E. Jordan, Reanna L. Lanoux, Daniel C. Larson,

Also, Kaitlin R. Ma, Tanner M. Magee, Lillian R. Marcus, Alexis L. May, Kaitlyn R. McKenzie, Karlee E. McKernan, Laney R. Miley, Glen M. Mills, Alexis J. Montgomery, Jensen A. Ortego, Koral A. Pattison, Kaylie H. Pinkerton, Austin O. Polk, Becka M. Quebedeaux, Amanda L. Quick, Frank L. Roberts, Lee-Ann J. Ryan, Joseph M. Sceroler, Madeline M. Scivicque, Jamie L. Smith, Jarrielle L. Spann, Abbie M. Stevenson, Breanna L. Stout, Spencer J. Suggs, Emma N. Swarner, Emma E. Tedder, Vincent T. Ton, Caleb H. Walls, Stephen P. Williams, Emily R. Wright

•Honor Roll: Kindra N. Aime, Trent M. Allen, Michael T. Brignac, Joseph L. Cambre, William C. Campbell, Kaleigh D. Caruso, Brittany E. Caves, Payton C. Cook, Trenton M. Coyle, Ashley L. Davis, Berkley P. Dean, Lakyn R. Domiano, Julian C. Ellis, Harleigh N. Emrick, Matthew C. Erwin, Leah E. Fournier, Emily C. Garafola, Sadie D. Gautreau, Gabriel M. Genre, Hayli M. Gillette, Kristopher M. Guedry,

Also, Dillon T. Haley, Christy L. Hall, Hayley M. Hamilton, Jacob B. Hardison, Raymond B. Hardison, Darrin T. Harris, Willliam J. Higginbotham, Hunter W. Holmes, Sidney B. Kent, Quentin Lewis, Austin N. Loup, Mackenzie C. Martone, Zachary C. Matherne, Heather R. Matthews, Stephanie A. Matthews, Steven B. Moore, Travis T. Nguyen,

Also, Caitlin E. O’Neal, Tiffany M. Oneill, Mattie R. Ort, Kevin M. Paninski, Brant H. Passman, Cody L. Plaisance, Victoria M. Reynolds, Austin T. Rogers, Carley E. Saunders, Brookney A. Stevens, Meagan E. Thames, Adam K. Torres, Douglas R. Walding, Chantel M. Ward, Morgan M. Welch, Emily A. Whittington

French Settlement

•President’s List: Clara E. Krzykwa, Brandon Lundy, Destinee N. Morales, Brianna N. Reeves

•Dean’s List: Dalton L. Aydell

•Honor Roll Cory J. Oliphant

Holden

•President’s List: Alexis M. Aime, Raini A. Blackwell, Cassie R. Boudreaux, Shelby C. Breckwoldt, Aaron T. Carlton, Holli B. Carlton, Randi M. Corbett, Breanna Finnell, Katie L. Graham, Tyler S. Hampton, Tyler J. Hasson, Megan D. Lanoy, Taylor A. McLean, Kaitlyn J. Methvien, Madison E. Mizell, Hannah N. Roberts, Morgan E. Sanders, Baylie D. Smith, Kelsey R. Stratton, Madisyn A. Wascom

•Dean’s List: Tyler M. Carollo, Lauren A. Clardy, Fabian Edwards, Sarah Jones, Nicholas M. O’Dell, Taylor Page, Kirsten Ray, Louis C. Sansovich, Deanna E. Woessner

•Honor Roll: Tiffany A. Ambrose, Brice C. Clardy, Nicole M. Dimitri, Ana M. Mesa, Dana Pierson, Alexandra C. Sanders, Julie M. Smith

Livingston

•President’s List: Gabrielle L. Achord, Ashleigh Balfantz, Josie M. Brock, Kaleb D. Brock, Selena E. Brown, Alyssa M. Chatagnier, London E. Cropper, Benjamin W. Cutrer, Emily A. Duffy, Lance E. Finnell, Ashton B. Gill, Cadie L. Guitreau, Carsyn M. Harris, Erin E. Lavergne, Whitney L. Lobell, Justin McLin, Alex R. McMorris, Brittney E. Nickens, Hayden C. Nickens, Jazmine D. Oliphant, Anna M. Pope, Ross D. Roddy, Kelli M. Satterfield, Ambriehlla M. St. John, Samuel H. Taylor, Beau J. Trabeau, Bailey L. Turner

•Dean’s List: Cory L. Boudreaux, Cheyenne L. Carter, Matthias Fowler, Victoria A. Hart, Lyla M. Hixson, Bridget M. Kellum, Angel R. Letulle, Brodie K. Newsom, Campbell B. Palmer, Daniel A. Palmer, Taylin B. Underwood, Melanie D. West

•Honor Roll: Madeline J. Felps, Jake A. Frelich, Jarrett T. Lobell, Melissa N. Merritt, Jennifer Miller, Brenna N. Schmidt, Carlie N. Whittington

Maurepas

•President’s List: Katie L. Balfantz, Kaitlyn W. Carroll, Ashley Doggette, Julia E. Ernest, Joshua T. Hughes, Ali E. McCoy, Simone M. Odom, Karli R. Raffray, Miranda R. Sullivan, Breanna M. Threeton, Britany M. Webber

•Dean’s List: Emma L. Austin, Claire R. Richardson

•Honor Roll: Jace R. Berthelot, Kayleigh N. Fontenot, Joshua L. Kling, Lacy L. Loupe, Hannah E. Maggio, Chaz N. Scivicque

Springfield

•President’s List: Keenan J. Austin, Andrew L. Benton, Taylor A. Brown, Stephany A. Davidson, James C. Egle, Adile Gendusa, Marrie C. Hills, Miranda Lobell, Kayla J. Magee, Latricia A. Manning, Madison M. Paulus, Janie L. Richardson, Emily D. Simeon, Rachel L. Sullivan, Jacqueline L. Zarate

•Dean’s List: Robert J. Brown, Tarez A. Cowsar, Kaitlin A. Didier, Kaylee Y. Dimm, Austin D. Harris, Zachary C. Husser, Erica K. Jubin, Dakota R. Stewart, Kaylee D. Threeton

•Honor Roll: Savannah R. Davidson, Jessica R. Gregoire, Courtney M. Lefebvre, Samara Scott, Carly L. Shields, Brooke A. Singer, Justine E. Threeton, Sidni N. Watson

Walker

•President’s List: Cody Arceneaux, Victoria G. Arledge, Morgan J. Arthur, Victoria A. Bankston, Taylor N. Barras, Kathryn O. Bokun, Kevin T. Bokun, Kailey R. Brown, Triston E. Brown, Lauren E. Buchanan, Brennan M. Burrick, Kristen Burrick, Patrick A. Byrd, Mackenzie J. Caillouet, Calyn B. Cain, Madeline C. Carter, Hunter J. Chaney, Preston W. Chaney, Lindsey D. Cheek, Paige L. Creel, Tessera B. Crockett, Mary L. David, Paige R. Devall, Emily M. Devillier, Taryn N. Dixon, Emily J. Fink, Breanna J. Foster, Lauren M. Gibson, Christian T. Gonzales, Samuel T. Gordon, Karly E. Gunter,

Also, Justin Hibbard, Merranda A. Houghton, Amber N. Howard, Christopher M. Hubert, Madison L. Lane, Tristan G. Leblanc, Mason D. Lockhart, Haley E. Loyacano, Melody A. McIntosh, Ryan M. Miller, Meredith A. Moore, Seth J. Oufnac, Bailee A. Owens, Lianet Perez, Shelby R. Phillips, Samantha E. Reine, Avery L. Renfrow, Brielle E. Ricca, Jessica R. Robinson, Maggie B. Robinson, Amy W. Sanders, Sydney R. Stewart, Brittany N. Talbert, Lynnsie M. Taylor, Ross J. Tomko, Garrett C. Voisin, Shanon M. Waguespack, Bailey M. Williams, Emily K. Williams

•Dean’s List: Bailey L. Armstrong, Luke B. Blocker, Sara J. Breaux, Zachary P. Cox, Kristin N. Curtis, Emma C. Duffy, Raegan E. Fontenot, Casey Hunt, Lindsey H. Johnson, Shaun T. Lowe, Alissa B. Martin, Emily B. Mayfield, Madelyn P. Paternostro, Jessie B. Ratliff, Alexa M. Salpietra, Kristen Shugart, Taylor E. Shugart, Micheala E. Thorpe, Jordyn M. Tolar, Daniel C. Turner, Jade S. Turner, Kylie S. Underwood, Kristian P. Westbrook, Victoria M. Young

•Honor Roll: Mikayla R. Anderson, Tabitha M. Berard, Camille A. Bokun, Christopher K. Bowman, Joshua R. Crawford, Catherine A. Darden, Sydney A. Elbert, Rhaimey A. Floyd, Lydia Hunter, Shelby L. Lee, Christopher D. McKey, Victoria N. McMasters, Anna M. Robertson, Kyron M. Scott, Taylor M. Sharp, Gretchen M. St.Pierre, James M. Stephens, Jenna R. Tullier

Watson

•President’s List: Lila M. Bordelon, Jessica A. Bowen

Note: Due to a computer glitch, some students were inadvertently omitted from the honors list that was submitted to The News in January.
18 2017-02-17
Baton Rouge

Southeastern to celebrate Black History Month


The Department of History and Political Science at Southeastern Louisiana University will celebrate Black History Month during February featuring a free lecture series.

This year’s series is dedicated to the memory of former Southeastern professor Albert J. Doucette Jr.

“We have quite a varied and interesting set of lectures this year,” said Bill Robison, head of the Department History and Political Science. “Ron Traylor will describe how black slaves in America managed to enjoy their own entertainments even while held in bondage and how those changed with emancipation.”

Robison said his lecture will use audio and video examples to discuss common stereotypes about the supposed differences in the ability of men, women and various ethnic groups to play particular kinds of music.

The lectures are free, open to the public and will take place in the Student Union Theatre. Scheduled are:

Wednesday, Feb. 22, 12:30 p.m.: “Black Celebrations in Slavery and into Freedom,” history instructor Ronald Traylor
Tuesday, March 7, 2 p.m.: “Who’s Got Natural Rhythm? Racial and Gender Stereotypes in the Music World,” William B. Robison
For more information, contact Robison at (985) 549-2413 or wrobison@southeastern.edu.


18 2017-02-17
Baton Rouge

SLU names honors list students for fall 2016


Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond has named 4,155 students to its honors list for the fall 2016 semester.

The honors list is divided into three academic levels. To be named to the President’s List, students must have earned a 3.50 or better GPA. Students on the Dean’s List have earned a 3.20-3.49 GPA, and Honor Roll students have earned a 3.00-3.19 GPA. Honors list students must be full-time undergraduates carrying at least 12 credit hours and have no grade below a C.

Students named to the honors list are:

EAST BATON ROUGE PARISH
Baton Rouge: (President’s List) Michael T. Ackermann, Jonathan Alexander, Maria Elena V. Allgood, Mallory R. Allphin, Austin B. Arnold, Matthew D. Arnold, Sarah D. Atkinson, Ashley M. Battley, Laine A. Beadle, Jonathan M. Beard, Claire M. Bergeron, Abbey N. Bethel, Nisha Bhatt, Laura K. Bogan, Lauren A. Bott, Allison M. Brannan, Taylor L. Braud, Austin Breaux, Bret H. Brian, Andrew J. Brouillette, Mccauley O. Bullock, Dalton J. Cambre, Camille Campbell, Chelsea M. Campbell, Kathryn R. Carline, Terricka J. Carpenter, Stephanie C. Carroll, Brandi N. Cedotal, Madeline M. Chenevert, Kimberly M. Christophe, Kahne T. Clark, Jamie D. Cockerham, Kenneth R. Cole, Taylor C. Cole, Blessin B. Conner, Sibelle Anne P. Corsino, Chancely N. Courson, Anthony J. Cousins, Alexis J. Craven, Keyana L. Davis, Caroline E. Dejohn, Shelby R. Devillier, Graydon R. Diaz, Kelonda A. Dixon, Alexandra L. Dodd, Brooke E. Doiron, Lauren A. Duke, Margaret J. Dunn, Joseph S. Eaglin, Lindsey R. Ellis,

Also, Johnathon B. Essex, Anna R. Falks, Cody M. Favaro, Austin W. Fogleman, Kelsey T. Franklin, Alyssa C. Gaudet, Evan P. Gaudet, Jenny T. Gautier, Austin C. Girod, Cabrina M. Gordon, Ragen N. Gosserand, Hannah N. Gregoire, Lauren R. Gregoire, Madeleine A. Gremillion, Courtney R. Grigsby, Tara S. Guillory, Victoria E. Guitreau, Michele A. Harder, Kaleb J. Harmon, Nicholas T. Harrison, Victoria C. Harrison, Courtney Hart, Alexander W. Hertzog, Avery D. Hester, Philencia L. Hillard, Ngu Hoang, Kierra L. Hollins, Rachel H. Hopkins, Amberlie T. Howard, Kelsey A. Howard, Rachael J. Javaherian, Shelby C. Johnson, Hayley N. Jordan, Devin A. Kelly, Ebony A. Kennedy, Kathryn E. Kennedy, Sarah M. Kerr, Natalie M. Knight, Sarah E. Krul, Reagan S. Laborde, Amanda C. Lally, Kathryn E. Landry, Shelby J. Laplace, Adam S. Lawrence, Ann M. Lebas, Kalyn R. Leblanc, William C. Lee, Kimberly C. Lowrance, Kianna L. Lynch, Kelsey R. Mack, Martin K. Maley, William E. Maley,

Also, Julia Malozovsky, Tiffany L. Manno, Victoria Marriott, Haley R. Mason, Lauren A. May, Silent M. McCarthy, Sara E. McCormick, Brooklyn R. McCurley, Ellen McElroy, Victoria D. Mercer, William Meyers, Alexis M. Minor, Patrick L. Mitchell, Paige E. Modicut, Bella L. Mokeba, Kearra N. Moore, Ashley N. Morgan, Tyler M. Morrison, Haeun Mun, Elena M. Nodine, Charles A. Norsworthy, Jayla J. Notestine, Tristyn S. Osby-Jackson, Alexis L. Paddie, Rachel C. Parker, Christian Patterson, Lauren V. Peck, Lina Pham, Khiem Phan, Vy P. Phan, Ashley N. Phill, Johnathan L. Pine, Lina Pleng, Brianna S. Poche, Olivia L. Ponthieux, Kathleen E. Pousson, Ryan F. Prejean, Kelsey R. Raybon, William C. Reeves, Jennifer B. Repp, Flavor L. Robinson, Raleigh A. Rogers, Colin S. Ross, Christian J. Ruch, Tyler D. Sansone, Chamberlain B. Scott, Kaitlyn A. Scuderi, Rachael E. Shockley, Houston Siegerist, Savannah R. Smith, Allison C. Soileau, Sarah A. Spangler, Zachary H. Sparks, Allison C. Stone, Megan L. Stroud, McCall A. Taylor, Michael G. Templeton, Monique V. Theriot, Ayonte A. Thomas, Carmen B. Torres-Diaz, Hannah M. Turner, Monetria Turner, Cassandra Twist, Danielle L. Valentine, Natalie M. Verbois, Sarah S. Vinson, Ciani C. Walker, Tiara A. Walker, Madison L. Wall, Anna M. Wallace, Krishina L. Wallace, Leyna E. Warren, Nicole H. Watson, Jacob F. Watts, Jahnice D. Williams, Jeremy J. Williams, Nicholas D. Williams, Connor S. Wilson, Madison L. Wilson, Jarrett R. Womack, Wanyu Xie, Luoxi Yu

(Dean’s List) Sushovan Adhikari, Alyssa A. Alleman, Alva E. Allen, George L. Anderson, Kimberly N. Ashmore, Deondra D. Bell, Alex J. Bertrand, Rachel L. Bogle, Jaslyn B. Bowman, Landon T. Boyd, Jarrod M. Braud, Kaitlun M. Bridges, Ryan J. Briggs, Chelsea N. Brignac, Stefanie G. Brignac, Megan C. Broussard, Akil Brown, Aundrea D. Burke, Sara R. Cage, Kendall Cannon, Allen C. Capell, Johqeise M. Chambers, Leighton M. Cole, Landon M. Collins, Steven J. Comeaux, Samantha Cooke, Landon M. Cormier, Megan L. Dang, Chelsea D. Davis, Evelyn Davis, Jamie I. Dearman, Ciara Devaull, Beverly J. Devillier, Hannah L. Disheroon, Devin K. Dixon, T’Nia M. Dubose, Nicholas A. Ferrara, Tyra J. Flowers, Ash’Leightatia Gaines, Brielle Garner, Courtney R. Gatlin, Andrew T. Granger, Ariel M. Green, Shelby L. Guidry, Victoria G. Guidry, Maegen N. Guillory, Matthew J. Guillot, Brooke M. Haigler, Brooke E. Hanegan, Madeline M. Harris, Brynne Harvey, Mattie E. Hawkins, Ha P. Hinh,

Also, Miriam A. Holmes, Erin A. Hooper, Brittany A. Howard, Lacey N. Ivey, Malik C. Jackson, Kelsey E. Jarreau, Scott M. Jarreau, Kennedi N. Jones, Brittany N. Kelly, Inchan Kim, Alexa M. Landry, Danielle E. Lavergne, Kylene M. Leblanc, Sarah R. Leblanc, Kylie E. Lecocq, Madelyn C. Ledoux, Sarah T. Lee, Rebekah M. Levy, Calli R. Loving, Allison E. Luker, Maranda Marquez, Crystal T. Maynor, Katie N. McKinney, Jasmine M. McDonald, Aaron M. Minckler, Queantae Mobley, Julie C. Mongrue, Karyn O. Moore, Tansha L. Moore, Anne E. Morgan, Grant M. Morgan, Nicole A. Moss, Noah B. Nichols, Donalyn M. Norris, Benir M. Osimbo, Tyler A. Overton, Linh M. Pham, Elizabeth M. Pyle, Mikelia L. Roby, Tamera A. Rushing, Kameryn E. Sadler, Raven M. Scott, Samantha N. Seward, Claire M. Shriver, Hope E. Simpson, Clytisha G. Smith, Cecily Solar, Joshua A. St.Cyr, Victoria N. Stafford, Joshua J. Stickling, Macey A. Stock, Emily C. Stockwell, Alexandria H. Stuckey, Lydia J. Stuckey, Annemarie G. Tanner, Hilda D. Taylor, Caroline A. Thornton, Brandon M. Viada, Joshua Washington, Lindsey C. Watkins, Aubree E. Weldon, Jasmine N. Williams, Kaitlyn K. Williams, Kayley D. Williams, Kourtney Williams, Kyle O. Williams, Hannah C. Zumo

(Honor Roll) Khadijah D. Adams, Blaine A. Amoroso, Madalyn G. Arboneaux, Marisa E. Bardwell, Airren R. Beter, Krysta D. Boatner, Cameron Bradley, Tara R. Brian, Christy M. Brown, Kiersten E. Brown, Wesley R. Brown, Trenee C. Calamia, Glover Chassaing, Charlot E. Chauvin, NaYoung Choi, Jydesha B. Coleman, Krystal M. Crabtree, Brannon T. Crochet, Ryne J. Daigle, Corey A. Darvill, Jadan P. Deshotels, Rachel M. Deville, Jacquelin A. Diaz, Colby A. Dillon, Kimber P. Duhe, Abel A. Duhon, Cameron A. Duhon, Alexandra C. Dupuis, Caitlin A. Farmer, Jacob M. Fletcher, Amber N. Galloway, Micha Gildon, Hayden J. Graffeo, Kimberly J. Groover, Hunter S. Gsell, Gabrielle A. Hale, Kendra N. Hall, Zachary A. Harrison, Kayla D. Jackson, Renee M. Jaynes, Quieasha R. Johnson, Lane R. Kesel, Alesce A. Kimble, Alex K. Kirkpatrick, Steven H. Lai, Tyler M. Laiche, Jesika M. Lee, Cardesha M. Lewis, Sarah E. Lyons, Kia M. Mathieu, Jeffrey McIntyre, Brandon J. Messenger, Meritt A. Miller, Cleland M. Montecillo, Caleb P. Moore, Amanda K. Moran, Kylie B. Morazan, Veronica D. Nguyen, Christopher J. Parsly, Leeamber M. Perry, Christopher J. Phillips, Erin E. Pittman, Karleacia T. Pooler, Raven R. Price, Skylar M. Quartararo, Katelyn E. Rains, Kenya M. Ridley, Zachary A. Rogers, Tamara B. Rozenbaum, Isabel C. Salvaggio, Jacqueline M. Savoy, Kellen F. Schexnayder, Raven D. Seymour, Madison K. Smith, Cassandra M. Soniat, Avery D. Vaughn, Destiny N. Vavasseur, Taylor B. Washington, Traneicea R. Wilkerson, Briana R. Williams, Jeffery Williams, Shelby A. Wilson, Danita L. Winfrey

Greenwell Springs: (President’s List) Breigh A. Allen, Hannah R. Ashford, Allison A. Bell, London Berthelot, Amanda K. Boothe, Shelby L. Breckwoldt, Mara A. Browning, Kaitlyn B. Cooke, Tyler E. Davis, Morgan A. Dietrich, Carly E. Duke, Madison Durr, Blakeli A. Entremont, Brant J. Guerin, Breanne N. Hill, Josie D. Jolibois, Sarah M. Jones, Ashton A. Kennedy, Cameron M. Kirkendoll, Brittany N. Klug, Peyton M. Knapps, Jeremy M. Lafleur, Alicen V. Lieux, Dylan F. Martin, Amy M. Newsom, Brooke A. Olinde, Lauren A. Pizzolato, Guadalupe Ramirez, Cassidy D. Roddy, James D. Schopp, Taylor G. Stiles, Rachel R. Terrell, Victoria A. Thomas, Chandler C. Tinkler

(Dean’s List) Bobbie L. Broome, Rachel A. Dupuy, Katarina N. Frank, Molly C. Keel, Tequanea M. Kelly, Forrest T. King, Justin P. Lafleur, Christine C. Miranda, Christina E. Roddy, Victoria B. Ross, Samuel D. Tomaszewski, Bailey R. Zito

(Honor Roll) Breanna H. Clark, Riley C. Corba, Sarah A. Delatorre, Brittany A. Dupree, Grant J. Falcon, John L. Fryoux, Leah D. Leblanc, Candace M. Miranda, Antonio J. Ragusa


18 2017-02-17
Hammond

Students to tour SLU Sustainability Center


The Southeastern Louisiana University Sustainability Center will celebrate "Sustainability Day" Wednesday with educational tours of the high-tech facility for junior high and high school students.
"We offer tours to area schools as a hands-on learning experience on alternative energy techniques, providing students with an opportunities to learn more about the sustainability techniques that are available," said Carlos Doolittle, manager of grounds, landscaping and recycling at Southeastern.


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The 90-minute tours will be offered at 9 a.m., 11 a.m, and 1 p.m.
Operated by the Southeastern Office of Physical Plant Services, the center is located at 2101 N. Oak St.
Schools are asked to pre-register for the free tours on Sustainability Day or any other day by emailing sustainability@southeastern.edu or by calling 985-549-5172.
The center opened years ago to provide an educational facility for university students as well as generate financial savings for the university.
Now a teaching resource available to the public, the award-winning center is a demonstration site to help students learn more about renewable energy, recycling and waste reduction, plant biology and other sustainable technologies.
Features include a plant propagation area that uses rainwater runoff for irrigation, technologically strong classrooms for energy engineering technology study and an educational outreach center powered by solar, wind and hydrothermal energy.
The facility also features projects that demonstrate biofuel technology, a mobile gasification unit that turns woody products into electricity, and a rainwater collection unit for non-drinking water purposes.
18 2017-02-16
Baton Rouge

Southeastern to celebrate Black History Month


The Department of History and Political Science at Southeastern Louisiana University will celebrate Black History Month during February featuring a free lecture series.

This year’s series is dedicated to the memory of former Southeastern professor Albert J. Doucette Jr.

“We have quite a varied and interesting set of lectures this year,” said Bill Robison, head of the Department History and Political Science. “Ron Traylor will describe how black slaves in America managed to enjoy their own entertainments even while held in bondage and how those changed with emancipation.”

Robison said his lecture will use audio and video examples to discuss common stereotypes about the supposed differences in the ability of men, women and various ethnic groups to play particular kinds of music.

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The lectures are free, open to the public and will take place in the Student Union Theatre. Scheduled are:

Wednesday, Feb. 22, 12:30 p.m.: “Black Celebrations in Slavery and into Freedom,” history instructor Ronald Traylor
Tuesday, March 7, 2 p.m.: “Who’s Got Natural Rhythm? Racial and Gender Stereotypes in the Music World,” William B. Robison
For more information, contact Robison at (985) 549-2413 or wrobison@southeastern.edu.
18 2017-02-16
Baton Rouge

"Let's Talk: Art" spring series kicks off in Hammond


The spring series “Let’s Talk: Art,” sponsored jointly by Southeastern Louisiana University’s Department of Fine and Performing Arts, Hammond Regional Arts Center and Friends of the Sims Memorial Library, has kicked off.

The next event in the series is set for 5 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 16, at the HRAC, 217 E. Thomas St., Hammond. Photographer Rebecca Meyers will lead attendees through her show “Through the Mind’s Eye: An Artist’s Journey,” on display at the center.

“Rebecca Meyers will discuss her influences and artistic journey using her panoramic images as reference,” said Sims Library Director Eric Johnson. “As she traveled 80 miles to work via train, she passed a vast industrial landscape, forming a large image in her mind, which she has now brought to life to share with others.”

Future talks include:

Melissa Miller, “Miriam Schapiro: Feminist Art and the American Quilt,” 5 p.m. March 15, Southeastern Contemporary Art Gallery
Irene Nero, “Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim Bilbao Museum in Spain: 20 Years Later,” 5 p.m. April 26, Southeastern Contemporary Art Gallery
Members of the Hammond Art Guild, “Celebrating 55 Years with the Hammond Art Guild,” 5 p.m. May 10, HRAC
For more information, call Johnson at (985) 549-3962.
18 2017-02-16
Baton Rouge

LSBDC to hold webinars on Quickbooks


The Louisiana Small Business Development Center at Southeastern Louisiana University will co-sponsor with Northshore SCORE webinars designed to help residents master QuickBooks for business.

Each online webinar is designed as a stand-alone course or can be taken as a series.

Titled “QuickBooks Webinars: Everything You Need to Know to Effectively Use QuickBooks Accounting Software,” the webinars are based on the experience that SCORE volunteers Jane and Bob Bloom have gained from using QuickBooks in their own business and from Jane’s years as a bookkeeper.

Advance registration is required for each seminar and available online through lsbdc.org.

“These are not textbook QuickBooks classes; they will show you how to make QuickBooks work for your organization,” said Sandy Summers, assistant director of the Small Business Development Center.

“Optimizing QuickBooks” is scheduled from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 22. The registration fee is $20. It will illustrate how to set up the QuickBooks system to get the most out of it. “You will learn how to optimize your Chart of Accounts and Items List plus more,” Summers said.

“Maximizing the Power of QuickBooks” is scheduled from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday, March 15 and has a $20 registration fee. Participants will learn how to create purchase orders, receive merchandise, generate sales receipts, create and send invoices, pay bills, make deposits, do payroll, generate financial and sales reports and more.

Participation is only guaranteed for pre-registered attendees. For information or to register, call (985) 520-0929.
18 2017-02-16
Baton Rouge

Small business seminar to be held in Walker


The Louisiana Small Business Development Center at Southeastern Louisiana University will hold a free seminar Feb. 21 in Walker designed to help people interested in starting a business.

Co-sponsored with Livingston Economic Development Council, Dixie Business Center and Livingston Parish Chamber of Commerce, the seminar, titled “Starting and Financing Your Business Idea,” will be from 9 a.m. to noon at the Livingston Parish Literacy and Technology Center, 9261 Florida Blvd.

“This workshop is highly recommended for all individuals interested in determining the feasibility of their business ideas and for those planning to start or who have recently started a small business. It would also be helpful for anyone seeking a small business loan or wanting to learn more about business planning,” said Sandy Summers, assistant director of the Small Business Development Center.

Topics to be covered include writing a business plan, sources of funds for start-up and expansion, small business resources and required licenses.

Brandy Boudreaux, of LSBDC at SLU, is the scheduled guest speaker.

Although there is no cost to attend, seating is only guaranteed for pre-registered attendees. To register or for more information, call (985) 549-3831. Online registration is available at lsbdc.org.
18 2017-02-16
Hammond

Columbia Theatre to present 'Murder on the Nile' with twist


Southeastern Louisiana University's Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts will present Aquila Theatre Company in Agatha Christie's "Murder on the Nile" in one performance only on Feb. 17 at 7:30 p.m. in the downtown Hammond theatre.
Now in its 25th season, Aquila Theatre stages "Murder on the Nile" by one of the great mystery writers in world literature, Agatha Christie, said Columbia Theatre Director Roy Blackwood. As usual with Aquila Theatre Company, there is a twist in the production - something to make it uniquely the company's own.
"The production is set in the early 1940s during World War II at the BBC Home Service studios in London," Blackwood said. "Air raid sirens were a regular occurrence in London during this time as Great Britain was on constant alert to bombings by Germany. Members of the theater troupe have arrived and are preparing for a live radio broadcast of 'Murder on the Nile.' But another air raid prevents the full cast from assembling and yet the show must go on somehow."
Tickets for the Feb. 17 Columbia show are $26 in the orchestra or balcony and $40 in the loge. Tickets can be purchased at the Columbia Theatre Box Office at 220 East Thomas Street in Hammond, which is open 11 a.m. - 4 p.m., Monday-Friday, online at www.columbiatheatre.org, or by phone at 985-543-4371.
Half-price tickets for Southeastern students are available 30 days prior to the show for students with university ID. The limit is one ticket per ID.
All Southeastern faculty, retired faculty or university staff with ID may purchase one ticket for the production and receive one ticket at half price. Both tickets must be purchased in the same transaction and for the same price at the Columbia box office. For more information, contact the Columbia Theatre at 985-543-4366.
18 2017-02-16
Hammond

Healthy eating on Valentine's Day


By LAUREN LANGLOIS staffwriter@hammondstar.com | 0 comments
On the holiday that is awash in sweets, a handful of Southeastern Louisiana University faculty and staff members opted to spend part of their Valentine's Day learning to cook healthy, delicious foods.
The Employee Wellness Committee held a presentation and cooking demonstration, "Meet Us At The Bar On Valentine's Day" Tuesday inside White Hall.
Heather Dykes and Christie Martin, registered dietitians and nutrition instructors in Southeastern's health and human sciences department, dished out Black Bean Brownies, homemade granola and guacomole to the group of about 10. They also dished out health advice while cooking recipes modified to reduce bad fats and sugars and increase vitamins and nutrients.
While the recipes were healthy, they could not help adding some yummy milk chocolate chips to the brownie recipe.
"Because it's Valentine's Day, you deserve a treat, right?" Martin told an agreeing audience.
They gathered inside the department's Family Consumer Science nutrition lab, which was recently completed using a grant from the Louisiana Board of Regents. The kitchen lab is used to teach classes, as well as test recipes, Dykes and Martin said.
It is also used to cook and serve healthy snacks to children participating in a program called Project I-PAL (Interactive Physical Activity Lab), a kind of gym located in the same hall.
First up was the homemade granola, a combination of baked quick oats, sunflower, sesame and flax seeds, walnuts and raisins, which are combined with a sugar substitute and brown sugar mix, canola oil, salt and eggs.
The nutritionists said fats and carbohydrates have gotten an unfairly bad reputation from fad diets. Depending on what kind of fats, they can be part of a healthy, balanced meal. For instance nuts and avocados are fatty foods, but the fats are good for you, they said.
"There is a lot of misinformation about carbs being bad," Dykes said.
Carbs from whole grains are rich in nutrients, notably fiber, while carbs from, say, a traditional cake are rich in flavor only, she explained.
Another tip was to combine legumes and whole grains since they compliment each other nutritionally. Consuming vitamin C helps a person absorb iron more efficiently and potassium helps balance out the negative effects of salt, she said.
Canned, low-sodium beans that are mashed into a paste are a key part of their brownie recipe. Beans add protein while not interrupting the dessert's chocolate flavor. They go into a bowl with canola oil (a healthier choice than butter, they said), sugar substitute, eggs, dark chocolate chips (which have antioxidants), only a half cup of flower, cocoa powder, salt, milk chocolate chips and good, old-fashioned vanilla extract.
"You can't have brownies without vanilla," Martin said.
Participants also treated themselves to a parfait with low-fat or Greek yogurt, blueberries, strawberries and granola, as well as burritos with healthy toppings, such as onions and peppers. Martin said bell peppers are an excellent source of vitamins while onions are a good way to help avoid the flu.
Dykes recommended that when shopping for eggs, seek out fresh ones rather than ones found in most grocery stores. Often, fresh eggs have more beta carotene in the yolk, giving it a richer color, she said.
"They taste really good too," she said.
18 2017-02-15
Hammond

Campus farmers market returns


The Southeastern Louisiana University student organization Reconnect will sponsor a series of farmers markets throughout the spring semester, with the first on Wednesday in the Student Union breezeway from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Tentative dates for the others are March 8, March 22 and April 5. Each will feature locally grown produce, arts and crafts, and fresh prepared foods, such as honey, cheese and baked goods. Vendors include Covey Rise Farms, Berry Hill Farms and various independent artisans.

"We want to support the local economy by promoting area farmers and artisans," said Reconnect President Jessica Bell, a sophomore sociology major. "For us, it's all about promoting awareness of the importance of buying and eating locally grown food, rather than food grown thousands of miles away."
Student vendors are encouraged to participate in the markets by emailing Reconnect at realfoodselu@gmail.com. Tables are provided at no charge.
A student environmental club, Reconnect participates in the Real Food Challenge, a national effort among college students to promote the use of locally grown, healthy and sustainable food products.
18 2017-02-09
Baton Rouge

Regions Bank to sponsor Chefs Evening President's Toast


The President’s Toast, an event that launches Southeastern Louisiana University’s annual fundraising event Chefs Evening, this year will again be sponsored by Regions Bank.

The President’s Toast precedes Chefs Evening, which is scheduled this year for March 12. The toast will be at the President’s Residence from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. and will feature food and wine pairings selected by the award-winning chef Joshua Garic, of Jacmel Inn Restaurant of Hammond.

Chefs Evening follows from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the university’s Student Union Grand Ballroom. Now in its third decade, Chefs Evening is the Southeastern Foundation’s signature fundraiser, providing support for university scholarships and academic programs, according to a news release. The event features wine tastings and unique culinary offerings developed by some of the area’s finest restaurants and distributors.

For more information or to purchase tickets, call the Southeastern Foundation at (985) 549-2239.
18 2017-02-09
Baton Rouge

Feb. 15 is final day to apply for SLU spring graduation


The final day for Southeastern Louisiana University students to apply to graduate in spring is Feb. 15, the university announced in a news release.

The graduation application and payment deadlines will be strictly enforced, university officials said.

Candidates for degrees can apply by logging into their LeoNet campus accounts and choosing the “Self Service, Degree Progress/Graduation, Apply for Graduation” option. Instructions are available on the “Current Students” link at southeastern.edu; then click on “Graduation Seniors” under Helpful Links or call Southeastern’s Office of Records and Registration at (985) 549-2066. There is also a direct link available at southeastern.edu/graduation.

The $25 application fee should be paid directly to the Controller’s Office, on North Campus in the Financial Aid Building.


18 2017-02-07
Hammond

LSBDC HOSTS WEBINARS ON QUICKBOOKS STARTING FEB. 8


HAMMOND – The Louisiana Small Business Development Center (LSBDC) at Southeastern Louisiana University will co-sponsor with Northshore SCORE a series of three webinars designed to help individuals master QuickBooks for business. Depending upon the viewer's level of QuickBooks usage and need, each webinar is designed as a stand alone course, or can be appreciated as a series.
Titled “QuickBooks Webinars: Everything You Need to Know to Effectively Use QuickBooks Accounting Software,” the series is based on the broad experience and knowledge that SCORE volunteers Jane and Bob Bloom have gained from using QuickBooks in their own business and from Jane’s years as a bookkeeper. Since participation is limited, advance registration is required for each seminar and is available online through www.lsbdc.org.
“These are not textbook QuickBooks classes; they will show you how to make QuickBooks work for your organization,” said Sandy Summers, assistant director of the Small Business Development Center.
The first webinar, “Introduction to QuickBooks,” is scheduled Wednesday, Feb. 8, from 7 to 8 p.m. The registration fee is $10. Information will include the different versions of QuickBooks, online and desktop, and information as to which version best supports individual businesses. “The Blooms will illustrate how to get QuickBooks working quickly,” Summers said.
The second webinar, “Optimizing QuickBooks,” is scheduled Wednesday, Feb. 22 from 7 to 8 p.m. The registration fee is $20. The Blooms will illustrate how to set up the QuickBooks system to get the most out of it. “You will learn how to optimize your Chart of Accounts and Items List plus more,” Summers said. “By optimizing QuickBooks, you are preparing it to provide you with detailed reports and analytics that will help you run your business.”
The third webinar, “Maximizing the Power of QuickBooks,” is scheduled for Wednesday, March 15, from 7 to 8 p.m. and has a $20 registration fee. Participants will learn how to use QuickBooks to create purchase orders, receive merchandise, generate sales receipts, create and send invoices, pay bills, make deposits, do payroll, generate financial and sales reports, and more.
Participation is only guaranteed for pre-registered attendees. Call Northshore SCORE to register or for more information at (985) 520-0929.
18 2017-02-06
Hammond

Two SLU students watch issue


Southeastern Louisiana University enrollment officials are offering assistance to two Iranian graduate students studying at SLU in light of President Donald Trump's executive order banning travel and revoking visas for people from Iran and six other countries.
A U.S. judge on Friday temporarily blocked the ban on travelers and immigrants from seven predominantly Muslim countries, siding with two states that urged a nationwide hold on the executive order that has launched legal battles across the country.


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According to Rene Abadie, public information director for the university, Southeastern has two graduate students from Iran who have been at the university for about a year.
It was unclear Friday if the students' visas are in danger of being canceled.
Abadie said currently the order does not impact them unless they leave the country and try to return or if their relatives overseas wish to visit them in the U.S.
Southeastern has no staff or faculty members who could be impacted by the order, he said.
Enrollment Services staffers are assigned to serve international students, Abadie said, and they are keeping in contact with the graduate students to offer any help during the executive order that has caused confusion and sparked protests.
The two students prefer to remain anonymous and give no comments, he said.
Trump announced last week that people from Iran, Iraq, Syria, Sudan, Somalia, Libya and Yemen would be banned temporarily from traveling to the U.S. as a national security measure. The executive order also temporarily stops the refugee program, according to the Associated Press.
According to The Associated Press, the U.S. State Department said up to 60,000 people from seven majority-Muslim countries had their visas canceled.
U.S. District Judge James Robart in Seattle ruled Friday that Washington state and Minnesota had standing to challenge Trump's order, which government lawyers disputed, and said they showed their case was likely to succeed.

18 2017-02-06
Hammond

Southeastern invites families to 'Rock 'n' Roar'


Southeastern Louisiana University's annual campus-community festival "Rock 'n Roar" is scheduled for Feb. 18.
In its 21st year, Rock 'n Roar will showcase Southeastern's academics and fun atmosphere for approximately 3,800 students from more than 80 visiting District 8 Literary Rally high school, as well as Southeastern students, alumni and community friends, said Julie Perise, interim director of the Southeastern Alumni Association.


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"With no charge for admission to Rock 'n Roar, patrons of all ages can enjoy educational displays by Southeastern's departments, food, music and more," Perise said.
Scheduled from 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Student Union, the festival will also offer art, baseball, and spirit camps for children.
Art education students will offer a hands-on art camp for children ages 6-12 from 9-11 a.m., with a check-in time of 8:30 a.m. The camp, which costs $15, will take place in Clark Hall.
A camp for young baseball enthusiasts is scheduled for 8:30-10:30 a.m., with a check in time of 8 a.m. at the football practice field behind the bull pen on campus. The camp is open to children ages 6-12 for a $15 fee. Participants are asked to bring their own bat and glove.
The Lionettes, Southeastern's dance team, and the Southeastern cheerleaders will host a spirit camp for children ages 5-12 from 9 a.m. to noon, with check in at 8:30 a.m. at the Kinesiology and Health Studies Building. The camp's $15 fee includes refreshments. Participants are asked to dress comfortably and wear tennis shoes. The camp will conclude with a performance by participants in the Kinesiology and Health Studies Building at noon.
Camp applications are available online at www.southeastern.edu/roarfest or at the Alumni Center, 500 W. University Ave., (985) 549-2150. Advance registration and payment is requested for all camps. Space is limited, so reservations should be made early.
Rock 'n Roar will also feature a variety of children's games and activities.
Call the Alumni Association, (985) 549-2150 or 1-800-SLU-ALUM, for details.
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FEMA DEADLINE -- The Federal Emergency Management Agency has extended the Proof of Loss deadline by 90 days for 2016 flood survivors needing more time to file claims through the National Flood Insurance Program.
The new deadline is May 10, 2017. Gov. John Bel Edwards had asked for the extension on Thursday.
This is the third extension for sending POL that has been granted. Policyholders can submit their Proof of Loss forms directly to adjusters.

18 2017-02-02
Hammond

Physics of video games is top of SLU’s Science on Tap presentation


Most people do not realize the tremendous amount of physics that goes into creating video games, explains a Southeastern Louisiana University physics professor.

The role of physics in video games will be the focus of the next Science on Tap lecture presented by Southeastern's Department of Biological Sciences on Tuesday.

Associate professor of physics Rhett Allain will be the featured speaker at 7 p.m. at Tope La Catering, 113 E. Thomas St., Hammond. The lecture is free and open to all ages with doors opening at 6:30 p.m.

“Many people are familiar with the popular game Angry Birds for mobile phones. The basic idea is to fling some birds toward structures with pigs in the hopes of knocking them over,” Allain said.

But is there real physics in a game like this? Allain’s presentation will demonstrate simple experiments in the game to learn the methods that model the motions of these birds as well as activities in other video games. “And we’ll discuss how this can be used as a method to explore the scientific process,” he added.

Allain is a frequent contributor to WIRED magazine and maintains a physics-oriented page on the publication’s website, wired.com/category/dotphysics/. A former physics consultant for the television show “Mythbusters,” he currently serves as a consultant for the popular CBS show “MacGyver.”

For information on this or future Science on Tap presentations, contact the Department of Biological Sciences at (985) 549-3740.
18 2017-02-02
Hammond

Communication student to host KSLU’s ‘Point of View’


A Southeastern Louisiana University communications senior is taking over hosting duties for radio station KSLU’s program “Point of View.”

Miranda Fleig, of Slidell, winner of last year’s Louisiana Association of Broadcasters scholarship, will host the weekly community interest program, which airs from 11 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Thursdays and Fridays. Fleig takes over for Rosa Dunn, who recently retired after hosting the show for 30 years, according to a news release.

KSLU is Southeastern’s educational public radio station. Operated on the Southeastern campus, the station’s signal is located at 90.9 FM or heard live over the website kslu.org. Last year, the station was named the No. 2 College Radio Station in the South by the Southeast Journalism Conference.

“I intend to keep a lot of the lighthearted feel of the show that Rosa had,” said Fleig, who worked with Dunn for several years helping to engineer the show. “I would also like to discuss issues important to Tangiapahoa Parish, such as unemployment, health care, local ecology, child welfare and social movements.

“I learned many skills from Rosa, and she was a delight to work with,” she said. “I always called her the station’s guardian angel.”

“I’m thrilled to have Miranda as the new host of ‘Point of View,’ ” said KSLU General Manager Todd Delaney. “She’s the perfect person to carry the torch that Rosa lit 30 years ago and bring the program to new heights.”

Fleig said she is interested in feedback from the community, including suggestions for guests and topics. Email miranda.fleig@southeastern.edu or call (985) 549-5758.
18 2017-02-02
Hammond

SLU names honors list students for fall 2016


Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond has named 3,768 students to its honors list for the fall 2016 semester.

The honors list is divided into three academic levels. To be named to the President’s List, students must have earned a 3.50 or better GPA. Students on the Dean’s List have earned a 3.20-3.49 GPA, and Honor Roll students have earned a 3.00-3.19 GPA. Honors list students must be full-time undergraduates carrying at least 12 credit hours and have no grade below a C.

Students named to the honors list are:

EAST BATON ROUGE PARISH
Baker: (President’s List) Collin Cashio, Maryann N. Dykes, Tyron’E B. Hawkins

(Dean’s List) Vallen K. Brown, Jack K. McAdams, Ashley R. Sam

(Honor Roll) Cameron P. Duncan, Marriun M. Dunn, Madelyn M. Lemoine, Tanner Stockton

Pride: (President’s List) Victoria A. Corrick, Breanna J. Foster, Mary C. Hodges, Courtney A. Jeffers, Amanda M. Speeg, Reed J. Williams

(Dean’s List) Luke M. Canella, John M. Hodges, Leah Lesage, Katherine E. Manemann, Mikki M. McLendon

(Honor Roll) Madison R. Knapp

Zachary: (President’s List) Matlin C. Amphion, Abigail Ashley, Maurice D. Askins, Reagan E. Baggett, Amber N. Boudreaux, Ryleigh G. Carr, Katlyn Daigle, Autumn L. Davis, Brittany R. Dempsey, Jonathan Dietz, Hannah M. Dixon, Shelby J. Eisworth, Jamie L. Hewitt, Macie C. Howell, Leeanna J. Humphrey, Brittany A. Johnson, Emily R. Mann, Evan Pace, Rhagan A. Rider, Shiva Shrestha, Meagan A. Thierry, Emily G. Treloar, Shaterika A. Winters

(Dean’s List) Bailey E. Boudreaux, Kylie L. Bozeman, Zechariah G. Cameron, Madeline L. Gagneaux, Brandi M. Hodge, Kelvin D. McCoy, Isabella M. Vazquez

(Honor Roll) Elise M. Beier, Brianna L. Ensminger, Brooklne S. Hadley, Mariah Johnson, Keely A. Leblanc, Logan J. Metcalfe, Mason M. Pendergist, Tasha M. Reid, Kennedi C. Saari, Tori R. Schenk, Shandrell N. Stewart, Grant E. Von Rosenberg, Brittny A. Williamson, Cody D. Wilson


18 2017-02-02
Hammond

Southeastern's Crain: Special session is good for universities


Southeastern Louisiana University President John Crain told faculty Wednesday that the special legislative session to start soon will help the chances of higher education avoiding a significant cut in the spring.
Speaking during the Faculty Senate meeting, Crain said a special session would give lawmakers a chance to vote for tapping into a rainy day fund to close the budget gap and to vote for spreading out cuts, so as to minimize the hit on higher education and health care.


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'I think it gives us the greatest opportunity to not have a significant cut this spring," he said.
Gov. John Bel Edwards called for a special session that will be Feb. 13-23 to address the current fiscal year's deficit of $304 million. His plan includes using $119.6 million from the rainy day fund.
The governor has also proposed spreading the cuts across the state's budget, including cuts to the state health department, the Legislature, the judiciary and state elected officials.
The proposal seeks to minimize cuts to colleges and universities, waivers and partner hospitals, and does not include cuts to K-12 education or tax raises.
The regular session will be April 10 through June 8.
The Faculty Senate recently passed a resolution calling for the administration to come up with a plan to provide faculty raises. Crain said providing competitive pay to faculty is on top of his list, but as long as a state employee pay raise freeze remains in effect, it is not possible.
Even without the freeze, raises are not possible right now because the university does not have the resources, he said.
He said early on in the budget process, the university had planned for raises. However, a change in the funding formula from the Board of Regents resulted in the university getting less funding than expected.
Soon afterward came the executive order from the governor, halting state employee pay raises because of the state's financial troubles.
There was a shortfall for last fiscal year that ended June 30 as well, which resulted in a $12 million reduction in higher education funding. Southeastern's share of that was $440,000.
With only a small part of the university's resources coming from state aid, Crain said increasing enrollment is more important than ever because the university has come to depend on self-generated revenue.
He said the administration is working with focus groups to increase retention rates at Southeastern, something equally important as recruitment. Every 100 students roughly represents a 1 percent raise, Crain said.
On the funding formula, which determines how the Board of Regents divides higher education funding among institutions, Crain said he is unsure what the formula will look like going forward.
There are new board members, including local attorney and SLU alumnus Jay Seale, who may have different ideas about the formula, he said.
University of Louisiana System, which Southeastern is a part of, also has a new president, Jim Henderson, and the university needs to work with him to advocate on behalf of the university system, Crain said.
Another topic of concern is funding for TOPS, the state's scholarship program that was only partially funded this school year.
Crain said the Board of Regents has made some recommendations, including having a flat dollar amount for TOPS awards rather than being based on tuition.
Southeastern has the third largest number of students receiving TOPS money, the university president said, so TOPS' fate will have an impact on the university.
After hearing from Crain, the faculty senators voted to draft a resolution urging state lawmakers to protect funds for higher education and TOPS.
18 2017-02-01
Hammond

SLU to host Bill Evans Jazz Festival


In honor of one of its most distinguished alumni, the Southeastern Louisiana University Department of Fine and Performing Arts will present the annual Bill Evans Jazz Festival Feb. 15-18.
The festival will feature free performances by the Alumni Jazz Ensemble, the SLU Jazz Combos and SLU jazz faculty. All performances are free and open to the public and will be held in the Pottle Music Building Recital Hall.

18 2017-01-25
Hammond

Science on Tap talk physics of video games


Southeastern physics professor Rhett Allain says most people do not realize the tremendous amount of physics that goes into creating video games.

The role of physics in video games will be the focus of the next Science on Tap lecture presented by Southeastern’s biological sciences department on Feb. 6.

18 2017-01-24
Baton Rouge

Southeastern's Columbia Theatre to present Aeolus: Classical String Quartet


Southeastern Louisiana University’s Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts, 220 E. Thomas St., Hammond, will present Aeolus: Classical String Quartet at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 26.

Violinists Nicholas Tavani, Rachel Shapiro, and Gregory Luce and cellist Alan Richardson formed the group in 2008 at the Cleveland Institute of Music. Since its inception, the all-American quartet has been awarded prizes at nearly every major competition in the United States, said Columbia Theatre director Roy Blackwood.

“Dedicated to bringing music into the community, the Aeolus Quartet has been widely recognized for its highly innovative and engaging outreach programs,” Blackwood says. “They were the 2013-2015 Graduate Resident String Quartet at the Juilliard School, and the group’s members currently make their home in New York City.”

Tickets are $26 in the orchestra or balcony and $40 in the loge. Tickets can be purchased at the box office, which is open 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday; by phone at (985) 543-4371; or by visiting columbiatheatre.org.


18 2017-01-24
Hammond

CABARET EVENING TO BENEFIT SIMS LIBRARY AND COLUMBIA THEATRE


HAMMOND – New Orleans singer and performer Raynel Shepard will star in an upcoming cabaret-style fundraiser to support two good causes at Southeastern Louisiana University’s Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts on Saturday (Feb. 4) at 7 p.m.

“Breakfast in Paris, Martinis in Manhattan: A Cabaret” is a unique fundraiser and musical program organized by the Friends of Sims MemorialLibrary and the Columbia Theatre, said Sims Library Director Eric Johnson. The cabaret-style show will take place in the Columbia Theatre Conference Center.

Johnson said Shepard will sing the immortal songs of Paris and New York, accompanied by New Orleans entertainer Harry Mayronne on piano. Guests will be treated to such favorites as “C’est Si Bon,” “I Love Paris,” “La Vie en Rose,” “Autumn in New York,” “I Get a Kick Out of You,” and “The Lady Is a Tramp,” evoking the sights, sounds, and sensations of both cities.

“Shepard comes from a musical family with deep roots in New Orleans. A singer and performer since the age of 14, she has recently returned to her familial and musical roots, dividing her time between New Orleans and Boston and performing regularly in both venues,” Johnson said. “Her repertoire includes cabaret, show tunes, jazz standards, bossa nova, and blues. With her sultry voice, beautiful sense of rhythm and haunting interpretation of ballads, she offers a musical experience you will never forget.”

Mayronne is the composer/co-producer of the long-running musical comedy “Waiting Around—The Restaurant Musical,” written with Ricky Graham, which was performed both in New Orleans and off-Broadway, Johnson added.

“As a pianist and musical director, Mayronne has played in many venues, from New Orleans and New York to West Virginia’s Greenbrier Resort and Berlin,” Johnson said. “A skilled marionette designer and puppeteer, he recently had his first gallery showing of marionettes in the French Quarter.”

Tickets for the cabaret are $40 each and, in addition to the show, include two signature cocktails created by Jacmel Inn. Additional beverages also will be available at a cash bar.

Tickets may be purchased online at https://connect.southeastern.edu/cabaret or via check payable to Southeastern Foundation and mailed to Friends of Sims Library, SLU 10896, Hammond, La. 70402.

Since seating is limited, advance reservations are required by Monday, Jan. 30. Tickets will be held at the box office of the Columbia Theatre. No tickets will be sold at the door.

For more information, call Janie Branham at Sims Library at 549-2186.

18 2017-01-24
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN HOSTS BILL EVANS JAZZ FESTIVAL ON FEB. 15-18


HAMMOND – In honor of one of its most distinguished alumni, the Southeastern Louisiana University Department of Fine and Performing Arts will present the annual Bill Evans Jazz Festival Feb. 15-18.

The festival will feature free performances by the Alumni Jazz Ensemble, the SLU Jazz Combos, and SLU jazz faculty. All performances are free and open to the public and will be held in the Pottle Music Building Recital Hall.

This year, the festival will feature a master class with guest artist Mike Esneault. An Emmy Award-winning pianist and composer, Esneault has enjoyed success across many mediums including television, cinema, and radio, in addition to his triumphs as a recording artist. He has recorded more than 30 scores for the Public Broadcasting Service and composed pieces for companies such as Exxon, McDonald’s and Blue Cross. His arrangements have been performed by orchestras around the world and in places such as Carnegie Hall and the Hollywood Bowl. Esneault is also an accomplished clinician and teacher.

“Mike was invited this year because he is a fine piano player, a wonderful writer and a great instructor,” said Michael Bothers, co-director for the Southeastern Jazz Ensemble and one of the festival’s coordinators. “The Jazz Ensemble will play several of his compositions in concert, which is great for our students because they will experience quality new music.”

The festival will also include the Louisiana Association for Jazz Education (LAJE) State Music Festival, a competition with performances by area middle and high school jazz ensembles. The festival will start Friday morning and conclude Saturday at noon in the Pottle Music Building Auditorium.

The performance schedule includes: Feb. 15, 7:30 p.m., Alumni Jazz Concert; Feb. 16, 7:30 p.m., Southeastern Jazz Combos; Feb. 17, 7:30 p.m., Southeastern Jazz Faculty Concert with guest artist Mike Esneault; Saturday, Feb. 18, 1 p.m., master class with Esneault; and 3 p.m., Southeastern Jazz Ensemble in concert with Esneault.

Masterclasses and performances are traditional parts of the Bill Evans Jazz Festival, but this year the department will be adding a more tangible aspect. Artifacts of Evans’ will be on display in the Southeastern Contemporary Art Gallery throughout the duration of the festival. Photographs, album covers and letters written by Evans will be exhibited to showcase the jazz legends’ achievements and his history with Southeastern.

Brothers said former Southeastern faculty member Ron Nethercutt will present a lecture Wednesday, Feb. 15, at noon on Evans in the Art Gallery located in East Stadium.

“Bill Evans is one of the greatest jazz pianists of all time, so naturally we would want to highlight his connection to Southeastern,” said Brothers.

Many of the articles that will be on display were taken from archives maintained by the university. However, some were gathered by Brothers personally.

“One of the letters in the exhibit has never seen the light of day until now,” he said. “Also, it took some doing, but we will have a program from the 1994 GRAMMY Awards where Evans received a Lifetime Achievement Award. We also were able to reach out to former members of the Bill Evans Trio, percussionist Marty Morell and bassist Chuck Israels for scans of photographs of Bill.”

For additional information, call the Department of Fine and Performing Arts at 985-549-2184.
PHOTO:
PIANIST, COMPOSER ESNEAULT TO HIGHLIGHT BILL EVANS FESTIVAL: Acclaimed pianist, composer and Grammy Award winner Michael Esneault will be a featured performer at Southeastern Louisiana University’s annual Bill Evans Festival to be held on campus Feb. 15-18. Information can be obtained by calling 985-549-2184.

18 2017-01-23
Hammond

Southeastern procession honors MLK


Chants of "united we stand, divided we fall" echoed through the night air on Southeastern Louisiana University's campus Wednesday, as a candlelight procession marched to honor Martin Luther King Jr. Day.
The occasion's theme was simple: stand together as Americans to demand equality and justice for all, just as the civil rights leader had fought for using a message of love and peace.
The procession included students, faculty and administrators, who held candles as they marched and chanted from the Pennington Student Activity Center to the Student Union. Once there, they heard from Brother Brandon Lewis, of Baton Rouge.
The service was organized by the Kappa Nu Chapter of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity at Southeastern.
Senior Tamara Alexander said Martin Luther King Jr. did so much to unite Americans in the fight for African Americans' civil rights, despite the violence he and other civil rights activists faced.
The fight to unite all Americans, whatever their skin color, was not in vain, the kinesiology student said.
"You can see out here the diversity of people," she said, as the large crowd waited to depart for the union.
Progress has been made toward equality, but Americans still face division based on racial prejudice, even "in our back yard," she said.
She was referring to the police shooting of Alton Sterling, an African American, last summer in Baton Rouge that led to protests. His death was followed by the ambush shooting of law enforcement officers in Baton Rouge by a man from Missouri that left three law officers dead.
During these difficult times, people especially need to unite for the rights Americans hold dear, said Alexander, president of Pi Iota Chapter of the Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority.
"We really need to be together," she said.
Once the procession arrived at the ballroom in the Student Union, the crowd was treated to a song from Ciara Reed and Brother Jeremy Lloyd, as well as a poem from Brother Cedric Dent, Jr.
Brother Lewis, an artist who is a member of New Hope Baptist Church in Baton Rouge, talked about what life was like for African Americans around the time the Civil Rights Movement began in the 1950s.
Black people could face violence, such as lynchings, if they did not follow Jim Crow laws in the South, he said.
They faced discrimination and segregation across the country. African Americans who tried to vote could face violence for exercising that right, Lewis said.
King and other civil rights leaders demanded change using nonviolent protests and marches. King and his family received death threats before he was assassinated in Memphis on April 4, 1968.
Even though his life was in danger, he stayed at the forefront of the movement, Lewis said.
"He remained true to his cause," Lewis said.
Lewis said Americans owe King the same bravery and determination he showed to spread his message of hope and love. Dr. King's legacy today is more than the "I Have a Dream Speech," the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, he said.
"Dr. King's legacy is the hope he gave to the people," he said.

18 2017-01-19
Baton Rouge

SLU faculty, staff receive top awards at convocation


Southeastern Louisiana University opened the spring semester on Jan. 6 with its Faculty-Staff Convocation.

The event, held in the Student Union Grand Ballroom, included presentation of the President’s Awards for Excellence, recognition of professors who were elevated to emeritus status, remarks by Southeastern President John L. Crain, recognition of donors, and service awards to faculty and staff who have worked at the university for 25, 30, 35 and 40 years.

Receiving the President’s Award for Excellence, the university’s highest honor for faculty and staff, were English instructor David Armand, artistic activity; political science professor Margaret Gonzalez-Perez, research; education professor Paige Lilley Schulte, teaching; professor of education Colleen Klein-Ezell, faculty service; and Assistant Director of Physical Plant Services Mark Whitmer, unclassified staff service.

Four retired members of Southeastern Louisiana University’s faculty were recognized with emeritus status in recognition of their distinguished and extraordinary service.

Crain recognized chemistry professors Don Elbers and Linda Munchausen, sociology professor Marc Riedel and accounting professor Pierre Titard. The emeritus title is one of the highest honors the university bestows.

The convocation concluded with an indoor picnic.


18 2017-01-19
Baton Rouge

SLU Community Music School to host double reed workshop


The Southeastern Louisiana University Community Music School will hold its 33rd annual Double Reed Workshop on Feb. 3-4.

Scheduled at Pottle Music Building Auditorium on Southeastern’s campus in Hammond, the workshop will provide instruction on the oboe and bassoon and will address playing position and technique, special fingerings, care and simple repairs; making double reeds for bassoon and oboe; and coaching on selected music, including contest and audition pieces.

The two-day workshop is $30 and is open to junior high and high school students, as well as adults. On the first day of the workshop, educational activities run from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. On the final day of the workshop, the activities resume at 8:30 a.m. and end at 4 p.m. There is an optional overnight stay.

Southeastern’s bassoon professor emeritus Jerry Voorhees and expert oboist Christine Webert will instruct the workshop.

“This is the 33rd year in a row we have held this workshop. The oboe and bassoon are very important instruments in bands and orchestras, but not many students are studying them,” Voorhees said. “I hope the workshop encourages students to study and play these unusual instruments by providing specialized information which is important to playing them successfully — information not usually covered in school music classes.”

To register or for more information, contact the Community Music School at (985) 549-5502 or cms@southeastern.edu or Voorhees at (985) 345-4537 or jerryvoorhees@charter.net.


18 2017-01-19
Hammond

Southeastern to host Study Abroad Fair


With a dozen study abroad trips planned for the spring, Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond will host its annual Study Abroad Fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Jan. 19.

The fair, which will be held in the Student Union breezeway, gives students and others the opportunity to learn about global education possibilities sponsored by the Office of International Initiatives in cooperation with several Southeastern academic departments.

The programs vary from one to three weeks in length and offer up to six academic credit hours each.

Lucia Harrison, director of the Office of International Initiatives, said the trips are available not only to Southeastern students but to students from other universities and the general public, as well. A limited number of scholarships are available.

“The fair will include former study abroad students, coordinating faculty and staff who will be available to answer questions and share their experiences,” Harrison added. “Applications for the trips can be completed at the fair itself or online at southeastern.edu/studyabroad.”
18 2017-01-12
Baton Rouge

SLU Community Music School selects outstanding musicians for 2016


The Southeastern Louisiana University’s Community Music School recently announced its fall 2016 CMS Outstanding Musicians: Matthew Braselman, Makaylah Herring and Katie Miranda.

The Outstanding Musicians were chosen by the votes of the audience during the three fall 2016 final recitals.

“We congratulate our fall 2016 CMS Outstanding Musicians as well as the other 40 young musicians who performed beautifully at the recitals,” said CMS Director Jivka Duke. “We are very proud of our students’ accomplishments and applaud their talent as well as their hard work and dedication.”

Braselman, a bassoon student of professor emeritus Jerry Voorhees, won the audience vote during the Dec. 6 recital. Herring, a violin student of Duke and a voice student of Associate Professor of Voice Joy Ratliff, won the vote at the Dec. 8 recital; and Miranda, a piano student of staff accompanist Irina Cunev and a bassoon student of Voorhees, won the audience vote at the Dec. 9 recital.

Braselman, of Mandeville, attends Fountainebleau High School.

Herring is from Holden and attends Holden High School. She has studied violin for 11 years and also plays guitar, mandolin and banjo. She is a singer, songwriter and has an album of original songs on iTunes.

Miranda lives in Hammond and attends Albany High School. She has been playing piano for seven years and the bassoon for a more than a year. She also enjoys photography, drawing and acting.

The Community Music School will begin its spring session Jan. 23, and registration has begun. Deadline to register without adding a $20 fee is Jan. 13; however, registration will remain open throughout the semester.

Duke said scholarships funded by First Guaranty Bank will once again allow the school to offer discounted tuition to students who are on reduced or free lunch at their schools in the spring.

Students of all ages may participate in private lessons on various instruments and voice. Opportunities for group instruction and ensemble formation also are available.

For more information, call (985) 549-5502 or visit southeastern.edu/cms.


18 2017-01-12
Hammond

Faculty Senate resolution calls for a plan to implement raises


Southeastern Louisiana University needs a plan for establishing annual salary raises for all academic faculty, the university's Faculty Senate said Wednesday.
The body passed a resolution stating the university administration needs to submit a plan for having "sustainable annual salary increase of no less than 2 percent per year for all academic faculty." It gives the administration a deadline of April 1 for the plan.


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Senators debated whether the resolution would give the wrong impression to the public since the university is facing a mid-year cut of $440,000 due to another state budget shortfall. While professors at Southeastern have not seen a raise in about eight years, Louisiana college students have suffered as well, with tuition and student loan debt climbing, they said.
One senator said he has heard students say they could no longer afford to attend college.
Talking about raises while the university struggles with a mid-year cut and students have an only partially-funded TOPS state scholarship program might look bad to the public, he worried.
However, faculty members said it is important for the public to know just how bad professors and instructors have had it the past eight years.
Some faculty members are depending on food stamps, despite having a full-time job, while others are having to take on another job to pay their bills, senators said.
Another said she could teach at a public high school and get a higher salary than what she has now.
The resolutions states faculty members have not received bona fide raises in more than eight years and that research indicates there is a link between quality teaching and higher pay.
Having liveable salaries that better reflect the cost of living is essential for retaining qualified professors, said Senator Stephen Rushing, chairman of the welfare committee that drafted the resolution.
"They have to do something," he said.
The resolution says 80 percent of professors and 62 percent of instructors at Southeastern have salaries that are below average for their rank based on information from the Southern Regional Education Board. The Consumer Price Index has shown the cost of living for faculty members in the region has risen substantially, it continued.
Also, the resolution argues the salaries of nonacademic and administrative support positions are much higher than the mean instructor salary. Other universities, such as LSU and Southern University Shreveport, put in faculty raises in their budgets in recent times, it said.
The committee had an earlier, longer draft of the resolution that included proposals for the university to fund raises, but that was taken out after senators disagreed on the ideas, one of which was to decrease funding for athletics. The new passed resolution simply states "why we need a raise" and asks the university administration to come up with a plan for securing them, Rushing said.
The resolution will also be amended to add language saying when money is available for salary increases, the raises should be distributed in a fair and equitable manner.
Faculty Senate President Dayne Sherman said he would like to see another resolution soon to address the rising cost of higher education for students and the burden it has placed on them.
With higher education being cut consistently for the past eight years, Southeastern is relying more on self-generated revenue, such as tuition, than on state aid, he said.

18 2017-01-12
Hammond

Faculty exhibit scheduled at SLU Contemporary Art Gallery


The Department of Fine and Performing Arts at Southeastern Louisiana University is hosting a faculty exhibition from Jan. 19 to Feb. 10 at the university’s Contemporary Art Gallery, 100 East Stadium, Hammond.

The gallery will host an opening reception on Thursday, Jan. 19, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. The gallery is open Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.

The exhibition will showcase a survey of artwork from Southeastern’s faculty who teach students in the visual arts, theater design and design in the Department of Fine and Performing Arts. The reception and exhibition are free and open to the public.

For more information, contact the gallery at (985) 549-5080.


18 2017-01-11
Hammond

Four receive SLU emeritus status


Four retired members of Southeastern Louisiana University's faculty were recognized with emeritus status in recognition of their distinguished and extraordinary service at the university Faculty-Staff Convocation held Friday.
Southeastern President John L. Crain recognized chemistry professors Don Elbers and Linda Munchausen, sociology Professor Marc Riedel, and accounting Professor Pierre Titard.


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The emeritus title is one of the highest honors the university bestows.
Elbers is a Southeastern graduate who joined the faculty in 1976 after earning his doctorate at LSU.
In addition to teaching, he maintained the instrumentation of the department, a valuable service considering a chemistry department is highly dependent upon its instrumentation, President Crain said.
In 1981 he was named the university's director of Technical Services. He returned to the department in 1996, teaching and once again maintaining the department's infrastructure, especially with regard to student safety.
Munchausen is another Southeastern graduate who returned to teach at her alma mater.
She received her doctorate from the University of Arkansas and conducted research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
She was appointed acting head of the chemistry and physics department in 1994 and department head in 1995.
The author of 13 scientific publications, she has served as president of the Louisiana Academy of Sciences. In recent years, she has become dedicated to high school science research, working with the Region 8 Science Fair and directing the Louisiana State Science Olympiad.
Riedel is an internationally recognized scholar who has made major contributions to the study of violence and homicide. He has authored or co-authored 12 books.
One of his works, "Criminal Violence: Causes, Patterns, and Prevention," is the standard text used by criminologists and professors nationwide. He has contributed 30 chapters to other books and has had more than 35 articles published in scholarly journals.
His work has been cited by the U.S. Supreme Court, and his participation on the boards of professional associations and research bodies underscores the respect he has earned by his peers.
A certified public accountant who joined the Southeastern faculty in 2000, Titard has served as Faculty in Residence and Special Government Employee for the New Orleans Division of the FBI, assisting in the investigation of financial crimes.
He received an award in 2011 from the FBI for his development of innovative and efficient processes in addressing white collar crimes. Titard is recognized by his colleagues for the care he shows for his students. He meets individually with each student every semester.

18 2017-01-11
Hammond

Professors honored at spring semester convocation


Southeastern Louisiana University opened the spring semester Friday with its convocation that included presentation of the President's Awards for Excellence, the university's highest honor for faculty and staff.
The event, held in the Student Union Grand Ballroom, also included recognition of professors who were elevated to emeritus status, remarks by Southeastern President John L. Crain, recognition of donors and service awards to faculty and staff who have worked at the university for 25, 30, 35, and 40 years.


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Receiving the President's Awards for Excellence were English Instructor David Armand, Artistic Activity; Political Science Professor Margaret Gonzalez-Perez, Research; Education Professor Paige Lilley Schulte, Teaching; Professor of Education Colleen Klein-Ezell, Faculty Service; and Assistant Director of Physical Plant Services Mark Whitmer, Unclassified Staff Service.
Armand, honored for his writing talent, is quickly earning a reputation as one of the foremost emerging young Southern writers.
A 2004 and 2006 graduate of Southeastern, he has written three novels and a book of poetry. Armand has been honored as Alumnus of the Year by the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, and was named one of "40 under 40" by "Gambit Magazine" of New Orleans.
A political scientist, Gonzalez-Perez was applauded for her research on women in terrorism. Internationally recognized as one of the leading authorities on the subject, her book is used as a text in courses across the globe. She is known for approaching research as a tool in teaching and gains much of her inspiration from her students' questions.
Referred to by her colleagues as a "teacher of teachers," Schulte cannot remember a time in her life when she did not want to be a teacher. An avid traveler, she brings her professional zeal for teaching along on her trips, presenting programs on prevention of bullying and teaching techniques in nations such as Moscow, China, the United Kingdom and Canada. She holds certification in teaching English as a Second Language, and coordinates Southeastern's teaching apprenticeship program with the St. Charles Parish School System.
With an academic focus on special education, Klein-Ezell is passionate about working with children with disabilities and their families. She has secured numerous grants designed to provide services for area schools, as well as valuable learning opportunities for her teacher-candidates.
Her most recent efforts have focused on the development of two unique facilities at Southeastern for children with special needs - a Lecotect room that provides adaptive toys to the children, and two Snoezelen rooms that create a calming, exploring and interactive experience for them.
Whitmer was recognized for his service to Southeastern and his community. He carries the spirit of service into his job, dedicated to the success of programs such as Rock n' Roar, Homecoming, commencements and football games. He has served as a marshal for the Krewe of Omega, attending to parade logistics; volunteer softball coach for various community teams; a participant in literacy programs in area schools; and assisting in maintenance, construction and yard work for his church, as well as tending to the sick and shut-ins of his community.
The convocation concluded with an indoor picnic sponsored by Aramark/Southeastern Catering, First Guaranty Bank, and North Oaks Health System.

18 2017-01-09
Hammond

LOOKING TO FUTURE


Competitive pay for faculty and staff tops Southeastern Louisiana University President John Crain's priority list that he plans to pursue once a pay freeze is lifted for universities and colleges.
At Southeastern's Faculty-Staff Convocation Friday, Crain spoke briefly about raises for faculty and staff during his State of the University address.
The event, normally held in the fall, was postponed this school year because of the flood in August. Crain said most of SLU's students are from the parishes that experienced the heaviest flooding, so Southeastern was hurt even though its campus was not damaged.
"It's reasonable to speculate that Southeastern was the higher education institution that was most significantly impacted by the flood," he said.
The university had to push back the start date for the fall semester. University employees also worked to reach out to students in flooded areas, who they had not heard from, to see if they were going to be able to attend this semester and to offer any assistance, he said.
Shortly after the flood hit Aug. 12, more than 200 students volunteered to gut flooded homes in Southeast Louisiana. Southeastern faculty, staff and alumni donated more than $100,000 to provide disaster relief for university family members, he said.
Along with having the unique challenge of responding to a natural disaster this school year, the university is again facing a cut to its state funding due to state budgetary problems, he noted.
The latest mid-year reduction for higher education institutions is $12 million. About $440,000 is coming out of Southeastern's budget.
Crain said higher education institutions, along with other state agencies, are under a pay freeze because of the state budget shortfall.
"But my highest budget priority remains addressing more competitive pay for our faculty and staff," the university president said. "As soon as we have the authority and capacity to do that, we will do so."
The large crowd inside the Student Union ballroom applauded that promise. Faculty Senate members have criticized on a number of occasions the lack of pay raises they have seen for the past several years.
Convocation is held annually and includes bestowing honors and recognitions on faculty and staff members. It is attended by many local dignitaries. Attending this year's event were Mayor Pete Panepinto, former Southeastern President Sally Clausen, SLU Alumni Association President Mayson Foster, state Rep. Steve Pugh, state Sen. Beth Mizell and many others.
Crain said "the relentless assault on our finances" means Southeastern has to rely heavily on students' tuition and the private donations of supporters. Every decision the university makes has to keep in mind how that decision will impact enrollment and private gifts from partners and alumni, he said.
More than 80 percent of the university's resources comes from self-generated funds while state aid only accounts for less than 20 percent, he said.
"That's an incredible statistic, and it's an incredible shift," he said.
The university has to convince students that what the university provides them is worth the price tag, and it has to convince its alumni members and partners that the university's efforts "add value for them" to justify their investment.
Despite these financially dark times, Crain said the university has had several recent successes.
The university's student marketing and recruitment plan to attract students seems to have worked since it began last school year.
The university had a record number of new student applications this fall and one of the largest freshmen classes, with 2,600 new freshmen.
The university has also reached it highest cohort graduation rate, he said. In 2016, the university's cohort graduation rate was 40 percent.
A four-year adjusted cohort graduation rate is the number of students who graduate in four years with a regular high school diploma divided by the number of students who form the adjusted cohort for the graduating class.
The Connect to Success, a partnership between the university and Northshore Technical Community College, also experienced a record enrollment this year, he said.
Being efficient has also become more important than ever, Crain said, and the university's sustainability initiatives have helped save about $1.2 million a year. Another good development for the university is its new science and technology building being built with state capital outlay money that should be ready by next year.
Crain said he seeks to be an optimist despite the financial challenges. Depending more on self-generated revenue does have a silver lining, he said.
"We are more in control of our destiny than ever before. We have the opportunity to engineer our own success," he said.

18 2017-01-09
Hammond

Forrest to bring back litter ed


Tangipahoa Parish Councilman Trent Forrest says he wants to revive an educational program promoting litter abatement in schools.
Early in 2015, the parish partnered with public schools, the Louisiana Children's Discovery Center and Southeastern Louisiana University to do an anti-litter awareness campaign in schools. It involved biology students from Southeastern talking with young students about the impact litter has on the environment.


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However, the educational program has stalled since then, Forrest said. A major coordinator for the partnership among the parish, Discovery Center, SLU and the school system was Anette Kirylo, former director of the Discovery Center who moved out of state and is no longer involved.
Forrest said he would like to see the education campaign pick back up again and he hopes to help with that this year.
"We definitely want to bring that back," he said.
Forrest is chair of the council's anti-litter committee that is also looking at the possibility of starting a litter court in Tangipahoa Parish, where people with litter tickets could be handled more effectively. He said the proposal has been discussed among the parish council members, justices of the peace and constables for quite some time and could become a reality in the next few years.
The parish's litter abatement currently involves parish employees picking up litter, inmates from the sheriff's office cleaning up roads and people required to have community service hours as punishment for DWIs picking up trash.
The north-end councilman said another ongoing goal is to push for gravel roads in his district to get overlayed. He said District 1 has more than 80 miles of gravel roads. The parish is working on the priority list of roads to be overlayed in each district under the next phase of the road overlay program for the parish.
Forrest said he also would like to see the architectural drawings for Kentwood's new library branch completed in 2017.

18 2017-01-09
Hammond

http://www.weeklycitizen.com/news/20170105/southeastern-student-selected-for-national-fellowship


Neil Bourgeois, a senior from Sorrento, will participate in the Undergraduate Fellows Program sponsored by the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA).

A Southeastern Louisiana University communication senior has been selected to participate in a national fellowship program designed to prepare individuals for a career in college student affairs.

Neil Bourgeois, a senior from Sorrento, will participate in the Undergraduate Fellows Program sponsored by the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA). The program provides students with various opportunities that prepare them for a career in student affairs. The national organization is the principle source for leadership, professional development and advocacy for student affairs professionals.


A first generation college student, Bourgeois is a leadership intern in Southeastern's Office of Student Engagement, where he helps develop programs to encourage student engagement opportunities in organizations such as the Student Government Association, Greek organizations and other student groups.

Under the fellowship, Bourgeois will work with his mentor, Pam Rault, director of the Office of Student Engagement, to review current trends and research in the field and keep track of specific goals that have been established. As a fellowship participant, he is also able to apply for leadership programs application fee waivers for the Graduate Record Exam, and internships and stipends to attend the NASPA conference.

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Bourgeois said he sees the strong possibility of a future career in student affairs.

"I hope one day to be either a Greek life adviser or work in leadership development at a university," he said. "I want to impact the lives of college students the way Southeastern and my mentors have impacted me. I want to make a difference and show students the many benefits of being involved in college."

In addition to his campus internship, Bourgeois is the secretary of Pi Kappa Alpha, serves as a senator in the Student Government Association and is an ExCEL (Excellence in Commitment to Education and Leadership) Scholar.


18 2017-01-09
Hammond

SLU Convocation bestows honors on faculty, staff


Southeastern Louisiana University Faculty-Staff Convocation on Friday highlighted the work of several professors who earned the President's Awards for Excellence.
The annual event recognizes faculty and staff members for their years of dedicated work at the university and their achievements, as well as announces new endowed scholarships and professorships


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David Armand, an author and faculty member, won president's award for artistic activity. His work has been recognized by several publications and his latest published work, the memoir "My Mother's House," tackles the state of care for the mentally ill. He is working on a second memoir about growing up in Folsom with an abusive father and a novel set in the Florida Parishes.
Margaret Gonzales-Perez, a political science professor who holds the C. Howard Nichols Endowed Professorship in History and Political Science, won the award for her research. Her book "Women Terrorists: Female Activity in International and Domestic Terrorism" has gained her an international reputation. The research for the book began after terrorist attack on Sept. 11, 2001, when she became interested in why women participated in terrorist groups that are male-dominated. The published work has since become a textbook for many courses around the country.
Paige Lilley Schulte, associate professor of education, won the award for excellence in teaching. She has earned a reputation as a "teacher of teachers" and has taught about teaching all around the globe. Schulte has been recognized internationally for her use of various techniques to promote active learning and student engagement. She has given presentations on bullying and teaching techniques in China, Mauritius, the United Kingdom and Canada. She became certified in English as a second language so she could help provide effective education to Latino children.
Colleen Klein-Ezell, head of the teaching and learning department, won the award for excellence in faculty service. Her passion is to help children with special needs. She joined the department in 2007. She has helped raise funds for students to attend national conferences, has served on several university committees and has helped secure grants to serve families with special needs. She helped secure a grant to establish a Lekotek, a library with adaptive toys for special needs children, and Snoezelen, a calming and interactive play room, at the university for families of children who have special needs.
Mark Whitmer, assistant director of physical plant services at the university, won the award for excellence in unclassified staff service. He supervises many employees and helps operate a variety of day-to-day services for the 363-acre campus, as well as helps with major events on campus. He is also very active with his church, Our Lady of Pompeii Catholic Church, and the community. His activities include recreational, spiritual and nutritional outreach programs. He has coached softball for local teams, helped with yard work for the community and church and has participated in food distribution during Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter.
The Emeritus Faculty Awards were also announced for Don Elbers, associate professor emeritus of chemistry; Linda Munchausen, professor emeritus of chemistry; and Pierre Titard, professor emeritus of accounting.
Endowed scholarships/professors that were announced include the Archie Vallie White First Generation Endowed Scholarship, the Holly & Smith Architects First Generation Endowed Scholarship and the J.W. McClimans Endowed Professorship in Computer Science or Engineering Technology.
Faculty tenure and promotions were presented to Laura Fazio-Griffith, associate professor with tenure; Kellen Gilbert, professor; Eric Johnson, professor; Paul Kelsey, tenure; Colleen Klein-Ezell, professor; Ho-Hoon Lee, professor; Molly McGraw, professor; Alissa Rowe, associate professor with tenure; Paul Sawyer, professor; Penny Shockett, professor; and Catherine Tijerino, associate professor.
Jack Lamonte received the Service Award for being employed with Southeastern for 40 years.
For 35 years, awards went to Donna Methvien and Barbara West. For 30 years of service, awards went to President John L. Crain, George Dorrill, Joseph Patti and Lynn Stirling.
Service awards for 25 years of service went to Michael Beauvais, Chris Bentley, Virginia Creel, Brian Crother, Gina Drago, Rufus Hayes, Jr., Shirley Jacob, Robert Kraemer, Margaret Little, Rebecca Muller, Dorothy Nelson, William Parkinson, Murray Pendarvis, Peggy Rolling, Matthew Rossano, Avinash Waikar and Mary White.

18 2017-01-06
New Orleans

Tammany Times: Jump start an education for the new year


For those who never completed high school or those who want to pursue a trade or a degree, the new year is a great time to move ahead in education.

Northshore Technical Community College has expanded to meet a variety of educational needs in St. Tammany. Some people have taken classes in welding and HVAC, and others who needed to recover from recent flooding learned rebuilding skills from sheetrocking to tile work.

Through partnerships with Southeastern Louisiana University and most recently, the University of New Orleans, other students have begun course work that will transfer to a school with a four-year degree program.

With locations in Slidell and Mandeville and a new campus soon to open in Lacombe, the community college has much to offer those pursuing education and training beyond high school. In particular, it is a way for those who did not graduate from high school to get back on track.

Adult Education Director Jason Leader wants those potential students who did not complete high school to make 2017 “their year to succeed.” The pathway to achieving a high-school equivalency credential, which before 2014 was called the GED, is now the HiSET exam.

Leader's program prepares St. Tammany students for the HiSET exam.

“We are also the official testing center in St. Tammany,” he said.

The next new student orientation for the HiSET is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday. This is an all-day mandatory meeting; bring their own lunch. A valid government issued ID card and Social Security number are required to complete the Intake Assessment Test.

Registration is available online at northshorecollege.edu/adult-education-opportunities/st-tammany-parish-adult-edu. Additional orientations will be held Feb. 6 and March 6.

As part of the enrollment process, students will be tested in reading, math and language. Those who score at the 11th-grade level and above will begin the official practice test for the HiSET. Those who score below than 11th grade will receive individualized lessons to help prepare them for the test.

HiSET preparation classes are offered in Slidell from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. or 4:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Monday and Wednesday, or 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday at 61134 N. Military Road.

Classes in Mandeville are held from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. or 4:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Monday and Wednesday, or 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday at 21454 Koop Drive, Building B, on the third floor.

A third class may be established at the community college's new STEM campus under construction in Lacombe when space is available. Instructor-led classes also are available online, Leader said.

In the period from July 2015 through June, the community college's Adult Education program served 1,016 students in St. Tammany, Leader said. There were 252 HiSETS awarded.

As more students have taken advantage of this program, more teachers have been added. With more than 40 students in the Slidell program, Leader said a third teacher was recently added.

Students who are 16 or 17 years of age can enter the program with an approved age waver from the school board. They must meet one of five criteria, he said, which can include pregnancy or hardship. Those who are age 18 must provide a drop slip from last school attended.

“Those 19 and up can come to us for preparation to take the HiSET,“ he said, or to take the HiSET.

NTCC’s Adult Education also offers English as a Second Language to more than 125 students. Leader said that these students are from countries around the world, and range from those with no higher education to college graduates.

“The goal is that these students master the language and move into the HiSET program, college or the workforce,” he said.

Adult Education also offers other inventive programs to move potential students from HiSET into higher education. There are also state and federal scholarship programs for students in the HiSET program to take college-level classes.

Those who receive their HiSET can go into the community college's workforce programs to upgrade their skills or into Connect to Success, a program that partners with colleges to offer a “bridge” to a bachelor’s degree, he said. Connect to Success is taught at Southeastern’s campus in Hammond.

NTCC is accredited by the Accrediting Commission of the Council on Occupational Education and is in the process of Southern Association of Colleges and Schools accreditation, he said.

Recent statistics posted by NTCC show that last year, about 1,200 students successfully transferred to more than 90 private and public two- and four-year colleges. Of those, 749 transferred to Southeastern. Eight percent of students at the community college last year earned associate degrees or certifications in high-demand fields, according to the Louisiana Workforce Commission.

For information, call (985) 732-6640, ext. 128; email adultedinfo@northshorecollege.edu; or visit northshorecollege.edu/WorkReadyU or facebook.com/NTCCAdultEducation. To learn about the state community college systems, visit lctcs.edu.
18 2017-01-05
Baton Rouge

Southeastern student selected for national fellowship


A Southeastern Louisiana University communication senior has been selected to participate in a national fellowship program designed to prepare individuals for a career in college student affairs.

Neil Bourgeois, a senior from Sorrento, will participate in the Undergraduate Fellows Program sponsored by the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators. The program provides students with various opportunities that prepare them for a career in student affairs. The national organization is the principle source for leadership, professional development and advocacy for student affairs professionals, according to a news release.

Bourgeois is a leadership intern in Southeastern's Office of Student Engagement, where he helps develop programs to encourage student engagement opportunities in campus organizations.

Under the fellowship, Bourgeois will work with his mentor, Pam Rault, director of the Office of Student Engagement, to review trends and research in the field and track specific goals that have been established.

Bourgeois said he sees the strong possibility of a future career in student affairs.

“I hope one day to be either a Greek life adviser or work in leadership development at a university,” he said. “I want to impact the lives of college students the way Southeastern and my mentors have impacted me. I want to make a difference and show students the many benefits of being involved in college.”

In addition to his internship, Bourgeois is the secretary of Pi Kappa Alpha, serves as a senator in the Student Government Association and is an Excellence in Commitment to Education and Leadership Scholar.
18 2017-01-04
New Orleans

SLU urges Christmas tree donations to help stop erosion


Southeastern Louisiana University is urging people to donate their Christmas trees to help save the state’s coast rather than throwing them in the trash. Rob Moreau, manager of SLU’s Turtle Cover Environmental Research Station, says when you put recycled trees into the marsh it can help the shoreline in many ways.


“It can help reduce erosion from wave action, you can help build up habitats. Very importantly, you can help keep the trees out of landfills.”

For more drop off information, visit southeastern.edu/turtlecove. Moreau says they are collecting trees at several places around the Hammond area.

“The City of Hammond, The City of Ponchatoula, our Sustainability Center on the Southeastern Louisiana University campus. We also bring our Turtle Cove trailer out in front of Middendorf’s Restaurant.”

Moreau says when the Christmas trees are placed along with shoreline, the trees help to trap the sediments. He says eventually, grass begins to grow inside of the tree.

“That helps to create a base for vegetation to grow. So, it’s like you’re adding a base for this vegetation and that’s how it works.”

18 2016-12-30
Baton Rouge

Hammond Westside students learn mindfulness from SLU nursing students


Southeastern Louisiana University senior nursing students created and implemented a health promotion project targeted to children in the community. The project was based on a mindfulness program being done in the Baltimore schools where children learn how to meditate and do yoga instead of being sent to detention, a news release said.

On Nov. 17, the nursing students taught Hammond Westside Montessori School fourth-graders breathing exercises, a few yoga poses and how to turn negative thoughts into positive thoughts. The goal was to help decrease stress and improve health and cognitive abilities.

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A jar was created for the classroom containing decorative sticks with reminders of the mindfulness practices taught. When children feel sad or angry, they may pull a stick and practice the exercise written on it — a yoga pose, a positive affirmation or a breathing exercise
18 2016-12-27
Baton Rouge

Southeastern Channel production named fourth best in nation


A student entertainment show produced for the Southeastern Channel, Southeastern Louisiana University’s cable access channel, has won fourth place in the nation.

“College Night” was named the country’s fourth best in the Best Comedy-Video category by College Broadcasters Inc. at the 2016 National Student Production Awards in Philadelphia recently. There were 969 entries in the competition from universities across the nation.

It was the 12th time that a Southeastern Channel production has been honored as one of the top four in the nation by College Broadcasters Inc. The channel has been recognized multiple times for its student newscast “Northshore News,” along with student news reporting, sports play-by-play and a student-produced promotional spot. The channel won first place in the nation the past two years for a student documentary and public service announcement.

It was the fourth time that “College Night” has placed in the top four in the nation. The winning episode from Dec. 11, 2015, was produced by Danielle Shearer, of Ponchatoula.

“I feel so honored. I produced a total of three episodes of ‘College Night,’ and it’s nice to have all of the hard work recognized on a national level,” Shearer said. “ 'College Night’ is special because it gives students who are more into filmmaking a chance to stretch their creative muscles."

Shearer not only produced the show but also wrote, directed, shot, edited and acted in many of the segments. Among the students who contributed to the program were Rachel Taylor, of St. Amant; Mallory Milton and Tyler Hampton, of Ponchatoula; Molly Flynn, of Amite; and Richard Mills, of Hammond.

“It’s a great honor for our students to be recognized once again as among the best in the nation,” said Southeastern Channel General Manager Rick Settoon.

The winning show was produced in the vein of “Saturday Night Live” with comedy sketches that used college activities like intramurals, sorority recruitment and beauty pageants to parody popular television shows like “Supernatural,” “Big Brother” and “Charlie’s Angels.”

The Southeastern Channel has won over 300 national, international, and regional awards in the last 12 years, including 13 Emmys. The channel airs in 90,000 households on the north shore with a potential viewing audience of 250,000 on Charter Cable 199. Its webcast and video on demand can be viewed at southeastern.edu/tv.


18 2016-12-27
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN MBA PROGRAM RANKED 35TH IN NATION


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University’s master of business administration program has been ranked 35th in the country by the web site TopManagementDegrees.com.
Southeastern is ranked in the listing of the 50 most affordable MBA programs and was selected on criteria that includes exemplary business programs and affordable tuition rates. Over 1,000 MBA programs are selected and then vetted based on accreditation and estimated tuition costs.
To be considered for the listing, the institution must first be accredited by one of the six accrediting agencies recognized by the U.S. Department of Education, and additionally accredited by one of the top three business school accrediting institutions. The Southeastern program is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, considered the premier accreditation agency in the world for business programs. The accreditation designation signifies the Southeastern program meets specific standards of excellence that is earned by less than five percent of the world’s business schools.
The second criteria to be considered for the listing is estimated total tuition cost of the program.
Interim Dean of the College of Business Antoinette Phillips said the ranking demonstrates the high expectations the program places on student success.
“Even with the tuition increases over recent years, our program continues to represent a significant value for our students,” said Phillips. “The exceptional quality of our program results in exceptional students who are highly recruited upon graduation.”
Phillips said all programs in the College of Business are accredited by AACSB, while the accounting program holds a separate and distinct accreditation by the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education.
Top Management Degrees is a web site for information about business and management education. The site contains rankings and reviews of the top management degree programs, along with information on how to select the right degree program for unique interests and needs.
The full report can be accessed at www.topmanagementdegrees.com/rankings/most-affordable-mba-programs-2017/.

18 2016-12-27
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN COLLECTS DISCARDED CHRISTMAS TREES FOR WETLANDS


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University is asking area citizens to do something useful for the environment with their discarded Christmas trees rather than throwing them into the trash pile.
“We can put the old Christmas trees to work in our area marshland while also reducing the waste stream going into landfills,” said Rob Moreau, manager of Southeastern Louisiana University’s Turtle Cove Environmental Research Station located on Pass Manchac between lakes Pontchartrain and Maurepas.
Although grant funding is no longer available from the state, local partners have pitched in to help collect the trees and make the project possible.
Southeastern scientists at Turtle Cove use the discarded trees to help build up marshland in areas that have been impacted by erosion and other factors, said Moreau.
Partnering in the project for the third year is the Southeastern Sustainability Center on North Oak Street, which will serve as a drop-off point for area residents to leave their used Christmas trees. Other partners include the city of Hammond and Middendorf’s Restaurant in Manchac, as drop-off sites.
Trees can be dropped off beginning Dec. 26 through Mardi Gras from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Hammond Maintenance facility, 18104 Hwy. 190, next to Piggly Wiggly Super Market. The Southeastern Sustainability Center, 2101 North Oak Street, will collect trees beginning Jan. 5 through the end of the month from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 8 to 10 a.m. on Friday. Moreau said a Turtle Cove trailer drop off site will also be maintained at Middendorf’s Restaurant.
He said the City of Hammond will provide transport of collected trees to the Turtle Cove Galva Canal parking lot area in Manchac where they will be stored until they are deployed in the marshes.
No flocked trees will be accepted, and all trees should be stripped of any ornaments, lights, tinsel and stands.
Moreau said the trees will be used to continue a pilot project started last year to determine whether the recycled trees can help fill in the logging ditches, formed when the area’s cypress forests were cut down over a hundred-plus-year span.
“The ditches allow salt water intrusion and increase the erosion process,” Moreau said. “Under the supervision of biology researcher Dr. Gary Shaffer, we will place trees in some selected ditches to determine if they can accumulate enough sediment that might assist in filling them in. We’ll monitor and evaluate this process over the next several years to determine its feasibility. If successful, this technique could be used in other similarly stressed ecosystems in coastal Louisiana.”
This marks the 22nd straight year Southeastern has conducted its recycled tree program. Moreau depends on volunteers and students to deploy the trees in the Manchac wetlands. More than 35,000 trees have been deployed through the Southeastern program.
Moreau said the benefits of the tree recycling program include protection against shoreline erosion, building of land to offset subsidence and sea-level rise, creation of new habitats for plants and animals and reducing waste going to landfills.
“The program is also a great way to conduct community service and environmental education from a hands-on standpoint for people of all ages,” he said.
Additional information can be obtained by contacting Moreau at rmoreau@southeastern.edu or by visiting the website at www.southeastern.edu/turtlecove and looking under the “Events” link.
Donations to help support the activity can be sent by check payable to “Friends of Turtle Cove” and mailed to Southeastern Box 10585, Hammond, LA 70402 or can be made by credit card by visiting the Turtle Cove web site and under the “Friends and Donors” link.

18 2016-12-27
Hammond

SLU COMMUNITY MUSIC SCHOOL NAMES TOP 2016 MUSICIANS


HAMMOND---The Southeastern Louisiana University’s Community Music School recently announced its fall 2016 CMS Outstanding Musicians, Matthew Braselman, Makaylah Herring and Katie Miranda.
The Outstanding Musicians were chosen by the votes of the audience during the three fall 2016 final recitals.
“We congratulate our fall 2016 CMS Outstanding Musicians as well as the other 40 young musicians who performed beautifully at the recitals,” said CMS Director Jivka Duke. “We are very proud of our students’ accomplishments and applaud their talent as well as their hard work and dedication. We look forward to early spring when we will hold our annual Spring Festival, yet another competitive event where the students with the highest scores will receive medals and pins. We are excited about our Strings Orchestra, which will continue to perform at various locations throughout the community.”
Braselman, a bassoon student of Professor Emeritus Jerry Voorhees, won the audience vote during the Dec. 6 recital. Herring, a violin student of Duke and a voice student of Associate Professor of Voice Joy Ratliff, won the vote at the Thursday, Dec. 8 recital; and Miranda, a piano student of Staff Accompanist Irina Cunev and a bassoon student of Voorhees, won the audience vote at the Friday, Dec. 9 recital.
From Mandeville, Braselman attends Fountainebleau High School. Duke said he is an excellent saxophone player and is an active musician with the Fountainebleau High School Jazz Band and Wind Symphony. He has been a member of the All State Orchestra, All State Jazz Band, District IX Jazz Band and District IX Honor Band for several years in a row.
Herring is from Holden and attends Holden High School. She has studied the violin for 11 years and also plays guitar, mandolin and banjo. She is a singer, songwriter and has an album of original songs on iTunes.
Miranda lives in Hammond and attends Albany High School. She has been playing piano for seven years and the bassoon for a more than a year. She also enjoys photography, drawing, and acting.
The Community Music School will begin its spring 2017 session on Jan. 23, and registration has already begun. Deadline to register without adding a $20 registration fee is Jan. 13; however, registration will remain open throughout the semester.
Duke said that scholarships funded by First Guaranty Bank will once again allow the CMS to offer discounted tuition to students who are on reduced of free lunch at their schools in the spring.
Students of all ages may participate in private lessons on various instruments and voice. Opportunities for group instruction and ensemble formation are also available.
For more information about these and all CMS programs and general registration, call 985-549-5502 or visit the CMS website at www.southeastern.edu/cms.

18 2016-12-22
Hammond

Southeastern Louisiana University holds fall commencement


HAMMOND — Southeastern Louisiana University conferred degrees on 1,031 graduates Dec. 10, at the university’s fall commencement exercises.

Louisiana Senate President John A. Alario Jr. was honored by his alma mater with the Southeastern Lifetime Achievement Award.

A 1965 graduate of Southeastern, Alario was recognized for his lifetime of public service including his 45-year tenure in both the Louisiana House of Representatives and the Senate, as well as his civic service with numerous nonprofit organizations.

Candidates for associate, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees were honored.

In his welcome, SLU President John L. Crain noted that the students being recognized at commencement included 354 men and 677 women receiving 15 different degrees, and representing 18 states and 16 countries.

The university awarded its highest academic honor, the President’s Medal for Academic Excellence, to seven students with the highest cumulative grade point average in the university’s five colleges.

Medal recipients included:

College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences: Art major Sarah Margaret Amacker, of Zachary, 4.0 GPA.

Students receiving associate, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees were:

East Baton Rouge
Master's Degrees

Baker — Tonya M. Aaron, Curriculum and Instruction; Sonya N. Warren, Counseling.

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Pride — Shelby J. Browning, Counseling.

Zachary — Zachary G. Leggett, Biology (Thesis).

Bachelor's Degrees

Baker — Vallen K. Brown, Nursing; Tyler French, Accounting; Tyron’E B. Hawkins, Kinesiology; Michael R. Ward, Kinesiology.

Pride — Jordyn P. Barlow, Health Education and Promotion; Alexis N. Flores, Communication; Mary C. Hodges, Nursing; Katherine E. Manemann, General Studies; Hayden P. Rabalais, Criminal Justice; Harley M. Rome, Early/Childhood Education.

Zachary — Luke M. Atchley, Kinesiology; Jessica M. Boudreaux, Family and Consumer Sciences; Shelby L. Durbin, Nursing; Connor M. Haynes, Management; Jessica N. Lavender, Special Education; Jovonni J. Mariano, General Studies; Whitney D. McKnight, Family and Consumer Sciences; Katie L. McReynolds, Health Education and Promotion; Taylor H. Pierce, Early/Childhood Education; Rachel L. Raborn, Accounting; Kayce N. Thompson, Business Administration.


18 2016-12-22
New Orleans

Crescent City College Report, December 21-27, 2016


SOUTHEASTERN LOUISIANA UNIVERSITY: Mason Dauphin, of Luling, a student at Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond, won two second-place Awards of Distinction in the 2016 national Videographer Awards competition. The awards were for his public service announcement “League of Losers” and for the music video “Spend Your Money,” which he created with Jordan Reid, of Luling, and Jeremy Rhodes, of New Orleans. Ben Delbert of Covington won an Award of Distinction for his music video “No Self Control.” An honorable mention went to the short film “The Messenger,” produced, directed, and videotaped by Reid, edited by Dauphin and written by Rhodes. Honorable mentions also went to the public service announcements “LOPA,” produced by Dominique Brogle of Destrehan; and “The Trevor Project,” produced by Brittany Robinson of Slidell.


18 2016-12-20
Hammond

SLU to collect discarded Christmas trees to help build up coastline


HAMMOND, LA (WAFB) -
Southeastern Louisiana University is asking residents to do something useful for the environment with their discarded Christmas trees this year.

"We can put the old Christmas trees to work in our area marshland while also reducing the waste stream going into landfills," said Rob Moreau, manager of SLU's Turtle Cove Environmental Research Station on Pass Manchac.

Despite a lack of grant funding, state and local partners have pitched in to make the project possible. The discarded trees will be used to build up marshland in areas that have been impacted by erosion and other factors.

For the third year, the Southeastern Sustainability Center has partnered with the project and will serve as a drop-off point for residents to leave their trees after Christmas. Another drop-off site is Middendorf's Restaurant in Manchac.

Trees can be dropped of beginning December 26 through Mardi Gras from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Hammond Maintenance facility, located at 18104 Hwy. 190 next to the Piggly Wiggly. The Southeastern Sustainability Center will collect discarded tree beginning January 5 through January 31 from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday and from 8 to 10 a.m. on Friday. A Turtle Cove drop-off site will also be maintained at Middendorf's Restaurant.

The City of Hammond will provide transportation of the collected trees to the Turtle Cove Galva Canal parking lot in Manchac, where they will be stored until they are taken to the marshes. No flocked trees will be accepted and all trees should be stripped of ornaments, lights, tinsel, and stands.

The trees will be used to continue a pilot project started last year to determine whether or not the recycled trees can help fill in logging ditches, formed when the area's cypress forests were cut down over a 100-year span.

"The ditches allow salt water intrusion and increase the erosion process. Under the supervision of biology researcher, Dr. Gary Shaffer, we will place trees in some selected ditches to determine if they can accumulate enough sediment that might assist in filling them in. We'll monitor and evaluate this process over the next several years to determine its feasibility. If successful, this technique could be used in other similarly stressed ecosystems in coastal Louisiana," said Moreau.

This is the 22nd straight year SLU has conducted its recycled tree program. The program depends on volunteers and students to deploy the trees in the Manchac wetlands. More than 35,000 trees have been deployed as part of the program.

Moreau says the benefits of the recycling program include protection against shoreline erosion, building of land to offset subsidence and sea-level rise, creation of new habitats for plants and animals, and reducing waste going to landfills. "The program is also a great way to conduct community service and environmental education from a hands-on standpoint for people of all ages," said Moreau.

For more information, visit www.southeastern.edu/turtlecove and look under the Events link.

Donations to help support the program can be sent by check, made payable to Friends of Turtle Cove and mailed to SLU at Box 10585 Hammond, LA 70402. Donations can also be made by credit card by visiting the Turtle Cove website under the Friends and Donors link.

Copyright 2016 WAFB. All rights reserved.


18 2016-12-19
Hammond

CAMPUS CLOSED


Southeastern Louisiana University offices are closed for the annual holiday break. The campus will reopen Jan. 3 at 7:30 a.m.
Information about on-campus dining during the holiday break can be found at www.southeastern.edu/dining.
University police officers will patrol campus buildings and will request identification from anyone found in buildings officially closed for the break, campus officials said. Employees and other individuals seeking access to campus should call the University Police Department at (985) 549-2222 to make arrangements.
The University Police Department is open around the clock to assist with all inquiries or special needs, officials said.

18 2016-12-16
Hammond

Recycled Christmas trees needed for marsh


Southeastern Louisiana University is asking area citizens to do something useful for the environment when they are finished with their Christmas trees.
"We can put the old Christmas trees to work in our area marshland while also reducing the waste stream going into landfills," said Rob Moreau, manager of Southeastern Louisiana University's Turtle Cove Environmental Research Station.


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The research station is on Pass Manchac between lakes Pontchartrain and Maurepas.
Although grant money is no longer available from the state, local partners have pitched in to help collect the trees and make the project possible.
Southeastern scientists at Turtle Cove use the discarded trees to help build up marshland in areas that have been impacted by erosion and other factors, Moreau said.
Beginning Dec. 26 and continuing through Mardi Gras, trees can be dropped off 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Hammond Maintenance facility, 18104 Hwy. 190, next to Piggly Wiggly Super Market.
The Southeastern Sustainability Center, 2101 N. Oak St., will collect trees Jan. 5-31 from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and 8-10 a.m. on Fridays.
Middendorf's Restaurant will also have a drop-off site, Moreau said.
The City of Hammond will take the collected trees to the Turtle Cove Galva Canal parking lot area in Manchac where they will be stored until they are deployed in the marshes, he said.
No flocked trees will be accepted, and all trees should be stripped of any ornaments, lights, tinsel and stands.
Moreau said the trees will be used to continue a pilot project started last year to determine if the recycled trees can help fill in the logging ditches, formed when the area's cypress forests were cut down over a hundred-plus-year span.
"The ditches allow salt water intrusion and increase the erosion process," Moreau said. "Under the supervision of biology researcher Dr. Gary Shaffer, we will place trees in some selected ditches to determine if they can accumulate enough sediment that might assist in filling them in. We'll monitor and evaluate this process over the next several years to determine its feasibility. If successful, this technique could be used in other similarly stressed ecosystems in coastal Louisiana."
This marks the 22nd straight year Southeastern has conducted its recycled tree program. Moreau depends on volunteers and students to deploy the trees in the Manchac wetlands. More than 35,000 trees have been deployed through the Southeastern program.
Moreau said the benefits of the tree recycling program include protection against shoreline erosion, building of land to offset subsidence and sea-level rise, creation of new habitats for plants and animals and reducing waste going to landfills.
"The program is also a great way to conduct community service and environmental education from a hands-on standpoint for people of all ages," he said.
Donations to help support the activity can be sent by check payable to "Friends of Turtle Cove" and mailed to Southeastern Box 10585, Hammond, LA 70402 or can be made by credit card by visiting the Turtle Cove web site and under the "Friends and Donors" link.

18 2016-12-14
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN CHANNEL SHOW NAMED 4TH BEST IN NATION


HAMMOND - A student entertainment show produced for the Southeastern Channel, Southeastern Louisiana University’s cable access channel, has won fourth place in the nation.
“College Night” was named the country’s fourth best in the “Best Comedy-Video” category by College Broadcasters, Inc. at the 2016 National Student Production Awards in Philadelphia recently. There were 969 entries in the competition from universities across the nation.
It was the 12th time that a Southeastern Channel production has been honored as one of the top four in the nation by College Broadcasters, Inc. The channel has been recognized multiple times for its student newscast “Northshore News,” along with student news reporting, sports play-by-play, and a student-produced promotional spot. The channel won first place in the nation the past two years for a student documentary and public service announcement.
It was the fourth time that “College Night” has placed in the top four in the nation. The winning episode from December 11, 2015, was produced by Danielle Shearer of Ponchatoula.
It was the second straight year that one of Shearer’s productions was recognized at the National Student Production Awards. Last year her promotional spot for the student sportscast, “The Big Game,” was named one of the best in the nation.
“I feel so honored. I produced a total of three episodes of ‘College Night,’ and it’s nice to have all of the hard work recognized on a national level,” said Shearer. “’College Night’ is special because it gives students who are more into filmmaking a chance to stretch their creative muscles,” Shearer said.
Shearer not only produced the show but also wrote, directed, shot, edited and acted in many of the segments. Among the numerous Southeastern Channel students who contributed to the program, those who also played a large part in writing, shooting, editing and acting were Rachel Taylor of St. Amant, Mason Dauphin and Jordan Reid of Luling, Mallory Milton and Tyler Hampton of Ponchatoula, Sarah Barbier of Mandeville, Molly Flynn of Amite, Richard Mills of Hammond, Dominique Brogle of Destrehan, and Courtney Bruno, Amairi Cordova and Maria Goddard of New Orleans.
“It’s a great honor for our students to be recognized once again as among the best in the nation,” said Southeastern Channel General Manager Rick Settoon. “Danielle is wonderfully creative and skilled with a great work ethic, and she led a talented team of students with high-quality standards to produce a fresh, clever and entertaining program.”
The winning show was produced in the vein of “Saturday Night Live” with comedy sketches that used college activities like intramurals, sorority recruitment and beauty pageants to parody popular television shows like “Supernatural,” “Big Brother” and “Charlie’s Angels.” One vignette, “Celebrity Rehab with Dr. S,” featured the character Milly Cypress as a humorous takeoff on Miley Cyrus.
Shearer also produced a pair of music video parodies, a college dormitory version of “Zombie” by Family Force 5 and a parody of “Bad Blood” by Taylor Swift and Kendrick Lamar with students cosplaying Disney princesses locked in a supernatural battle sequence.
“I learned so much at the Southeastern Channel,” Shearer said. “I got to learn a little bit of everything - reporting, producing, studio positions and commercial producing. Knowing these different departments of a television station makes you more marketable in the job field.”
Shearer graduated in May with a degree in communication with a concentration in electronic media. She was immediately hired as a marketing producer by KATC-TV 3 (ABC) in Lafayette. She said the techniques learned in video production courses like Comm 260 and 449 at the Southeastern Channel helped her with “College Night.”
“The basics that we were taught in production courses like framing, the production process, and the process of telling a story all helped us to have success with this show,” she said.
The Southeastern Channel has won over 300 national, international, and regional awards in the last 12 years, including 13 Emmys. The Channel airs in 90,000 households on the North Shore with a potential viewing audience of 250,000 on Charter Cable 199. Its live 24/7 webcast and video on demand are viewed in 46 states and 47 countries monthly at www.southeastern.edu/tv.

FOURTH IN THE NATION - The Southeastern Channel, Southeastern Louisiana University's educational access channel, has won fourth place in the nation for its student entertainment show, “College Night.” The show was honored by College Broadcasters, Inc. for “Best Comedy-Video” at the 2016 National Student Production Awards in Philadelphia. It’s the 12th time that the Southeastern Channel has been named one of the top four in the nation by CBI. From left are Rick Settoon, Southeastern Channel general manager, and Danielle Shearer of Ponchatoula, producer of “College Night.”

18 2016-12-12
Baton Rouge

Seventh Ward Elementary welcomes author at Family Literacy Night


Seventh Ward Elementary in Denham Springs hosted a Family Literacy Night on Nov. 14.

More than 80 students and their families wore green and gold to hear guest author Erin Cowser read her book ‘Let’s Lion Up with Roomie!’

Staff re-created portions of Southeastern Louisiana University's campus with wall art in Seventh Ward's multipurpose building so students could visit Friendship Circle, the SLU library and Strawberry Stadium.


18 2016-12-12
Hammond

SLU faculty member to be economist


The Louisiana Legislature's Health and Social Services Estimating Conference recently named Lara Gardner, an associate professor in the Southeastern Louisiana University College of Business, as its health economist.
With a specialty in health economics and health policy and almost 20 years of teaching experience in the field of economics, she was selected over economists from several universities, the conference members stated.


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Her primary role will be to help members of the conference and their Medicaid subcommittee develop spending forecasts and to review other information related to the Medicaid program.
"She will be a tremendous asset to our group and our efforts to manage Medicaid costs," said conference member Sen. Sharon Hewitt of Slidell.
Hewitt authored the legislation, which created the subcommittee, during the 2016 legislative session.
While a significant part of the state budget is connected to the Medicaid program, the state's ability to grasp costs and utilization of services during the budget process has been limited in the past, Hewitt said.
The new subcommittee is tasked with performing a quarterly review of Medicaid data by financial experts and healthcare economists to more accurately forecast Medicaid expenses and to bring more transparency and public input into the process.
"I honestly believe that this will become one of the most important committees in the Legislature as it oversees the forecasting of health care expenses, just as the Revenue Estimating Conference oversees the forecasting of revenue," Hewitt said. "With health care expenses being 45 percent of our state's 2017 budget, managing the state's largest expense during a time of extraordinary fiscal challenges is more critical than ever."
Gardner joined the Southeastern faculty in 2007.
She holds the Bruce Dugas Endowed Professorship in Business in the management and business administration department and serves on the editorial board for the "Research in Business and Economics Journal."
She holds a doctorate in economics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a master's degree in economics and undergraduate degree in international affairs from Florida State University.

18 2016-12-09
Baton Rouge

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18 2016-12-08
Baton Rouge

Holy Ghost students donate to food pantry


As part of their monthly stewardship offering, Holy Ghost Catholic School students spent one week in November conducting their annual food drive to benefit Southeastern Louisiana University’s food pantry.

With a donation of a nonperishable item, students were allowed to “Lion Up” in support of the Southeastern Lions by wearing the team colors of green and gold. Students collected truckloads full of food and hygiene items.


18 2016-12-08
Baton Rouge

SLU plans traffic changes for Saturday commencement


Visitors attending Southeastern Louisiana University’s commencement ceremonies on Saturday should anticipate heavy traffic and route changes affecting University Avenue between Interstate 55 and North Cherry Street.

Senate President John A. Alario Jr., R-Westwego, will receive Southeastern’s Lifetime Achievement Award and speak at the ceremony, where more than 1,000 students will receive degrees at the 10 a.m. ceremony in the University Center.

Harold Todd, director of University Police, said the section of University Avenue between West Tornado Drive and SGA Drive will be restricted from 7 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. that day. Local traffic will be allowed to proceed on University Avenue for as long as possible but will be diverted as congestion increases.

“Traffic will begin to get heavy early in the morning,” said Todd. “We anticipate the parking areas around the University Center to be filled before 9 a.m.”

Additional parking spaces around the University Center will be set aside for vehicles with appropriate handicapped placards. Individuals requiring handicap accommodations should try to arrive as early as possible.

Parking spaces in the Southeastern Oaks/Greek Village complex also will be used for this event. Residents are asked to use the back gate for entering and exiting between 8 a.m. and 2 p.m.

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Southeastern Lion Traxx shuttle buses will be in operation before and after the ceremony to accommodate those parking in outlying areas or needing special transportation assistance, Todd said. Shuttle stops will be marked with signs and/or canopies.

Drivers not attending commencement are asked to use Thomas Street and Morris Street or Natalbany Road to avoid University Avenue traffic.
18 2016-12-08
Baton Rouge

Southeastern business students win case study competition


A team of three Southeastern Louisiana University business and finance students earned first place in a regional competition designed to provide experience in mergers and acquisitions, investment banking, and finances.

The Southeastern team of Nicholas Byrd and Austin Polk, both senior finance majors from Denham Springs, and Hannah Reeves, a senior business administration major from Franklinton, competed in the third annual Association for Corporate Growth Energy Case Competition held recently at LSU.

Danielle Lewis, Joyce Junguns Professor of Finance, served as faculty adviser to the team.

Lewis said teams were given two weeks to prepare an oral presentation supported by PowerPoint and a handout that analyzed a hypothetical business scenario for an energy-related company.

“The competition simulates real world scenarios,” Lewis explained, “and ACG strives to make the competition as realistic and valuable as possible for the students.”

Byrd, who had participated in the competition last year, served as the unofficial leader of the group, even while carrying 18 credit hours, renovating his home due to flood damage and starting an internship at First Guaranty Bank.

“I feel that I gained experience on what it would be like as a junior level investment banker,” said Byrd. “The ACG Cup is supposed to simulate the stressful environment of investment banking, and I learned that I liked the pressure and excitement that comes with it. The competition made me realize I enjoy the investment banking culture, specifically mergers and acquisitions. I consider that a real potential career path.”

Polk said one advantage his team had was the group had worked together on different projects and knew how each other worked. “Like any group that works together, we had our differences, but we got the job done to the best of our ability.”

“The ACG Cup experience was extremely challenging but rewarding when it was all said and done,” said Polk. “It gave me insight regarding mergers and acquisitions that I could not gain in the classroom. But Southeastern has prepared me to think critically, which is one thing required for this competition.”

ACG Louisiana is a nonprofit organization that facilitates the networking of business professionals in Louisiana and the surrounding areas.
18 2016-12-08
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN, NTCC SIGN AGREEMENTS ON PATHWAYS IN BUSINESS, BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES


HAMMOND– Officials from Southeastern Louisiana University and Northshore Technical and Community College signed agreements Tuesday to officially align resources that will provide successful NTCC students with the opportunity to progress directly into Southeastern’s bachelor’s programs in business and biological sciences.
The signing took place at the NTCC STEM Campus as work on the new collaborative campus continues in Lacombe.
Southeastern President John L. Crain and NTCC Chancellor William S. Wainwright signed the documents amid a gathering of area elected officials and representatives of the Greater Hammond and St. Tammany West chambers of commerce, the Northshore Business Council, and St. Tammany Economic Development Foundation.
Also participating in the signing ceremony were Southeastern Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Tena L. Golding, Dean of the College of Science and Technology Daniel McCarthy, Interim Dean of the College of Business Antoinette Phillips, NTCC Provost and Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs Daniel Roberts, and Dean of Academics Jim Carlson.

18 2016-12-07
Hammond

HAMMOND WESTSIDE STUDENTS LEARN FROM SLU NURSING STUDENTS


HAMMOND---Southeastern Louisiana University senior nursing students created and implemented a health promotion project targeted to children in the community. The project was based on a mindfulness program being done in the Baltimore schools where children learn how to meditate and do yoga instead of being sent to detention. The schools have seen an improvement in behavior.
On Thursday, November 17, 2016 the nursing students taught the 4th graders a few breathing exercises, a few yoga poses, and how to turn negative thoughts into positive thoughts. The goal was to help decrease stress and improve health and cognitive abilities.

In the 2nd photo, the students made the teacher a jar with decorative sticks that each have a message of what was taught. That way, the students can continue to practice what they learned. Each stick has a yoga pose, a breath, or a positive affirmation written on it. So for instance, if a child is feeling sad or angry, he can pull a stick and do the exercise. The students took turns practicing, and in the photo, the teacher is choosing a stick to "Give herself a hug".

First photo (L to R): Donna Doussa, Andrea Robinson, Erin Brady, Jennifer Terre, Samantha Avera, Mary Wimbish, Mitzie Meyers (Nursing Instructor), Madeline Meyers (4th grade teacher), Victoria Reggio, Julie Smith

Second photo (L to R): Madeline Meyers, Erin Brady, Samantha Avera, Victoria Reggio

18 2016-12-05
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN HONORS ALUMNUS ALARIO FOR LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT


HAMMOND – Louisiana Senate President John A. Alario Jr. will be honored by his alma mater with a Southeastern Louisiana University Lifetime Achievement Award as part of the university’s commencement ceremonies at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 10, at the University Center.
That morning the university will confer more than 1,000 degrees on students who are graduating with bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees.

A 1965 graduate of Southeastern, Alario is being recognized for his lifetime of public service including his 45-year tenure in both the Louisiana House of Representatives and the Senate, as well as his civic service with numerous non-profit organizations.
“President Alario truly deserves this recognition, which is one of the highest honors the university has ever bestowed,” said Southeastern President John L. Crain. “His distinguished career in public service and his unifying influence have served Louisiana well especially during contentious and difficult times. Our state has struggled with economic and budget challenges in recent years. I have no doubt those issues would have been even more treacherous had it not been for the leadership and wisdom of John Alario.”
He has previously been recognized by Southeastern with its Golden Ambassador Award in 1998 and was named the Southeastern Alumni Association’s 1981 Outstanding Alumnus of the Year.
Alario is a tax consultant and owner of John A. Alario, Jr. Tax Service in Westwego. He is the dean of the Louisiana State Legislature, having served nine terms as the representative of House District 83 and currently in his third term as senator for District 8. He is the first Louisiana legislator to serve twice as Speaker of the House and twice as President of the Senate, and is the only legislator to serve multiple terms as both Speaker of the House and President of the Senate.
Alario currently serves on several key bodies in the Legislature including the State Bond Commission, the Revenue Estimating Conference, and the Joint Legislative Committee on the Budget.
His civic activities have included service on the boards of the Louisiana Epilepsy Association, the Task Force for Juvenile Facilities, the Louisiana Kidney Foundation and the West Jefferson Metroplex Civic Center Committee. From 1979 to 1985, he served as chairman of the Louisiana Exposition Authority, the body overseeing the 1984 World’s Fair in New Orleans.
His recognitions include receiving the Jefferson Parish Public School System Distinguished Citizen Award; the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Business Champion Award; and Legislator of the Year awards from the Professional Firefighters Association, Police Jury Association, Louisiana State Troopers Association, Louisiana Federation of Teachers and Association for Retarded Citizens. Additionally, he has received the West Jefferson High School Outstanding Alumnus Award and the Hale Boggs Outstanding and Dedicated Service to Community Award, among many others.

18 2016-12-05
Hammond

Regents eye relations with high schools


Partnerships between higher education institutions and high schools are one of the recommendations the Louisiana Board of Regents has for the 2017 legislative session.
For example, the state's higher education commissioner points to a new initiative requiring college students studying to be educators to do a full-year of teaching internships rather than a semester.


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Commissioner Joseph Rallo was in Hammond Friday as part of a tour he is making across the state to share information on higher education and get feedback from stakeholders. Local representatives, education officials and business leaders met with him in Southeastern Louisiana University's Cate Teacher Education Center.
Dual enrollment
The Board of Regents is concerned about how dual enrollment classes are done in Louisiana, Rallo said. The classes let high schoolers gain college credit before graduating.
In some schools, high school students attend a class at a higher education institution for dual credit, which Rallo said is the ideal way since students can get a sense of what classes are like in college.
In other cases, a college faculty member teaches the class at the high school, the second best option since the students still receive the rigor of being taught by a college professor, he said.
However, some schools have high school educators teach dual enrollment courses. Rallo said that scenario is the most common one and it is concerning because high school teachers cannot provide the same experience a college faculty member provides a student.
"We want to increase the rigor of the individual teaching in those classes to make sure that indeed it is a college-worthy class," he said.
Remedial classes
Rallo said the board also wants to revisit remedial classes, which he said are costing higher education institutions money. He said 37 percent of high school graduates in Louisiana need remedial English while 58 percent need remedial math when they come to college.
"Our position is the high school should be fixing that," he said. "They should not be passing on an individual who needs remediation."
Rallo said the board lost this argument the last time and plans to bring it back up in 2017.
A big question is who should pay for dual enrollment and remedial courses. Rallo said high schools should compensate colleges for the cost of dual enrollment and remedial courses through Minimum Foundation Program funding that local districts get from the state.
Textbooks
Also during this coming legislative session, the board plans to recommend pushing for open source text material as an alternative to college students buying textbooks.
Rallo said it is important to keep in mind that faculty have the right to choose what texts to use in their classes, so universities would work with faculty on open source materials. They would also need to make the process of accessing open source texts simple, he said.
He expects there will be opposition from some universities that make money selling textbooks to students through their bookstores.
Funding
One audience member asked how the decreasing state funding for higher education in Louisiana has affected the competitiveness of Louisiana colleges compared to other states.
Louisiana higher education institutions are getting "perilously close to that point where we as a public higher education can no longer have the quality," Rallo said.
Colleges and universities are seeing faculty members leave and class sizes increase, among other negative effects.
With a proposed mid-year budget cut of about $18.2 million for higher education this school year, Rallo said the board would like to see higher education have a more stable source of funding.
For several years now, institutions have had to adjust to cuts in state aid, including in the middle of the school year, by increasing their tuitions and shrinking their budgets. A recommendation will be to have an MFP for higher education, he said.
The board will likely again recommend that institutions be allowed to raise tuition more easily.
The GRAD Act, which allowed institutions to increase tuition if they met certain requirements, has expired and a law that allowed institutions to raise student fees to boost revenue is going away this year, he said.
The proposed constitutional amendment to allow tuition autonomy for university systems did not win voter approval this fall. This means that colleges and universities will need two thirds of legislators to approve any tuition increases, he said.

18 2016-12-02
Hammond

Southeastern named military-friendly school for 5th time


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University has been named a 2017 Military Friendly School by Victory Media, publisher of “G.I Jobs,” the premier magazine for military personnel transitioning to civilian life.
It is the fifth consecutive year the university has earned the special designation.
According to the company, the listing honors the top colleges, universities and trade schools that are doing the most to embrace the nation’s military service members and veterans and spouses as students and to ensure their success on campus.

“This listing demonstrates Southeastern’s ongoing commitment to our veterans and their educational success,” said President John L. Crain. “It is an honor to be named and to know that we are among the top institutions helping those individuals who have made great sacrifices in service to our state and nation.”
Southeastern enrolls approximately 400 military veterans attending the university on the Post 9/11 G.I. Bill of Rights. The university maintains a Veterans Upward Bound program; an Office of Veterans Affairs that assists students in obtaining benefits and with other issues; provides academic and other counseling services; offers scholarships specifically for military students and veterans; and maintains a wide range of online and distance learning programs that provide students with flexibility in scheduling.
The ROTC program returned to Southeastern last spring after more than a 20-year hiatus, during which time Southeastern students were still able to participate in ROTC, but had to take their military courses through Southern University’s Navy program or LSU’s Army and Air Force programs and had to travel to Baton Rouge in order to participate.
Also new to campus is the Southeastern Student Veterans & Military Interest Association, a group open to veterans, reservists, spouses, dependents, and ROTC participants attending both Southeastern and Northshore Technical Community College. The association was founded to help the school administration better understand and meet the needs of veterans; offer advice from experienced to incoming veterans; help civilians better understand the military experience; and provide opportunities for veterans to meet one another and connect.
Institutions competed for inclusion on the Military Friendly Schools list based on such categories as military support on campus, graduation and employment outcomes, and career and job counseling services. The data provided by schools were independently tested by the firm Ernst and Young.
The 2017 list of Military Friendly Schools shows the commitment of those institutions in providing a supportive environment for military students, the company said in announcing the list.
“Post-secondary institutions earning the 2017 Military Friendly School award have exceptionally strong programs for transitioning service members and spouses,” said Daniel Nichols, chief product officer of Victory Media. “Our Military Friendly Schools are truly aligning their military programs and services with employers to help students translate military experience, skills and training into successful careers after graduation.”
Victory Media is a service-disabled, veteran-owned small business founded in 2001. In addition to “G.I. Jobs,” the company also publishes the magazine “Military Spouse.”

18 2016-12-01
Baton Rouge

Adventure Aaron: LaPlace native attempts solo canoe record, paddles thousands of miles


For five months now, Aaron Carotta has paddled down two great rivers and lived out of his canoe in an epic trip from the mouth of the Missouri River to the Atlantic Ocean.

The 39-year-old LaPlace native has lived a life of adventure since a cancer diagnosis in 2008, traveling the world as "Adventure Aaron" and filming his exploits for international television.

However, this latest trek isn't for the TV screen. Carotta is seeking to set the world record for a solo canoe trip, and he's promoting "I'm Adopted," an online community for adopted children created by a friend.

"I hopped in the canoe and tossed it to the man upstairs," said Carotta, while resting and waiting for the weather to improve on Lake Maurepas earlier in November. "I really didn’t know where it was going. I just had an idea it was going to be something special."

Born in south Louisiana while his parents attended Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond, Carotta grew up traveling across the country following his father's career in Catholic education.

In 2008, Carotta was diagnosed with testicular cancer. After receiving treatment, he quit his job appraising real estate in south Florida and began traveling the world.

Carotta has visited 83 countries, and had almost as many adventures. He ran with the bulls, swam with sharks and bungee jumped. Along the way, he recorded his exploits with a video camera and wrote about his life.

His videos and blog led to a new career — hosting and producing adventure television, first in New Zealand, then in the United States for MAVTV. He created "Alive! With Adventure Aaron" in 2010 and then "Bucket Wish," which paired Carotta with sick children seeking adventure. His third show, "Catch and Cook," featured Carotta bagging wild game that was then prepared by a chef.

"It was unbelievable," he said. "New Zealand was definitely the most intense."

After "Catch and Cook" ended in 2014, Carotta tried settling down in Omaha, Nebraska, but he became restless again and started planning another journey.

On June 30, he began paddling the Missouri River in Montana, which took 80 days, before hitting the Mississippi River near St. Louis. He camped wherever he could and ate cans of Chef Boyardee.

Before the trip, Carotta had almost no paddling experience. Early on, he began broadcasting on Facebook, and people kept writing in telling him he needed to learn the correct paddle stroke to travel more efficiently.

"I hadn't even camped alone," he said.

On the Mississippi River near Greenville, Mississippi, he surpassed the 3,462-mile record in Guinness World Records, but he kept traveling. Everywhere he stops Carotta asks strangers to fill out affidavits on Guinness stationery so there are witnesses to his trek.

In Louisiana, friends he met along the way cooked jambalaya for Carotta and offered him a place to sleep. After almost five months paddling, Carotta made it to Baton Rouge and visited his 88-year-old grandmother.

Along the way, river travelers advised him to avoid the Mississippi River between Baton Rouge and New Orleans, so be began looking for a way to cut across to Lake Maurepas. Relatives from his mother's side of the family helped him scout a route by Bayou Manchac.

At the time, the bayou was dry, and because Guinness World Records' guidelines wouldn't allow him to accept help with the boat, Carotta used a small cart to help him drag the canoe 12 miles.

From Bayou Manchac, he paddled into the Amite River and down to Lake Maurepas. Just as he entered the lake in mid-November, a storm was kicking up waves, punishing his boat and threatening to sink him. It was his first experience battling tide-powered water.

"If I took my hand off the paddle for more than five seconds, it was going backward, but I had to bail the water out because there was a lot of water in the boat," he said.

Eventually, the storm subsided and he slept in the canoe. A friend Carotta met along the way told him to get in touch with Southeastern Louisiana University's staff at Turtle Cove, an old hunting lodge only accessible by boat that is used for research. They were happy to let him wait out the weather, and he was ecstatic to stop fighting 3-foot waves.

He could only rest for a few days according to the Guinness rules, and he was eager to get back on the water, but paddling in the choppy water then was dangerous.

"I’m a big believer in taking what the river gives you, but at the same time, there is a sense of urgency that I have developed in my own mind," he said.

From Turtle Cove, Carotta didn't know exactly where he would go. He planned to make it into the Atlantic Ocean in a few months, but even then he won't stop paddling.

"I don't want my journey to end," he said.


18 2016-11-30
Hammond

KRISTYN GARY OF DENHAM WINS MISS SOUTHEASTERN CROWN


HAMMOND -- Southeastern Louisiana University early childhood education major Kristyn Gary of Denham Springs has been chosen Miss Southeastern 2017.
Gary received her crown from Miss Southeastern 2016 Alexis LaPlante of Hammond at the annual pageant Saturday (Nov. 19) at Southeastern’s Pottle Music Building Auditorium. Sponsored by the Campus Activities Board, the pageant is affiliated with the Miss America Pageant system.
A sophomore, Gary also received the Miss Congeniality Award.
First runner up was Tonykea Alford, a senior elementary education major from Hammond. Alford also received the Miracle Maker, Lifestyle and Fitness, and Talent awards.
Communication major Jamie Dearman of Baton Rouge received the People’s Choice Award, while chemistry major Trista Kramer of Covington received the Student Government Association (SGA) Academic Award.
Gary will advance to the Miss Louisiana pageant, which will be held in Monroe in June.

PHOTO:
KRISTYN GARY WINS 2017 MISS SOUTHEASTERN CROWN – Recognized at the Miss Southeastern 2017 pageant are, from left, Tonykea Alford, first runner-up, Miss Southeastern 2017 Kristyn Gary, People’s Choice Award recipient Jamie Dearman, and SGA Academic Award recipient Trista Kramer. (photo credit to Larshell Green of The Lion's Roar)

18 2016-11-28
Baton Rouge

Southeastern's Columbia Theatre to offer Silver Screen Series


HAMMOND — Southeastern Louisiana University’s Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts is once again offering its Silver Screen Series.

The series features the best of independent and classic movies on the big screen at the theater, says Roy Blackwood, director of the Columbia Theatre. All movies begin at 7:30 p.m. at the theater, 220 E. Thomas St., Hammond.

The schedule is:

Nov. 28-29: The foreign documentary, “Landfill Harmonic.” The film, which is rated PG and runs about 95 minutes, is about the poor people of Cateura, Paraguay, who literally live with garbage. The documentary follows an orchestra as it takes its inspiring spectacle of trash-into-music around the world.
Dec. 12-13: “Dark Horse,” a British documentary about a group of friends from a blue-collar men’s club who decide to take on the elite “sport of kings” and breed a racehorse. Rated PG, the film is about 85 minutes.
Jan. 9-10: “When Elephants Were Young,” a foreign documentary about a young man and his young elephant who beg on the streets of Bangkok, where the controversial elephant business threatens their survival. The film has subtitles, is not rated and runs about 90 minutes.
Jan. 30-31: “April and the Extraordinary World,” an animated French film that is a riveting sci-fi adventure set in an alternate steampunk universe in 1941 Paris. The film, an hour and 43 minutes long, has subtitles and is rated PG.
Tickets for all films are $9, $7 for seniors and students, and $6 for children 12 and younger. The theater box office is open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more information, call (985) 543-4371.


18 2016-11-28
Baton Rouge

Southeastern Louisiana University instructor awarded chemical research grant


Thomas Sommerfeld, an associate professor of chemistry at Southeastern Louisiana University, has been awarded a three-year, $101,786 grant from the National Science Foundation.

Sommerfeld will use the grant to investigate how extra electrons aid in breaking chemical bonds while also providing undergraduate students with real-world learning opportunities, a news release said.

He said he’s aiming to identify reliable, cost-efficient methods of developing computer simulation methods to characterize the electron emission from unstable molecules.

The grant will allow Sommerfeld to hire several undergraduate chemistry students to work with him on the project, including senior Joshua Melugin, of Gonzales.


18 2016-11-28
Hammond

Faculty outsmart students at Southeastern Louisiana University Quiz Bowl


Southeastern Louisiana University held its annual Faculty-Student Quiz Bowl on Oct. 18 as part of Homecoming Week festivities. The event was sponsored by the Southeastern Alumni Association and Phi Kappa Phi Honors Society.

The faculty team, Mens Sana in Corpore Sano (“A Sound Mind in a Sound Body”) defeated the honors program student team, Correct Answer.


18 2016-11-28
Hammond

Southeastern Louisiana University honors distinguished alumni, volunteers


Southeastern Louisiana University’s Alumni Association recently recognized distinguished alumni and volunteers at its Awards Evening, held during Homecoming Week.

Alumnus of the year was Billy Kennedy, head basketball coach of the Texas A&M Aggies. Zac and Cari Caramonta, owners of Hammond’s Gnarly Barley craft beer production company, were honored as Young Alumni of the Year.

Winners of the 2016 Alumnus of the Year included Rob Dugas, vice president and chief procurement officer for Chick-Fil-A, College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences; Gino Marino, owner of Gino’s Restaurant in Baton Rouge, College of Business; Barbara Hebert, executive director of the Children’s Advocacy Center-Hope House, College of Nursing and Health Sciences; Rep. J. Rogers Pope, former superintendent of Livingston Parish Public Schools and current Louisiana District 71 Representative, College of Education; and Lucas Watkins, founder of Southland Forestry Services, Krebs, LaSalle and Lemieux and Elos Environmental, College of Science and Technology.

Special awards presented included the Loyal Lion Award to the late Gayle Neal; the Kathy L. Pittman Distinguished Service Award to George Ibert, of Ibert’s Jewelry; the L.E. Chandler Award to Amber Narro, associate professor of communication; the Director’s Diamond Award to Pat Walsh, retired from the office of retired Judge Jimmy Kuhn; and the Friendship Oak Award to Robby Turner, a 1989 graduate from Baton Rouge, for his efforts during August flooding.


18 2016-11-21
Hammond

SLU SHARES SURPLUS FURNITURE WITH FLOOD-RAVAGED SCHOOLS


HAMMOND – Surplus equipment and furnishings that once sat crammed in a warehouse at Southeastern Louisiana University will instead soon arrive to fill the classrooms of flood-ravaged schools in Livingston and Ascension parishes.
Such items would have usually been recycled in different buildings on campus until they became worn out and useless. At that point they would be transported to the Louisiana Property Assistance Agency (LPAA) in Baton Rouge for public auction. However, creative thinking and the can-do attitude of Southeastern employees and friends of the university re-routed the items this time to help those educators who suffered losses when their schools flooded.

It’s a departure from the usual procedure for Richard Himber, Southeastern director of Purchasing and Property Control, but something he said he was glad to do.
“State law allows transfers of surplus items between agencies; school boards, however, are quasi-state agencies,” Himber explained. “LPAA is allowing us to transfer the items to the public schools for a minimal fee, which is being paid by a private organization.”
In the aftermath of the flooding, Heather Collins of Franklinton, an administrative assistant in the Southeastern Office of Student Publications, created the Facebook page “Adopt a Louisiana Teacher,” which allowed teachers to post what they needed to get their classrooms going again.
“The need was greater than I originally thought,” Collins said.
She then partnered with a friend from her hometown of Franklinton, Louisiana Federation of Teachers Field Representative Mona Icamina, and together they reached out to another Franklinton native, Southeastern President John Crain, with an idea.
Due to special circumstances could it be possible to transfer the surplus furnishings so they could fill classrooms in dire need of provisions rather than be sold at public auction? LPAA responsed that yes a special transfer could be granted and Southeastern’s administration signed off on the transfer.
“I’ve known Mona for years and was happy to take her call,” said Crain. “When she explained their idea, it was a no brainer. Southeastern is thrilled to have another opportunity to help our regional K-12 partners as they recover.”
With special approval in hand, Collins and Himber scoured the Property Control warehouse on campus, tagging desks, chairs, tables, media carts, filing cabinets and other items to be transferred to the schools.
“Usually items kept in surplus are recycled into other departments on campus, where they will be used until they are no longer useful,” Himber said. “We see the area schools as extensions of the university, so we’re glad we are able to help.”
Trucks recently arrived to pick up the furnishings and transport them to the schools in Livingston and Ascension parishes.
“Any state agency can do this,” Collins said, “and we're hoping others will follow Southeastern’s example. I am very proud of Southeastern’s commitment to helping rebuild and heal Louisiana.”
Himber said any state colleges or universities who would like to follow suit are welcome to contact him at richard.himber@southeastern.edu and he’ll be happy to share the process for securing approval.

PHOTO:
PROPERTY TRANSFER – Heather Collins, an administrative assistant in the Southeastern Office of Student Publications, and Richard Himber, Southeastern director of Purchasing and Property Control, mark filing cabinets to be transferred to flood damaged schools in Livingston and Ascension parishes. The cabinets were just some of the surplus items being transferred to schools in need.

18 2016-11-18
Baton Rouge

Degree of Debt: Student loan crisis leads the nation in cumulative debt


BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -
When someone makes the decision to go to college, they go with the dream of graduating to get a high-paying job. But what happens when things don't go as planned and they are left with suffocating student loan debt?

"My student loan is like a black rain cloud right now," said Sarah Haydel.

Haydel graduated from ITI Technical College in Baton Rouge with a degree in medical office administration. She borrowed close to $20,000 to go to school. She paid off one-fourth of it but deferred the rest for a couple of years. With interest tacked on, her debt has doubled and she now sits on a student loan debt of $33,000.

"At this point in time, I wish that cloud - I could just blow it away," she said. "It's something I'm going to have to chip at little by little. I mean it's just something I'm going to have to live with at this point."

She has a job in the profession she studied, but chipping away at debt can still be very burdensome. Especially when factoring in the basic essentials of life, like buying a home.

"I struggle with that note along with the other necessities. Items such as your utilities," Haydel said. "Everyone needs a phone so I have to have a cell phone for communications. I have to have my car, my insurance there, health insurance for me, other necessity items [and] just healthcare costs in general has been hitting me. But along with that, when you tack on about $300 in your student loans, I'm sitting pretty close to broke."

Southeastern grad Seth Bourgeois left school with more than $25,000 in student loans. He has paid off about 25 percent of that amount, but he is still left with a good chunk of the debt.

"If I lose my job or something I know I'm not going to be able to pay them and they're going to deferment and then my credit goes bad. It's just I know they have to be paid. It's just a big debt," he said.

Louisiana natives Haydel and Bourgeois are not alone. In fact, more than 41 million Americans have college loan debt that totals more than $1.3 trillion. That amount exceeds credit card and auto loan debt.

"We absolutely are in a student debt crisis," said Alan Collinge.

Collinge runs the website StudentLoanJustice.org. He explained the crisis doesn't just affect students bearing the debt. It also plays a heavy hand in the economy.

"We're already seeing family formation stalled, major life purchases, homes and automobiles stalled. People are taking employment they would otherwise not want to take. The vicious nature of whatever it may be to make money rather than do what they went to school for," he said.

The federal government tracks colleges with the most students having problems by identifying each school's repayment rate. That's the percentage of students succeeding in paying their loans back.

The average repayment rate across the nation is 61 percent. Statewide, Louisiana comes in at 54 percent. Still above some of the state's neighbors, like Mississippi who is at 48 percent, Arkansas who is at 52 percent and Texas who falls at 53 percent.

Comparing that statistic to schools in Baton Rouge, Camelot College has the lowest repayment rate in the city and the entire state, with just 12 percent of students repaying their loans. Virginia College has the second lowest in the city at 30 percent. Baton Rouge Community College ranks third lowest with 38 percent.

In comparison, LSU has the highest repayment rate at 89 percent. Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond comes in at 77 percent. ITI Technical College has 66 percent. Southern falls just below the state average with just 51 percent.


On a mobile device? Click here to view an interactive version of the graphic.

Right now, the government judges schools by what's called a "Cohort Default Rate" which looks at students in a three-year window of time who have defaulted on their loans.

The White House said those numbers though are "susceptible to artificial manipulation." Still, under federal guidelines, schools with a default rate at or above 30 percent for three consecutive years can lose eligibility for federal aid.

All of the schools mentioned fall under that 30 percent threshold so they are technically considered in the clear.

So who is to blame when students aren't paying their loans back?

9News reached out to each of these schools for comment, but only ITI chose to speak on camera.

"The school has no control over who defaults or who doesn't, but we're held to that standard and we try to do the best we can because we do understand it's the taxpayers' money," said Joe Martin, president of ITI Technical College.

Martin said any student interested in enrolling at ITI is made sure of what consequences come along with borrowing money. That includes financial aid counseling before beginning classes and upon graduating.

"You can't measure people following through with their commitment and that hurts sometimes when you see someone come in with these great ambitions and then life hits them or whatever and then they lose their dream. But you know we try to help people every day with that dream here at ITI," he said.

He also explained ITI's financial aid counselors follow up with students after graduation to see if they are employed and whether they are keeping up with their loan payments. If not, the advisors provide resources for students to gain employment and start making a dent in their loans.

Both Haydel and Bourgeois said they do not regret going to college or borrowing money to do so. Though they fear that if they cannot continue making payments, this debt cloud will hang over them for the rest of their lives. Eventually disabling them from reaching life's big benchmarks like buying a home.

So Bourgeois has advice for future borrowers. He said to make sure they fully understand exactly what they are signing up for and know they will be in the hole as soon as they graduate.

"It's not free money. You can't just live off that money. It's a loan you have to pay it back. They need to understand cause I sure didn't when I was 18-19, I know that," he said.


18 2016-11-17
Baton Rouge

Southeastern Louisiana University early priority registration ends Friday


Spring 2017 class registration for Southeastern Louisiana University students ends at 12:30 p.m. Friday.

The priority registration period is for all currently enrolled students, returning students, new transfer and graduate students, a news release said.

Students can log into their LEONet account at southeastern.edu to check enrollment appointment times, spring class schedules and register online.

Students with registration holds on their accounts must clear the holds to be able to access the registration system.

Call (985) 549-2066 or 800-222-7358 or email records@southeastern.edu for details.
18 2016-11-17
Baton Rouge

Flood-damaged schools receive furnishings from Southeastern Louisiana University


Surplus equipment and furnishings from Southeastern Louisiana University recently made its way to flood-damaged schools in Livingston and Ascension parishes.

Heather Collins, an administrative assistant in the Southeastern Office of Student Publications, coordinated the effort by launching the Adopt a Louisiana Teacher page on Facebook. Teachers used the page to post what they needed for their classrooms, with furnishings being listed as a high priority so that money could go toward teaching materials.

The equipment and furnishings normally would have gone to the state surplus site run by the Louisiana Property Assistance Agency. Special permission was obtained from the agency to transfer the supplies, including desks, chairs, tables, media carts, filing cabinets and other items.

A private organization paid for the handling fee of a minimum of $3 per item, charged under state regulations. Collins said she hopes other state agencies will adopt this process to help rebuild flooded schools.


18 2016-11-17
Baton Rouge

Holy Ghost eighth-graders learn about nutrition with SLU nursing students


Southeastern Louisiana University nursing students Allison Mule’ and Jake Lipps recently taught a nutrition lesson to the eighth-graders at Holy Ghost Catholic School.

Students rotated through different stations with the assistance of SLU nursing students to learn about the importance of nutrition and exercise and received a healthy snack.


18 2016-11-17
Baton Rouge

Southeastern Louisiana University senior art exhibit goes on display Nov. 22


Southeastern Louisiana University kicks off the Department of Fine and Performing Arts Fall 2016 Senior Exhibition with an opening reception from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at the university’s Contemporary Arts Gallery.

The exhibit features Southeastern seniors completing their bachelor’s degrees in visual art design. Works include ceramics, painting, drawing, photography, animation, video art, printmaking, sculpture and graphic design.

The free exhibit is open to the public and closes Dec. 10. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesdays and 8 a.m. to noon Fridays.

Call (985) 549-5080 for details.
18 2016-11-16
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN STUDENTS SPONSOR FARMERS MARKET NOV. 16


HAMMOND – The Southeastern Louisiana University student organization Reconnect will sponsor a farmers market in front of the Student Union on Wednesday, Nov. 16, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The event will feature fresh and local produce from Reconnect, food samples, beef jerky, popsicles, ceramics, jewelry, natural soaps, henna, and much more. Vendors include Simple Works’ all-natural bath and body products, Tea Cakes by Lillie’s Daughter, Italian cookies by BAP, and Crescent City Pops.
“Holiday season is upon us again! Come shop local, handmade jewelry, all natural soaps, delicious jams, and more to finish all your holiday shopping at the Reconnect Farmer's Market without having to leave campus,” said Alexis Taylor, vice president of Reconnect.
Student vendors are encouraged to participate by emailing Taylor at alexis.taylor@southeastern.edu. A table and tablecloth are provided at no charge.
A student environmental club, Reconnect participates in the Real Food Challenge, a national effort among college students to promote the use of locally grown, healthy and sustainable food products.

18 2016-11-14
Hammond

SLU LSBDC OFFERS FREE CLASSES FOR ENTREPENEURSHIP WEEK


HAMMOND – The Louisiana Small Business Development Center at Southeastern Louisiana University is offering three free seminars during Global Entrepreneurship Week (GEW), Nov. 15-17.
The series is held one week each November with the intention of inspiring people everywhere through local, national and global activities to explore their potential as self-starters and innovators. The first two GEW seminars will take place at the LSBDC main office in Hammond, located at 1514 Martens Drive.
The first seminar, titled “Positive or Poison? Maintaining a Healthy Reputation Online” is scheduled Tuesday, Nov. 15, from 9 to 11 a.m. and is co-sponsored by Northshore SCORE, the Greater Hammond Chamber of Commerce, and Tangipahoa Economic Development. The scheduled guest speaker is Kim Walker of 5 Stones Media.
Assistant Director of the Small Business Development Center Sandy Summers said there are many places online where clients can share feedback with the world about their experiences, and it is important to know what they are saying.
“Most people don’t know that 52 percent of consumers report positive customer reviews make them more likely to do business compared to just 28% who prefer factors like location and price,” Summers said. “We want to help you take control of your online presence, tap into the power of reviewing, and respond to recommendations, referrals and reviews.”
The second seminar, “Franchising for Entrepreneurial Success,” is scheduled Wednesday, Nov. 16, from 9 to 11 a.m. and is co-sponsored by Northshore SCORE and the Greater Hammond Chamber of Commerce. The guest speaker is Ted Fireman of FranNet of Louisiana.
Summers said the event will look at pre-formatted franchise ownership solutions to help leverage existing business models to ramp up faster; mitigate risk; benefit from training and mentoring; attain assistance with marketing, staffing and other support; leverage scales of economy and collective knowledge; and be enabled to work “on” versus “in” a business.
Additional topics to be discussed include best practices for researching to find businesses that match need and budget; low cost options and financing vehicles; business ownership model comparison; franchise ownership rewards and risks; and best opportunities for full and part-time owner involvement.
The final event is scheduled Thursday, Nov. 17, from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. “#NorthshoreMILLS Northshore Millennial Meetup” will take place in the Southeastern Student Union Ballroom, located at 303 Texas Ave., with guest speakers from the Louisiana SBDC at Southeastern.
“Join Southeastern’s LSBDC as we share tips to help you start and grow your bueiness,” Summers said. “Participants can link up via social media #NorthshoreMILLS or join us in the Student Union first floor near the pool tables.”
Topics of discussion will include the reasons why individuals go into business, business goals; working with the right people to make a business work; the right location to make a business work; whether or not location matters; skills and support to make a business work; and any other business questions individuals may have.
For more information about the GEW seminars or to register, call 985-549-3831 or visit www.lsbdc.org.




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18 2016-11-14
Hammond

SLU SCIENTIST AWARDED NSF GRANT FOR CHEMICAL RESEARCH


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University Associate Professor of Chemistry Thomas Sommerfeld has been awarded a $101,786 grant from the National Science Foundation.
The three-year grant will allow Sommerfeld to investigate how extra electrons aid in breaking chemical bonds while also providing undergraduate students with real-world learning opportunities.
“Chemical bonds are electrons that are shared between atoms,” Sommerfeld said. “They can be thought of as a glue that holds the atoms in a molecule together.”
He explained that the bonds can be weakened by both too little and too much “glue,” and weakened bonds then be cleaved during the permanent motion of the atoms. Among examples of how this reaction is seen is in damage to living tissue by radiation in cancer therapy with electron beams.
In his research, Sommerfeld will try to identify reliable, cost-efficient methods of developing novel computer simulation methods that characterize the electron emission from unstable molecules.
His grant allows the employment of several undergraduate chemistry students to work with him on the project.
“The project allows me to introduce undergraduates on mini-projects that are indirectly related to my research first,” he said. “These projects can be addressed with standard quantum chemistry methods so that students learn the research techniques step-by-step. It’s a great opportunity that only a few undergraduate chemistry students experience.”

PHOTO:
MOLECULAR RESEARCH – Southeastern Louisiana University Associate Professor of Chemistry Thomas Summerfeld, right, talks with senior chemistry major Joshua Melugin of Gonzales about the computer simulation research work they are doing under a grant from the National Science Foundation.
18 2016-11-14
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN STUDENTS TEACH NUTRITION LESSON AT HOLY GHOST


Southeastern Louisiana University nursing students Allison Mule’ and Jake Lipps teach a lesson on “Nutrition” to the 8th graders at Holy Ghost Catholic School. Students rotated through different stations to learn about the importance of nutrition and exercise in their lives. Several SLU nursing students were on hand to assist students throughout the stations and provided them with a healthy snack.
18 2016-11-11
Hammond

Professor says popularity weighs heavy in races


Presidential campaigns have shifted to become more of a popularity contest over the years, a local professor said Tuesday as American voters cast their ballots.
"We're candidate centered now. We don't talk about their policies. We don't talk about their party positions in the same way. There are a lot of voters out there who vote based on who they like rather than what their policies would be," said Professor Claire Procopio, speech and communications professor at Southeastern Louisiana University.


;
As guest speaker for the Hammond Kiwanis Club on Tuesday, Procopio discussed ways the campaigning process has changed over the years.
Primary elections are a new phenomenon, she said. Previously, candidates were chosen by a party committee. Now, voters go to the polls to decide a party candidate to go to convention.
Procopio said although this made the process more democratic, it brought a few issues.
"What that means is when you pick your candidate, small places like New Hampshire and Iowa have an important influence on who has traction early on," she said.
Primaries prolong campaign periods, she noted.
Every year, campaigns become more expensive. The 2012 presidential election was the first billion dollar presidential campaign, she said.
A major change in campaigns is the debate model, Procopio said.
Flashback to the year 1858. Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas faced off for a Senate debate.
Each spoke a minimum of three hours throughout the entire debate.
"It was an all-day event. People trucked into town. You hung out and stopped for lunch in the middle," Procopio said.
During these all day events, the candidates debated only one proposition.
By contrast, today's debates cover more than a dozen topics and give the candidates limited time to address those topics.
"So instead of these all-day affairs of covering one topic where you could really dig into the policy, they clashed for two minutes," Procopio said.
In 1960 candidates John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon faced-off on live television.
With the television screen adding new challenges to the debate, Kennedy was declared the winner by television viewers while radio listeners were much more pleased with Nixon.
Procopio said Nixon made several mistakes on camera such as wearing the wrong color and refusing to put on makeup.
"Kennedy understood the television medium considerably better than Richard Nixon," she said. "Nixon came into it very policy oriented, ready to answer questions. Not concerned at all about the image piece of it."
While Kennedy talked directly to the camera, Nixon looked at reporters when talking making him look almost shifty-eyed. Kennedy won the debate because of his camera presence.
"There was definitely a moment there where America shifted. We shifted from the content of what they said and the policies of what they said into this sort of question of what they looked like," Procopio said.
Although shorter than the Lincoln and Douglas debate, candidates in 1960 were still given eight minutes to address issues.
Debate viewership has also decreased, Procopio said. In 1960, 68 million people tuned in, representing 60.9 percent of voting.
The first 2016 presidential debate had 80.9 million viewers representing 33 percent of voting age.
18 2016-11-10
Baton Rouge

SLU channel student productions wins national videographer awards


Nine Southeastern Louisiana University student-produced television productions have been recognized with 2016 national Videographer Awards.

The Southeastern Channel, the university’s educational access channel airing on Charter 199, won one first-place Award of Excellence, four second-place Awards of Distinction, and four Honorable Mentions for student-produced music videos, public service announcements and a short film.

The students wrote, produced, directed, videotaped and edited all of the programs for both the channel and production courses in the Electronic Media concentration of the Department of Languages and Communication.

“We’re excited that so many of our television and film students continue to win national honors for their outstanding work,” said Rick Settoon, Southeastern Channel general manager. “It’s a tribute to their talent, creativity, work ethic and high standards of quality. It’s also a credit to the staff and faculty members who work with them.”

There were more than 1,500 entries from throughout the United States and 15 other countries in the Videographer Awards 2016 competition. The Award of Excellence is awarded to those projects written, produced, shot and edited in an exceptional manner. The Award of Distinction is awarded for projects that exceed industry standards.

The Award of Excellence winner was the music video “Perfect,” produced and directed by Steven Farmer, of Ponchatoula.

Among the Award of Distinction winners was the music videos “Drink a Beer” by Trevor Vampran, of Prairieville.

Local honorable mention winner included “Bad Blood,” produced by Danielle Shearer, of Ponchatoula.


18 2016-11-10
Baton Rouge

Local student part of Quiz Bowl team at Southeastern Louisiana University


Southeastern Louisiana University held its annual Faculty-Student Quiz Bowl on Oct. 18 as part of Homecoming Week festivities. The event was sponsored by the Southeastern Alumni Association and Phi Kappa Phi Honors Society.

The faculty team, Mens Sana in Corpore Sano (“A Sound Mind in a Sound Body”) defeated the Honors program student team, Correct Answer.

Prairieville student Ashley Woodfield was a member of the Honors program team.


18 2016-11-10
Baton Rouge

Gonzales cadet at Southeastern Louisiana University receives ROTC scholarship


Cadet Aric Mackay, of Gonzales, was among students from Southeastern Louisiana University’s newly-reactivated ROTC program to receive scholarships funded by the Southeastern ROTC Alumni Chapter during the chapter’s annual reunion held during Homecoming Week.


18 2016-11-10
Baton Rouge

St. Amant student receives SLU Alumni Association scholarship


Haley Dewesse, of St. Amant, recently received a scholarship from the Southeastern Louisiana University Alumni Association during its Awards Evening, held during Homecoming Week.

Dewesse is majoring in social work.


18 2016-11-10
Hammond

Southeastern chamber orchestra to hold concert


The Southeastern Louisiana University Strings Chamber Ensemble will perform a fall concert on Tuesday, Nov. 15, at 7:30 p.m. in the Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts in downtown Hammond.
Titled "Musically Speaking," the program will be conducted by Southeastern Professor of Music and Conducting Yakov Voldman. General admission tickets are $10 for adults; $5 faculty, staff and non-Southeastern students. Southeastern students and non-SLU students are admitted free with their student ID cards. Tickets are available at the Columbia Theatre box office at 220 East Thomas St. or at the door on the night of the concert. Call 985-543-4371 for ticket information.


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"We have planned an exciting selection of music that will feature several solos by members of our faculty and select students," Voldman said.
The performance will start with "Simple Symphony" by Benjamin Britten, a central figure in British classical music; Antonio Vivaldi's "Concerto for Two Cellos in G minor," featuring cello performances by Southeastern lecturer Dan Cassin and student Adrain Harabaru of Moldova; and Tomaso Antonio Vitali's "Chaconne," with performances by award-winning student violinist Sungkyung Woo of South Korea.
Also on the program are Josef Suk's "Serenade op.6;" Pablo de Sarasate's "Romanza Andaluza" with student Marta Turianska of Ukraine on violin; "Ragtime" in memory of George Gershwin by Valeri Saparov; and C.M. von Weber's "Clarinet Quintet op.34" featuring a solo by student Jang Hyun Kim of South Korea.
The concert will conclude with Astor Piazzolla's "Libertango" and Henri Vieuxtemps' "Souvenir d'Amerique" featuring music faculty Victor Drescher on the clarinet and Zorica Dimova playing violin.
For more information, contact the Department of Fine and Performing Arts at 985-549-2184.

18 2016-11-08
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN ROTC CADETS RECEIVE SCHOLARSHIPS


SOUTHEASTERN ROTC CADETS RECEIVE SCHOLARSHIPS – Several Southeastern Louisiana University students in the university’s recently-reactivated ROTC program were honored with scholarships funded by the Southeastern ROTC Alumni Chapter at the chapter’s annual reunion held during Homecoming Week. Pictured are, front row, from left: Cadet Aric Mackay, Gonzales; Cadet Ernesto Mora, LaPlace; Cadet Precocia Parlow, Kenner; and Lt. Col. Melvin Chisolm, professor of military science; back row, from left: Lt. Col. (Ret.) Scott Adams, ROTC Alumni Chapter president; Cadet Christian Owens, Mandeville; and Maj. Steve Worth (Ret.) The ROTC program returned to Southeastern last spring after more than a 20-year hiatus.


18 2016-11-08
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN 2016 SOCIAL JUSTICE SPEAKER SCHEDULED


HAMMOND- Southeastern Louisiana University’s Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice’s 13th Annual Social Justice Speaker Series will feature Chris Eder, an Air Force veteran, yoga teacher and artist on Monday, Nov. 14, at 2 p.m. in Pottle Auditorium.
Eder will discuss his journey and how yoga can be used to treat Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and help veterans manage life after service. The lecture is free and open to the public.
“Eder served 23 and one-half years as a combat correspondent and considers himself a broadcast journalist turned yogi who now creates mala beads to support several non-profit organizations, such as Mindful Yoga Therapy for Veterans and the Give Back Yoga Foundation,” said Marc Settembrino, assistant professor of sociology at Southeastern. “Chris is a Yoga Alliance registered Vinyasa and Hatha interdisciplinary yoga instructor.”
Eder began his yoga journey in 1999 after a bout with sciatica and a diagnosis of adult attention deficit disorder. A friend introduced him to yoga as an alternative to pain pills and other medications. He has taught in a variety of styles, starting with sunrise yoga during a 2007 Air Force deployment to Baghdad. He also serves as the director of communications for Mindful Yoga Therapy.
Eder will also offer a free 90-minute yoga class on Tuesday, Nov. 15, at 10 a.m. Due to limited space, registration is required for the yoga class. Participants can register via email to marc.settembrino@southeastern.edu or by stopping by the Sociology and Criminal Justice Department in Fayard Hall, room 336. The location of the yoga class will be announced to registered attendees at a later date.
The Sociology and Criminal Justice Department organized the annual Social Justice Speaker Series as a means of bringing nationally and internationally recognized social justice activists to the Southeastern community. Previous speakers have included Sister Helen Prejean on the death penalty, Morris Dees of the Southern Poverty and Law Center on race and racism, and Medea Benjamin, co-founder of Code Pink, on war and human rights.
For more information, contact the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice at 985-549-2110.

PHOTO:
SOCIAL JUSTICE SPEAKER - Chris Eder, an air force veteran, yoga teacher and artist, is the scheduled guest speaker for Southeastern Louisiana University’s Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice’s 13th Annual Social Justice Speaker Series. Eder will offer a free lecture on Nov. 14 and a free 90-minute yoga class on Nov. 15.

18 2016-11-04
Hammond

SLU RANKED #1 IN SAFETY AMONG LA UNIVERSITIES BY COLLEGE CHOICE


HAMMOND – Safety at Southeastern Louisiana University ranked No. 1 in the state and 15th in the nation among large colleges and universities by a national college guide resource.
“One of the main fears for parents when sending their children to college is the safety of the college or university that child is attending,” said Christian Amondson, managing editor of College Choice. “Because this is a concern for so many parents, College Choice has created a ranking that helps address this issue.”
Southeastern is the only Louisiana university listed in the report, which was issued by CollegeChoice.com. The report can be found at www.collegechoice.net/rankings/safest-large-universities/.

“Maintaining a safe campus for our students, faculty, staff and other visitors to Southeastern is of paramount importance to the university,” said John L. Crain, Southeastern president. “We are pleased that our continuing efforts have earned Southeastern recognition as the safest university in the state and one of the safest in the nation.”
College Choice created the 2016 ranking for Safest Large Colleges and Universities in America using a three-year methodology that took into account more than just the college campus. Information was collected on the cities that the campuses were located in and their crime rates as well as the campus and its crime rates. Research also included data on the school’s general crime report, as well as the number of documented hate crimes, violence against women, arrests made, fire incidences, and discipline enforced activities.
CollegeChoice.com culled data from the U.S. Department of Education, U.S. News & World Report, the National Center for Education Statistics, as well as statistics reported via the institutions’ own websites. Information on the cities campuses are located in was added using public records of crimes within city limits.
Southeastern earned an anti-discrimination grade of 100 percent, a women’s safety grade of 95 percent, and a fire safety grade of 96 percent.
Crain added that in recent years Southeastern has placed considerable resources into safety efforts, including the installation of enhanced lighting and additional video monitoring cameras in residence halls and other strategic locations on campus. The university maintains the Southeastern Emergency Alert System, an extensive compilation of communications that includes the use of its website, email, text messaging, social media and telephone alerts to send emergency notifications, including storm alerts, to faculty, staff, students, and students’ families.
The Southeastern Emergency Alert System notifies students, faculty, staff and their relatives/friends who have been pre-registered in the case of an emergency. All student, faculty, and staff email accounts are pre-registered with the system, but in order to receive emergency alert text messages and voice calls on a cell phone, additional registration is required. Logging into a university LEONet account and clicking on the Emergency Notification link in the left-hand navigation menu will allow individuals to perform the additional registration. Text messages will be sent only in true emergencies and occasionally to test the system.
The latest innovation added to the safety offerings on campus is the creation of a safe campus app. This free app can be downloaded to any smart phone or device from www.southeastern.edu/safecampusapp. The app can direct dial the University Police Department (985-549-2222) from its home screen and from links embedded throughout its sections. Among the areas addressed on the app are suggested steps to take in the case of an active shooter or stabbing on campus, bomb threat, fire or explosion, intruder/mental health emergency or otherwise. The app also addresses procedures to be taken should there be a need for a lockdown, shelter in place or evacuation. Additional information is provided should instances of physical injury, sexual assault, weapons on campus or weather emergencies occur.
In addition, an outdoor public address system with speakers strategically located across the main campus will sound a siren in the event of an emergency. If the siren is ever activated, individuals are advised to check their devices (cell phones, tablets, etc.) for details. Also, more than 40 Code Blue emergency phones are located throughout the campus and its perimeter that allow anyone to instantly contact University Police with the touch of a button.
A safe environment for students is one of the reasons Southeastern has seen significant growth in its new student population recently, according to Director of Enrollment Services Lori Fairburn.
“More and more we are hearing parents and incoming students express the importance of attending a university and area that are known for safety,” said Fairburn. Southeastern experienced a 14.4 percent increase in new freshmen this fall.

PHOTO:
SOUTHEASTERN NAMED SAFEST IN STATE – A recent report released by the national college resource guide College Choice ranked Southeastern Louisiana University as the safest large college or university in the state and 15th in the nation. Among the many safety features the campus offers is the presence of more than 40 Code Blue emergency phones on the campus that immediatly connect callers to the University Police Department.

18 2016-11-03
Baton Rouge

Wine with Friends: SLU's library raising money at wine tasting


The Friends of Sims Library is hosting its eighth annual “Wine with Friends,” a fundraiser for Southeastern Louisiana University’s Linus A. Sims Memorial Library, at 7 p.m. Nov. 4.

Held at the library, the event will feature six wines paired with food samplings; live music; a silent auction featuring art, books, wine and gift certificates; and door prizes, said Library Director Eric Johnson.

Wines will be introduced by Todd Delaune from The Red, White & Brew in Hammond.

The group supports the activities and collections of the library. Funds generated by Friends of Sims Library are used to supplement the library’s annual budget, purchase needed equipment and resources, and provide programs, lectures, author readings and signings, and other special events.

Johnson said all funds raised go directly to the library.

Tickets are $35 each. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. with the tasting beginning at 7 p.m. Space is limited, so early reservations are requested. Tickets will not be sold at the door.

Order tickets online at southeastern.edu/libraryfriends or via check payable to Southeastern Foundation, SLU 10896, Hammond, LA 70402.

For information about the wine tasting or the the group, contact Janie Branham at (985) 549-2186 or jbranham@southeastern.edu.


18 2016-11-03
Baton Rouge

Southeastern Louisiana University crowns homecoming royalty


Reigning during Southeastern Louisiana University homecoming festivities are queen Maggie Hinson, from Denham Springs, and king Justin Bankston, from Loranger.


18 2016-11-03
Hammond

SLU faculty explore ideas to free up money for raises


Ideas for freeing up money in the Southeastern Louisiana University budget to secure permanent raises for faculty prompted questions during the Faculty Senate meeting Wednesday.
Ultimately, the Senate tabled the matter until the next meeting in January.


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One idea is to reduce the current athletics department's budget by 60 percent, the same amount the state has cut from the university as a whole.
Senators said they want more details about the data that suggests the university is losing money on athletics. One senator said an internal review should be done on the data rather than relying on an outside study. Another said he would like to know how much big-name football games bring in.
The resolution cited an article in USA Today on the National Collegiate Athletic Association's finances that lists 231 universities based on their athletics departments' revenue for 2014-2015. Southeastern was placed in the 189th spot with a total revenue of $12,370,704 and total expenses of $12,528,745. The article shows the university's amount of subsidy for athletics was $7,994,352 or 64.62 percent.
It clarifies that the $7,994,352 takes into account the "$100,620 that the athletics department transferred back to the school and - under a 2015 change in the NCAA's reporting system - is recorded as a revenue loss. This transfer amount cannot exceed the sum of money the department received from student fees and the school: $7,225,849."
Faculty members also had several questions about the suggestion to merge the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences with the College of Science and Technology to form the College of Arts, Sciences and Technology. This would save money on administrative overhead costs, the committee that drafted the resolution reasoned. Those two colleges were suggested in part because they had been one college before and were later separated.
Members said they would like the resolution to include how much money could be saved by the merger as well as how much could be saved from the other measures listed so that when the resolution is presented it can be a complete and accurate proposal for the university to consider.
Salary raises have been a frequent topic at the Senate meetings, and its faculty welfare committee has been working on drafting a resolution on the need for pay increases this semester. Part of the work was studying the university's budgets from the past several years.
The resolution states that Southeastern faculty members have not received a bona fide raise in eight years while the cost of living for the area has risen.
It also states 80 percent of Southeastern's faculty and 62 percent of its instructors have salaries below the Southern Regional Education Board average salary for their rank. As a result of a lack of pay raises, Southeastern has lost experienced faculty members.
The draft resolution says many of the salaries for non-academic positions and administrative support positions are higher than the mean instructor salary. Meanwhile, spending on the athletics department has increased while the university has gone through cuts in state aid.
The draft proposes the university do one or a combination of measures to pay for faculty raises: reduce the athletics department budget, merge the two colleges, eliminate assistant provosts, assistant vice presidents or assistant deans where possible, establish a student fee each semester that could be dedicated to faculty salaries and/or raise private funds.
The student fee suggestion also prompted debate on whether it was appropriate to put the cost on students for faculty salary raises.

18 2016-11-02
Hammond

'ABOUT THE KIDS'


Miniature superheroes, princesses and other characters congregated outside Southeastern Louisiana University's Pennington Student Activity Center for games and candy during the 12th annual Fall Carnival on Monday evening.
Out on the lawn, games and activities were designed and set up by various university clubs, groups and Greek organizations. Some games and activities included face painting, moon bounces, potato sack racing, bowling, ball tosses and others.
"It's about the kids coming out and having a great time but having a safe, great time," said Mikayla Tymes, Black Student Union president and sociology junior. "Our school provides the Hammond-area children a safe environment to trick-or-treat because we know that trick-or-treat can be dangerous and not everyone has the best intentions for our children. This is a safe alternative than going door-to-door to get candy."
Tymes said this year saw a better turnout because of good weather and greater participation from university groups.
"That's a great thing to see, when everybody can come out and support each other and support the community," she said.
Coordinated by the Office of Student Engagement, the event was a collaborative effort made by the university's Office of Multicultural and International Student Affairs, the Black Student Union, Office for Student Engagement and Recreational Sports and Wellness, and Trick-or-Treat with the Greeks.
The event was free and open to the public.

18 2016-11-02
Hammond

SLU FALL CARNIVAL INCLUDES TRICK OR TREAT WITH GREEKS TONIGHT


HAMMOND – Area children are invited to participate in Southeastern Louisiana University’s 12th annual Fall Carnival Monday, Oct. 31, from 5-7 p.m.
The university’s Office of Multicultural and International Student Affairs, the Black Student Union, Office for Student Engagement and Recreational Sports and Wellness are sponsoring the event in conjunction with Trick or Treat with the Greeks, which is coordinated by the Office of Student Engagement.

Both events are scheduled on the lawn of Southeastern’s Pennington Student Activity Center, located at 1350 N. General Pershing, and are free of charge.
“This is our annual service effort,” said Brendan Daigle, coordinator of Multicultural and International Student Affairs. “Our goal is to provide all of the typical traditions of Halloween in a safe, carnival atmosphere.”
Daigle said both events provide safe alternatives to traditional neighborhood door-to-door trick-or-treating and are free for the general public. Although children of all ages are invited to the festivities, the event targets children in kindergarten through fourth grade and will include games with prizes, candy, spacewalks, face painting, and much more.
Parents and guardians are asked to accompany their children throughout the evening. For more information, call 985-549-3850 or email multicultural@southeastern.edu.

18 2016-10-31
Hammond

SLU’s LSBDC hosts event for veterans’ business


HAMMOND – The Louisiana Small Business Development Center (LSBDC) at Southeastern Louisiana University will present the seminar “Starting and Financing Your Veteran-Owned Business” in Hammond on Tuesday, Nov. 1, from 9 a.m. –12 p.m.
Co-sponsored by Northshore SCORE, the seminar will be held at the LSBDC Southeastern main office, located at 1514 Martens Drive.
“This workshop is highly recommended for veterans and military families interested in determining the feasibility of their business idea, planning to start or have recently started a small business, seeking a small business loan, or wanting to learn more about business planning,” said Assistant Director of Southeastern’s SBDC Sandy Summers. “Special focus will be placed on financing for veteran-owned businesses.”
Summers said topics of discussion include writing a business plan, sources of funds for start-up and expansion, small business resources, and required licenses.
There is no cost to attend the event; however, pre-registration is preferred, as seating is only guaranteed for registered attendees.
For more information, contact LSBDC Southeastern at 985-549-3831 or lsbdc.slu@lsbdc.org. Online registration is available at www.lsbdc.org.
18 2016-10-31
Hammond

Campus Activities Board sponsors pumpkin carving activity


CARVING PUMPKINS – Southeastern Louisiana University freshmen Melissa Fisher of Slidell (left) and Sydney McSlarrow of Coweta, Okla., try their hands at carving pumpkins at a Halloween event held Wednesday (Oct. 26) in the Student Union and sponsored by the Campus Activities Board. Students were able to select their own pumpkins for carving or decorating.
18 2016-10-28
Hammond

Greater Hammond Chamber supports Amendment 2 for SLU


The Greater Hammond Chamber of Commerce board of directors voted unanimously to support Louisiana Amendment 2, which gives higher education governance boards the power to establish tuition without legislative approval.

"It's important for us as a business leader to help keep our members aware of issues that would affect our region," Chamber Chairman Brian Shirey said. "The Chamber has always been a staunch supporter of both Southeastern and NTCC and education remains a priority at all levels.
"Due to the economic importance of Southeastern Louisiana University and Northshore Technical Community College to our community, the Governmental Affairs Committee recommended that the Chamber support this amendment, as it allows university boards to establish their tuition and fee amounts without seeking legislative approval," Governmental Affairs Committee Chair Elsbet Smith Hollywood said.

Currently, the Louisiana Constitution provides that any new fee or increase in an existing fee, including tuition and fees charged by post-secondary education management boards, must be approved by a two-thirds vote of the legislature. According to The Excellence in Higher Education Coalition, Louisiana is the only state to require the two-thirds vote, and the colleges and universities have suffered financially because of the inherent politics involved.

"The Greater Hammond Chamber has recognized that control over college and university tuition rates by the Louisiana Legislature has contributed to the financial instability that has plagued our colleges and universities in recent years," said John L. Crain, Southeastern Louisiana University president. "This amendment will help Louisiana be more competitive in the regional, national and global education marketplace by returning tuition autonomy to the university systems and their management boards, allowing pricing to be set in accordance with market forces, including program cost, demand and students' ability to pay."

If passed, Amendment 2 would allow higher education boards the freedom to use their knowledge to establish tuition rates, give universities a competitive edge with universities in surrounding states, bring stability to the budget, and provide flexibility to adjust costs in relation to what it actually costs the university to administer the program.

"The Louisiana Community and Technical College System supports Amendment 2. The Board understands the market demands, the value proposition our colleges provide for students and industry, and most importantly our mission of access and affordability for those who need it the most," Northshore Technical Community College Chancellor Dr. William Wainwright said. "Our colleges are the pathway to the middle class. The Board is best situated to set tuition rates while balancing the access mission and ensuring quality workforce training programs for the people of Louisiana."

For more extensive information about Amendment 2 and other amendments, visit the Public Affairs Research Council of Louisiana at http://parlouisiana.org/.
18 2016-10-28
Hammond

Southeastern La. donates school supplies to teachers affected by recent flooding


LIVINGSTON PARISH, LA (WAFB) -

It's been a very long road to recovery for schools in Livingston Parish as many school teachers lost everything in the flood. That includes desks, pencils, binders and everything that makes a classroom come together. It's why a local university is now reaching out to help.

"Our school system suffered in excess of $1 million worth of damage," said Ed Foster, a supervisor with the Livingston Parish Public Schools. "That's life changing damage for all of us."

At this time, five schools are still sharing sites, and students won't return to their original campuses until January. Even then, most of them will have to use temporary buildings, but that road is a little easier now.

Southeastern Louisiana University (SLU) donated dozens of school supplies to teachers in Livingston and Ascension Parishes, including desks, filing cabinets, and chairs.

"We looked at it as these schools that are impacted, they're area schools," said Richard Himber, Director of Purchase and Property Control for SLU. "They're part of the university. We look at them as an extension of the university."

The folks at Southeastern said they usually have too many supplies and end up auctioning it off. One of Southeastern's administrative assistants, Heather Collins, took the lead after finding the need on Facebook.

"Being raised by a school teacher, I knew that the majority of what goes into your classroom actually comes out of your personal finances," Collins said. "So as teachers flooded, they didn't have the finances to put their classrooms back together."

"Some of our teachers had been teaching for thirty plus years, and had accumulated a wealth of teaching materials," Foster said. "And those
were all destroyed in one fell swoop. And that's almost like a personal attack on those teachers."

The supplies are now in a storage facility in Livingston and will be distributed to the teachers with the most needs over the course of the next week.
18 2016-10-27
Baton Rouge

SLU nursing students assisted after flood by Alabama nursers


Morgan Mincey’s home in Denham Springs — like so many others in the Livingston Parish area — was hit hard by the August floods.

A junior in nursing at Southeastern Louisiana University, Mincey said her family had never anticipated a flood of this nature, especially since they did not live in a flood zone.

“We definitely were not prepared for a flood; then water started flowing into our house,” she said. “The cost to rebuild, purchase home furnishings and replacing personal items is overwhelming. We are rebuilding and trying to put our lives back together.”

Mincey is one of two SLU nursing students who received a $500 disaster fund scholarship donated by the University of Alabama Capstone College of Nursing in Tuscaloosa. The funds were raised through contributions of UA faculty and staff, its alumni association, and the Association of Student Nurses.

Also receiving assistance through the donation is Seth Crnko, of Denham Springs.

“We are thankful to be able to support SLU, specifically the students of the School of Nursing, during this time,” said Johnny R. Tice, instructor and faculty adviser to the University of Alabama Capstone College of Nursing. “While we know the road to recovery is a long one, it’s our hope that our contribution helps make the journey a little shorter.”

“I am thankful to the University of Alabama for generously reaching out in this time of need,” said Crnko, whose truck was severely damaged and home also flooded. “This gift has given me reassurance that everything is going to be OK.”

“The outreach to our community has been tremendous,” Mincey added. “I am thankful to the University of Alabama for reaching out to Southeastern’s School of Nursing. The love and support from people you don’t know are treasured.”

“The University of Alabama, especially its Student Nursing Association, has shown a true spirit of caring,” said Eileen Creel, head of the Southeastern School of Nursing. “This act of kindness by UA’s Capstone College of Nursing was incredibly uplifting at a difficult time for so many students and faculty. We are very appreciative.”


18 2016-10-27
Baton Rouge

SLU plans Trick-or-Treat with the Greeks during fall carnival


Children are invited to participate in Southeastern Louisiana University’s 12th annual Fall Carnival from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Monday.

The university’s Office of Multicultural and International Student Affairs, the Black Student Union, Office for Student Engagement and Recreational Sports and Wellness are sponsoring the event in conjunction with Trick-or-Treat with the Greeks, which is coordinated by the Office of Student Engagement.

Both events are free and scheduled on the lawn of Southeastern’s Pennington Student Activity Center, 1350 N. General Pershing.

Brendan Daigle, coordinator of Multicultural and International Student Affairs said, the event is set to provide all of the typical traditions of Halloween in a safe, carnival atmosphere.

Daigle said both events provide alternatives to traditional neighborhood trick-or-treating. Although children of all ages are invited to the festivities, the event targets children in kindergarten through fourth-grade and will include games with prizes, candy, spacewalks, face painting, and much more.

Parents and guardians are asked to accompany their children throughout the evening. For more information, call (985) 549-3850 or email multicultural@southeastern.edu.


18 2016-10-27
Baton Rouge

Tailgaters will compete in gumbo cook-off at Southeastern on Saturday


Southeastern Louisiana University’s 10th annual Game Day Gumbo Cook-Off will take place in the Friendship Circle in Hammond during tailgating activities on Saturday.

The event raises funds in support of student-athletes’ programs.

As part of the tradition, tailgaters can show off their gumbo cooking skills before the Lions' football game against Central Arkansas at 2:30 p.m.

There is no cost to participate as a tailgater gumbo chef. The registration form will be available for download from the SAAC page on the Lions Athletics website at lionsports.net.

Serving cups will be provided to each tailgating group. Participants are asked to bring spoons and however much gumbo they are willing to share with their fellow tailgaters.

The public is invited to taste the gumbo at the various tasting stations around Friendship Circle and “vote” for their favorites by stuffing coins and bills in designated “voting jars” at each site. “Voting” will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

The voting jar with the most money will win the 2016 Fans’ Choice Award. Additionally, the Judges’ Choice Award will be presented based on a blind taste test of samples at each of the participating tailgate sites.

Both winners will be announced at halftime and will receive Game Day Gumbo Cook-Off Champ gumbo paddles.

Tailgaters have until Friday to register. Completed registration forms can be faxed to (985) 549-3495 or scanned and emailed to sherry.kennemer@southeastern.edu. The contest is open to any group, whether or not they have a regular tailgating location for Southeastern home games.

For more information about the cook-off, call (985) 549-2256.


18 2016-10-27
Baton Rouge

SLU plans Trick-or-Treat with the Greeks during fall carnival


Children are invited to participate in Southeastern Louisiana University’s 12th annual Fall Carnival from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Monday.

The university’s Office of Multicultural and International Student Affairs, the Black Student Union, Office for Student Engagement and Recreational Sports and Wellness are sponsoring the event in conjunction with Trick-or-Treat with the Greeks, which is coordinated by the Office of Student Engagement.

Both events are free and scheduled on the lawn of Southeastern’s Pennington Student Activity Center, 1350 N. General Pershing.

Brendan Daigle, coordinator of Multicultural and International Student Affairs said, the event is set to provide all of the typical traditions of Halloween in a safe, carnival atmosphere.

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Daigle said both events provide alternatives to traditional neighborhood trick-or-treating. Although children of all ages are invited to the festivities, the event targets children in kindergarten through fourth-grade and will include games with prizes, candy, spacewalks, face painting, and much more.

Parents and guardians are asked to accompany their children throughout the evening. For more information, call (985) 549-3850 or email multicultural@southeastern.edu.


18 2016-10-26
Hammond

Southeastern students sponsor farmers market Oct. 26


HAMMOND – The Southeastern Louisiana University student organization Reconnect will sponsor a farmers market in front of the Student Union on Wednesday, October 26, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The event will feature food sales from area farmers, food samples, ceramics, jewelry, beef jerky, henna, and much more. Vendors include Sacred Earth Bars, Berryhill Farms, Simple Works’ all-natural bath and body products, and Tea Cookies.
“The Reconnect Farmers Market is an event where you can interact with local farmers and vendors, eat a healthy and fresh lunch, or pick up some homemade jewelry or bath products from your fellow students and other vendors. It’s a way to shop local and support healthy food choices without having to leave campus,” said Alexis Taylor, vice president of Reconnect.
Student vendors are encouraged to participate by emailing Taylor at alexis.taylor@southeastern.edu. A table and tablecloth is provided at no charge.
A student environmental club, Reconnect participates in the Real Food Challenge, a national effort among college students to promote the use of locally grown, healthy and sustainable food products.

18 2016-10-26
Hammond

DENHAM JUNIOR, LORANGER SENIOR NAMED SLU HOMECOMING QUEEN, KING


2016 SOUTHEASTERN HOMECOMING QUEEN AND KING –Maggie Hinson of Denham Springs, a junior kinesiology major, and Justin Bankston of Loranger, a senior in computer science, were named Queen and King of Southeastern Louisiana University’s Homecoming 2016 at halftime of the university’s Homecoming game Saturday, Oct. 22. Hinson is active in Alpha Omicron Pi sorority and the National Society of Leadership and Success. She has been named to both the President’s and Dean’s lists. Bankston is a member of Kappa Alpha Order, Order of Omega, National Society of Collegiate Scholars and Upsilon Pi Epsilon. He is the recipient of the Green ‘S’ Award and is listed in 2016 Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges.

18 2016-10-26
Hammond

SLU RECOGNIZES ALUMNI, VOLUNTEERS AT AWARDS EVENT


SOUTHEASTERN RECOGNIZES DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI, VOLUNTEERS AT AWARDS EVENT
HAMMOND -- One of the most successful coaches in Southeastern Louisiana University’s history and a pair of local entrepreneurs were honored Friday night as the Alumni Association’s Alumni of the Year during Homecoming Week celebrations.
Billy Kennedy, currently head basketball coach of the SEC-champion Texas A&M Aggies, was recognized as the Alumnus of the Year, while Zac and Cari Caramonta, owners of the micro-brewery Gnarly Barley, were honored as the Young Alumni of the Year.
Kennedy recalled how he played basketball as a walk-on to the Lions’ team in 1982 and said he realized then he wanted to be a coach. He thanked his family for providing the support he needed as he moved from job to job.

Kennedy graduated from Southeastern in 1986. A native of Metairie, he joined Southeastern as head coach in 1999 and served until 2005, leading the Lions to two Southland Conference regular-season titles and the school’s first-ever trip to the NCAA tournament. In 2004 he was named the Southland Conference Coach of the Year.
Last season saw the Aggies earn a share of the Southeastern Conference Championship and advance to the NCAA Sweet 16. Kennedy was named the SEC Coach of the year, and his team climbed to No. 5 in the Associated Press Top 25.
The Young Alumni of the Year, the Caramontas, are owners and operators of the Hammond-based craft beer production company Gnarly Barley. The couple met at Southeastern as undergraduates and married in 2009. Their products are distributed at approximately 300 locations throughout nine parishes.
Also at the Awards Evening, the 2016 Alumnus of the Year for each of Southeastern’s academic colleges was recognized. Winners included:
College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences – Rob Dugas, a 1986 communication graduate, is currently the vice president and chief procurement officer for Chick-Fil-A, overseeing 2,000 stores nationwide.
College of Business – Gino Marino, a former Southeastern football player who played running back from 1970-73, was an instrumental player in helping the university return football to its athletic program. He is the owner of the award-winning Gino’s Restaurant in Baton Rouge.
College of Education – Rep. J. Rogers Pope, who holds both a bachelor’s and master’s degree from Southeastern, is a life-long educator, serving as a teacher and coach before becoming superintendent of Livingston Parish Public Schools. He currently serves in the a Louisiana House of Representatives representing District 71.
College of Nursing and Health Sciences – Barbara Hebert received a degree in liberal arts studies in 1980 and later earned her master’s degree in education in counseling in 1994, both from Southeastern. Currently the executive director of the Children’s Advocacy Center – Hope House, she previously served as director of Southeastern’s Counseling Center and has touched the lives of countless students.
College of Science and Technology – Lucas Watkins of Ponchatoula earned a master’s degree in biology and established several businesses, including Southland Forestry Services and the engineering and consulting firm, Krebs, LaSalle and Lemieux, where he developed a subsidiary company, Elos Environmental, a wetland delineation and permitting service company.
Other special awards were presented at the event, including:
Loyal Lion Award – Presented by Southeastern President John L. Crain , the award was given posthumously to Gayle Neal, who demonstrated life-long support for the university. A former president of the Alumni Assocation, Neal served as an assistant dean of Continuing Education at Southeastern and as an assistant superintendent in the Louisiana State Department of Education.
Kathy L. Pittman Distinguished Service Award – George Ibert of Ibert’s Jewelry was honored for his long-time support of Southeastern fund-raising events, including Chefs Evening, FeLions Champagne Bingo, and the Alumni Association’s Champagne, Chocolates and Diamonds event.
L.E. Chandler Award – Presented to the faculty or staff member who has assisted students and student organizations, the Chandler Award was given to Amber Narro, associate professor of communication. Narro serves as an adviser for the Southeastern Press Club and coordinates an annual study abroad program. Her most recent work involved helping student volunteers organize to clean up area homes after the August flood. The more than 170 students provided help in more than 50 homes with flood damage.
Director’s Diamond Award – Pat Walsh retired from the office of retired Judge Jimmy Kuhn of the First Circuit Court of Appeals and has now become a permanent fixture in the Alumni Association’s offices as a valuable volunteer.
Friendship Oak Award – Robby Turner, a 1989 graduate from Baton Rouge, was recognized for his efforts to organize the delivery of relief supplies and his work with local officials to provide for the needs of Baton Rouge residents during the most recent floods.
The Alumni Association also recognized recipients of the organization’s scholarships. Receiving the scholarships were Emily Crithers of Brookhaven, Miss., a senior majoring in occupational safety, health and environment; Haley Dewesse of St. Amant, a social work major; Kayla Martin of Metairie, majoring in communication sciences and disorders; Grace Mikesell of Baton Rouge, a nursing student; Anna Rudesill of Pearl River, a student in communications with a minor in art; and Erin Fernandez of Marrero, who received the SGA President’s scholarship.

PHOTOS:
SOUTHEASTERN HONORS ALUMNI OF THE YEAR – The Southeastern Louisiana University Alumni Association recognized Texas A&M head basketball coach Billy Kennedy as its Alumnus of the Year and Zac and Cari Caramonta of Hammond as the Young Alumni of the Year. Pictured are, from left, Southeastern President John L. Crain, Interim Alumni Association Director Julie Perise; Cari and Zac Caramonta; Kennedy; and Alumni Association President Mayson Foster.

COLLEGE ALUMNI HONORED – Southeastern graduates were honored with Alumni of the Year recognition by their respective colleges at Homecoming’s Alumni Awards event. Pictured, from left, are Alumni Association President Mayson Foster; Rob Dugas, College of Arts, Humanities and Social Studies; Gino Marino, College of Business; J. Rogers Pope, College of Education; Lucas Watkins, College of Science and Technology; Barbara Hebert, College of Nursing and Health Sciences; Alumni Association Interim Director Julie Perise; and President John L. Crain.

18 2016-10-24
Baton Rouge

Theater, music and lectures highlight fanfare's final week


Children’s theater, musical performances and lectures highlight the final week of Fanfare, Southeastern Louisiana University’s annual October-long arts festival in Hammond.

“Peter and Wendy” will be performed by the Missoula Children’s Theatre with a cast of local children in the Columbia Theatre at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28, and 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29. Tickets are $15 for adults and $10 for children and are available at columbiatheatre.org or at the box office, (985) 543-4371.

Next up is OcTubaFest, a free concert series featuring tuba and euphonium faculty and students and presented by the Department of Fine and Performing Arts in performances Oct. 25-26. All concerts will be held in Pottle Music Building Recital Hall. The 7:30 p.m. concert on Oct. 25 features euphonium students. On Oct. 26, concerts are at 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. The 6 p.m. performance features students in small and large ensembles. The 7:30 p.m. concert is a solo recital by Brian Gallion, who will present “Movie Music for the Tuba.”

Kelly Link, a 2016 Pulitzer Prize finalist and author of several volumes of short stories, will read from her work at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 26 as part of the university’s Common Read program. Events that day also include student presentations on the author’s work at 9:30 a.m., an 11 a.m. question-and-answer session with the author, followed by Link's reading and a book signing and reception. All events are free and open to the public and will be held in the Student Union Theatre.

On Oct. 26 and Oct. 31, free Then and Now Lectures are scheduled in Pottle Music Building Auditorium. At noon Wednesday, Oct. 26, Joe Burns will present “Forty Odd Years of the Rocky Horror Picture Show, Including the Art of Shadow-Casting.” On Monday, Oct. 31, at 1 p.m., William Robison will present "Barking Pumpkin and Zomby Woof: The Life, Music, and Surprising Politics of Frank Zappa.”

Fanfare tickets are on sale at the Columbia/Fanfare box office, 220 E. Thomas St., (985) 543-4371. Some tickets may be purchased online at columbiatheatre.org. The box office is open Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and one hour prior to Columbia performances. For a complete schedule, contact the Columbia/Fanfare office at (985) 543-4366 or visit the theater's website.


18 2016-10-24
Hammond

Hear Them Roar


FROM THE COURT — Members of the Southeastern Louisiana University Homecoming Court toss goodies to spectators as they ride in fancy convertibles during the homecoming parade Saturday.
18 2016-10-20
Hammond

WINE TASTING TO BENEFIT SOUTHEASTERN’S SIMS LIBRARY


HAMMOND -- The group Friends of Sims Library (FoSL) is hosting its eighth annual “Wine with Friends,” a fundraiser for Southeastern Louisiana University’s Linus A. Sims Memorial Library, at 7 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 4.
Held at the library, the popular event will feature six wines paired with food samplings, live music, a silent auction featuring art, books, wine and gift certificates, and door prizes, said Library Director Eric Johnson. Wines will be introduced by Todd Delaune from The Red, White & Brew in Hammond.
FoSL is an organization that supports the activities and collections of the library. Funds generated by FoSL are used to supplement the library’s annual budget, purchase needed equipment and resources, and provide programs, lectures, author readings and signings, and other special events.
Johnson said all funds raised go directly to the library, thanks to donations from area businesses.
Tickets are $35 each. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. with the tasting beginning at 7 p.m. Space is limited, so early reservations are requested. Tickets will not be sold at the door.
Order tickets online at southeastern.edu/libraryfriends or via check payable to Southeastern Foundation, SLU 10896, Hammond, LA 70402.
For more information about the wine tasting or the FoSL, contact Janie Branham at (985)-549-2186 or jbranham@southeastern.edu.

18 2016-10-20
Hammond

SLU's common read program to feature fiction writer Link


Kelly Link, a 2016 Pulitzer Prize finalist and author of several volumes of short stories, will visit Southeastern Louisiana University Oct. 26 as part of the university's Common Read program.
Sponsored by the Department of English and the Southeastern Writing Center, Common Read provides students and community members the opportunity to read selected works and then meet their contemporary author.
Events that day include student presentations on the author's work at 9:30 a.m., an 11 a.m. question and answer session with the author, and a 6:30 p.m. public reading by Link followed by a book signing and reception. All events are free and open to the public and will be held in the Student Union Theatre.
Link's latest collection of short stories, "Get in Trouble," is her first for adult readers in a decade and features nine new haunting stories. Known for her fertile imagination, Link writes unconventional tales in what has been described as "magical realism," incorporating a sense of sly humor.
Among her short story collections are "My True Love Gave to Me," "Monstrous Affections," "Stranger Things Have Happened," and "Steampunk!," a Lotus Award finalist.
Link earned her master of fine arts degree from the University of North Carolina. She and her husband are co-editors of the literary magazine "Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet."
"For several years now, we've sponsored a Common Read program, featuring a prominent, contemporary author, and it always serves as an exciting experience for our students," said Department of English Head David Hanson. "By meeting and talking with an author who they're studying in class, students gain a rare opportunity to see deeply into an author's life of writing."
For more information, contact the Southeastern Department of English at 985-549-2100.
18 2016-10-20
Hammond

Southeastern theatre to present play 'Distracted'


Southeastern Louisiana University's theatre program will open its fall season with the play "Distracted," a portrayal of a family dealing with attention deficit disorder (ADD) and the problems it creates.
The play will run tonight through Oct. 21 at 7:30 p.m. in the Vonnie Borden Theatre located in D Vickers Hall.


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Authored by playwright and screenwriter Lisa Loomer, who co-authored the screenplay for the Academy Award-winning film "Girl, Interrupted," "Distracted" blends comedy with a heightened sensitivity to an issue in society. The play revolves around a married couple's attempts to handle their 9-year-old son, who may or may not have ADD.
While largely humorous, "Distracted" has serious moments as well and features strong language and adult situations, according to director Jim Winter, associate professor of theatre.
"The play explores the pressures all of us face in this fast-paced, media-crazed, modern world," said Winter.
General admission tickets are $15; $5 for seniors and non-Southeastern students; Southeastern faculty, staff and students are admitted free with ID.
The cast includes nine Southeastern students including Misty Gros and Gavin Gaudry of Lafitte, Judah Fabre of Zachary, Colin Ross of Baton Rouge, Jordin Jones of Zachary, Payton Core of Folsom, Harlan Thorpe of New Orleans, Olivia Waguespack of Covington, and Angela Griffitt of Mandeville.
For more information, contact Southeastern Theatre at (985) 549-2115.

18 2016-10-17
Hammond

Training changes raise cost concerns


New requirements for becoming a certified teacher have university officials concerned about the cost, said Southeastern Louisiana University President John Crain.
One of the main changes the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education approved last week requires students to have one-year residencies, where they will teach for a year under a mentor rather than getting one semester of classroom experience.


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President Crain said the new requirements could come with added costs for universities that have already dealt with years of budget cuts.
"We're all sensitive to program changes that cost more," he said Friday.
The changes aim to help new teachers be better prepared and capable for their first job but drew opposition from several groups, including the Louisiana Association of Educators and the Louisiana School Boards Association.
Over the past few months, President Crain and Shirley Jacob, dean of the college of education, have met with state officials about the upcoming changes for teacher certification, which will take effect in July 2018. They recently met with State Superintendent John White, who is a proponent of the changes, to discuss their concern about funding the new requirements, Crain said.
The objections Crain has heard have focused mainly on funding concerns, particularly when it comes to the year-long apprenticeship part. He said he is not opposed to the idea of having student teachers get more experience in the classroom under the watchful eye of a mentor.
However, he feels the teaching program at Southeastern already does a fine job preparing certified educators for their first teaching post, he said.
"They tend to be very effective," he said, adding that first-time teachers who graduate from Southeastern generally do well on their evaluations.
Many classes taken by student teachers at Southeastern require a specific number of hours in the field, participating in a variety of programs at K-12 schools, in addition to the first semester of teaching, he said.
Southeastern participated in a federal pilot program for preparing student teachers that is funded by a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The program has some students participating in year-long apprenticeships, so the concept is not entirely new to the university, Crain added.
According to the Associated Press, the BESE-approved changes would have mentor teachers get paid extra while the student teachers could get a stipend during their residency.
The education department has said federal grant money will help pay for the more rigorous teacher training.

18 2016-10-17
Hammond

NEW MEMORIAL


Near the Friendship Oak at Southeastern Louisiana University sits a new addition to the campus, bricks bearing people's names arranged around the crest of the fraternity Sigma Tau Gamma Fraternity.
A crowd of alumni, current members and their loved ones clutching small candles gathered around the fraternity's new memorial plaza Friday to dedicate the 41 bricks that represent the fraternity's deceased brothers, their spouses and the fraternity's "white rose sweethearts."
According to alumnus member Dickie Whitson, who led the ceremony, the memorial was installed Monday.
The memorial is unique among the many chapters of the national fraternity, as well as being a unique feature at Southeastern, he said.
"We're proud of that," he said.
He said Sigma Tau Gamma was started at SLU in 1939 and is the oldest national fraternity on the campus.
Many prominent leaders have emerged from Sigma Tau Gamma, including judges, he said.
The memorial is identified by a keystone marker bearing the coat of arms of the fraternity and is separated from the rest of the plaza's commemorative bricks.
One of the more recent deceased brothers who is memorialized by one of the bricks is Richard Gayle "Coach" Neal, Sr., who died Sept. 30.
The fraternity's Phi Chapter, the New Orleans Alumni Chapter and the Phi Chapter Alumni Association hosted the event.

18 2016-10-13
Baton Rouge

East Feliciana High School students attend college and career fair


East Feliciana High School held its fall college and career fair on Sept. 19 in the school's gymnasium in Jackson.

The event provided students in eighth- through 12-grade the opportunity to browse and collect information provided by various colleges and universities as well as business and industry representatives from around the state.

Seniors used the opportunity to meet with public and private schools regarding admission, scholarships, housing and campus tour opportunities.

Thirty-eight institutions were represented at the fair, including LSU, Southern, Southeastern, BRCC, the University of Louisiana at Monroe and Dillard and Xavier universities.

Throughout the 2016-17 school year, East Feliciana High plans to host several events to ensure every student graduates from high school ready for college or a career, district officials said.
18 2016-10-13
Hammond

Children and teen can audition for "Peter and Wendy"


Auditions for the Missoula Children's Theatre production of "Peter and Wendy" will be held on Monday, Oct. 24, from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts.
A non-profit educational theater troupe, Missoula Children's Theatre has been a hometown arts favorite since 1992, often as part of Fanfare, Southeastern Louisiana University's October arts festival.


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"Children in grades kindergarten through high school may audition," said Director of Columbia Theatre and Fanfare Roy Blackwood. "Approximately 50-60 local students will be cast to appear in the show with a Missoula tour actor/director. Missoula will cast the young actors on Monday and get started right away teaching them lines, staging, songs and movement. By Saturday, the children will be ready to perform, complete with professionally designed costumes and scenery."
Students wishing to audition must arrive by 4 p.m. and stay for the entire two-hour session. The first rehearsal begins approximately 15-30 minutes after the audition and lasts until 8:30 p.m.
"Since it is a group audition, no advance preparation is necessary - but a smile never hurts," Blackwood said. "Students should just be ready to come and have a good time."
Among the roles to be cast are Peter, his Shadow, Tinker Bell, and the Lost Boys; Wendy and her brothers John and Michael; their parents Mr. and Mrs. Darling with their faithful friends Nana and Liza; Captain Hook and his Pirate Crew, along with the Crocodile; Tiger Lily, the band of Neverlanders and Neverland Creatures; and, carrying them to Neverland, a group of stormy Clouds. Assistant directors will also be cast to aid in rehearsals throughout the week and to take on essential backstage responsibilities.
"Although not all cast members will be needed at every session, those auditioning must have a clear schedule for the entire week and, if selected, be able to attend all rehearsals required for their role," Blackwood said. "A detailed rehearsal schedule will be distributed at the conclusion of the audition."
"Peter and Wendy" will be performed at the Columbia Theatre in two performances on Friday, Oct. 28, at 7 p.m. and Saturday, Oct. 29, at 2 p.m. All cast members must be available for all scheduled performances and rehearsals.
Tickets for the public performances are $15 for adults and $10 for children. They are available online at columbiatheatre.org or at the box office, 985-549-4371.
The Missoula Children's Theatre is a non-profit organization based in Missoula, Mont. This season, more than 65,000 young people across the globe will take to part in Missoula productions.
For additional information, contact the Columbia Theatre at 985-543-4366 or visit columbiatheatre.org.
18 2016-10-13
Hammond

UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA HELPS SLU NURSING STUDENTS POST-FLOOD


HAMMOND – Morgan Mincey’s home in Denham Springs – like so many others in the Livingston Parish area – was hit hard by the recent floods in Southeast Louisiana.
A junior in nursing at Southeastern Louisiana University, Mincey said her family had never anticipated a flood of this nature, especially since they did not live in a flood zone.
“We definitely were not prepared for a flood; then water started flowing into our house,” she said. “The cost to rebuild, purchase home furnishings and replacing personal items is overwhelming. We are rebuilding and trying to put our lives back together.”
Mincey is one of two Southeastern nursing students who received a $500 disaster fund scholarship donated by the University of Alabama Capstone College of Nursing in Tuscaloosa. The funds were raised through contributions of UA faculty and staff, its alumni association, and the Association of Student Nurses. Also receiving assistance through the donation is Seth Crnko of Denham Springs.
“We are thankful to be able to support SLU, specifically the students of the School of Nursing, during this time,” said Johnny R. Tice, instructor and faculty adviser to the University of Alabama Capstone College of Nursing. “While we know the road to recovery is a long one, it’s our hope that our contribution helps make the journey a little shorter.”
“I am thankful to the University of Alabama for generously reaching out in this time of need,” said Crnko, whose truck was severely damaged and home also flooded. “This gift has given me reassurance that everything is going to be okay.”
“The outreach to our community has been tremendous,” Mincey added. “I am thankful to the University of Alabama for reaching out to Southeastern’s School of Nursing. The love and support from people you don’t know are treasured.”
“The University of Alabama, especially its Student Nursing Association, has shown a true spirit of caring,” said Eileen Creel, head of the Southeastern School of Nursing. “This act of kindness by UA’s Capstone College of Nursing was incredibly uplifting at a difficult time for so many students and faculty. We are very appreciative.”


18 2016-10-12
Baton Rouge

SLU picks 14 for homecoming court


Fourteen Southeastern Louisiana University students on this year's queen and beau courts will reign over Homecoming festivities Oct. 17- 22 in Hammond.

Chosen for the queen court are seniors Taylor Drude, Hammond; Maya Gauthier, Hahnville; Maria Goddard, New Orleans; Cierra Heckmann, Chalmette; Chelsea Loupe, LaPlace; and juniors Maggie Hinson, Denham Springs; and Haley Loyacano, Walker.

Beau court members are seniors Justin Archote, Independence; Justin Bankston, Loranger; Neil Bourgeois, Sorrento; Duncan Martin, Livingston; and Nicholas Wylie, Ponchatoula; and juniors Seth Leto, Amite; and Austin Rogers, Denham Springs.

The 2016 queen and beau, the top junior or senior vote-getters, will be announced at halftime of the Homecoming football game when the Lions take on Houston Baptist at 4 p.m. Homecoming Day, Oct. 22, in Strawberry Stadium.

The court also will participate in Homecoming festivities including Gumbo YaYa on Oct. 19, the bonfire and pep rally on Oct. 20 and the Homecoming Day parade at noon.

For more information about Homecoming events, contact the Alumni Association at (985) 549-2150 or (800) SLU-ALUM, or visit southeastern.edu/homecoming.


18 2016-10-12
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN PLANS HUGE HOMECOMING CELEBRATION NEXT WEEK


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University celebrates Homecoming Week, Oct. 17 – 22 with an abundance of spirited activities capped by tailgating, reunions, a parade and football action in Strawberry Stadium.
With a theme of “Roomie’s Road Trip,” Homecoming 2016 also will feature an myriad of awards and recognitions. Sponsoring this year’s Homecoming festivities are the Tangipahoa Convention and Visitors Bureau and with the Southeastern Student Government Association sponsoring all student-related activities. The week culminates with Homecoming Day Saturday, Oct. 22, when the Lions take on Houston Baptist at 4 p.m.
Homecoming Week will offer a number of time-honored traditions, such as Gumbo YaYa for students, campus and community decorating contests, an alumni art exhibit, and the FeLions’ Homecoming luncheon.
The celebration begins on Monday with Business Week, Oct. 17-20, which features a variety of lectures by specialists in numerous phases of business. The Southeastern Family reunion will cap off the day on Oct. 17 at 7 p.m. in the Student Union Park.
On Tuesday, Oct. 18, the action begins at 2 p.m. when students and faculty battle it out in the Phi Kappa Phi Quiz Bowl in the Student Union Theatre. Next up is the student paint run at 6 p.m. in North Oak Park. The day closes out with a volleyball match vs. McNeese at 7 p.m. in the University Center. Attendees are encouraged to come dressed in their best “Coach Smoot” Hawaiian attire and get tropical for the mid-week match.
On Wednesday, Oct. 19, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., students will enjoy food and fun at Gumbo YaYa, where the 2016 Homecoming court will be introduced to the student body.
Also on tap at 12 p.m. is the annual Lyceum Lights faculty lecture in the Alumni Center, featuring Southeastern Child Welfare Program Coordinator Corie Hebert. Hebert will present “Louisiana Child Welfare Training Academy and Southeastern Louisiana University: The Best Kept Secret on Campus.”


At 3 p.m. that day the Lady Lions will host a softball exhibition at North Oak Park, and the student competition “Minute to Win It” will be held in Strawberry Stadium at 7:30 p.m.
On Thursday, Oct. 20, Gamma Beta Phi will host its “A Ton of Fun Food Drive” from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Student Union Mall with collections benefiting the Student Food Pantry. The FeLions will host their Homecoming luncheon at Trey Yuen at noon. Also at noon is an Alumni Art Lecture by Georgia Polkey in the Contemporary Art Gallery.
Thursday evening kicks into gear with a 6 p.m. Lady Lions Volleyball match versus Incarnate Word in the University Center, and an ROTC Alumni Reunion is scheduled at 7 p.m. at Murphy’s Seafood in Hammond. A bonfire, pep rally and Roar Rally spirit competition sponsored by SGA is scheduled at 6:45 p.m. at Cook Field on North Campus. Spectators can also enjoy music by the Spirit of the Southland Band, followed by a Lip Sync contest for students at 8 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 21, begins with the Homecoming Golf Tournament at Carter Plantation at 1 p.m. Cost of the event is $150 per person or $600 per four-man team. Participants will receive lunch prior to play. All proceeds from the event will benefit Southeastern Golf. For more information, contact Head Coach Jake Narro at 985-549-5186 or jnarro@southeastern.edu.
The Southeastern Pennington Student Activity Center will be offering free workouts for Alumni all day Friday and Saturday.
Also, the Alumni Association will host the annual Alumni Awards Evening, sponsored by Gary and JoAnn Sandifer and family, at 7 p.m. in the Student Union Ballroom. Tickets for the event are available at the Alumni Association, (985) 549-2150 or on line at www2.southeastern.edu/external/alumni_events/alumni_awards. Texas A&M head basketball coach Billy Kennedy will be recognized as Alumnus of the Year, while Zac and Cari Caramonta, owners and operators of Gnarly Barley brewing company, will be honored as the Young Alumni of the Year. In addition, the African-American Alumni Chapter will host its annual Homecoming mixer beginning at 9 p.m. in the Alumni Center.
On Homecoming Day, Oct. 22, the focus shifts to Friendship Circle, where visitors can enjoy tailgating, reunions and entertainment starting at 11:30 a.m. There will be booths manned by area merchants. Activities for children include a variety of crafts, face painting, train rides and inflatables. Attendees are asked to leave pets at home.
Southeastern donors who have endowed scholarships and professorships will be honored at 10 a.m. in the President’s Residence. The campus bookstore will open from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
In addition to football, several sporting events are scheduled Saturday, including a basketball green and gold scrimmage at the University Center at 9:45 a.m. and a softball alumni fall fun game at 10 a.m. in North Oak Park. The Southeastern volleyball team takes on Corpus Christi A&M in the University Center at 12 p.m.
The annual Homecoming parade rolls at 12 p.m. Following the parade, Lion fans can cheer on Head Coach Ron Roberts and his team during the “Lion Walk” as they make their way through Friendship Circle to Strawberry Stadium at 1:30 p.m.
Reunions and tailgating will be hosted by many of the university’s colleges and divisions, as well as by groups such as the Former Football Players, Seventies Black Alumni, ROTC, and Greek organizations. The Alumni Association tailgate will take place in Friendship Circle from 11:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. and is sponsored by the Lion Athletic and Alumni associations, with the Livingston Alumni Chapter hosting the event.
After pre-game activities, the Lions will kick off against Houston Baptist at 4 p.m. The 2016 Homecoming queen and king will be announced and crowned at halftime.
Immediately after the game, the Greater Hammond Chamber of Commerce and the Downtown Development District will host “Railroad Roar,” an evening of dining and entertainment by participating downtown businesses. For more information, call the Greater Hammond Chamber at (985) 345-4457.
For a complete schedule of Homecoming 2016 events, visit www.southeastern.edu/homecoming or call the Alumni Center, 1-800-SLU-ALUM or (985) 549-2150.

18 2016-10-11
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN ANNOUNCES 2016 HOMECOMING COURT, BEAU COURT


HAMMOND – Fourteen Southeastern Louisiana University students have been chosen as members of the 2016 Homecoming queen and beau courts. The seven women and seven men will reign over Homecoming festivities Oct. 17- 22.
Chosen as members of the queen court are seniors Taylor Drude, Hammond; Maya Gauthier, Hahnville; Maria Goddard, New Orleans; Cierra Heckmann, Chalmette; Chelsea Loupe, LaPlace; juniors Maggie Hinson, Denham Springs; and Haley Loyacano, Walker.
Members of the beau court are seniors Justin Archote, Independence; Justin Bankston, Loranger; Neil Bourgeois, Sorrento; Duncan Martin, Livingston; and Nicholas Wylie, Ponchatoula; and juniors Seth Leto, Amite; and Austin Rogers, Denham Springs.
The 2016 queen and beau, the top junior or senior vote-getters in the recent online campus election, will be announced at halftime of the Homecoming football game when the Lions take on Houston Baptist on Homecoming Day, Oct. 22, at 4 p.m. in Strawberry Stadium.
The court also will participate in Homecoming festivities such as Gumbo YaYa on Oct. 19, the bonfire and pep rally on Oct. 20, and the 12 p.m. Homecoming Day parade.
Drude, an integrative biology major, is a member of Alpha Omicron Pi sorority, Division of Student Affairs Ambassadors, Order of Omega, Delta Omega Alpha Pre-Professional Society, Tri Beta Honor Society and Gamma Beta Phi. She is the recipient of the Vice President’s Award of Excellence and the Green ‘S’ Award.
Gauthier majors in communication sciences and disorders. She is a member of Delta Sigma Theta sorority, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, National Society for Collegiate Scholars, and National Student Speech Language and Hearing Association. She is also an Excel Mentor, a member of the Intramural Flag Football Championship Team, Peace and Purpose Mindfulness Organization, and a 2015-16 DSA Ambassador. Gauthier was one of 40 students in the nation selected to participate in the 2016 American Speech Language Hearing Association Minority Student Leadership Program in Philadelphia.
Goddard, a communication major, is a member of PRSSA, where she was the most active member in 2013 and served as community service director from 2013-15. She has been named to the President’s List, is a recipient of the Press Club of New Orleans Scholarship, the Public Relations Society of America Multicultural and Diversity Scholarship, and the freshman honor scholarship. Goddard was part of the team that won awards for the second best college radio station and Best TV Station in the South at the Southeast Journalism Conference.
Heckmann is a kinesiology fitness and human performance major. She is a member of Phi Mu Fraternity and is captain of the nationally ranked Lionettes dance team. She has also been named to the President’s List and is Sweetheart of Kappa Sigma Fraternity.
Loupe, a kinesiology major, is a member of Alpha Omicron Pi, Gamma Beta Phi, Delta Omega Alpha Pre-Professional Society, and Sigma Alpha Lambda National Leadership and Honors Organization. She is also a member of the Biology Undergraduate Society, Society for Collegiate Leadership and Achievement and the Kinesiology and Health Sciences Club. She has been named to the President’s List, Deans’s List and the Thirteen Club.
Hinson is a kinesiology major. She is a member of Alpha Omicron Pi and the National Society of Leadership and Success. She has been named to the President’s List and the Dean’s List.
Loyacano is an elementary education major. She is a member of Alpha Omicron Pi and the Order of Omega. She has served as a Lions Connected Mentor and a 2016 Orientation Leader, where she received the Spirit of Orientation Award.
Archote is a business management major. He is a member of Delta Tau Delta Fraternity, where he serves as president. He is also a College of Business Ambassador and a member of the National Society of Collegiate Scholars. He has received the Outstanding Freshman Male of the Year award, the Greek Man of the Year award, and is a Green ‘S’ Award recipient.
Bankston is a computer science major. He is a member of Kappa Alpha Order, where he serves as president. He is a member of the Order of Omega, the National Society of Collegiate Scholars, Upsilon Pi Epsilon, and is Beau of Alpha Omicron Pi. He is the recipient of the Green ‘S’ Award and was listed in 2016 Who’s Who Among Students in American Colleges and Universities.
Bourgeois, a marketing major, is a member of Pi Kappa Alpha. He is a Student Government Association Senator and Excel Scholar. He served as a 2014 Orientation Leader and a 2015 DSA Leadership Ambassador. He is the recipient of the Green ‘S’ Award and was listed in Who’s Who Among Students in American Colleges and Universities.
Martin is a management major. He is a member of Alpha Psi Omega and has been named to the President’s List. He appeared in Southeastern’s theatre production of “Encore, Encore!” and directed a scene from the play “Raised in Captivity.” Martin is Beau of Gamma Beta Phi.
Wylie, a kinesiology major, is a member of Kappa Sigma Fraternity. He has been named to the President’s List every semester and is a member of the three-time intramural basketball championship team.
Leto is a political science major. He is a member of Delta Tau Delta Fraternity, where he serves as vice-president. He is also a member of the Order of Omega, a DSA Leadership Ambassador, and served as the SGA Senate Appropriations Committee chairman. He was named Outstanding Freshman Male of the Year in 2015 and is the recipient of the Green ‘S’ Award.
Rogers, a marketing and management major, is treasurer and Junior Founding Father of Pi Kappa Alpha at Southeastern. He served as a 2015 Orientation Leader, a DSA Leadership Ambassador and as an SGA senator. He is also a recipient of the Green ‘S’ Award.
For additional information about Southeastern Homecoming events, contact the Alumni Association at (985) 549-2150 or 1-800-SLU-ALUM or visit www.southeastern.edu/homecoming.
PHOTOS:
2016 SOUTHEASTERN HOMECOMING COURT – Seven Southeastern Louisiana University students have been chosen as members of the 2016 Homecoming court and will reign over Homecoming festivities, Oct. 17-22. Members of the queen’s court are, from left, front, Taylor Drude, Maria Goddard and Cierra Heckmann; back, from left, Maya Gauthier, Maggie Hinson, Haley Loyacano, and Chelsea Loupe.

2016 SOUTHEASTERN HOMECOMING BEAU COURT -- Members of Southeastern Louisiana University’s 2016 Homecoming beau court are, from left, front, Neil Bourgeois, Nicholas Wylie and Seth Leto; back, from left, Duncan Martin, Justin Bankston, Justin Archote and Austin Rogers.

18 2016-10-11
Hammond

Alumni: Come home to Southeastern for Homecoming 2016


HAMMOND---Southeastern is celebrating Homecoming 2016 with a week of spirited activities and time-honored traditions on October 17 to 22.
The university community is invited to participate in this week of festivities designed to welcome alumni and friends to campus, including tailgating, reunions, a parade and football action in Strawberry Stadium.
The Homecoming Week schedule will encompass a ton of fun events, celebrating the 2016 theme of “Roomie’s Road Trip.” Favorites like Gumbo YaYa and the annual bonfire for students, Lyceum Lights luncheon for faculty, campus and community decorating contests, as well as reunions for Southeastern alumni, are just a few of the festivities.
On Friday, Oct. 21, the Alumni Association will host the Alumni Awards Evening to recognize 2016 Alumnus of the Year Billy Kennedy, Texas A&M University basketball coach, and the 2016 Young Alumni of the Year Zac and Cari Caramonta, owners and operators of the Hammond-based craft beer brewery Gnarly Barley.
Homecoming culminates on Saturday, Oct. 22 with activities and tailgating for the whole family in Friendship Circle, a parade at noon, and the Homecoming football game at 4 p.m. in Strawberry Stadium. The big reveal happens at halftime, when the 2016 Homecoming Queen and King will be crowned.
Immediately after the game, the Greater Hammond Chamber of Commerce will host “Railroad Roar,” an evening of dining and entertainment by participating downtown businesses.
The 2016 alumni activities are sponsored by Tangipahoa Tourism, and student activities are sponsored by the Student Government Association.

18 2016-10-11
Hammond

GRAD FAIR PREPARES SLU STUDENTS TO GRADUATE


READY TO GRADUATE – Southeastern Louisiana University student Amber Grace of Abita Springs, left, assists senior Michelle Guillot of Slidell in trying on graduation robes at the university’s annual Grad Fair held Oct. 5-6. Sponsored by the Southeastern Alumni Association, Grad Fair gives students the opportunity to order their caps and gowns, invitations, rings and have their graduation photos taken. Southeastern’s graduation ceremonies will be held December 10.


18 2016-10-10
Baton Rouge

Southeastern's art gallery features work by Samantha Burns, Aaron Collier and Silas Munro


HAMMOND — The Southeastern Louisiana University Contemporary Art Gallery will host exhibits from Oct. 13 through Nov. 10 featuring paintings by Aaron Collier, sculpture installations by Samantha Burns and video by Silas Munro.

The exhibits, part of the university’s Fanfare fall festival of the arts, are in the East Stadium gallery. An opening reception will be held from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 13.

The exhibit is free. Gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Thursday; 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday and 8 a.m. to noon Friday. For more information, call (985) 549-5080.


18 2016-10-10
Baton Rouge

Believe In Girls: Girl Scouts kick off new year of Scouting


HAMMOND — Approximately 1,000 Girl Scouts, their leaders and parents gathered on the campus of Southeastern Louisiana University on Saturday, Sept. 24, for the annual Believe In Girls event that signals the start of a new year of Scouting for young girls who are members of troops from 23 parishes in southeast Louisiana.

Participants in the BIG gathering could choose from scores of demonstrations and classes covering a wide variety of topics of interest to participants in Girl Scout groups. Representatives of numerous governmental agencies and private businesses manned booths and classrooms to provide Girl Scouts with many and varied learning experiences.

Keynote speaker for the event, Helena Moreno, state representative for District 61 in New Orleans, told the large crowd of girls and their mentors gathered in a grassy area near the University Center, that they should seek to establish their own identity and take pride in being a girl. Moreno, a former television journalist, recounted her experiences in eventually finding a career first in broadcast journalism and then as an elected state official.

“When I decided to run for the Legislature, I was told that I didn’t have a chance," Moreno said. "Well, I lost the first time I ran, but I’ve been elected three times since. When you have a dream, you have to keep working to see it come true. Be proud that you are a girl and keep telling yourself that you can accomplish whatever you want if your work hard enough at it.”

Moreno built her remarks around the word “STRIVE.” Those letters, she told the Girl Scouts, stand for: Significant, Tenacity, Respect for Yourself, Integrity, Vision and Education. Moreno said the Louisiana Legislative Women’s Caucus Foundation printed a sufficient number of sheets with the “STRIVE” message on it for each girl to take home and “put it on your wall so that you will see this message every day.”

Jasmine Hunter, communications specialist for Girl Scouts Louisiana East, said the BIG event was the most important gathering of the year for all who are involved in Girl Scouting. “While we have programs throughout the year, much of our activity is centered around the school year so it is only appropriate that we get the Girl Scout year off to a big, special event in September which is the Believe In Girls day. We have so many things for the girls to experience here today that they cannot possibly do everything … but there is something for everyone here and we know the scouts here today will enjoy what we have for them.”

Hunter said the many activities generally centered around the different initiatives that are core to the Girl Scouts: healthy living, financial literacy, an emphasis on science, technology, engineering and mathematics, sports and arts and culture.

“Scouting is still very relevant for girls today. We are trying to reach out to girls with programs that they are interested in and that they enjoy pursuing," she said of the scouting experience in today's world. "We ask them to put down their telephones and to get outside of the usual routine and develop skills that will make their lives richer and more fulfilling and prepare them for leadership roles in the future.”

Hunter explained that Louisiana Girl Scouts East has internal and external development and recruiting teams that work with the schools and local organization to build troops. “Our hope is to have a Girl Scout troop in every region and town so that young ladies can experience the joy and benefits of Scouting,” she said.

Marianne Addy, chief marketing and communications officer for Louisiana Girl Scouts East said about 14,000 girls are participating in the 23 parishes in the region.

Addy said the recent flooding in the area had directly affected about 16 percent of the Girl Scout troops in Louisiana Girl Scouts East. She explained that donations are being raised across the nation to help those troops that were affected by the flood. She said donations were being taken at the BIG event to help those troops purchase new uniforms. A tent was set up at the BIG event where pet food and supplies were being collected to assist four area animal shelters that are still harboring animals displaced by the disaster.

The Girl Scouting experience is available to all ages, Hunter said, as she outlined the six levels of scouting in which girls can participate: Daisy, kindergarten through first grade; Brownies, second and third grades; Juniors, fourth and fifth grades; Cadets, sixth through eighth grades, Seniors, ninth and tenth grades; and Ambassadors, high school juniors and seniors.

At the center of the day’s activities were special demonstrations at the Main Stage. These included presentations by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory in Livingston Parish, Dow Chemical, Oschner Medical Center's health care career panel, the Delgado College STEM Camp’s Kitchen Chemistry and the Tangipahoa Parish Sheriff’s Office K9 Division.

SLU’s cheerleaders and members of the university’s varsity athletic teams participated in the event serving as guides and entertainers. All attendees were invited to watch the Southeastern volleyball team take on conference foe Houston Baptist at 1 p.m. in the University Center. A scavenger hunt was among the day’s activities along with hula-hooping, giant bubble making and other interactive games.

Rebecca Troulliet, a graduate student in the health professions, said she was enjoying interacting with the Girl Scouts. “I love to volunteer, and this is a great way to reach out to these young girls and encourage them to consider a career in the sciences. They are all so happy and having so much fun … those smiles make it all worthwhile,” she said.

Addy judged the day to be a big success. She said that the BIG event had attracted more exhibitors and programs than at past events and that the response of the many Girl Scout troops in Girl Scouts Louisiana East had been rewarding. She finished by observing, “Oh yes … and the weather is great! After what so many people have been through in this area lately it’s wonderful to be here on a day blessed with sunshine and all these wonderful young women who are looking forward to another successful year of Scouting.”
18 2016-10-10
Hammond

SLU STUDENTS PRESENT WINNING STUDY AT NATIONAL BANKING CONFERENCE


HAMMOND – Students from Southeastern Louisiana University’s College of Business highlighted the opening day of the recent Community Banking in the 21st Century Research and Policy Conference with a presentation of their award-winning study of Hammond-based First Guaranty Bank.

The four students were recognized in St. Louis as the first-place national winners of the competition conducted by the Washington, DC-based Conference of State Bank Supervisors, a nationwide organization of banking regulators from all states and U.S. territories. In all, 23 student teams from various universities participated in the competition.

The competition allowed students to learn more about banking by partnering student teams with local banks to conduct original case studies, said Danielle Lewis, the Joyce Junghans professor of finance who served as faculty adviser for the team.

In the conference’s opening remarks, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis President and Chief Executive Officer James Bullard, remarked, “From what I can tell from the winning case study paper prepared by students from Southeastern Louisiana University and from the incredible personal stories of the students on the team, they just might steal the show at this year’s conference. The work of these students and of all the students in the competition shows how a single community bank has impacted its community and region.”

Jerome Powell, who took office as a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System in 2012, said the Southeastern winners of the case study competition are impressive and accomplished young men and women who are just preparing to embark on their careers, and that he expected to hear more from them in the future.

Lewis said the students received considerable praise from bank CEOs, bank regulators and academics attending the conference who commented on the depth and quality of research the four students performed. A video of the presentation can be found on the CSBS website at http://www.cvent.com/events/csbs-community-bank-case-study-competition/event-summary-5bcbfe47e8e9499fa801055bba172a51.aspx.

The Southeastern team included Nicholas Byrd of Denham Springs, a senior finance major who is considering pursuing a graduate degree possibly in economics; Tarez Arceneaux Cowsar of Springfield, a senior at Southeastern, who anticipates sitting for the CPA exam after graduation in 2017; Joseph Edwards of Monroe, who is currently pursuing a master of science degree in finance; and Andrea Villarreal of Mexico, an academic All-American in Women’s Tennis, who is pursuing a professional career in tennis and resides in her home of Monterrey, Mexico. Each student received a $1,000 scholarship award.

First Guaranty Bank partnered with the team and provided banking data to help construct the report. The students worked on the course project as part of the Real-World Ready course initiative to incorporate more hands-on, experiential learning into students’ curriculum campus-wide.

“If it were not for FGB’s willingness to be transparent with data, we could not have worked on so many quantitative models that were used in the report,” Lewis said. “The loan level data made all the difference.”

She said the final 25-page report and accompanying 10-minute video were helpful to the bank, showing that FGB had an approximate $1 billion dollar economic impact from 21 branches located in multiple areas throughout Louisiana.

FGB President and Chief Executive Officer Alton Lewis, praised the work of the students, noting that, in addition to being full time students, they participated in university athletics or held jobs while working on the demanding study.

“We are so proud of our students and Dr. Lewis for the excellent work they did in this competition and for the national attention they have brought to Southeastern’s business program,” said Antoinette Phillips, interim dean of the College of Business.

18 2016-10-10
Hammond

Southeastern Salute


Cris Cochran, Southeastern Louisiana University catering director, was one of the many people who were stranded on I-12 during the August flood.
She was westbound in a stretch of cars between Robert and Hammond for nearly seven hours.
About half a mile in, the water crept over the roadway and began rushing, she said, but she was eventually able to safely make it to the other side onto dry land.
She knew then that something had to be done for the first responders who helped her and other countless people during the flood.
"There were lots of first responders who were there to help us," Cochran said. "When you see your life flash before your eyes and you see people who are willing to risk theirs to save you from a terribly dangerous situation, it just makes you know that you have to do something for them."
On Saturday, Southeastern partnered with Aramark Food and the Tangipahoa Parish President's Office to host Southeastern Salute, a tailgate for all first responders and their families in Tanipahoa Parish.
I think this is a great thing, to pay first responders back," said Jerry Wrinkles, Hammond Rural Fire Department operator. "It's not very often that as a first responder people thank us. We're not thought about until we are actually needed. For Southeastern to put on something like this, it's really amazing for them to thank us for helping them."
Cochran said the event has been a work in progress since the flood with lots of brainstorming and planning, but the time spent to make the event happen was more than worth it in the end. The first 250 first responders and family members who arrived were given tickets to Saturday's game. They were also invited onto the field pregame to make a human tunnel for the football players to run through.
Barbecued pulled pork, baked beans, coleslaw, banana pudding and refreshments were served at the tailgate. Corn hole games, inflatables and other outdoors activities were available.
"We're just very thankful for them, for everything they do," Cochran said of the first responders. "We don't show our appreciation enough."

18 2016-10-07
Baton Rouge

Hammond Horror Festival returns for a sixth year of terror Oct. 14-16


Scares aplenty await those brave enough to attend the sixth annual Hammond Horror Festival, event organizers said.

Scheduled for Oct. 14-16 in and around downtown Hammond, the festival will feature activities including a masquerade showcase, screenings of independent horror films and an original theatrical performance.

This year, it also functions as a fundraising opportunity for the American Cancer Society’s Tangipahoa Relay for Life and for donations to aid in flood recovery efforts.

The festivities are under the artistic direction of Taylor McLellan and James Winter, who created the concept as a way for local artists to get their work shown and to offer alternative entertainment in the community.

“The goal is to give the community a unique experience,” McLellan said. “Hammond should come out to support the local art scene, and be entertained by something more than your iPhone.”

The first night features “A Macabre Showcase” at the Gnarly Barley Brewing Company, 1709 Corbin Road, from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. Costumes are encouraged but not required. Tickets will be available at the door for $20 per person. The showcase replaces the masquerade ball of years past. Also gone this year is the zombie fashion show.

The showcase includes a performance by the La LA Tribal Belly Dance Troupe in honor of the 30th anniversary of the film “Labyrinth,” along with added performances by Lightwire Theatre and the Wicked Little Voodoo Dolls, a news release said. It also will feature a horror-themed local arts market.

The second day of the festival includes the theatrical production “7 Tales from the Labyrinth,” a series of seven 10-minute plays written, designed and directed all within the span of one day. It is sponsored by the Southeastern Louisiana University campus theater honor society Alpha Psi Omega. The theme for the theater festival this year will be based on the idea of a labyrinth, the release said.

Tickets for “7 Tales from the Labyrinth” are $7 each at the Pottle Auditorium on the university’s main campus. The box office opens at 7 p.m. and the show begins at 8 p.m.

Visit hammondhorrorfest.org for details.


18 2016-10-07
Hammond

Fanfare goes back in time to punk rock


There was no head banging in Southeastern Louisiana University's Pottle Auditorium Wednesday, but a lecture on 1980s punk rock resurrected the moment in music history when punk rockers created a community of their own.
Reminiscing on his days touring with punk rock bands and living in the communal homes that brought musicians and fans together, professor Ralph Wood told the audience that punk rock in the 1980s thrived in a tight-knit, do-it-yourself world built for misfits who did not quite fit in.
Wood was a member of several punk rock bands and still plays punk music on Sundays with friends. He is the assistant dean of the College of Nursing and Health Science, professor of health studies and drummer for the band Impaired Faculties, made up of SLU faculty members.
His lecture on 1980s punk rock was part of the university's annual art festival, Fanfare.
Growing up, he said he always felt like a bit of an outsider. When he arrived at Southern Illinois University, he was introduced to the punk scene, with its emphasis on artistic freedom and rebellion from the mainstream.
"This is more than music," he said.
One of the punk groups Wood has been a member of was called Finger Cuff, a group formed with a graduate student at SLU. The group has since been renamed but still gets together to play weekly just for fun.
The lecture had ended with a clip of "Smells Like Teen Spirit" by Nirvana, a band that Wood said was one of many groups influenced by 1980s punk.
During that decade, punk bands would tour in their own vans, promote their own music and get their music heard through independent labels and college radio stations. Without college radio stations in particular, punk rock bands would have had a hard time getting their music to the public, he said.
"There was a time when none of that was on the radio," he said.
There was a DIY feeling to punk music that did not get mainstream recognition until later. Punk rockers played and stayed in punk houses where there was no separation between the fans and their beloved musicians and their outsider music was welcomed with open arms, he said.
"This is where the community happened," he said.
The famed Lost Cross punk house near Southern Illinois University recently celebrated its anniversary with a big reunion. Wood said, unfortunately, he could not make it to the place where he formed a lot of fond memories.
Influential bands that made their marks on the genre included Black Flag, Dischord and the Replacements, which Wood said should have been a lot more successful but had a tendency to sabotage itself. After performing on Saturday Night Live, the Replacements were banned from the show, he said.
"They should have been huge," he said.
It was not until the late 1980s or early 1990s that punk broke into the mainstream market, with major record labels signing some punk bands, such as Husker Du. The store Hot Topic opened its doors at the end of the decade, introducing many to the punk aesthetic, he said.
Then there was the creation of Lollapalooza in the early 1990s, which featured a lot of punk bands. Wood said it is good that punk gained a wider audience, as the genre still has the same attitude and the same kind of musicians who love to play it "loud and fast."
"For me punk rock is as true a music as you can find," he said.

18 2016-10-07
Hammond

Local economy predicted to be steady in 2017-18


Southeastern Louisiana University and North Oaks Health System are the big drivers for the Hammond area's economy, which has remained relatively flat over recent years, according to economist Loren Scott.
Scott, LSU professor emeritus of economics, presented his outlook for 2017 and 2018 at a luncheon Tuesday sponsored by the Hammond Chamber of Commerce at the Events Center. His presentation included a graph that showed the area experienced major growth in 1990-2007 but stagnation that started in 2008. And, he said, there appears to be no signs the stagnation will change in the next two years.


;
The Hammond metropolitan statistical area, the newest MSA for the state, has experienced a steady economy for the past eight or so years, caused mostly by lower enrollment at SLU and a stable workforce at North Oaks, he told the crowd.
He does not expect major changes for the area's two largest employers over the next few years. Researchers predict a growth of 100 new jobs a year for the Hammond MSA or 0.2 percent, he said.
"There are no major capital projects or employment spurts planned at North Oaks. While budgeted expenditures at SLU are up 0.9 percent this fall, the state budget is in such a bind that administrators have to plan for the very real possibility of mid-year budget cuts. No spike in enrollments at SLU is expected," his report stated.
Some positives researchers pointed to were the 70 new jobs expected at the Walmart Distribution Center in Robert and the move of Brown's Dairy from New Orleans to Tangipahoa that is expected to bring 186 jobs. Also, the state has announced more road projects for the region compared to last year. Planned are $30.1 million in road projects over 2017 and 2018, as well as $24.9 million for other public infrastructure projects in the region.
These gains are tempered by the 81 layoffs at Garden City Group, a legal administrative services firm in Hammond, and the layoffs expected at Bradken, the steel foundry in Amite, he said.
While the flood caused devastation for many, Scott said the construction sector will benefit from the rebuilding of flooded homes and businesses. The question is "where are we going to end up after all this," particularly since most of the flooded homes in Tangipahoa Parish were not covered by flood insurance, he said.
The region will need more aid from the federal government to permanently rebuild communities, similar to the Road Home Program after Hurricane Katrina, he said. Gov. John Bel Edwards is working on pushing Congress to provide more aid.
"He's trying very hard to get that money up," Scott said.
Scott does not believe rebuilding after major flooding across the region will be as difficult or take as long as the recovery from Hurricane Katrina when people had homes underwater for weeks. Southeastern and many businesses here were able to reopen relatively soon after the flood, he said.
The economist said Hammond MSA is not as dependent on the oil industry as are other areas of Louisiana and was not as impacted by the recession of 2008.
The third largest employer in the Hammond MSA is North Lake Division Evergreen Life Services, which serves residents with disabilities and is run by the Evergreen Presbyterian Ministries for the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals.
With North Oaks, SLU and North Lake Division as the major employers, health care and education play a prominent role in the local economy while manufactoring is not as big a factor, the report states. For Hammond MSA, health care represents 22.1 percent of employment, compared to the 15.3 percent on the state level, and educational services represent 11.8 percent locally compared to 8.7 percent on the state level. Manufacturing represents 3.8 percent for the area.
Regarding the state's outlook, Scott said the price for oil per barrel is expected to go up in 2017 and 2018. The average price in 2016 is $42 and is expected to be $53 in 2017 and $60 in 2018.
"Though enormous uncertainty requires us to place a $30 to $90 a barrel range around those forecasts," his report states.
Next year, the state is expected to lose 700 jobs due to trouble in the oil exploration field. In 2018, the state economy is expected to see growth in other sectors, bringing 13,700 or 0.7 percent growth statewide.

18 2016-10-07
New Orleans

Initial look at higher ed initiative raises concern


The new initiative for higher education that the Louisiana Board of Regents has begun was a topic of concern for some attending Southeastern Louisiana University's Faculty Senate meeting Wednesday.
The board adopted Elevate Louisiana in December 2015 as part of a response to the "new reality for higher education." The Faculty Senate's budget committee was assigned to research the initiative to see what it means for Southeastern specifically.



;
Budget Chairman Kurt Corbello, political scientist at SLU, said what he has gleaned so far from information about Elevate Louisiana is causing him concern.
"Reading between the lines, it can be alarming," he said after the meeting.
Corbello said he is concerned by the initiative's focus on getting more students graduating with degrees for in-demand fields, as college should be about more than getting a high-paying job. The initiative also appears to pass responsibility of reorganizing higher education onto universities, he said.
Faculty Senate President Dayne Sherman said he would like the faculty body to have a resolution on its view of Elevate Louisiana by the start of the spring semester when the legislative session will begin.
The board of regents came up with its master plan for higher education in 2011 that tries to adjust to the reality of higher education after institutions have experienced years of cuts to their state aid.
It is based on the following principals: undergraduate education is essential for the state's economy, access to graduate programs should be re-evaluated from a narrower statewide perspective, resources are needed for essential research at selected institutions and post-secondary educational resources should be used to meet the workforce needs of a region.
The board sought input from the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems, creating seven parameters for its proposed actions: revise existing role, scope and mission statements at universities, adopt a policy on merging institutions, develop a warning system for financial stress at institutions, revise the regent's policy on low-completer review to elevate the threshold for review, do statewide and regional reviews of all graduate programs and targeted undergraduate programs and review degree program requirements and available courses to encourage structured degree pathways.
The reviews of degree programs will look at determining the roles and purposes of graduate programs, minimizing duplication of programs without limiting access and getting an appropriate mix of programs at each institution.
Faculty senators discussed whether to pass a resolution stating its view on Elevate Louisiana, but first more research on the initiative is needed, Corbello said.
"I still have to dig deeper," he said.

18 2016-10-06
Baton Rouge

Southeastern Louisiana University faculty member receives industry award


Southeastern Louisiana University’s Lu Yuan recently received the Craft Workforce Development Champion Award from the Greater Baton Rouge Industry Alliance at its ninth annual Craft Workforce Development Excellence Awards banquet in Baton Rouge.

Yuan, a certified safety professional, was recognized for academic leadership in the field. He also is the interim head of the university’s Department of Computer Science and Industrial Technology.

Yuan was nominated for the award by Chris Newton, coordinator of workforce development at Cajun Industries, a news release said.

“Dr. Yuan and the faculty in Southeastern’s Occupational Safety, Health and Environment program are a step above others in providing training for careers in the demanding field of safety,” Newton said.

Last year, Yuan received the Outstanding Safety Educator Award from the American Society of Safety Engineers.

Yuan said that as the state continues to expand its focus on development of industry, the need for professionals in the field will only increase, the release said.

The university’s occupational safety, health and environment program is one of 26 programs nationwide to award the Graduate Safety Practitioner Designation from the Board of Certified Safety Professionals and is accredited by the Applied Science Accreditation Commission of ABET.

The Greater Baton Rouge Industry Alliance is a 60-facility nonprofit trade association that seeks solutions to common issues with a focus on safety performance and workforce development.


18 2016-10-06
Baton Rouge

Southeastern Dance to present "Bayourella: A Story of Forgiveness"


HAMMOND — Southeastern Louisiana University’s resident student dance company, Dance Performance Project, will present “Bayourella: A Story of Forgiveness” as part of Fanfare, the university’s annual October arts festival.

Performances are at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 5–7 in Vonnie Borden Theatre located in D Vickers Hall on campus, where $5 tickets will be available before each performance.

The production, directed by dance instructor Skip Costa, will include original music performed live, original costume designs and a set that includes a 25-foot dock over the bayou.

For more information, contact dance coordinator Martie Fellom at martie.fellom@southeastern.edu.
18 2016-10-06
Hammond

Initial look at higher ed initiative raises concern


The new initiative for higher education that the Louisiana Board of Regents has begun was a topic of concern for some attending Southeastern Louisiana University's Faculty Senate meeting Wednesday.
The board adopted Elevate Louisiana in December 2015 as part of a response to the "new reality for higher education." The Faculty Senate's budget committee was assigned to research the initiative to see what it means for Southeastern specifically.


;
Budget Chairman Kurt Corbello, political scientist at SLU, said what he has gleaned so far from information about Elevate Louisiana is causing him concern.
"Reading between the lines, it can be alarming," he said after the meeting.
Corbello said he is concerned by the initiative's focus on getting more students graduating with degrees for in-demand fields, as college should be about more than getting a high-paying job. The initiative also appears to pass responsibility of reorganizing higher education onto universities, he said.
Faculty Senate President Dayne Sherman said he would like the faculty body to have a resolution on its view of Elevate Louisiana by the start of the spring semester when the legislative session will begin.
The board of regents came up with its master plan for higher education in 2011 that tries to adjust to the reality of higher education after institutions have experienced years of cuts to their state aid.
It is based on the following principals: undergraduate education is essential for the state's economy, access to graduate programs should be re-evaluated from a narrower statewide perspective, resources are needed for essential research at selected institutions and post-secondary educational resources should be used to meet the workforce needs of a region.
The board sought input from the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems, creating seven parameters for its proposed actions: revise existing role, scope and mission statements at universities, adopt a policy on merging institutions, develop a warning system for financial stress at institutions, revise the regent's policy on low-completer review to elevate the threshold for review, do statewide and regional reviews of all graduate programs and targeted undergraduate programs and review degree program requirements and available courses to encourage structured degree pathways.
The reviews of degree programs will look at determining the roles and purposes of graduate programs, minimizing duplication of programs without limiting access and getting an appropriate mix of programs at each institution.
Faculty senators discussed whether to pass a resolution stating its view on Elevate Louisiana, but first more research on the initiative is needed, Corbello said.
"I still have to dig deeper," he said.
18 2016-10-05
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN SBDC HOSTS GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING WORKSHOP


HAMMOND – The Louisiana Small Business Development Center at Southeastern Louisiana University is hosting a government contracting course in Walker on Thursday, Oct. 6.
Co-sponsored by Louisiana Procurement Technical Assistance Center (PTAC), Livingston Economic Development Council, and Dixie Business Center, the free course will take place from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Livingston Parish Literacy and Technology Center, located at 9261 Florida Blvd.
Deputy District Director of the U.S. Small Business Administration Jo Lawrence will serve as speaker for the course.
According to SBDC Assistant Director Sandy Summers, the System for Award Management (SAM) is the primary database for vendors doing business with the federal government. The registration is often referred to as “self-certifying” a small business. Federal Acquisitions Regulations require all prospective vendors to be registered in SAM prior to the award of a contract, basic agreement, basic ordering agreement, or blanket purchase agreement.
Summers said SAM is also a marketing tool to businesses. It allows government agancies and contractors to search for a company based on its ability, size, location, experience, ownership and more.
“The goal of this workshop is to walk participants through completion of their SAM registration. For those who were registered in Central Contractor Registration (CCR), assistance will be provided in migrating their legacy CCR account,” said Summers. “All contractors wishing to do business with most all federal agencies are required to register in the SAM. This is done by first creating an account. The registration must then be renewed and/or updated annually. It is very important that the information entered into SAM be accurate, detailed, current and complete.”
Summers said participants can bring their laptops or work from computers provided.
To complete the SAM registration, participants will need the following:
-- A company D&B (Dun and Bradstreet) DUNS number.
-- A company Tax Identification Number (TIN) / Employer Identification Number (EIN).
-- A company Commercial and Government Entity Code (CAGE Code). The CAGE Code is a five-character ID number used extensively within the federal government, assigned by the Department of Defense’s Defense Logistics Agency (DLA). The CAGE code is used to support a variety of mechanized systems through the government and provides a standardized method of identifying a given facility at a specific location.
-- Banking information. Participants will need an ABA routing number for their bank; account number and type, or lockbox number; automated clearing house (ACH) point of contact; remittance point of contact; and accounts receivable point of contact
-- Statistical Information. Participants need to be able to provide receipts from their firm including average annual receipts for the past three years,; the number of employees at the firm; and the average number of persons employed for each pay period.
Summer said at the end of SAM registration there will be an opportunity to “Register or Update Your SBA Profile.”
“This is a separate data base from the SAM database and a place where all small business firms want to be sure and get registered,” she said. “SBA’s Dynamic Small Business Search (DSBS) is a site that most all Federal Contracting Activities as well as Large Business Prime Contractors use for market research when looking for a particular small business firm or sector of small business firms when making decisions on whether or not to use small business set asides. Be sure to complete this section in full detail to include the ‘Capabilities Narrative.’”
Although the seminar is free, pre-registration is required due to limited seating available.
For more information on the course or the requirements, call 985-549-3831. Registration is available on line at www.lsbdc.org.

18 2016-09-30
Hammond

ENROLLMENT STEADY: AS REGION RECOVERS, SO DOES SOUTHEASTERN


HAMMOND - As the university with the largest percentage of students from areas impacted by recent flooding, the uncertainty of so many variables for so many Southeastern Louisiana University students, faculty and staff in mid-August was incalculable. Compounding the unknown factors was the fact that the flooding ensued less than a week before the scheduled start of classes for the fall semester.

"As a regional university, many of Southeastern's students hail from the parishes that were hardest hit by the flooding," said President John L. Crain. "Almost half of our students call four of the most impacted parishes
home - Ascension, East Baton Rouge, Livingston and Tangipahoa.”

Thankfully, the campus and immediate surrounding communities remained largely unscathed but the flooding wreaked havoc on the usual timeline for the fall semester, and the start of classes was eventually pushed back from Aug. 17 to Aug. 22, said Crain.

Faculty and staff volunteered to launch and man a phone bank in the Admissions Communications Center while a myriad of additional communication efforts were employed to reach out to students whose statuses remained unknown or who had indicated via an online semester intent form that they needed special assistance.

"First we wanted to let our students know we were thankful to have reached them and that they were safe. And then we wanted to assure them that Southeastern would help them however possible," said Crain.

In all, more than 5,000 calls were made. Deadlines for financial aid, course selection and payment of fees were extended. Additional payment options were made available. Special consideration was given to those unable to move into residence halls prior to the start of classes or attend the first days of class. Textbook Rental replaced nearly 200 textbooks that were lost or damaged in the flood free of charge for students. Parking passes and Southeastern IDs were also re-issued at no cost. In addition, over 100 alumni received re-prints of diplomas.

"Faculty and staff expended extraordinary effort," Crain said. "Some were making calls and helping make accommodations for students even while they were waiting for water to recede in their own houses. It is times like this that the Southeastern Family truly pulls together, and I am humbled to work alongside them.”

Beyond the more technical but necessary items such as adjustments to the academic calendar and the corresponding changes needed to meet financial aid disbursement regulations, members of the university also stepped up to volunteer their personal time and energy to assist with clean-up efforts. Students and student-athletes proved to be "Lion Strong," volunteering well over 1,000 hours of service to help with recovery efforts throughout our region. They helped rip out sheetrock, move water-logged furnishings, and whatever else needed to be done in well over 100 homes.

Likewise, many faculty and staff helped friends and neighbors with recovery efforts and have donated money and supplies for disaster relief assistance. The Southeastern Food Pantry, which usually serves only the student population, opened its doors to families of students and those in the community in need of provisions.

The Lion Ride Share program was conceived and implemented online in order to help commuting students, faculty and staff members who lost vehicles in the flooding. Additionally, the Southeastern Foundation established a Disaster Relief Fund to assist in meeting the short term needs of as many students, faculty, and staff as possible. Staff secured a grant from the Northshore Community Foundation to supplement the funds donated by individuals.

One student who received grant funding wrote the following as a thank you:
"In August of 2016, the month I started my first semester of college, my home was flooded. I lost personal belongings, including clothes, shoes, pictures of me and loved ones who are no longer with us, etc. To be part of a wonderful university that was able to collect money for students like me warms my heart. I cannot thank you enough for your generosity. This truly means so much to me."

Nearly 200 grants have been provided thus far to assist those needing help as they continue to work toward recovery. As the region embarks on the more long-term phases of recovery, students are urged to take advantage of the services available to them free of charge through the University Counseling Center. Counselors are available for sessions with those who may be feeling overwhelmed by flood-related issues, especially now that the initial shock of the natural disaster has passed. Students may access the center in the Student Union Annex or call (985)549-3894 to make appointments.

"I am tremendously proud of our campus community members who went above and beyond in the aftermath of the flooding," said Crain. "There is no doubt their efforts made a difference in the lives of those impacted and led to our strong fall enrollment despite the enormous uncertainties and obstacles faced at the outset.”

Southeastern Louisiana University's fall enrollment of new freshmen increased, rising 14.4 percent. Prior to the flooding, Southeastern was anticipating its largest freshman class in recent history, Crain said. Of note is an accompanying increase in ACT composite scores among that freshman class (now 22.3 compared to 21.9 last year) , which translates into more students who are better prepared to succeed in a university setting. Fall total enrollment headcount is 14,499, roughly the same as last year's.

Enrollment officers and counselors at Southeastern report the vast majority of students who were unable to enroll this fall indicate they plan to sit out one or two semesters with the intent of eventually re-enrolling, according to Lori Fairburn, Director of Enrollment Services

"We are working with them every way possible to help them continue their higher education and will welcome them to campus as soon as they are able to return," Fairburn said.

Also showing enrollment gains this fall is Connect to Success, the admissions bridge program that now boasts approximately 649 students, the highest in the program's five-year history. The partnership between Southeastern and Northshore Technical Community College provides post-secondary educational opportunities for students in the region who are seeking admission to the university but don't yet meet admission criteria. NTCC students participating in the program take their courses on the Southeastern campus, and have access to its library, Student Union, and other amenities and services.

Continuing to serve its mission as a regional university, the top feeder parishes to the university remained consistent, with 3,263 students from St. Tammany Parish and 1,957 from Tangipahoa Parish. Other parishes sending high numbers of students to Southeastern include East Baton Rouge, 1,830; Livingston, 1,562; Jefferson, 1,288, and Ascension, 1,261.

18 2016-09-29
Hammond

ST.TAMMANY PARTNERS WITH SOUTHEASTERN TO TEST FLOATING MARSH


Southeastern Louisiana University biological sciences graduate student Zachary Leggett ties plants to a floating platform he constructed that will serve as a floating marshland to help clean stormwater contamination in the Del Sol subdivision in St. Tammany Parish.

ST. TAMMANY PARISH PARTNERS WITH SOUTHEASTERN, COMITE RESOURCES TO TEST EXPERIMENTAL FLOATING MARSHLAND
A relatively low-tech method of imitating a natural marshland was implemented to help clean freshwater ponds contaminated by stormwater runoff. This research is being funded by St. Tammany Parish Government in cooperation with scientists at Southeastern Louisiana University and the wetlands assimilation company Comite Resources, Inc.
The effort is intended to improve water quality throughout St. Tammany through several water quality initiatives. Included is a project in the Del Sol subdivision of Covington that utilizes an innovative, yet relatively low-tech method of imitating a natural marshland that will help to clean freshwater ponds contaminated by stormwater runoff.
The $222,000 pilot project is a component of the newly initiated St. Tammany Parish stormwater management plan, a project that was launched to help the parish determine the most efficient and effective methods to retrofit other stormwater retention ponds, turning them into water quality enhancers, according to parish officials.
“Improving water quality and our environment in the parish are crucial,” said St. Tammany Parish President Pat Brister. “As we continue to research and implement the latest, most effective strategies to address pollution and stormwater runoff problems, we will continue to make great strides in improving the overall quality of our water throughout the entire community. Success will also make this pilot project replicable throughout St. Tammany and mimicked throughout the country.”
The project is being funded by the parish and implemented by Southeastern Louisiana University wetlands expert and Professor of Biological Sciences Gary Shaffer and graduate student Zach Leggett, who are working with Racheal Hunter of Comite Resources, Inc. based in Zachary, La.
Rainwater runoff enters the Del Sol pond from three directions, carrying with it sediment, oils, tar, fertilizers and herbicides that accumulate in the subdivision’s watershed and contaminate the pond.
Leggett and Shaffer are evaluating the cleaning effects of a man-made floating marsh in the eight-acre pond. Leggett’s hands-on project is the focus of his master’s thesis at Southeastern.
“The floating plants take out the excess nutrients and turbidity, or cloudiness, in the water, including fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides and other materials that can be harmful to water quality,” Leggett said.
In the fall, Leggett and his team constructed a star-shaped, eight-armed frame of PVC piping with four-foot wide vinyl coated crab wire between the piping that acts as a platform and serves as a supporting structure for marsh plants, such as maidencane, arrowhead and spider lily. The plants attached to the netting, serve as a natural filtering mechanisms for the pond water. The predominant water plant used in the structure is maidencane, an inexpensive plant that is easily propagated in the university’s greenhouses before being transplanted into the frame.
“The maidencane roots are full of gas, so the plants tend to float on top; this makes it ideal for this kind of structure,” explained Shaffer. “Maidencane is a good plant for this purpose; the roots grow about 20 inches deep and suck up the excess nutrients in the water and help clean the pond. As an added benefit, the structure also becomes a huge refuge for small fish and other species.”
While water quality tests are only in the early stages, Shaffer said the pond has become much clearer with a huge reduction in turbidity, or cloudiness. In addition, he said, the frames are full of minnows and juvenile fish, which greatly improves the ecosystem function of the pond.
“We expect the turbidity and nutrient levels at the site will be significantly reduced, which means we would be successful in our efforts to remove the contaminants and clear the water,” said Leggett. “And it would tell us whether maidencane is the ideal plant for this process.”
Hundreds of ponds in St. Tammany Parish are in need of water quality improvement, according to Parish officials. The Parish’s floating marshlands project, if successful, will play a significant and relatively inexpensive role in improving water quality. “
The research project and its final report are expected to be completed in 2017 after the plants have completely covered the platform.
Members of the Water Environment Federation, a not-for-profit technical and educational organization representing water quality professionals around the world, toured the natural marshland site in the Del Sol neighborhood on Tuesday (Sept. 27). The professionals were in New Orleans for the Water Environment Federation Technical Exhibition and Conference during the week of September 24-28, 2016, and visited the site to learn about best management practices that are being applied to existing stormwater ponds. Registrants who participated in the tour were from throughout the United States, as well as Singapore and Mexico.

18 2016-09-29
Hammond

Southeastern ranked 58th national in recent study of financial aid


Southeastern Louisiana University has been ranked 58th nationally among the best colleges for university-provided part-time student employment.
The study was published in the newsletter "Student Loan Report" using information compiled by Peterson's Financial Aid Data. Southeastern was listed among the top 250 colleges and universities in the nation for its student part-time employment record.


;
According to the study, Southeastern provides approximately 1,093 on-campus jobs for students who are not affiliated with the Federal Work Study program. Only three Louisiana institutions made the list.
"Providing part-time employment for students benefits both the students and the university," said Lori Fairburn, director of Enrollment Services. "The students gain exposure to a professional work environment and learn valuable lessons in time management, multi-tasking, project planning and more, while earning money to help pay for typical college expenses. The institution gains the benefits of having additional part-time workers on the staff to augment operations of the office."
"Student Loan Report" is an online newsletter that provides information to college students and parents regarding news, issues and studies on student loans and student debt. The report can be found on the web at studentloans.net.

18 2016-09-29
Hammond

Government contracting course scheduled


The Louisiana Small Business Development Center at Southeastern Louisiana University will host a free government contracting course in Walker on Oct. 6.
Co-sponsored by Louisiana Procurement Technical Assistance Center, Livingston Economic Development Council and Dixie Business Center, the course will take place from 10 a.m. to noon at the Livingston Parish Literacy and Technology Center, 9261 Florida Blvd.


;
Deputy District Director of the U.S. Small Business Administration Jo Lawrence will serve as speaker.
According to SBDC Assistant Director Sandy Summers, the System for Award Management is the primary database for vendors doing business with the federal government.
The registration is often referred to as "self-certifying" a small business. Federal Acquisitions Regulations require all prospective vendors to be registered in SAM prior to the award of a contract, basic agreement, basic ordering agreement or blanket purchase agreement.
Summers said SAM is also a marketing tool that lets government agencies and contractors search for a company based on its ability, size, location, experience, ownership and more.
"The goal of this workshop is to walk participants through completion of their SAM registration. For those who were registered in Central Contractor Registration, assistance will be provided in migrating their legacy CCR account," Summers said. "All contractors wishing to do business with most all federal agencies are required to register in the SAM. This is done by first creating an account. The registration must then be renewed and/or updated annually. It is very important that the information entered into SAM be accurate, detailed, current and complete."
Summers said participants can bring their laptops or work from computers provided.
To complete the SAM registration, participants will need the following: a company Dun and Bradstreet DUNS number; company Tax Identification Number / Employer Identification Number; company Commercial and Government Entity Code; banking information and statistical Information.
"This is a separate data base from the SAM database and a place where all small business firms want to be sure and get registered," she said. "SBA's Dynamic Small Business Search is a site that most all Federal Contracting Activities as well as Large Business Prime Contractors use for market research when looking for a particular small business firm or sector of small business firms when making decisions on whether or not to use small business set asides. Be sure to complete this section in full detail to include the 'Capabilities Narrative.'"
Although the seminar is free, pre-registration is required due to limited seating available.
Call 985-549-3831 for more information.

18 2016-09-29
Hammond

Columbia Theatre at SLU announces 2016-2017 season


Southeastern Louisiana University's Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts launches its 2016-17 season, offering everything from live music to dance to theatre.
The season also boasts entertainment genres, such as campus ensembles and silver screen cinema showings featuring the best of independent and classic movies on the big screen at the theatre, said Roy Blackwood, director of the Columbia Theatre and Fanfare, Southeastern's annual festival of the arts, humanities and social sciences. Movie screenings and campus ensemble performances will be scheduled throughout the season. Dates and additional information will be available soon at columbiatheatre.org.
Blackwood said the season is dedicated to the late Marjorie Morrison of Hammond, a long-time friend and supporter of both Southeastern and the Columbia Theatre.
"An avid supporter of the arts, Mrs. Morrison served as a member of Southeastern's Arts and Cultural Committee and was a member of Fanfare's Board of Directors since its inception over two decades ago," Blackwood said. "We are forever grateful for her steadfast support and dedication to enriching the culture of the region."
The Columbia season officially opens Sept. 29 with Southeastern Opera/Theatre Workshop's presentation of "A Little Night Music," Stephen Sondheim's sexy and sophisticated tribute to the foibles of love. The production is scheduled on Sept. 29 and 30 at 7:30 p.m..
Next on tap is a performance from entertainer Lynn Trefzger on Oct. 7 at 7:30 p.m.
"Lynn Trefzger is a ventriloquist and comedienne with a trunk full of zany characters that have accompanied her to stages throughout the country," said Blackwood. "She, and her many voices, have appeared on ABC, TNN, A&E, and Lifetime. Recently she was featured in a comedy/documentary about the art of ventriloquism with Jay Johnson and Jeff Dunham called 'I'm No Dummy' by NBC Universal. Her off-the-wall audience interplay is riotously funny, and her performances are tailored for both family and adult audiences. "
The Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra will begin its series of performances at Columbia on Oct. 14 at 7:30 p.m. with Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 1. The program begins with a series of light-hearted overtures, including Nicolai's "Overture to the Merry Wives of Windsor," Beethoven's "Overture to Corolian," and Korgold's "Overture to Much Ado About Nothing."
Additional LPO concerts include the Yuletide Celebration on Dec. 2 and the New World Symphony on March 3. Both concerts are scheduled at 7:30 p.m.
Missoula Children's Theatre will make a return visit the week of Oct. 24 - 29 with a production of "Peter and Wendy" for area youth. Upon their arrival on Oct. 24, Missoula will hold auditions and cast approximately 50 to 60 area children. Rehearsals will begin that day, and a full scale production will be presented Oct. 28 at 7 p.m. and Oct. 29 at 2 p.m. For additional information, contact the Columbia Theatre administrative office at 985-543-4366.
Also in the theatre category is Aquila Theatre presenting "Murder on the Nile" on Feb.17. Based on Agatha Christie's own novel "Death on the Nile," the production is set on a paddle steamer cruising the Nile River in the 1940s. Passengers are abuzz when famous heiress Kay Ridgeway boards the ship. Class, money and reputation are all at stake for the passengers and, before they know it, deceit, theft and murder quickly make waves on the river.
A pair of musical concerts highlights November. First up is a benefit concert for Fanfare on Nov. 5 at 7:30 p.m. by Southeastern's all-professor rock band, Impaired Faculties.
"Impaired Faculties will celebrate Guy Fawkes Day, Halloween's brother holiday celebrated by America's ally, friend, and mother country, Great Britain, with bonfires, effigies, fireworks, libations, satire, and no shortage of tricks and treats at the Columbia Theatre," Blackwood said.
Scheduled Nov. 22 is the Fabulous Equinox Orchestra at 7:30 p.m. Jeremy Davis and Clay Johnson founded the Fabulous Equinox Orchestra to bring the greatest songs, original arrangements and musicianship to the stage.
"This group has toured all over North America, performing in the style and swagger of legendary entertainers, such as Frank Sinatra," Blackwood said. "Davis and Johnson put their own stamp on the Great American songbook, graced with a touch of Motown, Ray Charles, Johnny Cash, and Elvis, offering a freshness and relevance that speaks to everyone."
Two dance ensembles are also scheduled this season. First up on Dec. 9 and 10 at 7 p.m., is Hammond Ballet Company's "The Nutcracker." The classic holiday ballet features professional guest artists and excellent all-star local dancers.
Later in the season, Eisenhower Dance will perform on March 25 at 7:30 p.m. Eisenhower Dance, Blackwood said, has spent the last 25 years giving life to a repertoire of internationally known choreographers, as well as the highly acclaimed work of Artistic Director Laurie Eisenhower.
Established in Detroit by Eisenhower in 1991, the company tours internationally, performing works by choreographers such as Edgar Zendejas, David Parsons, Lar Lubovitch, Ron de Jesus, and Gina Patterson.
Aeolus: Classical String Quartet will perform Jan. 26, at 7:30 p.m. "Dedicated to bringing music into the community, the Aeolus Quartet has been widely recognized for their highly innovative and engaging outreach programs," Blackwood said. "Since its inception, the all-American quartet has been awarded prizes at nearly every major competition in the United States."
Rounding out the season is a Pajamas and Play performance of "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" on April 29 at 7 p.m. In this children's story, a boy learns an important life lesson about integrity, honesty, and the consequences of "crying wolf." Kids are encouraged to wear their pajamas to this musical retelling of a classic tale. Milk and cookies will also be served.
A compliment to the Columbia Theatre season, Fanfare, will feature many "home-grown" artists. Fanfare will once again showcase music, theater, dance, lectures, children's events, and art exhibits, highlighting the myriad of talent university faculty and students have to offer in Fanfare's 31st season. The complete Fanfare schedule will be posted soon and updated regularly at southeastern.edu/fanfare.
For Columbia Theatre season or individual ticket information, contact the administrative office at 985-543-4366 or log on to columbiatheatre.org.
18 2016-09-27
Hammond

SLU RANKED 58TH IN NATION FOR PART-TIME JOBS FOR STUDENTS


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University has been ranked 58th nationally among the best colleges for university-provided part-time student employment.
The study was published in the newsletter “Student Loan Report” using information compiled by Peterson’s Financial Aid Data. Southeastern was listed among the top 250 colleges and universities in the nation for its student part-time employment record.
According to the study, Southeastern provides approximately 1,093 on-campus jobs for students who are not affiliated with the Federal Work Study program. Only three Louisiana institutions made the list.
“Providing part-time employment for students benefits both the students and the university,” said Lori Fairburn, director of Enrollment Services. “The students gain exposure to a professional work environment and learn valuable lessons in time management, multi-tasking, project planning and more, while earning money to help pay for typical college expenses. The institution gains the benefits of having additional part-time workers on the staff to augment operations of the office.”
“Student Loan Report” is an online newsletter that provides information to college students and parents regarding news, issues and studies on student loans and student debt. The report can be found on the web at studentloans.net.

18 2016-09-27
Hammond

"GNARLY" COUPLE TAPPED AS SOUTHEASTERN YOUNG ALUMNI OF YEAR


HAMMOND – It’s rather fitting that an alumni couple who are making their mark in the craft beer industry will be tapped as Southeastern Louisiana University 2016 Young Alumni of the Year.
Zac and Cari Carmonta, owners and operators of the Hammond-based craft beer production company Gnarley Barley, will be officially recognized at the Southeastern Alumni Association’s Awards Evening to be held at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 21, during Homecoming Week.
“Zac and Cari are true entrepreneurs who met at Southeastern and have made Hammond their home,” said Alumni Association President Mayson Foster. “Their company, Gnarley Barley, and the quality products they are crafting, are being distributed throughout the Northshore and helping to contribute to the local economy.”
The couple – Zac from Mandeville and Cari from Covington -- met at Southeastern as undergraduates. He was a general studies major, while Cari was studying family and consumer sciences majoring in merchandising with a minor in marketing. They married in 2009 and now have a one-year-old daughter named Stevie.
What started as a home-based hobby in their garage became a passion for crafting small batches of beer that received rave reviews at area festivals. That passion led to the formation of a corporation in 2011.
They both new they wanted Hammond – home of Southeastern and a really cool skate park downtown – to also be home to their brewing company. They successfully released their first beers in 2014 from a 10,500 square foot location on Corbin Road. Gnarly Barley now produces three flagship beers and two specialty beers, which are distributed at approximately 300 locations throughout nine parishes. The company plans to start offering the product in cans in time for Mardi Gras next year.
Alumni Awards Evening will include recognition of several Southeastern faculty and staff inclusing Alumnus of the Year for 2016 Billy Kennedy, the current head basketball coach at Texas A&M who graduated from Southeastern in 1986 and served as one of the university’s most successful head coaches from 1999 to 2005.
Tickets for the event are available from the Alumni Association by calling 1-800-SLU-ALUM or through the association’s website, southeastern.edu/homecoming.

PHOTO:
BREWING LION LOYALTY - Zac and Cari Carmonta, owners and operators of the Hammond-based craft beer production company Gnarly Barley, have been named Southeastern Louisiana University’s Young Alumni of the Year. The couple will be officially recognized at the Southeastern Alumni Association’s Awards Evening to be held at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 21, during Homecoming Week.

18 2016-09-27
Hammond

SLU professor awarded fellowship by Nursing Honor Society


HAMMOND – AtNena Luster-Tucker, a faculty member at the Southeastern Louisiana University School of Nursing, has been awarded a one-year fellowship to study quality in online nursing education.
Luster-Tucker is one of only seven nursing scholars in the nation to receive the fellowship to participate in the Emerging Educator Administrator Institute offered by Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society.
She has completed the program’s three-day workshop in Indiana and will spend the rest of the year at Southeastern working to complete the leadership project, which is focused on online learning in nursing education.
Currently the interim director of Southeastern’s Center for Faculty Excellence, Luster-Tucker is an assistant professor at the School of Nursing.
“The integration of online learning in nursing education has been one of the largest movements ever seen in nursing education. The nursing profession is a unique combination of theory and hands-on skills, both of which can be taught successfully via distance education,” she explained.
She said her project involves evaluation of Southeastern’s online nursing courses, which are offered at the undergraduate and graduate levels, through an evidence-based assessment tool.
“The College of Nursing and Health Sciences has worked diligently for many years to create courses that we believe are innovative and engaging,” she added. “I am excited to see the evaluation outcomes at the end of the project.”
She intends to complete the training as a master course reviewer, which will allow her to train other faculty to help review the online nursing courses at Southeastern.
Luster-Tucker said the experience will also assist her in the role of supervising the university’s Center for Faculty Excellence, which works with faculty to support and enhance teaching and learning at Southeastern.
“The identified best practices are not limited to nursing,” she said, “and can be utilized university-wide in our faculty development activities.”

18 2016-09-27
Hammond

Cast selected for SLU opera workshop "A Little Night Music"


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University’s Opera/Music Theatre Workshop will present the Broadway musical, “A Little Night Music” on Thursday and Friday, Sept. 29 and 30. Scheduled at 7:30 p.m., at the Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts in downtown Hammond, the performance is part of Fanfare, the university’s annual fall festival for the arts, humanities and social sciences.
Set in 1900 Sweden, “A Little Night Music” explores the tangled web of affairs centered around actress Desirée Armfeldt and the men who love her: a lawyer by the name of Fredrik Egerman and the Count Carl-Magnus Malcom, explained Charles Effler, director of the Opera/Music Theatre Workshop. When the traveling actress performs in Fredrik’s town, the estranged lovers’ passion is rekindled. This strikes a flurry of jealousy and suspicion between Desirée; Fredrik; Fredrick’s wife, Anne; Desirée’s current lover, the Count; and the Count’s wife, Charlotte. Both men – as well as their jealous wives – agree to join Desirée and her family for a weekend in the country at Desirée’s mother’s estate. With everyone in one place, infinite possibilities of new romances and second chances bring endless surprises.
“One of Sondheim’s musical innovations in this show is the use of five singers as a sort of Greek chorus (called the Liebeslieders). Like the Greek chorus from classical Greek tragedy, these singers comment on the dramatic actions of the play, but with song instead of the spoken word,” Effler said.
“Also, the traditional orchestral overture, highlighting tunes from the show, is augmented with this group of singers; there are still tunes from the show, but they are now presented with the lyrics,” he added. “In another innovation, Sondheim draws inspiration from opera -- three characters all sing three different solo songs with completely different moods and melodies. Sondheim then combines them seamlessly into a gorgeous trio.”
A Little Night Music is full of hilarious, witty and heartbreaking moments of adoration, regret and desire, and contains Sondheim’s popular song, the haunting “Send in the Clowns.”
Opera Workshop welcomes back guest stage director Ken Goode for this production. Originally from New Orleans, Goode directed Opera Workshop’s performance of “It’s Only Life” three years ago.
Opera Workshop also welcomes back Southeastern Alumna Kay Schepker and Jane Rownd Wear, both of Hammond. Schepker is the aunt of Wear and said she is looking forward to performing with her niece.
“We are in a few scenes together. Our characters don’t interact much at all, but I’m enjoying watching her perform her role,” Schepker said. “It’s great to be able to watch her work and see how she’s grown as a singer and actress. Since she completed her graduate school work at Indiana University, I didn’t have the opportunity to see her perform very often. It’s also a fun time for our family to be able to see us both together in a production.”
The cast for the production includes Rachel Davis (Mandeville) as Desiree Armfeldt; Alfred Harper (New Orleans) as Frederick Egerman; Randi Gaspard (Covington) as Anne Egerman; Terelle Bibbins (Slidell) as Henrik Egerman; Kay Schepker (Hammond) as Madame Armfeldt; Kaylin Guillory (Covington) as Fredrika Armfeldt; Robert Roy (Lacombe) as Count Carl-Magnus Malcolm; Morgan Curole (Larose) as Countess Charlotte Malcolm; Jane Wear (Hammond) as Petra; Sarah Cage (Baton Rouge) as Mrs. Nordstrom; Elizabeth Langley (Mandeville) as Mrs. Segstrom; Anne Labranche (Abita Springs) as Mrs. Anderssen; Brandon Wear (Slidell) as Mr. Erlanson; Wesley Newton (Bourg) as Mr. Lindquist; Cody Sires (Chalmette) as Frid; Deondra Bell (Baton Rouge) as Malla; Jeremy Guillot (Denham Springs) as Bertrand; and Mia Gibson (Sulphur) as Osa.
Effler will serve as musical director and conductor, Department of Fine and Performing Arts faculty members Steve Schepker will design the set and Benjamin Norman will design the lighting. Southeastern students Katie Walker of Marrero and Kayla Rochelle of Destrehan will serve as stage manager and makeup designer respectively.
Advance tickets are available at the Columbia Theatre box office Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and will also be available one hour prior to each performance. Ticket prices are $21 for adults; $16 for seniors, Southeastern faculty/staff and non-Southeastern students; and $8 for children 12 and under. Southeastern students are admitted free of charge with their university ID.
For more information about the Opera/Music Theatre Workshop contact Effler at ceffler@southeastern.edu.
“A Little Night Music,” book by Hugh Wheeler, music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, originally produced on Broadway by Harold S. Prince, is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI) and all authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI, 421 West 54th Street, New York, NY, 10019, www.MTIShows.com.

PHOTO: OPERA OPENS SOUTHEASTERN’S FANFARE – The 31st season of Southeastern Louisiana University’s Fanfare will open with Southeastern Opera /Music Theatre’s production of “A Little Night Music” on Sept. 29 and 30 at the Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts. Rehearsing for the production are, from left, Anne Labranche of Abita Springs and Rachel Davis and Elizabeth Langley of Mandeville.

18 2016-09-27
Hammond

SLU senior awarded Minority Leadership Scholarship


HAMMOND – For the second consecutive year, a Southeastern Louisiana University student in Communication Sciences and Disorders has been awarded a national leadership scholarship by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
Senior Maya Gauthier of Hahnville will receive one of 40 Minority Student Leadership Program (MSLP) scholarships in the nation. The award allows her to participate in leadership training at the 2016 ASHA convention in Philadelphia Nov. 15-20. As an MSLP participant, she will take part in leadership-focused educational programs and activities to help build and enhance leadership skills and gain an understanding of how the association works.
To be considered for the award, Gauthier had to submit a letter of recommendation and prepare an essay describing the qualities of an individual who demonstrates leadership, the skills she wants to develop, and how participation in the program will enhance her leadership skills.
“Maya may be the most extraordinary undergraduate I have taught in the 23 years I’ve been at Southeastern,” said Roxanne Wright Stoehr, instructor and clinical supervisor for the communication sciences and disorders program. “She is always prepared for class and demonstrates an uncanny ability to understand complex and abstract material and to reflect on subjects at an unusually high level for an undergraduate. In addition to her scholastic ability, she is a mindful and caring person.”
After studying about autism, a spectrum of disorders characterized by difficulties in social interaction, and verbal and nonverbal communication, during her sophomore year Gauthier organized a fundraiser, collecting about $2,000 for local families of children with autism.
This is just one example of Gauthier’s character, according to Stoehr.
Gauthier, who last year earned the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders’ Charles W. Campbell Award for the outstanding junior in the program, plans to graduate in spring 2017, and to continue graduate studies at Southeastern in CSD.

PHOTO:
NATIONAL SCHOLARSHIP – Southeastern Louisiana University Communication Sciences and Disorders senior Maya Gauthier of Hahnville works with seven-year-old Zachary Musso of Hammond in the CSD clinical lab. Gauthier was awarded one of 40 Minority Student Leadership Program scholarships by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

18 2016-09-26
Hammond

Columbia Theatre opens its 2016-17 season


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University’s Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts, 220 E. Thomas St., offers everything from live music to dance to theater in its 2016-17 season.

Movie screenings and campus ensemble performances will also be scheduled throughout the season. Dates and additional information will be available soon at columbiatheatre.org.

The season is dedicated to the late Marjorie Morrison, a longtime supporter of both Southeastern and the Columbia Theatre, said Roy Blackwood, director of the Columbia Theatre and Fanfare, Southeastern’s annual festival of the arts, humanities and social sciences.

Morrison served as a member of Southeastern’s Arts and Cultural Committee and was a member of Fanfare’s Board of Directors since its inception over two decades ago, Blackwood said.

Here's some of the season's highlights:

Sept. 29-30, 7:30 p.m. — Southeastern Opera/Theatre Workshop’s presents “A Little Night Music,” Stephen Sondheim’s sexy and sophisticated tribute to the foibles of love.
Oct. 7, 7:30 p.m. — Lynn Trefzger, ventriloquist and comedienne, who has appeared on ABC, TNN, A&E, and Lifetime. Recently she was featured in a comedy/documentary about the art of ventriloquism with Jay Johnson and Jeff Dunham called ‘I’m No Dummy’ by NBC Universal.
Oct. 14, 7:30 p.m. — The Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra begins its series of performances at Columbia with Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 1. Additional LPO concerts include the Yuletide Celebration on Dec. 2 and the New World Symphony on March 3. Both concerts are scheduled at 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 24-29 — Missoula Children’s Theatre's production of “Peter and Wendy” for area youth. Missoula will hold auditions and cast approximately 50 to 60 area children on Oct. 24. Rehearsals begin that day, and the production will be presented at 7 p.m. Oct. 28 and 2 p.m. Oct. 29. For more information, contact the Columbia Theatre administrative office at (985) 543-4366.
Nov. 5, 7:30 p.m. — Benefit concert for Fanfare by Southeastern’s all-professor rock band, Impaired Faculties.
Nov. 22, 7:30 p.m. — The Fabulous Equinox Orchestra, founded by Jeremy Davis and Clay Johnson, perform.
Dec. 9-10, 7 p.m. — Hammond Ballet Company’s “The Nutcracker,” the classic holiday ballet featuring professional guest artists and local dancers.
Jan. 26, 7:30 p.m. — Aeolus: Classical String Quartet will perform.
Feb. 17 — Aquila Theatre presents “Murder on the Nile,” based on Agatha Christie’s novel “Death on the Nile.”
March 25, 7:30 p.m. — Eisenhower Dance will perform.
April 29, 7 p.m. — Pajamas and Play performance of “The Boy Who Cried Wolf,” a children’s story in which a boy learns an important life lesson about integrity, honesty and the consequences of “crying wolf.” Kids are encouraged to wear their pajamas to this performance. Milk and cookies will be served.
As a compliment to the Columbia Theatre season, Fanfare will once again showcase music, theater, dance, lectures, children’s events and art exhibits, highlighting talented university faculty and students. The complete Fanfare schedule will be posted soon and updated regularly at southeastern.edu/fanfare.

For Columbia Theatre season or individual ticket information, contact the administrative office at (985) 543-4366 or visit columbiatheatre.org.


18 2016-09-23
Baton Rouge

SLU celebrates birthday


PHOTO
18 2016-09-23
Hammond

GOV. EDWARDS APPOINTS SLU PROFESSOR TO STATE BOARD


HAMMOND – Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards has re-appointed Southeastern Louisiana University Professor of Education Colleen Klein-Ezell to the Louisiana State Interagency Coordinating Council for EarlySteps.
The agency advises and assists the Department of Health and Hospitals in matters regarding EarlySteps, a program for children with developmental disabilities from the ages of birth to three-years-old.
Head of Southeastern’s Department of Teaching and Learning in the College of Education, Klein-Ezell serves as the current president of the Louisiana Council for Exceptional Children, which has recognized her with the Higher Education Special Education Professional Award. She is a member of the Education Committee of the Greater Hammond Chamber of Commerce and has been recognized by the Tangipahoa Parish School Board for participation in the Kids Hope mentoring program.
She has been instrumental in obtaining more than $1.3 million in grants from the Louisiana Board of Regents to fund programs for the community and to provide learning opportunities for special education teacher candidates. At Southeastern, she is the co-adviser of the Student Council for Exceptional Children.
18 2016-09-22
Hammond

St. Tammany college briefs for September 21, 2016


SLU MUSIC: Graham Guillory, a Southeastern Louisiana University music major, studied one-on-one this summer with Grammy-winning guitar master Pepe Romero. Guillory, a sophomore from Mandeville, successfully auditioned to attend the annual Celedonio Romero Guitar Institute held at the Wanda L. Bass School of Music at Oklahoma City University. The workshop drew 36 students from around the world who had master classes and private instruction with members of the Grammy-winning Los Romeros Quartet. Graham was assigned to private lessons with the virtuoso leader of the quartet, Pepe Romero.


18 2016-09-21
Hammond

NEW COLUMBIA THEATRE SEASON DEDICATED TO MARJORIE MORRISON


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University’s Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts launches its 2016-17 season, offering everything from live music to dance to theatre.
The season also boasts entertainment genres, such as campus ensembles and silver screen cinema showings featuring the best of independent and classic movies on the big screen at the theatre, said Roy Blackwood, director of the Columbia Theatre and Fanfare, Southeastern’s annual festival of the arts, humanities and social sciences. Movie screenings and campus ensemble performances will be scheduled throughout the season. Dates and additional information will be available soon at columbiatheatre.org.
Blackwood said the season is dedicated to the late Marjorie Morrison of Hammond, a long-time friend and supporter of both Southeastern and the Columbia Theatre.
“An avid supporter of the arts, Mrs. Morrison served as a member of Southeastern’s Arts and Cultural Committee and was a member of Fanfare’s Board of Directors since its inception over two decades ago,” Blackwood said. “We are forever grateful for her steadfast support and dedication to enriching the culture of the region.”
The Columbia season officially opens Sept. 29 with Southeastern Opera/Theatre Workshop’s presentation of “A Little Night Music,” Stephen Sondheim’s sexy and sophisticated tribute to the foibles of love. The production is scheduled on Sept. 29 and 30 at 7:30 p.m..
Next on tap is a performance from entertainer Lynn Trefzger on Oct. 7 at 7:30 p.m.
“Lynn Trefzger is a ventriloquist and comedienne with a trunk full of zany characters that have accompanied her to stages throughout the country,” said Blackwood. “She, and her many voices, have appeared on ABC, TNN, A&E, and Lifetime. Recently she was featured in a comedy/documentary about the art of ventriloquism with Jay Johnson and Jeff Dunham called ‘I’m No Dummy’ by NBC Universal. Her off-the-wall audience interplay is riotously funny, and her performances are tailored for both family and adult audiences. ”
The Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra will begin its series of performances at Columbia on Oct. 14 at 7:30 p.m. with Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 1. The program begins with a series of light-hearted overtures, including Nicolai’s “Overture to the Merry Wives of Windsor,” Beethoven’s “Overture to Corolian,” and Korgold’s “Overture to Much Ado About Nothing.”
Additional LPO concerts include the Yuletide Celebration on Dec. 2 and the New World Symphony on March 3. Both concerts are scheduled at 7:30 p.m.
Missoula Children’s Theatre will make a return visit the week of Oct. 24 - 29 with a production of “Peter and Wendy” for area youth. Upon their arrival on Oct. 24, Missoula will hold auditions and cast approximately 50 to 60 area children. Rehearsals will begin that day, and a full scale production will be presented Oct. 28 at 7 p.m. and Oct. 29 at 2 p.m. For additional information, contact the Columbia Theatre administrative office at 985-543-4366.
Also in the theatre category is Aquila Theatre presenting “Murder on the Nile” on Feb.17. Based on Agatha Christie’s own novel “Death on the Nile,” the production is set on a paddle steamer cruising the Nile River in the 1940s. Passengers are abuzz when famous heiress Kay Ridgeway boards the ship. Class, money and reputation are all at stake for the passengers and, before they know it, deceit, theft and murder quickly make waves on the river.
A pair of musical concerts highlights November. First up is a benefit concert for Fanfare on Nov. 5 at 7:30 p.m. by Southeastern’s all-professor rock band, Impaired Faculties.
“Impaired Faculties will celebrate Guy Fawkes Day, Halloween’s brother holiday celebrated by America’s ally, friend, and mother country, Great Britain, with bonfires, effigies, fireworks, libations, satire, and no shortage of tricks and treats at the Columbia Theatre,” Blackwood said.
Scheduled Nov. 22 is the Fabulous Equinox Orchestra at 7:30 p.m. Jeremy Davis and Clay Johnson founded the Fabulous Equinox Orchestra to bring the greatest songs, original arrangements and musicianship to the stage.
“This group has toured all over North America, performing in the style and swagger of legendary entertainers, such as Frank Sinatra,” Blackwood said. “Davis and Johnson put their own stamp on the Great American songbook, graced with a touch of Motown, Ray Charles, Johnny Cash, and Elvis, offering a freshness and relevance that speaks to everyone.”
Two dance ensembles are also scheduled this season. First up on Dec. 9 and 10 at 7 p.m., is Hammond Ballet Company’s “The Nutcracker.” The classic holiday ballet features professional guest artists and excellent all-star local dancers.
Later in the season, Eisenhower Dance will perform on March 25 at 7:30 p.m. Eisenhower Dance, Blackwood said, has spent the last 25 years giving life to a repertoire of internationally known choreographers, as well as the highly acclaimed work of Artistic Director Laurie Eisenhower. Established in Detroit by Eisenhower in 1991, the company tours internationally, performing works by choreographers such as Edgar Zendejas, David Parsons, Lar Lubovitch, Ron de Jesus, and Gina Patterson.
Aeolus: Classical String Quartet will perform Jan. 26, at 7:30 p.m. “Dedicated to bringing music into the community, the Aeolus Quartet has been widely recognized for their highly innovative and engaging outreach programs,” Blackwood said. “Since its inception, the all-American quartet has been awarded prizes at nearly every major competition in the United States.”
Rounding out the season is a Pajamas and Play performance of “The Boy Who Cried Wolf” on April 29 at 7 p.m. In this children’s story, a boy learns an important life lesson about integrity, honesty, and the consequences of “crying wolf.” Kids are encouraged to wear their pajamas to this musical retelling of a classic tale. Milk and cookies will also be served.
A compliment to the Columbia Theatre season, Fanfare, will feature many “home-grown” artists. Fanfare will once again showcase music, theater, dance, lectures, children’s events, and art exhibits, highlighting the myriad of talent university faculty and students have to offer in Fanfare’s 31st season. The complete Fanfare schedule will be posted soon and updated regularly at southeastern.edu/fanfare.
For Columbia Theatre season or individual ticket information, contact the administrative office at 985-543-4366 or log on to columbiatheatre.org.

PHOTO:
NEW COLUMBIA SEASON ANNOUNCED - The 2016-17 season of Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts offers something for everyone with everything from live music to dance to theater. The 2016-2017 season includes a dance production by Eisenhower Dance on March 25 at 7:30 p.m.

18 2016-09-21
Hammond

USDA AWARDS SECOND GRANT TO SLU FOR HEALTH COACHING PROGRAM


HAMMOND - A two-year $646,482 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture will continue to provide authentic field experiences for Southeastern Louisiana University students, while at the same time increasing the quality of life for area residents. The funding will allow Southeastern and its partners, including North Oaks Health System, to expand a highly successful health coaching program that has reduced hospital readmission rates by 72 percent since its inception two years ago.
Provided through the Delta Health Care Grant program, the grant will support the Health Transition Alliance, a partnership involving the Southeastern College of Nursing and Health Sciences and North Oaks Health System which was established in 2014. At that time, the work of Southeastern health coach interns collaborating with the Alliance was supported by a grant of more than $350,000 from the USDA. It focused on the preparation of students to work as health coaches for recently-discharged patients, and has seen success rates higher than those previously recorded with similar programs across the nation.
“This project has been a ‘win-win’ for all involved,” said Southeastern President John L. Crain. “We’ve heard amazing success stories on health care in our community from the first grant. We’re proud of what the university and our partner North Oaks are doing to serve the health care needs of our region.”
USDA Rural Development Business Cooperative Service Administrator Sam Rikkers said Delta Health Care Grants such as this are designed to improve access to health care services in rural areas, where health is most compromised and challenged and providers are not as readily available.
Ann Carruth, dean of the College of Nursing and Health Sciences and principle investigator for the grant, said Louisiana has many health challenges, including a near 35 percent obesity rate, high rates of diabetes and heart disease and is ranked 48th in infant mortality and 47th in preventable hospitalizations.
The Health Transition Alliance is a health system-wide, physician-led interdisciplinary program to help recently discharged patients better manage care in hopes of reducing hospital readmissions. Southeastern students from the health education and promotion program serve as health coach interns and participate in helping patients achieve post-discharge goals by following physicians’ instructions for home care, taking medications appropriately, following a prescribed diet and using appropriate therapies, and scheduling follow up visits with their physicians.
“Health coaches are being used to change behaviors, and this can be the single hardest thing people try to do,” Carruth said. “Our health coaches are learning that some patients simply don’t have the resources to make health choices, so we try to work with the clients on that. Patients also will tell students things about their lives and their health that they will not tell to a physician or nurse. That’s an important insight into their care.”
Initiated in 2014, the pilot program has yielded impressive results, Carruth reported. More than 45 student health coaches have been trained, and 65 high risk patients discharged from the hospital have received health coaching.
“We’ve seen readmission rates among at risk patients decrease by 72 percent and a significant decrease in emergency hospital visits as well,” she added. “I have not found any other program demonstrating that kind of success.”
“The reduced readmission rates and visits to the emergency department are important,” said James E. Cathey Jr., North Oaks president and chief executive officer. “But that is minor compared with how these health coaches have impacted people and their lives. They are making a real difference in the new world of health care.”

PHOTO:
HEALTH GRANT AWARDED -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture awarded a $646,482 grant to Southeastern Louisiana University and its partner North Oaks Health System to support a health coaching system designed to reduce hospital readmissions among at risk patients. Pictured are, from left, Sam Rikers, administrator of the USDA Rural Development Business Cooperative Service; Ann Carruth, dean of the Southeastern College of Nursing and Health Sciences; James E. Cathey Jr., North Oaks president and chief executive officer; Michele Sutton, North Oaks executive vice president; and Clarence W. Hawkins, director of Louisiana USDA Rural Development.

18 2016-09-19
Hammond

SLU writer-in-residence releasing new book


For the writer-in-residence at Southeastern Louisiana University, being simultaneously interested in the contemporary South and the region's past is not contradictory at all.
"I'm a fan of history...but I'm also a fan of what's happening right now too," Chris Tusa said. "That shouldn't be strange."


;
With historic novels, he gets to explore the past, particularly New Orleans' past that he finds fascinating. With contemporary novels, he can examine how modern technology shapes people's perspectives and interactions with others, he said.
"It's really interesting to do both," he said.
Tusa, who is also an English professor at LSU, has been the writer-in-residence at Southeastern for about four years.
He is the author of "Dirty Little Angels," published in 2009, and is promoting his new published novel, "In the City of Falling Stars," which is expected to be officially released by the University of West Alabama at the end of this month. He is also working on two new novels, one a historical fiction and another that will be set in modern times.
The contemporary South is a place that he believes does not get depicted enough in popular culture. Instead, outdated images of uneducated people sitting on porches is the prevailing depiction of the region, he said.
"Why not see how the South has changed," he said. "We are much more complex."
Tusa said he has seen first-hand how the region has evolved. There is more acceptance of people who are different and less division among groups.
Tusa grew up in New Orleans and went to Brother Martin High School. He described his neighborhood in the 1970s and 1980s as a mix of black and white families that were nonetheless divided during a time when racism was more prevalent. Now he sees students of different backgrounds hanging out all the time.
Bucking Southern stereotypes is what he hopes to do with "In the City of Falling Stars." The main protagonist is a black New Orleanian who is in an interracial marriage shortly after Hurricane Katrina when the city is still reeling from the devastation. He described the setting as a kind of post-apocalyptic place.
Modern technology plays a prominent role. Maurice Delahoussaye, the main character, starts to unravel as he becomes increasingly paranoid about the world around him, believing the government to be behind a grand conspiracy. Dead birds are falling from the sky that he blames on the air quality, and he begins seeing religious visions that make him suspect his wife, who had an affair with another man, is going to give birth to Jesus Christ.
Tusa described the book as dark, much like his first book that follows a brother and sister who fall under the influence of a disturbed preacher. But he wanted to inject some humor into the novel as well. For example, when Maurice tells his wife his suspicion about the baby, she assures him that she certainly is no Virgin Mary.
"I tried to add some comedy," he said.
Tusa said he is interested in exploring how technology and access to almost limitless information can change individual's perspective of their surroundings and themselves and "impact us in ways that real life can't."
Most of all, he hopes what readers get from the book is how technology can sometimes create an alternative, crazy world for people and that some are more susceptible to getting stuck in that world.
For his first book, he said reviews were mixed, possibly because the plot of "Dirty Little Angels" may have been too dark for some. His second novel has gotten a better reaction from critics and readers, he said. He was happy to hear feedback from several readers who said they were surprised by where the book ended up.
"I always felt like the reader deserves to be duped," he said. "If I'm reading a book, I want you to dupe me."

18 2016-09-19
Hammond

SLU student studies with Grammy-winning guitar master


Music major Graham Guillory, a Southeastern Louisiana University sophomore from Mandeville, recently studied one-on-one with Grammy-winning guitar master Pepe Romero.
Guillory earned an invitation to the annual Celedonio Romero Guitar Institute held at the Wanda L. Bass School of Music at Oklahoma City University this summer, said guitar instructor Patrick Kerber.
Thirty-six international students attended the intense workshop, which featured masterclasses and private instruction with members of the Grammy-winning Los Romeros Quartet. Guillory was assigned to private lessons with the virtuoso leader of the quartet, Maestro Pepe Romero, and performed several times with the Romero family, considered the Royal Family of Guitar, during the final concert.
"I was very honored and a bit shocked to be appointed section leader for one of the large guitar ensemble pieces," Guillory said. "I realized that in the guitar world, not only does a student from Southeastern get by in this environment, but a guitar student from Southeastern competes with his peers from Ivy League schools and conservatories. Studying with the Romeros was intellectually stimulating, and profoundly improved my ability. It was an unparalleled experience."
With the large ensemble, he performed "El Baile de Luis Alonso" by Geronimo Giminez and "La Vida Breve by Manuel de Falla" sitting next to Celin Romero as a section leader.
"I encouraged Graham to audition for the class. I knew that he would work side by side with upperclassmen and graduate students and that he would do well," Kerber said.
"It was my thought also that the Romeros would seize on Graham's enthusiastic attitude and grant him some extra unscheduled time, which they did. It is their style to identify passion and discipline in students and to encourage these qualities."

18 2016-09-19
Hammond

NEW COLUMBIA THEATRE SEASON DEDICATED TO MARJORIE MORRISON


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University’s Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts launches its 2016-17 season, offering everything from live music to dance to theatre.
The season also boasts entertainment genres, such as campus ensembles and silver screen cinema showings featuring the best of independent and classic movies on the big screen at the theatre, said Roy Blackwood, director of the Columbia Theatre and Fanfare, Southeastern’s annual festival of the arts, humanities and social sciences. Movie screenings and campus ensemble performances will be scheduled throughout the season. Dates and additional information will be available soon at columbiatheatre.org.
Blackwood said the season is dedicated to the late Marjorie Morrison of Hammond, a long-time friend and supporter of both Southeastern and the Columbia Theatre.
“An avid supporter of the arts, Mrs. Morrison served as a member of Southeastern’s Arts and Cultural Committee and was a member of Fanfare’s Board of Directors since its inception over two decades ago,” Blackwood said. “We are forever grateful for her steadfast support and dedication to enriching the culture of the region.”
The Columbia season officially opens Sept. 29 with Southeastern Opera/Theatre Workshop’s presentation of “A Little Night Music,” Stephen Sondheim’s sexy and sophisticated tribute to the foibles of love. The production is scheduled on Sept. 29 and 30 at 7:30 p.m..
Next on tap is a performance from entertainer Lynn Trefzger on Oct. 7 at 7:30 p.m.
“Lynn Trefzger is a ventriloquist and comedienne with a trunk full of zany characters that have accompanied her to stages throughout the country,” said Blackwood. “She, and her many voices, have appeared on ABC, TNN, A&E, and Lifetime. Recently she was featured in a comedy/documentary about the art of ventriloquism with Jay Johnson and Jeff Dunham called ‘I’m No Dummy’ by NBC Universal. Her off-the-wall audience interplay is riotously funny, and her performances are tailored for both family and adult audiences. ”
The Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra will begin its series of performances at Columbia on Oct. 14 at 7:30 p.m. with Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 1. The program begins with a series of light-hearted overtures, including Nicolai’s “Overture to the Merry Wives of Windsor,” Beethoven’s “Overture to Corolian,” and Korgold’s “Overture to Much Ado About Nothing.”
Additional LPO concerts include the Yuletide Celebration on Dec. 2 and the New World Symphony on March 3. Both concerts are scheduled at 7:30 p.m.
Missoula Children’s Theatre will make a return visit the week of Oct. 24 - 29 with a production of “Peter and Wendy” for area youth. Upon their arrival on Oct. 24, Missoula will hold auditions and cast approximately 50 to 60 area children. Rehearsals will begin that day, and a full scale production will be presented Oct. 28 at 7 p.m. and Oct. 29 at 2 p.m. For additional information, contact the Columbia Theatre administrative office at 985-543-4366.
Also in the theatre category is Aquila Theatre presenting “Murder on the Nile” on Feb.17. Based on Agatha Christie’s own novel “Death on the Nile,” the production is set on a paddle steamer cruising the Nile River in the 1940s. Passengers are abuzz when famous heiress Kay Ridgeway boards the ship. Class, money and reputation are all at stake for the passengers and, before they know it, deceit, theft and murder quickly make waves on the river.
A pair of musical concerts highlights November. First up is a benefit concert for Fanfare on Nov. 5 at 7:30 p.m. by Southeastern’s all-professor rock band, Impaired Faculties.
“Impaired Faculties will celebrate Guy Fawkes Day, Halloween’s brother holiday celebrated by America’s ally, friend, and mother country, Great Britain, with bonfires, effigies, fireworks, libations, satire, and no shortage of tricks and treats at the Columbia Theatre,” Blackwood said.
Scheduled Nov. 22 is the Fabulous Equinox Orchestra at 7:30 p.m. Jeremy Davis and Clay Johnson founded the Fabulous Equinox Orchestra to bring the greatest songs, original arrangements and musicianship to the stage.
“This group has toured all over North America, performing in the style and swagger of legendary entertainers, such as Frank Sinatra,” Blackwood said. “Davis and Johnson put their own stamp on the Great American songbook, graced with a touch of Motown, Ray Charles, Johnny Cash, and Elvis, offering a freshness and relevance that speaks to everyone.”
Two dance ensembles are also scheduled this season. First up on Dec. 9 and 10 at 7 p.m., is Hammond Ballet Company’s “The Nutcracker.” The classic holiday ballet features professional guest artists and excellent all-star local dancers.
Later in the season, Eisenhower Dance will perform on March 25 at 7:30 p.m. Eisenhower Dance, Blackwood said, has spent the last 25 years giving life to a repertoire of internationally known choreographers, as well as the highly acclaimed work of Artistic Director Laurie Eisenhower. Established in Detroit by Eisenhower in 1991, the company tours internationally, performing works by choreographers such as Edgar Zendejas, David Parsons, Lar Lubovitch, Ron de Jesus, and Gina Patterson.
Aeolus: Classical String Quartet will perform Jan. 26, at 7:30 p.m. “Dedicated to bringing music into the community, the Aeolus Quartet has been widely recognized for their highly innovative and engaging outreach programs,” Blackwood said. “Since its inception, the all-American quartet has been awarded prizes at nearly every major competition in the United States.”
Rounding out the season is a Pajamas and Play performance of “The Boy Who Cried Wolf” on April 29 at 7 p.m. In this children’s story, a boy learns an important life lesson about integrity, honesty, and the consequences of “crying wolf.” Kids are encouraged to wear their pajamas to this musical retelling of a classic tale. Milk and cookies will also be served.
A compliment to the Columbia Theatre season, Fanfare, will feature many “home-grown” artists. Fanfare will once again showcase music, theater, dance, lectures, children’s events, and art exhibits, highlighting the myriad of talent university faculty and students have to offer in Fanfare’s 31st season. The complete Fanfare schedule will be posted soon and updated regularly at southeastern.edu/fanfare.
For Columbia Theatre season or individual ticket information, contact the administrative office at 985-543-4366 or log on to columbiatheatre.org.

PHOTO:
NEW COLUMBIA SEASON ANNOUNCED - The 2016-17 season of Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts offers something for everyone with everything from live music to dance to theater. The 2016-2017 season includes a dance production by Eisenhower Dance on March 25 at 7:30 p.m.

18 2016-09-16
Regional/National

The Rain, It Raineth Every Day: NOLA Project’s ‘Flood City’


You can’t make this stuff up.

This past Aug. 8, 23 days before the NOLA Project’s premiere production of Gabrielle Reisman’s Hurricane Katrina-inspired play Flood City was scheduled to begin performances in New Orleans, heavy rain began to fall just north and west of the city. The storm didn’t let up for eight days. By Aug. 15, more than seven trillion gallons of water had fallen in Louisiana and Mississippi. The toll to date: 13 fatalities, an estimated $110 million in agricultural losses, 40,000 homes damaged.

Dubbed the “Great Flood of 2016” and labeled by commentators as a “once-in-a-thousand-years event,” the storm was no Katrina. Despite the massive scope of its damage, New Orleans itself was minimally affected, and the loss of life was minuscule by comparison to the Great Flood of 2005. But for Reisman and her production team, the untimely storm jolted the play they were rehearsing into a cathartic new reality.

“Talk about déjà vu,” exclaims the 33-year-old playwright, who had moved to New Orleans from Chicago in August 2005, three weeks before Katrina hit. “The situation was so similar: watching people deal with their destroyed houses, the streets full of garbage, people complaining, ‘The world’s not listening to us! Nobody’s here to help us!’”

NOLA Project artistic director A.J. Allegra.
NOLA Project artistic director A.J. Allegra.
“I felt a lot of helpless guilt,” confesses NOLA Project’s enterprising artistic director A.J. Allegra, another transplant from the Midwest, who was a college student working in New Orleans on the first-ever NOLA Project productions when Katrina sidelined the fledgling company’s initial efforts. “In New Orleans so often the narrative goes that the city is under siege by weather disasters, but in this case the situation had flip-flopped. We normally have to seek refuge in cities like Baton Rouge or Hammond, or other parts of the state to the north or west—and now they’re the ones underwater!”

In fact, the set for Flood City (Sept. 1-17) was being constructed in the town of Hammond, some 60 miles northwest of the city, when the rains hit. Set designer Steve Schepker, a theatre professor at Southeastern Louisiana University, was trapped by the encroaching water—while his own house wasn’t flooded, it was surrounded by standing water, leaving him unable to travel. “That Friday and Saturday, I hunkered down with relatives and ate and drank, just glad my house was fine,” Schepker says. The NOLA Project’s managing director Carol Knott, who also lives in Hammond, and three members of Schepker’s building crew were not so lucky—their nearby homes were all invaded by water.

The town of Hammond, Louisiana, in late August, where sets for "Flood City" were being constructed. (Photo by Steve Schepker)
The town of Hammond, Louisiana, in late August, where sets for “Flood City” were being constructed. (Photo by Steve Schepker)
To their dismay, so was the downtown Hammond warehouse where Schepker and his team were building the Flood City set. When the waters receded enough so that Schepker could regain access to the workspace, but with none of his assistants available to help, the designer put finishing touches on the sprawling, mostly wooden construction himself. Then he set about the task of hauling it to New Orleans to install it in the show’s venue, a black-box theatre at NOCCA (New Orleans Center for Creative Arts), the well-appointed high school for the performing arts located in the city’s Marigny district adjacent to the French Quarter.

Easier said than done. “We couldn’t even provide Steve with a skeleton crew because of the storm,” Allegra says ruefully. “People would say things like, ‘No way—we don’t have a pirogue on the back of our car!’ Hammond suddenly seemed half a world away, as opposed to an hour-and-a-half trip.”

What’s more, moving the expansive set required a 24-foot rental truck, but all such large vehicles had been commandeered by the Red Cross for use in disaster relief efforts across the region. Schepker ended up disassembling the structure and making two separate trips in 16-foot trucks, the only ones available.

Allegra allows that there were silver linings to the storm clouds. “In the process of transporting the set, a lot of redesigning happened, some of it for the better. Because the set pieces had to be broken apart for transport, the design became more abstract. Both Steve and Gabby liked the changes a lot.”

A week later, with the set safely ensconced at NOCCA, Schepker could be discovered steering a wheelbarrow through NOCCA’s riverside warehouse complex, hauling two giant containers of playground mulch. “This stuff is made of chopped-up recycled tires,” he tells me with a satisfied grin. “It’s not dirt, but it will look like dirt when we spread it around the set. Celebrate us, we’re being green!”

Trey Burvant and Matthew Thompson in "Flood City" at the NOLA Project. (Photo by John B. Barrois)
Trey Burvant and Matthew Thompson in “Flood City” at the NOLA Project. (Photo by John B. Barrois)
It was the approach of the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina in 2015 that prompted playwright Reisman to act on her longstanding impulse to memorialize the storm and its aftermath onstage. Despite being a newcomer back in 2005, when she arrived to complete an undergraduate degree at the University of New Orleans, Reisman had spent a lot of time in the city (“I had family here since before I was born—my two brothers live here, my dad once worked at Arnoult’s, my aunt had a pizza place here”), and her knowledge of local sensibilities made her determined to infuse her Katrina play with the wit and humor she knew was characteristic of the place. The play might even be, she was inclined to think, a full-blown comedy.

Playwright Gabrielle Reisman.
Playwright Gabrielle Reisman.
“I wanted to show what it was like living in a post-flood city, and how we who went through it kind of compartmentalized our memories about it—but nothing I was writing was very exciting,” she allows, even after she worked on the piece during a residency at the MacDowell Colony in New Hampshire (“That version had songs in it, it was way less funny—I was totally stuck!”). Figuring that indirection might be a better writing tactic than adherence to the facts of the matter, she put in a frustrated call to her father, now back in their home state of Illinois, fishing for ideas about disasters in American history that might bear dramatic comparisons to Katrina. He mentioned the famous Johnstown Flood of 1889, and Weisman began trolling the Internet for accounts of that well-documented calamity. What she discovered was revelatory.

“I said to myself, Oh my God! There were so many perfect parallels!” Reisman marvels. These included not only the suddenness and ferocity of the tragedy but the fact that it was caused by inadequate flood-control measures—in this case the catastrophic failure of a 72-foot-high dam on the Little Connemaugh River 14 miles upstream of Johnstown, a Pennsylvania valley town—and the remarkable grit and determination exhibited by survivors. “That was also the first time the Red Cross and the National Guard and the media all came out in force, responding to a flood of such proportions. The fact is that what happened in Johnstown in 1889 created a blueprint for disasters to come.”

A scene from the Johnstown Flood.
A scene from the Johnstown Flood.
Information about Johnstown, she found, was plentiful. The flood has been the subject or setting for numerous histories, novels, poems, and other works, including Rebecca Gilman’s epic dramatization of the story, A True History of the Johnstown Flood, directed to mixed notices by Robert Falls in 2010 at Chicago’s Goodman Theatre. Much further back, in 1909, a theatrical exhibition portraying the flood, billed as “our time’s greatest electromechanical spectacle,” toured widely and was seen at the Stockholm Exhibition in Sweden by 100,000 visitors. No fewer than three American films carry the title The Johnstown Flood: a silent epic from 1926, an animated 1946 film in which Mickey Mouse uses time-reversal power to undo the disaster, and a short documentary that won an Academy Award in 1990.

With her focus deflected to an emblematic but richly comparable flood, and her appetite especially whetted by the flavorful language journalists used in their contemporary accounts of the 117-year-old disaster, Reisman had rekindled her playwriting imagination. Everything suddenly seemed right. She knew what she had to do next: Visit Johnstown.

Reisman arrived there for a brief stay in February 2015, and the first thing to grab her attention was a kind of geographic class division: In the narrow valley—Johnstown lies in the deepest river gorge in the U.S. east of the Rockies—compact working-class houses lay tight against one another, in contrast to the expansive and well-appointed middle-class homes ensconced on the high cliff overlooking the town. “There is a funicular that can carry you to the top of the mountain—it’s one of the largest in the country, you can drive a bus onto it,” Reisman recalls. Down below, walking paths marked by turnstiles led to the old Cambria Iron Company mill, a still beautiful Industrial Revolution-era building, just upstream from the city. The historic mill and its fate would become an integral element of her play.

“Bethlehem, Pa., is four hours east of Jonestown,” Reisman explains, “and it was Bethlehem Steel that kept the mill alive and functioning into modern times. The mill had been repaired and put back into operation after the flood, and Bethlehem Steel moved in and bought it in the 1930s. They renamed it Bethlehem Steel Johnstown, and operated it from that time until it was closed down in 1992. You can see by those turnstiles that everybody must have walked to work all those years. It was a way of life that stayed the same for so long.”

Driving around the town, Reisman was deeply moved. She wondered, “Why am I crying?” It wasn’t just that Johnstown was now a shell of its former self—the population had indeed dipped from more than 100,000 in the city’s heyday to less than 20,000, and most of downtown was abandoned. What stirred Reisman was “the steadfastness of the people who remained—their determination to say, ‘We’re not leaving! We’re not giving up! Now, on to the next thing!’ That’s the place’s kinship to New Orleans.”

In fact, there have been repeated floods in Johnstown—it was after a deluge in 1936 that levees were built and the town took on the short-lived nickname “No-Flood City,” which eventually morphed over time into its more accurate opposite, which Reisman adopted as her title (and for its part,Johnstown has embraced the name, hosting a Flood City Music Festival every August). The most recent major flood, in 1977, was more or less the nail in Johnstown’s coffin, convincing Bethlehem Steel not to update the mill structure but instead slowly reduce its usage. The mill’s final closure in 1992 becomes a time-hopping riff in Reisman’s play, as a group of beer-fueled steel workers raucously lament the end of an era at a local juke bar turned tourist-hungry casino.

Ashley Ricord Santos, Ian Hoch, and Keith Claverie in "Flood City" at NOLA Project. (Photo by John B. Barrois)
Ashley Ricord Santos, Ian Hoch, and Keith Claverie in “Flood City” at NOLA Project. (Photo by John B. Barrois)
Coincidentally, both Allegra and Reisman grew up in Illinois, which, though prone to the occasional tornado, is not the hotbed of natural disasters that Louisiana can be.

“It’s easy for somebody to say, in hindsight, ‘Why did you found a city right here at the watery mouth of the Mississippi 300 years ago?,’” Allegra says jokingly as he, the playwright, and Flood City director Mark Routhier join me for a conversation in the sunny NOCCA courtyard a few hours before the show’s first run-through. “But it takes more than just stubbornness or bull-headedness to go through multiple floods and continue to rebuild.

“Looking at the history of Katrina plays onstage,” Allegra goes on to postulate, “the most successful ones are those that handle it with a sense of humor. When I was still new to New Orleans, I went to see [actor-director] Ricky Graham’s show I’m Still Here, Me!, which I believe was the first Katrina play ever, the first show that opened after the storm. As a newcomer, I didn’t even get the local patois of the title, and I was laughing at stuff I didn’t fully understand—but it showed me how effective it can be to deal with tragedy through humor.” Allegra went on to mount NOLA Project founder Andrew Larimer’s satirical Get This Lake Off My House in 2006, confident that for Louisianians comedy is the best medicine in the face of inconsolable loss.

And it’s the laughs in Flood City—Reisman is willing to call the finished play “a clown show of nonstop shtick”—that may surprise audiences expecting ponderousness or lamentation. The humor gained polish during the show’s developmental process, which included a retreat near San Antonio, Tex., with theatrical innovator Erik Ehn, and a workshop presentation of the script at Playwrights Horizons of New York City’s Superlab, a cooperative venture with the ensemble Clubbed Thumb, where director Will Davis and dramaturg Adam Greenfield had input on the play. (Reisman also has connections to the site-specific troupe Brooklyn Yard and to theatres in Austin, where she did graduate work at the University of Texas; her résumé includes recent productions for Austin’s Zach Theatre of Alice in Wonderland and a residency at the youth-oriented New Victory Theater on 42nd Street with the immersive ensemble Underbelly, of which she’s a founding member.) The question that persisted through the show’s development was: Will Flood City’s jokes hit home?

Routhier thinks so, though the too-close-for-comfort recent flooding in the state has given him some second thoughts. “What scares me most is that this is a comedy that looks at the tenacity and good humor that helps people get through a natural disaster—but how much patience will audiences have for that tone after they’ve just been hit by a fresh calamity?”

He’s reassured, though, by Reisman’s savvy as a writer. “Gabby has a lovely way of injecting social critique into her work,” avows the director, who has worked regularly with NOLA Project and recently spent a year in Washington, D.C., running a directing intensive at the Kennedy Center sponsored by the National New Play Network. “There’s pushback about how the government doesn’t take care of things, how the people who are to blame don’t get blamed. All that fun stuff in the dialogue has resonance in the real world.”

Indeed, that night at the first run-through, the play’s real-world immediacy is striking: Trump-era concerns such as blatant prejudice against immigrants and the loss of jobs to trade deals and cheap foreign labor ripple through the dialogue. Flood City may be set in 1889 and 1992, but it has solid strands of 2016 in its DNA.

That tone of indignation is reinforced by the script’s willingness to lay blame for the Johnstown tragedy where it belongs: at the feet of the rich and famous. It was neglect by the likes of Henry Clay Frick and Andrew Carnegie—they led a club that modified the already faulty South Fork Dam to create a private resort lake for themselves and their wealthy associates—that was a direct cause of the flood, but none of the well-to-do were ever held accountable. After a long legal fight, the court judged the dam break to be an act of God and granted the survivors no legal compensation.

That’s just part of the backstory that unfolds as Reisman’s script progresses from monologues and one-on-one conversations between benumbed survivors to group encounters with Red Cross nurses (Clara Barton famously showed up in Johnstown with 50 volunteers, and stayed for more than five weeks), opportunistic journalists with cameras, and ambitious real-estate entrepreneurs.

The rehearsal atmosphere in NOCCA’s three-quarter-round space is informal and communicative. Actors’ suggestions and questions are fielded with equanimity by Routhier, Riesman, and the show’s tech team, which includes such top-notch resident talents as sound designer Brendan Connnelly and lighting designer Evan Spigelman.

The seven cast members, most of whom play multiple roles (“Almost all my plays have double-casting and overlap between spaces and characters,” Reisman notes), swarm confidently across Schepker’s bifurcated set. A note of hilarity breaks out when Routhier announces that a major casino scene will incorporate anachronistic dance moves to the rhythms of a ’70s instrumental loop.

That finger-snapping sequence, as well as a cascade of sound cues, Hope Bennett’s homespun double-period costumes, and Spigelman’s high-impact lighting effects (which include an unsettling photographic flash effect that punctuates scene changes) are all in place two nights later when Flood City goes up in front of its first audience. The crowd is mostly high school students with a special interest in the arts, half from NOCCA and half from Lusher, an uptown charter school dedicated to arts and academics. The laughs that Routhier was anxious about come heartily and frequently, and the students are on their feet cheering after the play’s ambiguous final scene.

The response vindicates Reisman’s approach. “I’m convinced you need humor,” she tells me during the whirl of post-curtain congratulations, “to get audiences to open up to ideas about social injustice and environmental stewardship. It’s boring to watch victims just be victims. That’s not cathartic—or even true to life, really.”

Allegra is pleased, too. “What I really want is for this play to have a life beyond New Orleans,” he enthuses. “There’s an issue with a lot of plays that premiere in New Orleans—they’re so localized in their concerns that they don’t have the ability to move on to other regions of the country. But the concerns in this play are anything but parochial. This play has important things to say to people everywhere.”

Jim O’Quinn, the founding editor of this magazine, now lives in New Orleans.

A version of this story appears in the November 2016 issue of American Theatre
18 2016-09-14
Hammond

Kennedy Named Southeastern Louisiana Alumnus of the Year


HAMMOND, La. – Southeastern Louisiana University’s most successful men’s basketball coach in history, Billy Kennedy, has been named the university’s 2016 Alumnus of the Year. He will be honored during Southeastern’s Homecoming celebrations in October.

Head basketball coach at Texas A&M for the past five seasons, Kennedy has been successful at all levels in his basketball coaching career, having earned Coach of the Year honors from multiple athletic conferences.

Most recently, Kennedy guided the Aggies to their first SEC Championship and a trip to the Sweet 16 during the 2015-16 campaign and was honored as SEC Coach of the Year by both the Associated Press and his fellow SEC coaches as well as earning District VII Coach of the Year recognition from the U.S. Basketball Writers Association.

Additionally, Texas A&M climbed to No. 5 in both the Associated Press Top 25 and the USA Today/Coaches Poll to mark the school’s highest-ever national ranking.

Kennedy is a 1986 graduate of Southeastern, where he played basketball, earned a bachelor’s degree in social studies education, and served as the university’s winningest basketball coach. A native of Metairie, he attended Holy Cross High School in New Orleans before heading to Hammond to continue his education.


“Anyone who has ever met Billy Kennedy can attest to the fact that he is a class act in every way,” said Mayson Foster of Hammond, president of the Southeastern Alumni Association. “His focus, wherever he has worked, has been on the success of his student-athletes, both on the court and in the classroom. We’re proud that Billy will return to his alma mater this fall to accept this honor, and we know he looks forward to seeing his many friends in the Hammond and New Orleans communities.”

He will be honored at the Alumni Association’s annual Awards Evening, scheduled for Friday, Oct. 21.

Kennedy joined Southeastern as head coach in 1999 and served until 2005, leading the Lions to two Southland Conference regular season titles and the school’s first-ever trip to the NCAA tournament. He was named Coach of the Year by the Louisiana Sports Writers Association, the Louisiana Association of Basketball Coaches and the National Association of Basketball Coaches for District 8 in back-to-back years. The Southland Conference named him Coach of the Year in 2004.

Kennedy has also held assistant coaching positions at Northwestern State University, Tulane, Creighton University, and the University of Miami. In addition to his positions at Texas A&M and Southeastern, he has served as head coach at Centenary College and Murray State University.


18 2016-09-13
Baton Rouge

SLU's student-run farmers market will sell food, arts and crafts, more


HAMMOND — The Southeastern Louisiana University student organization Reconnect will hold a farmers market in front of the Student Union from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday.

The only student-run farmers market on a college campus in the state, the event features food sales from area farmers, food samples, arts and crafts, homemade soaps; and vendors, including Simple Works’ all-natural bath and body product and Francis Chauvin’s homemade pies and shoe sole pastries.

In addition to fresh produce, other items include jams and jellies, beef jerky, tea cakes, hummus, farm-fresh eggs, breads and popsicles.

A student environmental club, Reconnect participates in the Real Food Challenge, a national effort among college students to promote the use of locally grown, healthy and sustainable food products
18 2016-09-13
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN IS CELEBRATING 91ST BIRTHDAY THIS WEEK


HAMMOND---Southeastern Louisiana University turns 91 on September 14. Lions everywhere are encouraged to join in celebration of all things Green and Gold!



Students, faculty, and staff are invited to enjoy cupcakes at a birthday celebration on Sept. 14 starting at 10 am in the Student Union, under the covered breezeway near the bookstore. This event is sponsored by the Campus Activities Board.



Southeastern Louisiana University began as a grass-roots movement by the people of Hammond and the surrounding area, who recognized the need for an institution of higher education in order to further the educational, economic and cultural development of southeast Louisiana.



President Linus A. Sims opened our doors on September 14, 1925 with a faculty of three women, two men and forty students. What began as a junior college supported by local taxes has developed into a major university as Southeastern has grown to meet the evolving needs of southeast Louisiana.

More information about the history of our University can be found here.


18 2016-09-13
Hammond

SEED Center Business Incubator turns three


This month marks the third anniversary of the operation of the Southwest Louisiana Business Incubator in the SEED Center.
The construction of the SEED Center and the establishment of the Incubator was based on a detailed feasibility study and the successful track record of hundreds of incubators around the nation and world. Many incubators specialize in one type of business but we determined that due to our size market, we would operate what is known as a “mixed-use” incubator. We do not limit the type of businesses to any one category. Therefore, we have technology companies, engineering and appraisal services, publishing, and more.
Prior to the SEED Center, a small mini-incubator was established in the Magnolia Building with the approval of the Calcasieu Parish Police Jury with support from the City of Lake Charles. After a successful test run, it was decided that a full size incubator could help develop a culture of entrepreneurship in our region. Traditionally our area has not had as many separate businesses per capita as our counterparts in Lafayette and Beaumont.
With the industrial expansion and major growth coming to our area many individuals may choose this time to open their own business.
Adrian Wallace, executive director of the Business Incubator, can assist you in evaluating your business idea and help you determine if the incubator is the right venue for your business. By the way, in the three years of the incubator’s operation Adrian has been elected president of the State Incubator Association and he was elected to the national incubator association board of directors. This is a good sign of credibility for our relatively new operation.
A business incubator provides office space for start-ups along with counseling, and training programs. The purpose is to help new businesses get stronger so they can grow out of the incubator into commercial office space. Businesses in an incubator have a very high success rate because of the attention and counseling they receive.
To date, the SW La. Incubator has been home to over 30 businesses with over 276 employees. Revenues this year are already over $3.8 million dollars. These are businesses that were not in operation prior to moving into the incubator.
The SEED Center Incubator is only one part of the services offered at The SEED Center. Free, confidential business counseling is available from the McNeese Small Business Development Center, and Score. Help with government contacts is available through PTAC. Market data including information on your potential customers is available from the Alliance.
One of the rewarding benefits of working at the Alliance is to watch true startup businesses present their idea to our incubator screening committee, then see them develop into successful businesses. We want to replicate this throughout the five parish region, so if you have an idea for a business, visit The SEED Center at 4310 Ryan St.
If you have the desire, fortitude, and ideas for your own business, now is the time to contact the business incubator at the SEED Center.
18 2016-09-09
Hammond

COACH BILLY KENNEDY NAMED SLU ALUMNUS OF THE YEAR


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University’s most successful men’s basketball coach in history, Billy Kennedy, has been named the university’s 2016 Alumnus of the Year. He will be honored during Southeastern’s Homecoming celebrations in October.
Head basketball coach at Texas A&M University for the past five seasons, Kennedy has been successful at all levels in his basketball coaching career, having earned Coach of the Year honors from multiple athletic conferences.
Kennedy is a 1986 graduate of Southeastern, where he played basketball, earned a bachelor’s degree in social studies education, and served as the university’s winningest basketball coach. A native of Metairie, he attended Holy Cross High School in New Orleans before heading to Hammond to continue his education.
“Anyone who has ever met Billy Kennedy can attest to the fact that he is a class act in every way,” said Mayson Foster of Hammond, president of the Southeastern Alumni Association. “His focus, wherever he has worked, has been on the success of his student-athletes, both on the court and in the classroom. We’re proud that Billy will return to his alma mater this fall to accept this honor, and we know he looks forward to seeing his many friends in the Hammond and New Orleans communities.”
He will be honored at the Alumni Association’s annual Awards Evening, scheduled for Friday, Oct. 21. Tickets and more information on the event can be obtained from the Alumni Association at 985-549-2150.
Kennedy joined Southeastern as head coach in 1999 and served until 2005, leading the Lions to two Southland Conference regular season titles and the school’s first-ever trip to the NCAA tournament. He was named Coach of the Year by the Louisiana Sports Writers Association, the Louisiana Association of Basketball Coaches and the National Association of Basketball Coaches for District 8 in back-to-back years. The Southland Conference named him Coach of the Year in 2004.
After last year’s successful season that saw the Aggies earn a share of the Southeastern Conference Championship and advance to the Sweet 16, Kennedy was named SEC Coach of the Year and garnered the District 21 Coach of the Year honor from the National Association of Basketball Coaches. His team climbed to No. 5 in both the Associated Press Top 25 and the USA Today/Coaches Poll to mark the school highest-ever national ranking.
Kennedy has also held assistant coaching positions at Northwestern State University, Tulane, Creighton University, and the University of Miami. In addition to his positions at Texas A&M and Southeastern, he has served as head coach at Centenary College and Murray State University.

18 2016-09-08
Hammond

LeFevor on exhibit at Southeastern


A photographic exhibition by artist and historian David LeFevor will be on display from Sept. 8 - 29 at Southeastern Louisiana University's Contemporary Art Gallery. LeFevor will also present an artist lecture in the gallery's lecture area on Sept. 27 at noon.
The exhibit, "Cuba: Histories of the Present," will feature 30 large format prints taken in Cuba from the year 2001 to 2015. LaFevor's work in Cuba began as a student at the University of Havana.


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The gallery will host an opening reception on Thursday, Sept, 8 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. The gallery is open Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. The exhibit is free and open to the public.
Gallery Director Dale Newkirk said, "These images focus on daily life, racial identity, and material culture."
LeFevor is an assistant professor of Latin American History and Digital Humanities at the University of Texas in Arlington. The exhibit is organized by UTA's Center for Greater Southwestern Studies.
For more information, contact the gallery at 985-549-5080.

18 2016-09-07
Hammond

SLU CHEMIST DISCUSSES WOOD TREATMENT POST-FLOODING


HAMMOND – A Southeastern Louisiana University chemist will discuss the chemistry behind treating wood that may have been flooded at a free seminar scheduled noon Friday (Sept. 9) in Pursley Hall, room 211.

Georgina Little, an instructor of experimental chemistry, will discuss “Can Mold be Treated by Amateurs.”

“Many people are having to become mold treatment do-it-yourself-ers as they try to recover from flood damage,” Little said. “The internet is full of lots of advice on how to treat framing that has been sitting in flood water before adding new sheetrock. Unfortunately, even the more respectable sources do not agree on the best way to treat the wood; in some cases they actually contradict one another.”

Little will investigate the claims from a chemistry perspective and provide information on the biology of mold. This presentation will focus on the chemistry of some proposed treatments and whether or not the claims being made "hold water."

18 2016-09-07
Hammond

SLU: SHERMAN FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP AWARDED TO FOLSOM STUDENT


SHERMAN FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP AWARDED – The William F. Sherman, M.D. Memorial Scholarship was presented to Southeastern Louisiana University student Lacy Falgot of Folsom, second from left, by Hammond dentist Kenneth Sherman. The Sherman family endowed the scholarship in memory of the late Dr. Sherman of Ponchatoula, a 1971 Southeastern graduate who was killed in an automobile accident in 1976. The scholarship supports students seeking careers in medicine. Pictured are, from left, Danny Acosta, a friend and mentor of the late Dr. Sherman; Falgot; Kenneth Sherman; and Southeastern Donor Relations Coordinator Lisa Patti.


18 2016-09-07
Hammond

SLU ECONOMICS FACULTY LISTED THIRD MOST PROLIFIC IN SOUTH


HAMMOND – The economics faculty at Southeastern Louisiana University has been ranked the third most prolific in research in the U.S. Southern Region, according to a study published in the journal “Economics Bulletin.”
The study, titled “Out of Big Brother’s Shadow: Ranking Economics Faculties at Regional Universities in the U.S. South,” evaluated research productivity from more than 200 colleges and universities in the South that are classified as regional universities. Southeastern was ranked tops among four Louisiana institutions in the listing.
“Our economics faculty publish quality applied and scholarly research, in line with the college’s mission,” said Antoinette Philips, interim dean of the College of Business. “They reflect their research in their teaching, which leads to an enriched learning experience for our students.”
Southeastern’s economics program is based in the Department of Management and Business Administration. Faculty in the program have been published in the “Journal of Urban Economics,” “Economics of Education Review,” “Journal of Macroeconomics,” and “Applied Economics,” all of which are ranked among the top 100 economics journals.
The study was written by economists Frank Mixon of Columbus State University and Kamal Upadhyaya of the University of New Haven and can be found on line at www.economicsbulletin.com/.
The authors note that approximately 200 regional universities are located in states that comprise the U.S. South, and no study to date focused solely on the research endeavors of economics faculties affiliated with these universities.

18 2016-09-07
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN POET RECOGNIZED FOR PUBLISHING "WATERLINES"


HAMMOND – “Waterlines,” a book of poetry by Southeastern Louisiana University English Instructor Alison Pelegrin, has been published by LSU Press.
Pelegrin’s fourth full-length poetry collection describes the terrible power of nature even as the poems underscore Louisiana’s beauty.
Water, even the threat of hurricanes and floods, can sustain people as they settle into the casual beauty of their everyday lives, the poet said.
American poet Sheryl St. Germain said about Pelegrin, “I love her bold and impudent voice, her unflinching vision. I would trust her to take me anywhere.” David Kirby, author of “Get up, Please,” said “Pelegrin stays close to her roots yet journeys out and back, ranging widely and then coming back home to tap strength and sustenance. In the end ‘Waterlines’ is a big, big book.”
A resident of Covington, Pelegrin also is the author of “The Zydeco Tablets,” “Big Muddy River of Stars, “Hurricane Party,” and three chapbooks: “Squeezers,” “Voodoo Lips” and “Dancing with the One-Armed Man.” Her poems have been featured in “Poetry Daily,” “The Writer’s Almanac,” as well as various other literary journals.
A recipient of the President’s Medal for Artistic Activity, one of the highest honors Southeastern bestows on faculty, Pelegrin has received fellowships from the Louisiana Division of the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts and was a Tennessee Williams Scholar at the Sewanee Writers’ Conference.
The book is available through Amazon.com, at local bookstores or through the LSU Press, www.lsupress.org or 1-800-848-6224.
PHOTO:
WATERLINES – Southeastern Louisiana University English Instructor Alison Pelegrin has published her fourth book of poetry called “Waterlines.” The book describes the power of nature, as well as Louisiana’s beauty.

18 2016-09-01
Baton Rouge

Southeastern Louisiana University fall graduation deadline is Sept. 15


Southeastern Louisiana University students have until Sept. 15 to apply to graduate in fall 2016.

Candidates for associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees can apply through their LeoNet campus accounts by choosing the “Self Service, Degree Progress/Graduation, Apply for Graduation” option. For instructions, visit southeastern.edu under the “Current Students” link; click on “Graduation Information – Apply for Graduation.”

Students also can apply by calling the Office of Records and Registration at (985) 549-2066 or via direct link at southeastern.edu/graduation.

The application fee is $35 and should be paid directly to the Controller’s Office in the Financial Aid Building on North Campus.


18 2016-09-01
Baton Rouge

Free government contracting course scheduled for Sept. 13 in Hammond


A free government contracting course, hosted by the Louisiana Small Business Development Center at Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond, is slated for Sept. 13 at 1514 Martens Drive.

The course is co-sponsored by the Louisiana Procurement Technical Assistance Center, Tangipahoa Economic Development and Greater Hammond Chamber of Commerce.

Speakers include representatives from Louisiana Economic Development, the Office of State Procurement and Louisiana Procurement Technical Assistance Center.

Representatives will be available to help attendees compete registration for the Small and Emerging Business Development program, Veterans Initiative or Hudson Initiative. Attendees should bring a laptop or electronic device.

Call (985) 549-3831 for information or register online at lsbdc.org.


18 2016-09-01
Baton Rouge

Employers invited to Southeastern Louisiana University Career Fair


Employers and businesses are invited to participate in Southeastern Louisiana University’s annual Career Fair on Sept. 15.

The fair will be held from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in the Pennington Student Activity Center for Southeastern students and alumni. More than 130 area and national employers typically attend the fair, a news release said.

The registration deadline is Thursday. Visit southeastern.edu/careerfair, call the Office of Career Services at (985) 549-2121 or email careerservices@southeastern.edu.
18 2016-09-01
Hammond

SLU faculty members release song to support flood relief


Impaired Faculties, a Hammond-area local rock band whose members also happen to be Southeastern Louisiana University professors, has released an original song, “Waterline,” intended to raise funds for students and their families affected by the recent floods.

The song, written by communication professor Joseph Burns and produced by bassist Randy Settoon, was recorded by the band one week after the historic floods devastated southeast Louisiana, a news release said. “Waterline” reflects on the nature of flooding in Louisiana and the resilience and hope of its people in the face of disasters.

Burns said the song is being sold for $1 through the website impairedfaculties.com, and can also be purchased as CDBaby.com and will be available on iTunes and Amazon.com soon. A purchaser of “Waterline” will also be allowed four other songs by the group free of charge if purchased on the website.

The band has pledged all proceeds from the sale of the single to the SLU Disaster Relief Fund, a collection point for donations to aid students impacted by the flooding.

In addition to Burns, members of the group include Dan McCarthy, guitar and vocalist, dean of the College of Science and Technology; Bill Robison, guitar and vocalist, head of the Department of History and Political Science; professor of business Settoon, bass guitar and vocalist; and Ralph Wood, drums, assistant dean of the College of Nursing and Health Sciences.

The song is the first release by the band since its 2015 debut album, “Lipstick and Whiskey.”


18 2016-09-01
Hammond

Southeastern Community Music School registration now open


The Southeastern Louisiana University’s Community Music School (CMS) began its fall session on Aug. 29. Registration has already begun and will remain open throughout the semester.
Students of all ages may participate in private lessons on various instruments and voice. Opportunities for group instruction and ensemble formation are also available.


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“In the fall 2016 semester, we will add two new faces to our instructional roster, Katie Walker and Lisa Rhonis. Ms. Walker, a Southeastern voice student, will be teaching voice at our Hammond location, while Ms. Rhonis, who holds a masters degree and is also a certified Suzuki instructor, will teach guitar at our Mandeville location,” said CMS Director Jivka Duke. “In addition, we hope to add a string orchestra class on Saturday mornings on the Southeastern campus.
Duke said that due to sponsorship of the program by First Guaranty Bank this academic year, the CMS will once again offer discounted tuition to students who are on reduced or free lunch at their schools.
For more information about CMS programs and general registration, call 985-549-5502, or see the CMS website at www.southeastern.edu/cms.

18 2016-08-29
Hammond

Faculty Senate president to advocate for higher ed


For Dayne Sherman, his goal as new Southeastern Louisiana University Faculty Senate president is simple: advocate for higher education funding and work to improve conditions for faculty, staff and students at the university.
He said his two biggest enemies are apathy and lack of information, and as a library professor he knows a thing or two about searching for information. In his new role, he wants to use information to "keep apathy at bay."
"I think half my job is making people aware," he said.
Faculty Senate met Wednesday for its first meeting of the fall semester. Sherman sent senators an email suggesting the body discuss documents on the Louisiana Board of Regent's funding formula for colleges and universities. The formula this school year resulted in Southeastern getting about $1.4 million less in funding, a cut that Sherman said is unfair.
"This formula seems to be leaving Southeastern out," he said Thursday, adding the university is the third largest in the state.
The new faculty senate president said he plans to push for resolutions advocating for more state funding for higher education and to improve working conditions at Southeastern, pointing out that faculty members have gone without merit raises for years.
Sherman said he is skeptical about the board's formula, as it seemed to award some universities and penalize others unfairly. Since the recession, colleges and universities have faced significant financial cuts from the state that has led to layoffs, program cuts and higher tuitions.
He is also critical of the board's Elevate Louisiana initiative, which the board adopted last year as a response to the "new fiscal reality" of higher education.
"The new fiscal reality of Louisiana requires postsecondary education to seriously re-consider how it conducts its business to insure that it invests strategically in quality programs that meet the needs of the state's citizens, business and industry, and elevates the state's priorities as a whole," the board states.
Sherman said he is particularly concerned about the initiative's talk on mergers. The board explains on its website the purpose of Elevate Louisiana and lists seven parameters it will use for proposed actions.
"I'm very disturbed by what's coming out of the Board of Regents," he said.
The parameters include, approving revisions to existing role, scope and mission statements, developing a policy on mergers/consolidations of institutions, adopting a policy on financial early warning systems and financial stress, revising the board's policy on low-completer review to elevate the threshold for review, conducting reviews on all graduate programs and targeted undergraduate programs and reviewing degree requirements and available courses to encourage structured degree pathways with limited course choices.
18 2016-08-29
Hammond

Band sings of resilience, draws relief donations


By LAUREN LANGLOIS staffwriter@hammondstar.com | 0 comments
While waters from the historic flood earlier this month started receding across the region, the musicians that make up the band Impaired Faculties got to work making a song that would celebrate Louisianans' resiliency while raising money for flood victims.
They came up with "Waterline," a song born out of two concepts: drawing a line to mark how high floodwater gets inside a home and rising above adversity, said Joe Burns, band member and Southeastern Louisiana University communication professor.
The song is now available for $1 at impairedfaculties.com, as well as CDBaby.com. It will soon be on iTunes and Amazon.com as well. All proceeds will go toward the SLU Disaster Relief Fund.
Burns was playing with his kids and listening to news on the flood when lyrics started coming to him for a song that would be an ode to Louisianans' pride in their homeland that does not disappear when bad weather comes their way.
"We live here because its wonderful," he said. "No one is running."
He described the song as "epic," with a message that is defiant in the face of people asking why south Louisianans live in a corner of the country that gets pummeled by hurricanes and heavy rains regularly.
"If you have to ask, then you won't understand," the singer belts.
The band is made up of SLU professors Burns; Dan McCarthy, guitarist, vocalist and dean of the College of Science and Technology; Bill Robison, guitarist, vocalist and head of the Department of History and Political Science; Randy Settoon, bass guitarist, vocalist and business professor; and Ralph Wood, drummer and assistant dean of the College of Nursing and Health Sciences.
The song talks about how this flood is different than the rest in that it follows another major flood in March. Settoon saw damaging waters in his home during the March flood and a little bit of floodwater in August. Robison, who lives in the Baton Rouge area, was surrounded by water for days.
"Bill Robison was an island unto himself," Burns said.
Luckily for Burns, who lives in Hammond, no water got inside his home. However, they all know what it is like dealing with frustrating, disruptive and sometimes deadly storms. Burns remembers going through Hurricane Katrina in 2005, which he rode out with his family.
The band wanted to do something to help those affected by the latest flood. Originally they thought of doing a concert to raise funds, something along the lines of Woodstock. That is still an idea they'd like to do, but the song was a project that could be done by themselves to benefit the SLU Disaster Relief Fund set up for students and their families impacted by the storm.
Once he had the lyrics down, the band got to work creating the music. They recorded it in Settoon's studio that had gotten a bit of water. Each member already had an idea of what to bring to the song.
"We all knew exactly where we were going," he said.
They recorded it in one day a week after the floods started on Aug. 12. Now they are asking that people spend a $1 to help out their flooded neighbors and enjoy their rock creation that Burns said sounds great at any volume.
"It can be as loud as you want it to be," he said.

18 2016-08-29
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN OFFERS LION RIDE SHARE TO HELP COMMUTERS


HAMMOND – In order to help those struggling with transportation to and from campus following the recent historic flooding, Southeastern Louisiana University has created Lion Ride Share.
“When communicating with students, faculty and staff who suffered from flooding, one common concern was finding transportation to and from campus after having lost their vehicles,” said Executive Director of Public and Governmental Affairs Erin Cowser. “Lion Ride Share was created to help facilitate a means for those who could use a ride to class or even a ride home for the weekend to help with recovery work.”
Both those in need of a ride and those willing to share a ride are invited to connect with fellow students, faculty and staff members through the website www.southeastern.edu/lionrideshare.
As an added bonus, Lion Ride Share allows users to determine their own criteria for choosing a fellow rider.
“We hope you find this resource useful. Remember to buckle up and Lion Up,” Cowser added.

18 2016-08-25
Baton Rouge

SLU creates regional flood relief web portal


With so many residents still reeling from recent floods across the region, Southeastern Louisiana University has compiled an online repository of flood relief resources available at www.southeastern.edu/floodrelief.

“Our hope is that this information will be useful as the region begins the recovery process,” said President John L. Crain. “Those in need of specific services or goods can find out where to register for help with cleanup, where to find free boxes, where they can get school supplies once local K-12 schools reopen and more.”

Anyone with additional resources to submit on the web portal should contact outreach@southeastern.edu.


18 2016-08-25
Baton Rouge

QuickBooks seminar planned in Hammond


The Louisiana Small Business Development Center at Southeastern Louisiana University will co-sponsor with the Greater Hammond Chamber of Commerce and Northshore SCORE a free seminar designed to help residents master QuickBooks for business.

The QuickBooks for Everyday Business Use seminar is set for 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Aug. 30 at the Southeast Louisiana Business Center, located at 1514 Martens Drive, in Hammond. Guest speaker for the seminar is Mark Winebrener, of ClearView Accounting.

The primary value of QuickBooks or any accounting software, said Sandy Summers, assistant director of the Small Business Development Center, is to provide the financial and management data that will help effectively manage a business. Additionally, she said, it should provide consistently accurate data for the preparation of any tax or compliance forms required by government or industry agencies.

Topics to be covered include accounting principles; financial statements; QuickBooks online, setting up a chart of accounts, customers and vendors; invoices and forms; attaching receipts to transactions; receiving payments and deposits; entering and paying bills; sales tax; inventory; payroll; and reconciling accounts.

Although there is no cost to attend, seating is only guaranteed for preregistered attendees. To register or for more information, call (985) 549-3831. Online registration is also available at www.lsbdc.org.
18 2016-08-25
Hammond

SLU offers counseling after flood


Southeastern Louisiana University Counseling Center will have free individual counseling for all Southeastern students, faculty, staff and their families. Following the unprecedented flooding in the region, they are offering support groups to aid in disaster recovery.
"We are providing a safe, quiet space to process this experience. We want to help students, faculty and staff adjust to the 'new normal'," said Annette Newton, counselor and community liaison for the center.


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To schedule an appointment at the Counseling Center, call (985) 549-3894.
The Counseling Center will also offer students disaster recovery support groups. Licensed professional counselors will help with crisis debriefing, general questions and concerns. Room 2202 in the Student Union has been reserved for sessions at the following dates and times: Thursday, Aug. 25, 1-2 p.m.; Tuesday, Aug. 30, 11-12 noon; Wednesday, Aug. 31, 11-12 noon; and Thursday, Sept. 1, 1-2 p.m.
Here are some things to know about mental health after a disaster:
• Distress is a normal reaction to an abnormal situation and includes feeling anxious, angry, stressed, overwhelmed, tearful, and numb. Distress causes people to have difficulty sleeping and concentrating. You can expect to experience some of these symptoms after a disaster.
• Severe distress can be a sign of Acute Distress Disorder. It is characterized by abnormal levels of anxiety and dissociative symptoms and is different than Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.
• Most people psychologically and emotionally recover within a few weeks after a disaster. This is called resilience. Resiliency is improved when we connect and help one another. By remaining calm, we help ourselves, so that we may be of service to others.
• Children need help processing natural disasters that may be difficult for their underdeveloped brains to comprehend. Talk to your children and siblings to help them understand why these events occurred and support their emotional needs.
For more information, contact the Counseling Center at (985) 549-3894.
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CHILLIN' WITH THE CAMBER -- Chillin' with the Chamber has been rescheduled for Sept. 1, 6:30-8:30 p.m., according to the Greater Hammond Chamber of Commerce.
The chamber and Title Sponsor Cypress Pointe Surgical Hospital look forward to drawing the winner for the $10,000 grand prize and other prizes, as well as having Mrs. Frances Chauvin tear up the chamber note.
Guests will enjoy live music by steel drum artist Mitch Rencher, as well as hors d'oeuvres, desserts and an open bar provided by chamber member restaurants. Guests are encouraged to wear cruise-appropriate attire. No swimsuits, please.
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FREE TAX SERVICES - Locally owned and operated Jackson Hewitt Tax Service is offering free assistance to those taxpayers needing copies of personal tax returns to obtain federal aid due to the recent flooding. Jackson Hewitt offices in Baton Rouge, Hammond, Lafayette, Houma and Lake Charles will assist clients in obtaining copies of tax returns prepared for 2015 at no charge.
In addition, any taxpayer wishing to file an amended return to claim a refund for damage suffered during the recent flooding in South Louisiana may come in beginning today through Oct. 15, 2016 and receive assistance preparing and filing that return at no charge.
Please call 800-234-1040 for a location near you. We are here to assist our community in this time of need. Jackson Hewitt where taxes are less taxing. Louisiana Strong. Louisiana Proud.
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SUNDRESSES AND SHRIMP BOOTS - Due to the extensive flooding that has affected offices, staff, volunteers and the CAS service region, the 2016 Cottages for CASA kick-off celebration, Sundresses and Shrimp Boots event on Aug. 28 has been postponed.
The event was originally scheduled for this Sunday at the Cedar Post Barn in Albany
Child Advocacy Services is in the process of trying to reach all parties involved and will notify the public, partners, supporters and ticketholders when other arrangements have been finalized.
For questions and information about the Cottages for CASA Playhouse Raffle and the Sundresses and Shrimp Boots event or the services provided through Child Advocacy Services, please contact Ginger Cangelosi at 1-800-798-1575 or see www.childadv.net.

18 2016-08-25
Hammond

Universities unite


Two universities came together Monday morning to support the flood recovery cause.
Representatives of the University of South Alabama drove to Louisiana a semi-truck hauling four 26-foot-long box trailers filled with water, non-perishable food items, baby products, cleaning supplies, pet products and other supplies.
Half of the items were being sent to the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, and the other half were delivered to the United Way of Southeast Louisiana donation center in the warehouse of the Daily Star building. Southeastern Louisiana University Athletics staffers helped unload the items.
Jamene Dahmer, senior vice president of resource development, marketing and volunteerism, said this is the biggest donation United Way has received and was especially grateful to receive several brooms and mops -- handy flood recovery items which had not been donated by other sources.
When South Alabama Athletic Director Joel Erdmann, a former Southeastern athletic director, heard about the flooding in Louisiana, he reached out to Southeastern Athletic Director Jay Artigues who connected him with United Way.
Erdmann said from Tuesday to Sunday last week, the South Alabama athletic department began taking donations from the community. For 12 hour days, teams, student works, administration and staff manned the collection and stocked the trucks.
"We tried to blow it up on social media, and it was pretty successful," Erdmann said.
Erdmann said it is amazing to see people take the time out of their day and spend money on people in need.
"It's pretty heartwarming," he said. "And we also appreciate all the folks of Southeastern for unloading."
Artigues said he was glad to help after the Alabama community showed such support.
"They really did a great job of coming together out there in Mobile and showing support for us," he said.
The donated items will be counted for inventory and then divided into kits to be distributed to churches in the area, Dahmer said. The churches will then directly distribute the items into the community.
Southeastern coaches, administration and staff volunteered their time to unload on the items Monday since the student athletes had started class on Monday. The student athletes cleaned 60 flooded houses last week, with the baseball team alone doing 37 homes.
"All those guys really stepped up," Artigues said.

18 2016-08-25
Hammond

JAGUARS SEND TRUCKLOADS OF DONATIONS TO LIONS, COMMUNITY


HAMMOND – When Joel and Tina Erdmann parted ways with Southeastern Louisiana University seven years ago, they said the Hammond university would always hold a special place in their hearts.
That sentiment led to five trucks loaded down with donated water, food, baby supplies, pet food, cleaning materials and other items courtesy of the people of the Mobile area who responded to the University of South Alabama’s (USA) call to help the people of south Louisiana impacted by the recent floods. It was a special delivery from the USA Jaguars and their community to the SLU Lions and their community.
“I met with our staff and coaches last week and suggested we help, and they were in full support,” said USA Athletic Director Joel Erdmann, who served as athletic director at Southeastern from May 2007 to August 2009 when he returned to his alma mater. “I knew we needed to do something, so we put out a call to the community for supplies. I didn’t know what kind of response we would get. By the second day, I knew we would need a second truck. The supplies kept coming in and we ended up with five trucks full of supplies.”
When Jamene Dahmer of the United Way of Southeast Louisiana saw the five large trucks loaded with supplies pulling into the Daily Star newspaper’s parking lot Monday morning, her first words were, “This is so heartwarming. It is an example of the best of human kindness.”
After dropping off half the supplies in Hammond, the trucks headed to Lafayette to help the people in that area since USA plays in the Sun Belt Conference with the University of Louisiana-Lafayette.
Monday was the first day of classes at Southeastern, and most of the student-athletes were in the classroom, so more than 40 coaches and staff members volunteered and worked together to unload the trucks and sort them in the warehouse.
Dahmer said the supplies would be distributed to area churches and other organizations that are disseminating them to people in need.
Southeastern Athletic Director Jay Artigues said he is impressed with the outpouring of volunteerism and support the area is receiving from people and organizations.
“Joel contacted us last week and said he wanted to do something to help our area,” Artigues said. “It’s a very generous gesture.”
“Last week, our student-athletes gutted over 60 homes and worked in food banks and shelters,” he added. Monday it was the staff and coaches’ turn to do their community service.
In addition to the response of the student-athletes, more than 160 other students worked Wednesday through Friday cleaning and gutting more than 68 homes.
On hand at the USA delivery was Tangipahoa Parish President Robby Miller. “This is overwhelming,” he said, “and shows we have friends all over the region. Joel’s efforts will make a real impact on those affected by the floods.”
PHOTOS:
UNLOADING SUPPLIES – Southeastern head women’s soccer coach Blake Hornbuckle hands off supplies destined for flooded regions in the Hammond area. The supplies were collected through a drive spearheaded by a University of South Alabama drive. Southeastern coaches and staff unloaded the supplies and sorted them in the Hammond Daily Star’s warehouse under the supervision of the United Way of Southeast Louisiana.

OLD FRIENDS -- University of South Alabama Athletic Director Joel Erdmann, right, talks with Tangipahoa Parish President Robby Miller, center, and Southeastern alumnus Andre Coudrain after delivering truckloads of disaster relief supplies in Hammond. Erdmann was the former athletic director at Southeastern several years ago and headed the drive in the Mobile area to aid flood victims in the Hammond and Lafayette areas.

18 2016-08-24
Hammond

University Faculty Band Releases Song For Louisiana Flood Victims, Donating All Money To Relief Efforts


Local all-Southeastern Louisiana University (SELU) professor rock-band ‘Impaired Faculties’ is stepping up to help flood victims across the state by selling their new song dedicated to those impacted by flooding and giving all the proceeds to disaster relief.

The song, “Waterline,” is available for $1 on Impaired Faculties website, HERE.

The band’s spokesman and front guitarist Dr. Joe Burns said 100 percent of the proceeds will go to SLU’s Disaster Relief Fund, which helps flooding victims who have lost their homes and property in the recent devastation.


18 2016-08-22
Baton Rouge

Resources for businesses


The Walker Business Recovery Center is now open, offering a wide range of services to businesses impacted by the severe storms and flooding that began last week.

The center is located at the Southeastern Louisiana University Literacy and Technology Center, Room 101, 9261 Florida Blvd. in Walker. It will be open on weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. No appointment is necessary. All services are provided free of charge.

SBA representatives will meet with each business owner to explain how an SBA Disaster Loan can help finance their recovery. LSBDC consultants at the center will provide counseling on a wide variety of matters designed to help small business owners re-establish their operations, overcome the effects of the disaster and plan for their future. Services include assessing business economic injury, evaluating the business’s strength, cash flow projections and most importantly, a review of all options to ensure each business makes decisions that are appropriate for its situation.
18 2016-08-22
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN CREATES REGIONAL FLOOD RELIEF PORTAL


HAMMOND – With so many individuals still reeling from the recent floods across the region, Southeastern Louisiana University has compiled an online repository of flood relief resources available at www.southeastern.edu/floodrelief.
“Our hope is that this information will be useful as the region begins the recovery process,” said President John L. Crain. “Those in need of specific services or goods can find out where to register for help with cleanup, where to find free boxes, where they can get school supplies once local K-12 schools reopen and more.”
And, of course, as much as it is intended to assist those who suffered damages from the flooding, it is also a helpful collection of ways for people to assist with recovery efforts. There is information about the different items being accepted at various locations throughout the region. You can also sign up to volunteer your time doing everything from gutting houses to sorting canned goods at the Southeastern Food Pantry.
Anyone with additional resources they would like to submit for inclusion on the web portal, should forward information to outreach@southeastern.edu.

18 2016-08-22
Hammond

SHERMAN: GIVING A CUP OF COLD WATER


By: Dayne Sherman

My heart is heavy for Louisiana residents invaded by floodwaters, many still fighting the deluge, water still deep in homes.

But for the bravery and love of the people in South Louisiana we would perish from the earth. Have you seen the heroic video of David Phung and his buddies as they were riding in a duck boat, and they came upon a woman in her little red car, the waters drowning the convertible, the car sinking?

They risked their lives, saved both woman and her dog.

Believe me when I say America is already great. We don’t need to be made great again, all presidential slogans aside.

My house in Ponchatoula is as dry as driftwood on a sunny beach. Yet I have compassion for my Louisiana brothers and sisters. Who expected such a Noahic flood without a hurricane? I sure didn’t.

Governor John Bel Edwards has been on top of this and other crises since he started work on January 11. He’s had a hard row to hoe, but he’s up for it. Even the Louisiana Governor’s Mansion flooded. Only in Louisiana.

He’s doing his part, and so should we. Not everyone can steer a duck boat to fish people and pets out of the water. Thankfully, there were people who could and did.

For the rest of us, ripping out sheetrock and cleaning houses might be the best we can do. That needs to be done. Others of us may only be able to bring lunch to a work crew, and that’s important. Some folks unable to help otherwise can give money.

I’ve done demolition, brought food to workers, and gave money. Likewise, I’ve tried to use my communication skills and influence to advocate for those in need. Nothing I’ve done was anywhere close to risking life and limb in water rescues.

But beware of the scammers when donating money. The frauds are not only unscrupulous contractors preying on the innocent. Instead, they are fake charities carrying out scams to separate the kindhearted from their cold cash.

A good place to give locally is the Southeastern Louisiana University Disaster Relief Fund, which will help students in need. Some 7,000 students at Southeastern live in the area hit by flooding. That’s half the student body. I gave to the fund, and I hope you, too, will consider helping students in need. The website is https://connect.southeastern.edu/slu-disaster-relief-fund-donation-page.

We will pull through this difficult time if we put people first. Just giving a cup of cold water to a person in need is the main mission of caring. Everything else is lagniappe.

Dayne Sherman is a writer and professor. He blogs at TalkAboutTheSouth.com, and his latest work is an ebook titled “Fat Boy: A Short Memoir.”
18 2016-08-19
Hammond

SLU to make up lost days from flooding


Fall break will not happen this semester at Southeastern Louisiana University to make up for lost days after the region was pummeled by rain that led to widespread floods.
President John Crain said about 7,500 Southeastern students are Livingston, East Baton Rouge and Tangipahoa parishes that experienced major flooding. He spoke to the Ponchatoula Rotary Club Thursday about the flood's impact on the Southeastern community, as well as state funding reductions for colleges and universities over the years.


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The university call center is working on contacting students from flood-hit areas to find out if the flood affected them and, if so, how the university can help them get back to school. Crain said the university has contacted 4,000 or more students so far and is working on contacting the rest.
"That's the task today," he said.
Crain said the university could help these students by adjusting their class schedules to ease course loads, such as having more online classes available to them, so that they can have time for recovery.
Classes, originally supposed to start Wednesday, were pushed back to Monday because of the flooding. To make up for the days lost, the university will not have a fall break, he said.
Deadlines for registration, fee payments and course selection were also pushed back. The Fall Convocation was canceled last week and has not yet been rescheduled.
Employees were asked to return Monday this week if they could safely travel, and the university has gotten started on normal activities like processing payroll, along with helping communities recover from the flood.
On Wednesday and Thursday, volunteers gathered at the Student Union to sign up for gutting homes. Many students who were able to travel have moved in to campus housing as well, he said.
During Hurricane Katrina, the university lost students who did not return because of the hurricane's aftermath, Crain said. However, the campus also gained visiting students who were attending New Orleans colleges and universities.
Normally, the university takes a census on enrollment on the 14th day, but that will likely be pushed back, he said.
Based on the university's experience with Hurricane Katrina, he said students take different amounts of time to recover from a natural disaster. Some students may feel anxious to get back to class for a sense of normalcy but struggle to concentrate on their work. Others may wait until later months to return while other decide not to come back at all, he told the club.
While the university is concerned about the potential impact financially since more than 80 percent of its funds depend on tuition, Crain said the university is focusing now on helping students, faculty and staff hurt by the floods.
"We're really focusing on recovery," he said after the meeting.
Important dates
Aug. 22: First Day of Classes
Aug. 22-24: Drop/Add Period (students will be able to drop to zero hours, if needed)
Aug. 24: Final Day to cancel registration with a 100 percent refund (the university will consider refunds beyond this date on a case-by-case basis)
Aug. 26: Financial Aid funds will be dispersed to Bank Mobile (formerly Higher One)
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18 2016-08-18
Baton Rouge

Southeastern Baseball squad joins cleanup efforts in Central


CENTRAL - The Southeastern Louisiana University team and coaching staff joined the early recovery efforts in Central on Tuesday morning.

The Lions' head coach Matt Riser and assistant coaches made a stop at the house of an SLU alum’s parents and proceeded to work tirelessly to rip out all of the still wet carpet, sheetrock, insulation and other material that will need removing before renovation can begin.

“As an SLU Alum, and a former SLU athlete, this was extra special for me and my parents. I've always been proud to be a Lion, I am now prouder than I have ever been,” said Ken Pastorick. “Southeastern is a community, and we experienced that Tuesday.”

Other Southeastern student athletes joined the early cleanup efforts to help flood victims this week. Hammond saw its share of the flooding itself with heavy rains swelling rivers in Tangipahoa Parish.


18 2016-08-18
Hammond

Science on tap begins next month


The Department of Biological Sciences at Southeastern Louisiana University and Tope lá Catering present "Science on Tap" beginning next month.
This event is an informal, laid-back science seminar series open to the public and free of charge.


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People of all ages are welcome and encouraged to attend.
Grab a drink or food, enjoy some photos, ask some questions and let's talk science!
The event will be the first Tuesday of every month at Tope lá Catering.
Doors will open at 6:30 p.m., and theseminar starts at 7 p.m. A cash bar will be available.
Schedule:
Sept. 6
Dr. Kyle Piller -Dept. of Biological Sciences
"Inland fishes of Louisiana: An overview of a unique and underappreciated fauna"
Oct. 4
Dr. Brian Crother - Dept. of Biological Sciences
"The Origin of Species: What did Charles Darwin say?"
Nov. 1
Dr. John Burris - Dept. of Computer Science & Industrial Technology
"From Zero to code: Modern programming made easy"
Dec. 6
Dr. Chris Beachy -Dept. of Biological Sciences
"The fantastic frog and the sexy salamander"
Feb. 7
Dr. Rhett Allain -Dept. of Chemistry and Physics
"Angry Bird physics"
March 7
Dr. David Norwood - Dept. of Chemistry and Physics
"T. B. A. (this is a real title)"
April 4
Dr. Mary White - Dept. of Biological Sciences
"Designer babies: Is science catching up with science fiction?
May 2
Dr. Tara Turley-Stoulig - Dept. of Biological Sciences
"Pokémon GMO: Should we fret at all?"

18 2016-08-18
Hammond

'Lion paws on deck' to help flood victims


Classes may be pushed back to Monday, but Southeastern Louisiana University students were on campus Wednesday, getting their instructions and cleaning equipment to help flood victims throughout the region.
And they will be back to help flood victims again today.
Amber Narro, communication professor, came up with the idea of organizing student volunteers to help clean flooded homes and the effort was put together by university officials the day before. The call to help was answered by more than 100 volunteers, who came ready in knee-high boots and other gear. Organizers plan to go out to devastated places again today.
"It's all lion paws on deck," said Erin Cowser, director of public and governmental affairs for Southeastern.
Volunteers broke into groups and received their instructions about where to go and what work they will have when they arrive, including pulling out Sheet rock and carpets.
Narro gave them some safety pointers, including to be weary of snakes and other critters that may be calling flooded buildings their new homes.
Many flood relief organizations need people doing the physical recovery work more than anything. That and cleaning supplies, Narro said.
"The only thing we hear is manpower, manpower, manpower," she said.
While she did not see any flooding in her house, her neighbors, and many other people she knows personally, were devastated by the weekend's floods throughout the region. All she did to look for someone to help was go to her neighbor's home and knock.
"There's no shortage of places to help," she said. "That's what people need to do."
St. Albert's Catholic Church donated cleaning supplies for the effort, and Narro is encouraging volunteers to leave behind the much-needed supplies once their work is finished.
"They'll be glad to have that there," she said.
The organized flood relief effort has the spirit of the Big Event, said Pam Rault, director of student engagement who was also at the Student Union helping.
Big Event is a large community service project led by students and held in the spring.
Elaina Pichon, a Southeastern student who was awaiting instructions Wednesday morning, said she has friends whose family members live in Denham Springs. They were trapped in their homes as water filled their bottom floor, she said.
She and other members of her group were assigned to clean homes in the Denham Springs area that was hit hard by flooding.
They recalled how Southeastern flooded during the March flood, enough to make the tunnel leading to a parking lot look like a pool. Officials said the weekend's flood did not cause significant water damage to the university.
Volunteers should meet today at 9 a.m. in front of the Student Union. They should be ready with closed-toe shoes and an extra set of clothes. Cowser said those who cannot volunteer can still donate supplies, such as work gloves, goggles, garbage bags and brooms.

18 2016-08-18
New Orleans

St. Tammany college notes for August 17, 2016


SOUTHEASTERN LOUISIANA UNIVERSITY: Southeastern Louisiana University students employed at the Southeastern Channel won six 2015 Mark of Excellence Awards, including second-place overall television newscast for "Northshore News," at the Society of Professional Journalists recent Region 12 conference in New Orleans. Region 12 comprises all universities in Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas and Tennessee. Southeastern competed against all schools with 10,000 or greater enrollment.The Southeastern Channel students honored were named second-place finalists in five categories: television general news reporting for "Port Marigny," Dominique Brogle, of Destrehan; television feature reporting for “I-10 Twin Spans Rebuilt,” Brittany Robinson, of Slidell; television news and feature photography for “Pumpkin Spice Latte” and “Abita Mystery House,” Sarah Barbier, of Mandeville; television sports photography, "Lions Cross Country," Tyler Waggenspack, of Baton Rouge; and television in-depth reporting, “Drums Along the River: History of the Natchez Pow-Wow," Drew Sagona, of Pearl River. The Southeastern Channel is broadcast on Charter 199 in Tangipahoa, St. Tammany and Livingston parishes and at www.southeastern.edu/tv.


18 2016-08-18
New Orleans

SLU students spread Lion pride to flood victims


HAMMOND- More than a hundred Southeastern students traded in their textbooks for recovery tools on what was supposed to be their first day back to class.

The registration table at the Student Union Wednesday wasn't for a club or recreational sports team, though the long-line turnout certainly seemed that way. It was a sign-up station for students to help flooded families in the areas surrounding their Hammond-based campus.

"They were supposed to start school today and instead of starting school they're out in the community and working and about to see some things that are pretty amazing," said SLU professor Amber Narro.

"Just kind of show that someone is there for them in their time of need," said sophomore Matt Labbe, "Show them that there can be light in the darkest of times."

That light was a moving surprise for one homeowner in Ponchatoula's Country River neighborhood.

"I was here by myself and a crew of kids showed up. Blessing not even in disguise. They are here, they're cleaning, big help. Big help," said Nathan Boulet, "I was a little emotional this morning, but it's getting a lot better."

Coming into a community with debris piles upon debris piles can certainly be overwhelming, but some of these students haven't shied away because they say they've seen it before in their own front yards.

"Native of New Orleans, I was there for Katrina, I know what it's like," said sophomore Joseph Ricci, "So seeing the destruction in Katrina is almost numbing to a point where you're going up to a house and you know you're going to have to gut it."

But they know their presence brings promise.

"A lot of heartbreak, but hope that we're here for a reason right now," said Cole Wascom.

"It's sad, but it's good to see Southeastern kids coming together to help someone out in need," said Terri Dawson.

And they're hoping this lion pride will help the community roar back to its feet.

This grassroots effort will be at it again Thursday, August 18th. Students and staff interested in helping can meet at the student union for 9 a.m. Those who can't volunteer can donate supplies at the same time and location.

(© 2016 WWL)


18 2016-08-17
Associated Press

Southeastern Louisiana University delays start of classes


HAMMOND, La. (AP) — Southeastern Louisiana University has postponed the start of classes for the fall semester to Monday, Aug. 22, due to widespread flooding and its impact on students, faculty and staff.
Originally scheduled to start classes Wednesday, the university has also extended deadlines for financial aid, course selection and payment of fees. The extended fee payment deadline and final move-in date for campus housing is Friday. Students impacted by flooding should contact studentaccounts@southeastern.edu or universityhousing@southeastern.edu to request additional time.
The Hammond, Louisiana, campus is open and all services are available for students. The campus and Hammond area have emerged from the flooding largely unscathed. Students who were able to travel started checking into their residence halls on Sunday.
Check the university's main webpage, southeastern.edu, for more information.

18 2016-08-17
Baton Rouge

Review: SLU professor offers hope, reason in dealing with education issues


As Louisiana — indeed the nation — embarks on a new school year, there are cries for help in nearly every corner of American public education.

Testing has moved to the forefront of academic and public discussion, which is believed by many to be the single biggest problem facing our schools today. Against this backdrop, Southeastern Louisiana University professor James D. Kirylo offers a voice of hope and reason in dealing with the important issues in his new book, "Teaching with Purpose: An Inquiry into the Who, Why, and How We Teach."

Howard Gardner, a Harvard professor of cognition and education, sums up the situation this way: “(American) society suffers from three biases: Westist, Testist and Bestist. Westist involves putting certain Western cultural values, which date back to Socrates, on a pedestal. Logical thinking is important; rationality is important, but they are not the only virtues. Testist suggests a bias toward focusing on those human abilities or approaches that are readily testable. Bestist, which implies that all the answers to a given problem lie in one certain approach, such as logical-mathematical thinking, can be very dangerous.”

There has long been argument as to the real purpose of American public schools: transmitting knowledge and culture intact; transforming society; or nurturing individual development. The pendulum has swung to extremes many times in the history of public education.

Schools have long been viewed as change agents, and teachers, who were once at the forefront of decision-making, have been reduced to dispensers, collectors and tabulators of data. School improvement is determined almost entirely by numbers — specifically, standardized test scores. Standardized testing ad absurdum has created an atmosphere of anxiety, anger and distrust among teachers, students and parents. It places the primary onus for improvement on teachers, to the virtual exclusion of other variables. Kirylo’s book emphasizes six key dispositions needed for the development of creative, humane teachers: love, faith, hope, humility, compassion and persistence.

Along with these qualities, there must also exist an environment of equity, diversity and social justice. Are we not equally charged with the nurturing of caring, responsible, empathetic and critical-thinking decision-makers? They arrive unfinished, and they leave the system changed in great part by their journey. What happens while they are in our charge is paramount to personal and societal goals. Kirylo’s book proposes a model for purposeful teaching which includes restoration of dignity and authority to the teachers themselves. The school, as a microcosm of society at large, should reflect the very communities we aim to create.

“Teaching with Purpose” will be of interest to educators, parents and other primary stakeholders. This is no attempt to cast out demons, but rather a reimagining of healthy, caring school communities. Decision-makers must work toward restoring integrity to the classroom for both teacher and learner — recognizing the importance of cultivating cooperation and respect throughout the school community.

DIXON HEARNE, PH.D., IS AUTHOR OF “TEACHING SECOND-LANGUAGE LEARNERS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES,” SEVERAL BOOK CHAPTERS AND IS EDITORIAL BOARD MEMBER/REVIEWER FOR SEVERAL EDUCATION JOURNALS. HIS WEBSITE IS DIXONHEARNE.COM.


18 2016-08-11
Baton Rouge

Southeastern sets audition for 'Bayourella'


Southeastern Louisiana University’s student dance company, Dance Performance Project, will hold contemporary dance auditions for Southeastern students and community dancers Aug. 17, 18 and 20 for an upcoming dance concert in October.

Called “Bayourella: A Story of Forgiveness,” the fall event will be directed by dance instructor Skip Costa. The production also will include original music performed live, original costume designs, and a set that includes a 25-foot dock over the bayou.

“‘Bayourella: A Story of Forgiveness’” is an InterARTS performance approach to movement creation being developed by Costa that fuses the elements of dance, music, theater, and visual arts for a true kinesthetic experience for the audience, usually within a very emotional journey through the human condition,” said Dance Coordinator Martie Fellom. “In this production, one of the aspects that Skip is focusing on is the complexity and cruelness of Bayourella’s stepmother’s life in order to define her treatment towards Bayourella.”

Auditions are open to incoming Southeastern freshmen, as well as community dancers in sixth- through 12th-grade, and will be conducted in the dance studio in the Kinesiology and Health Studies Building, Costa said. Students attending the audition will be taught several short movement phrases and should wear something that shows their form.

Auditions for Southeastern students are 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Aug. 17-18. Dancers should arrive by 4:45 p.m. and need only attend one audition.

Auditions for community dancers are scheduled from 11 a.m. to noon Aug. 20. Dancers should arrive by 10:45 a.m. Community dancer rehearsals are scheduled 10:45 a.m. to noon on two Saturdays - Sept. 24 and Oct. 1.

For more information, email Fellom at martie.fellom@southeastern.edu.


18 2016-08-11
Baton Rouge

Rose Awards recognize area architectural projects


GraceHebert Architects was the big winner at the American Institute of Architects Baton Rouge Chapter's annual Rose Awards Gala on July 30.

The gala was held at the East Baton Rouge Parish Main Library on Goodwood Boulevard.

GraceHebert's expansion project for Cajun Industries office took home the chapter's Rose and Members' Choice awards as well as Planning Commission Award.

Jurors for this year's awards were from Memphis and included head juror Todd Walker, archimania architects; John Jones, John Jones Architecture; and Louis Pounders, ANF Architects.

Also receiving multiple awards were Ritter Maher Architects, a Rose Award and a Planning Commission Award for renovating a Mid City eyesore for its own offices and creating a model block development in the process; and Holly & Smith Architects, of Hammond, a Silver Rose Award for renovations to Loyola University's Monroe Hall, a collaboration with Holabird & Root, of Chicago; and a Gold Rose Award for renovations and additions to Southeastern Louisiana University's Student Union, in collaboration with WTW Architects, of Pittsburgh.

The night's other winners included: Coleman Partners Architects, a Silver Rose Award for St. Thomas More Catholic School's Administration Building & Media Center; Chenevert Architects, a Silver Rose Award for renovations to the historic Butler Building for its offices; plus one design & construction, a Gold Rose Award for the law offices of Williamson Fontenot Campbell & Whittington; Hoffpauir Studio, a Gold Rose Award for renovation of St. Michael the Archangel Catholic Church; and Crump Wilson Architects, a United States Green Building Council Sustainability Award for BASF Geismar facility's new utilities control building.

FOLLOW PAM BORDELON ON TWITTER, @PAMSPARTYLINE.


18 2016-08-11
Hammond

Southeastern convocation to launch new academic year


Southeastern Louisiana University will launch the 2016-17 academic year with its annual fall convocation for faculty and staff on Friday in the Student Union Grand Ballroom.

Scheduled for 11 a.m., the convocation will include greetings and a state of the university address by President John L. Crain. Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Tena Golding will preside over the event, which is open to the community.

The convocation will include presentation of the President’s Awards for Excellence, the university’s highest honors for faculty and staff.

Also scheduled for recognition are faculty and staff who have been with the university for 25, 30, 35 and 40 years; those faculty receiving tenure and promotions, emeritus faculty designees and donors who have established newly endowed professorships and scholarships.

The annual Alumni Association-sponsored picnic will immediately follow the morning’s ceremonies.
18 2016-08-11
Hammond

Southeastern to hold dance auditions


Southeastern Louisiana University's resident student dance company, Dance Performance Project, will hold contemporary dance auditions for Southeastern students and community dancers Aug. 17, 18 and 20 for an upcoming dance concert in October.
Auditions are open to incoming Southeastern freshmen, as well as community dancers in grades 6 - 12, and will be conducted in the dance studio in the Kinesiology and Health Studies Building, dance instructor Skip Costa said.



;
Students attending the audition will be taught several short movement phrases and should wear something that shows their form, especially on the upper body torso.
Auditions for Southeastern students are scheduled Aug. 17 and 18, from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Dancers should arrive by 4:45 p.m. and need only attend one audition.
Auditions for community dancers are scheduled Saturday, Aug. 20, from 11 a.m. to noon. Dancers should arrive by 10:45 a.m. Community dancer rehearsals are scheduled 10:45 a.m. to noon on two Saturdays - Sept. 24 and Oct. 1.
Called "Bayourella: A Story of Forgiveness," the fall event will be directed by Costa.
The production will include original music performed live, original costume designs and a set that includes a 25-foot dock over the bayou.
"'Bayourella: a Story of Forgiveness' is an InterARTS performance approach to movement creation being developed by Costa that fuses the elements of dance, music, theater, and visual arts for a true kinesthetic experience for the audience, usually within a very emotional journey through the human condition," said dance coordinator Martie Fellom. "In this production, one of the aspects that Skip is focusing on is the complexity and cruelness of Bayourella's stepmother's life in order to define her treatment towards Bayourella."
For more information, contact Fellom at martie.fellom@southeastern.edu.

18 2016-08-10
Hammond

CONVOCATION FRIDAY LAUNCHES NEW YEAR AT SOUTHEASTERN


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University will launch the 2016-17 academic year with its annual fall convocation for faculty and staff on Friday, Aug. 12, in the Student Union Grand Ballroom.
Scheduled for 11 a.m., the convocation will include greetings and a state of the university address by President John L. Crain. Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Tena Golding will preside over the event, which is open to the community.
The convocation will include presentation of the President’s Awards for Excellence, the university’s highest honors for faculty and staff. Receiving the awards are Instructor of English David Armand, excellence in artistic activity; Political Science Professor Margaret Gonzalez-Perez, excellence in research; Professor of Education Paige Lilley Schulte, excellence in teaching; Professor Education Colleen Klein-Ezell, excellence in faculty service; and Mark Whitmer, assistant director of Physical Plant Services, excellence in unclassified staff service.
Also scheduled for recognition are faculty and staff who have been with the university for 25, 30, 35 and 40 years; those faculty receiving tenure and promotions, emeritus faculty designees and donors who have established newly endowed professorships and scholarships.
The annual Alumni Association-sponsored picnic will immediately follow the morning’s ceremonies in the ballroom. Additional sponsors of the picnic include Aramark, First Guaranty Bank, and North Oaks Health System.
18 2016-08-04
Baton Rouge

Southeastern sets job fair for students


Southeastern Louisiana University’s Office of Career Services will sponsor a job fair on Aug. 25 to help students find part-time jobs while they complete their studies.

The event will take place from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Student Union.

“The fair offers an opportunity for students to connect with approximately 30 local employers,” said Ken Ridgedell, director of career services. “Employers’ representatives will be on hand to accept job applications from currently enrolled Southeastern students.”

Ridgedell said the part-time job fair is a casual-dress event for students to drop by between classes.

Career Fair 2016, the annual job fair for upperclass students and recent alumni looking for full-time placement, will be held from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Sept. 15 at the Pennington Student Activity Center.

For information about the part-time job fair, call (985) 549-2121. For more information about Career Fair, visit www.southeastern.edu/careerfair or call (985) 549-2121.


18 2016-08-04
Baton Rouge

SLU student newspaper photographer wins photography awards


A Southeastern Louisiana University student photographer was honored at the 136th Annual Louisiana Press Association Convention held recently in Lake Charles for his work in the student-run newspaper “The Lion’s Roar.”

Two photographs by William Schmidt, the assistant editor of “The Lion’s Roar,” were awarded second and third place honors in the Best News Photo category.

Schmidt, a history graduate student from Hammond, submitted photos illustrating some of the many challenges facing higher education, a news release said. One of his winning images depicted a rally that took place last year at the Louisiana State Capitol in which students voiced their displeasure to funding cuts in higher education. The other photograph shows students participating in a protest of the Consuming Fire Ministries during that group’s assembly on Southeastern’s campus last September, an event that sparked discussion on the freedom of speech.

“It was an honor to be recognized by the LPA for my photos,” said Schmidt. “I was completely shocked when I first heard the news that my photos were moving forward in competition.

“I am glad that ‘The Lion’s Roar’ has given me the chance to gain photography skills and experience,” he said. “I hope to continue moving forward with my skill sets as I continue to work for the newspaper.”
18 2016-08-04
Hammond

SLU Convocation set for August 12


Southeastern Louisiana University will launch its academic year with its annual fall convocation for faculty and staff Aug. 12 in the Student Union Grand Ballroom.
Scheduled for 11 a.m., the convocation will include greetings and a state of the university address by President John L. Crain. Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Tena Golding will preside over the event, which is open to the community.



;
Scheduled to receive awards are Instructor of English David Armand, excellence in artistic activity; Political Science Professor Margaret Gonzalez-Perez, excellence in research; Professor of Education Paige Lilley Schulte, excellence in teaching; Professor Education Colleen Klein-Ezell, excellence in faculty service; and Mark Whitmer, assistant director of Physical Plant Services, excellence in unclassified staff service.
Also scheduled for recognition are faculty and staff who have been with the university for 25, 30, 35 and 40 years; those faculty receiving tenure and promotions, emeritus faculty designees and donors who have established newly endowed professorships and scholarships.
The annual Alumni Association-sponsored picnic will immediately follow. Additional sponsors are Aramark, First Guaranty Bank and North Oaks Health System.
• • •
BACK-TO-SCHOOL EVENT -- A back-to-school education event is scheduled for 7 tonight at Beacon Light Baptist Church of Hammond, 500 E. Hanson Ave.
James D. Kirylo, education professor at Southeastern Louisiana University, will speak on "Teaching with Purpose (what teachers ought to know about teaching and what parents ought to know about teachers)."
• • •
EMILY HINES NIGHT -- Santa Fe of Hammond will donate proceeds from sales tonight to help cover expenses for Emily Hines at St. Jude Children's Hospital. Hines' mother is Suzette Callais, a member of the Tangipahoa Professional Women.
Dawn Forshag-Cazedessus is the scheduled guest speaker for the Tangipahoa Professional Women's Meeting at Rosaryville Spirit Life Center on Aug. 24, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Her topic is "How is Your Business Behavior?"
After selling her franchise corporation in 2007, she became a Relator in 2008 and became a productivity coach in 2012 in the Mandeville Market Center while continuing to sell real estate.
• • •
ROADWORK -- Magazine Street between Wilbert Dangerfield Drive and MLK Drive was closed through Tuesday night and is expected to be open by midday today, according to Robert Morgan of the city street department.

18 2016-08-01
Baton Rouge

Southeastern Louisiana University camp helps kids with autism, other disorders, feel at home


HAMMOND — At school, 9-year-old Abigail Worthington has trouble dealing with all the sounds, smells and feelings she encounters every day.

Diagnosed with sensory processing disorder, Abigail can get worn out experiencing all that.

But for three days every summer, she indulges in activities that make her more comfortable. At Southeastern Louisiana University's Camp Sensation, there are rooms created specifically to soothe her and virtual-reality games that make her feel less out of sync.

"It is for people like me," said Abigail, while playing in a kitchen with homemade slime, a pleasing texture for her. "You can do things you can't normally do other places."

At Camp Sensation, children with disorders like Abigail's as well as others with autism, Down syndrome and other diagnoses, get the chance to experiment with different feelings, sounds and smells. Some are hypersensitive and benefit from soothing textures and quiet. Others need more noise, more action.

"It just depends," said Colleen Klein-Ezell, an associate professor of early childhood education at SLU. "All these kids have a different story."

For three days, the children move among the stations, playing virtual-reality video games, cooking, smelling new foods and experiencing new sensations.

Younger preschool and elementary-age children attend in the morning; older kids come in the afternoon. Their parents attend at least part of the camp and learn new concepts and techniques for helping their children learn and feel comfortable.

At the center of the camp is the Snoezelen Sensorium, two rooms created to fill different needs.

One room is dimly lit with light tubes resembling huge lava lamps in one corner and padded seating spread throughout. Low-key music plays, and the bass reverberates on special chairs so children can feel the music.

Next door, a brightly colored room for children in need of extra stimulation features a swing and padded stairs and huge blocks to climb.

"It is calming, or it heightens their senses," Klein-Ezell said.

Campers can choose their own experience.

"We let them decide what their needs are," Klein-Ezell said. "It's not up to us."

In the darkened calming room, 10-year-old Daniel Holt lies on a chair, feeling the sounds of classical music. Holt, who has autism, sits quietly and looks at the blue light moving around the walls while a volunteer places weighted blankets on him.

Some people with autism long for this feeling of weight on their body, Klein-Ezell says, like the feeling of a hug.

"They are just kind of compressed," she said.

While Daniel lies in comfort, Jack Dahl constantly moves. He plays with an oversized circular pad with buttons numbered 1 through 8. Each time he punches one, the light tubes change colors.

Jack craves activity, his mother said, and he enjoys swinging in the more active room next door, but the swing is out of commission for the day.

"These are things you can't find in your home, different things he's attracted to," said Loria Dahl, of Mandeville. "We're learning maybe he needs more of that."

For Abigail's parents, they can never discover too much about her condition. She is highly intelligent and does well in school, but after a school day filled with noise and other sensory challenges, she needs to check out alone in her room. The tastes and textures of foods affect her differently every day. Something she likes for one meal will disgust her at another.

"Her senses are really heightened and really extreme," said her mother, Becky Worthington, while watching her play. "She needs to be grounded, needs things to calm her down."

Camp Sensation has helped the Worthingtons better understand their daughter's needs.

"I just think it is such a good environment to be in," Becky Worthington said. "Every day, we learn something."


18 2016-07-28
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN STUDENTS BEGIN COLLEGE WITH ’TRADITIONS’ AUG. 14


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University students will once again have the opportunity to begin a new semester getting to know their peers and all that the university has to offer thanks to “Traditions.”
“Traditions provides new and returning students with various free programming and information to assist them in making Southeastern their home away from home,” said Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs Jim McHodgkins. “Students have the opportunity through Traditions to get to know each other and the campus and become comfortable with the routine of campus life.
“Students who become engaged with their selected institution early in their college careers generally perform better academically and socially,” McHodgkins added.
Traditions begins Sunday, Aug. 14, with Move-in Mane-ia from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. in the Student Union Ballroom. Volunteers will be on hand to assist students as they move into their personal residence halls. Students can check in at their designated move-in times and receive Traditions materials.
Additionally on Sunday at 7 p.m., Lion Craze will feature Playfair, a high-energy extreme socializing event. Sponsored by the Campus Activities Board (CAB) and the Office for Student Engagement, Lion Craze will take place at the Pennington Center, where students will also have the opportunity to learn about actual Southeastern traditions and their history.
Monday, Aug. 15, University Housing and Hall Council will host a Paint Party at 6:30 p.m. at Lee Field.
Monday and Tuesday, students will be able to participate in concurrent activities happening all over campus, such as a trip to the mall via the Lion Traxx shuttle service. These events will be hosted by recognized student organizations. Go to southeastern.edu/traditions for a full schedule of events.
Tuesday concludes with Strawberry Jam, the official semester kick-off party in Strawberry Stadium. Sponsored by Southeastern Athletics, Strawberry Jam is scheduled at 5 p.m. and includes the students’ first “Storm 30” led by Cheerleaders, Lionettes and the Spirit of the Southland Band to get everyone prepared for tailgating for the first Lion home game on Sept. 24. Free food, t-shirts and music will also be plentiful. All fall athletic teams will be present. In the event of inclement weather, the event will move to the adjacent parking garage.
Traditions will continue on Wednesday, Aug. 17, the first day of classes, with First Day Q&A sponsored by the Office for Student Engagement. Scheduled from 7:30 to 11 a.m. in the Student Union Quad, students can stop by the “Just Ask Me” tents to get answers to all their first day questions from the Division of Student Affairs Leadership Ambassadors. Maps and other resources will also be provided. Information will be available again on Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Wednesday’s activities continue with “Get the Scoop Involvement Fair” from 12 to 2 p.m. in the Student Union Quad. Student organizations and departments will be on hand to answer questions about getting involved, and students can enjoy a scoop of ice cream while they browse.
Also on Wednesday students can stop by the Pennington Rec Center from 3 to 5 p.m. to learn about intramural sports, Group X Classes, or get in a quick work out. Then from 6 to 8 p.m. students can enjoy a relaxing social night of acoustic music, coffee and refreshments. Sponsored by CAB and Dining Services, CAB Coffee and Live Music will take place outside of the Student Union Starbucks.
Thursday, Aug. 18, offers students two CAB sponsored events. The first, CAB City Sampler, is scheduled from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Student Union Breezeway. Area businesses will be distributing free food, coupons and giveaways to students. The second event, a late night block party called CAB After Dark, is scheduled from 8 to 11 p.m. in the Pennington Center. Also a Rec Sports and Wellness sponsored event, CAB After Dark will offer exciting activities, including a foam pit dance party, games and food. Students can also bring out their creative sides at the t-shirt design station and photo booth.
On Friday, August 19, CAB will sponsor Outdoor Movie Night and will present the summer blockbuster movie “Captain America: Civil War” on an inflatable screen under the stars at 7:30 p.m. in Strawberry Stadium.
For more information about Traditions, go to southeastern.edu/traditions.

18 2016-07-22
New Orleans

Tuition increase at Southeast Louisiana University set at 3 percent


VIDEO
18 2016-07-22
New Orleans

Northshore college leaders combat class cost, quality concerns


MANDEVILLE, La. -- Today's Louisiana college experience has been described as the good, the bad and the ugly because of the state's financial crisis and the cuts to higher education as a result.

Leaders of the state's third largest university, and one of the top ten fastest growing community colleges in the country, told a St. Tammany Chamber of Commerce crowd Thursday morning that it's a balancing act.

"It's just like it is in business, if you don't constantly re-invent what you do to meet the needs of your customers and your constituents, you're not going to be successful and you're not going to survive and thrive," said Southeastern Louisiana University President Dr. John Crain.

That survival has been more than challenging for longtime Southeastern Professor James Kirylo. Despite making it a priority to personally fight for higher education in Louisiana, he'll be starting classes this Fall as a professor at the University of South Carolina.

"Clearly, the last, going almost on a decade, there is a very low morale with faculty across the state because of a lack of commitment and so it's had an impact," he said.

Kirylo is releasing a book, "Teaching With Purpose," which he says includes the importance of a teacher's personal stability.

"One of the assumptions from the book is that we teach from the inside out, so we must know who we are, what our motives are, and processes that impact our thinking and our action," he said.

Now, with TOPS offerings only covering the Fall semester, in full, this year, parents are nervous for their families.

"It's a big, big issue for us," said parent Kim Walker, "It will affect how we are saving and making adjustments in our own budget at home."

But it's not all bad news for higher education. Southeastern Louisiana University and Northshore Technical Community College say that partnerships, like the one they share, actually allows them to offer more opportunities despite the state's shortfalls.

"We will continue to grow and a lot of the offset that we provide to survive is due to innovative partnerships with our chambers, economic development, our business and industry partners," said NTCC President Dr. William Wainwright.

While the budget battle continues, those leaders say the fight is far from over.

Kirylo will be signing his book, "Teaching With Purpose" at the Mandeville Barnes & Nobles on Saturday, July 30 from Noon-3 p.m., and at the Metairie Barnes & Nobles on Thursday, August 4th from 5 p.m.-8 p.m.



18 2016-07-21
Hammond

Southeastern Music Celebration 2016


The Southeastern Louisiana University Community Music School recently completed Southeastern Music Celebration 2016, a series of summer programs for young musicians. Students from Livingston Parish participating included (front row, from left) Madeline McCauley, Alexis Didier, Gabriella Desio, Savannah Cecchini, Joshua Giachetti, (back row) Katie Howard, Olivia Osenenko, Kaylee Hibbard, Anabelle Snow, Jessica Horn and Leslie Inez Hughes.


18 2016-07-15
Baton Rouge

Southeastern Louisiana makes football coaching staff changes


HAMMOND — Southeastern Louisiana football coach Ron Roberts finalized his coaching staff for the upcoming season with a pair of additions on Thursday.

Roberts announced the hiring of assistant coaches Dwight Tillman (cornerbacks) and Joe Graves (running backs). Both hires are pending approval by the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors.

Roberts also announced defensive line coach and recruiting coordinator Brandon Lacy has added the title of assistant head coach. In addition, linebackers coach Aaron Schwanz has added the role of special teams coordinator.

Tillman spent last season as defensive coordinator at Randallston High School in his hometown of Baltimore, Maryland. Before that, he was the defensive backs coach at Baltimore’s Franklin High School, where he was a part of consecutive Class 3A state championships.

Tillman was coached by Roberts in 2010 and 2011 at Delta State, where he was a two-year starter. As a senior, he was a second team All-South Region selection. Tillman earned his bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Delta State in 2012.

Graves, of Covington, was a three-year starter on the offensive line for Southeastern and earned All-Southland Conference honors in each of his final three seasons, helping SLU to Southland Conference championships in 2013 and 2014. Graves graduated from SLU with a bachelor’s degree in history in May.

Nicholls State
HAYS JOINS STAFF AS RUNNING BACKS COACH: In Thibodaux, Nicholls State coach Tim Rebowe announced the addition of Brock Hays to the coaching staff as running backs coach.

Hays comes to Nicholls after coaching at Louisiana College, where he served as defensive line coach, pro scouting liaison and academic liaison.

Hays also coached at Edna Karr in his hometown of New Orleans, where he served as the defensive line coach, assistant defensive coordinator and assistant head coach from 2014-2015. He also acted in a similar role at Edna Karr from 2010-2013 before taking the defensive coordinator position at Miller McCoy Academy in New Orleans for the 2013-2014 school year.

Hays started his coaching career at Helen Cox and also coached at New Iberia High School and Grambling High School.

Hays is a 2009 graduate of Grambling, where he obtained his bachelor’s degree in kinesiology.


18 2016-07-14
Baton Rouge

Southeastern Louisiana University establishes Robert ‘Doc’ Goodwin endowment


In honor of former head athletic trainer Robert ‘Doc’ Goodwin’s 30-plus years at Southeastern Louisiana University, the school is establishing an endowment supporting the athletic program.

The announcement was made by a group of lead donors at a surprise reception held recently at the university’s Dugas Athletic Training Room.

Collegiate Consulting LLC owner Ron Anderson, of Hammond, spearheaded the effort to establish the endowment. Anderson was a student-athlete on Southeastern’s track team in the early 1990s when Goodwin was head trainer, a news release said.

Goodwin is a graduate of Southeastern and has received the Alumni Association’s Distinguished Service Award, the L.E. Chandler Award for service to students and Southeastern’s Presidents Award for Excellence in Service.

His other honors include the Louisiana Athletic Trainers Association Hall of Fame, the Louisiana Sports Medicine Society’s Jim Finks Award and the National Athletic Trainers Association District IXS Service Award.

Visit southeastern.edu/goodwin for information.
18 2016-07-08
Hammond

’DOC’ GOODWIN HONORED WITH SLU ATHLETIC ENDOWMENT FUND


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University is honoring former head athletic trainer Robert “Doc” Goodwin by establishing an endowment in his honor.
At a surprise reception held recently at the university’s Dugas Athletic Training Room, a group of lead donors made the announcement in recognition of his more than 30 years as head athletic trainer at the university and for his support of Southeastern Athletics and mentorship to its students.
Southeastern graduate Ron Anderson of Hammond led the effort to establish the endowment, which will be used for general support of the athletic program. Anderson, who owns Collegiate Consulting, LLC, was a student-athlete on Southeastern’s track team in the early 1990s when Goodwin was head trainer. More information on the fund can be found at southeastern.edu/goodwin.
Athletic Director Jay Artigues praised Goodwin for his service to the university, including the instrumental role he played in helping to create the university’s athletic training program and the North Oaks Sports Medicine program. An alumnus of Southeastern, Goodwin has received the Alumni Association’s Distinguished Service Award, the L.E. Chandler Award for service to students and Southeastern’s Presidents Award for Excellence in Service.
Goodwin also has been inducted into the Louisiana Athletic Trainers Association Hall of Fame and has received the Louisiana Sports Medicine Society’s Jim Finks Award and the National Athletic Trainers Association District IXS Service Award.

PHOTO:
‘DOC’ GOODWIN ENDOWMENT ESTABLISHED – Southeastern Louisiana University alumnus and former student-athlete Ron Anderson, left, led the efforts to honor former head athletic trainer Robert ‘Doc’ Goodwin with an endowment to help support the Southeastern athletic program.

18 2016-07-07
Baton Rouge

Southeastern Louisiana art exhibit features work by N.O. artist Nicole Charbonnet through August


The Southeastern Louisiana University Contemporary Art Gallery is featuring an exhibit of works by artist Nicole Charbonnet, of New Orleans.

The exhibit’s title, Palimpsest, refers to a form of artwork characterized by the superimposition of textures, images, words and washes of paint and fabric intended to reveal a memory through semi-transparency of the pre-existing structures, said Dale Newkirk, professor of art and director of the gallery.

The exhibit runs through Aug. 25. The gallery, at 100 E. Strawberry Stadium, is open during the summer from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday. The show is free and open to the public.

Charbonnet received her master of fine arts degree from Boston University and her undergraduate degree from the University of Virginia. She also has studied at Academie Goetz in Paris and Cleveland Institute of Art in Lacoste, France.

Among Charbonnet’s awards and honors are grants from the Pollock Krasner Foundation of New York; the E.D. Foundation of Ridgefield, New Jersey; and the Elizabeth Greenshields Foundation of Montreal. She also has received fellowships from the Louisiana Division of the Arts, the Artists Foundation of New York and Art Matters, Inc.

For additional information, call (985) 549-2193.


18 2016-07-07
Baton Rouge

Southeastern’s Sustainability Center wins award for energy-efficiency


The Louisiana chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council has awarded the Operational Excellence Champion Award to the Southeastern Louisiana University Sustainability Center.

Southeastern physical plant director Byron Patterson accepted the award on behalf of his team for its efforts to make the campus as energy efficient as possible, a news release said.

The university was honored for its energy-efficient, money-saving technologies. The Sustainability Center helps provide education for students in energy, mechanical and construction engineering technology.

The center includes solar panels on some university buildings that generate hot water and electricity; a recycling program to reduce waste going to landfills by 80 percent; a tree and plant farm for landscaping on campus; a composting area; and rainwater retention ponds to help irrigate plants and support a geothermal system for one of the center’s classrooms.
18 2016-07-07
Hammond

Southeastern’s Economic Ripple


We cannot talk business in Tangipahoa Parish without including Southeastern Louisiana University. As one of the largest employers, if not the largest, in Tangipahoa Parish, it is also a major revenue driver for the Parish. And, unless you have been living under a rock for the last few years, you know University funding has been a major economic issue statewide, but has severely affected our Southeastern Louisiana University. Dr. John Crain has been the Captain at the helm of this ship steering the University through the rough financial waters. I posed a few questions to Dr. Crain to help see a more practical and personal element of Southeastern Louisiana University.

Our business community, our local Parish economy, is directly and largely impacted by Southeastern’s presence and success. As Dr. Crain points out, students, visitors, and staff of the University have a ripple effect through the Parish’s economy. He cites an economic impact study done a few short years ago which revealed the Universities total regional economic impact surpasses a half a billion dollars annually. Aside from the dollar impact they are a key component to the local Workforce Development of the region. They provide many of the employees as well as business owners which service our Parish. Not only do they bring revenue to the business community, provide the business community with employees and business owners, but they also offer services to help those businesses grow. Dr. Crain points out Southeastern’s Southeast Business Center and Louisiana Small Business Development Center which “provide business consulting and training and also facilitate access to intellectual resources housed within the university and its academic programs.”

While a larger portion of this impact may be more noticeable in Hammond, consider the amount of students in Tangipahoa Parish and even in St Tammany Parish who stay home to go to college. Their tax dollars stay local. Dr. Crain stated that a large majority, in the 80% range, of Kindergarten through 12th grade teachers in Livingston Parish were Southeastern graduates. It is important to understand we have a “regional university” located in Tangipahoa Parish. To further stress the importance of the University impact, Dr. Crain believes “what is good for the Northshore is good for Southeastern.” The importance of having a “strong viable university helps ensure a robust workforce and good quality of life for our citizens.”

In order for the university to remain strong in “fulfilling its mission”, it must have “strong connections with regional stakeholders.” He strongly believes the University must stay “plugged into the needs of the region.” One of the ways this is done is through their “relationships with K-12 schools, healthcare agencies, businesses, and non-profit organizations.”

Taking a peek inside the man behind Southeastern, I asked Dr. Crain what his favorite part of his role with the University was. His passion for his job is fueled by seeing students come to the university and go through the transformation that occurs from new freshman to graduating senior. Seeing them mature, evolve, grow and learn…is what makes everything worthwhile.” A curious person must ask how does one shed the pressure of such a role? Dr. Crain's outlets are exercise and playing the piano when he has the opportunity, and on a rare occasion he enjoys picking up and reading a good fiction. With the reality he is often faced with, who wouldn’t want to step away from it occasionally?

We have only scratched the surface of the economic impact of Southeastern Louisiana University on Tangipahoa Parish. I look forward to more conversations with Dr. Crain as well as providing more insight to this great resource we have here in Tangipahoa Parish. While talking with Dr. Crain and writing this article, one thought I learned growing up comes to mind – “You only get out of something what you put in.” In the terms of Southeastern students, alumni, and fans, that thought has been summed up into a 2 word phrase – Lion Up!”


18 2016-07-01
Hammond

SLU gets $1.4 million cut


Southeastern Louisiana University will be getting reduced state aid of nearly $1.4 million due to the distribution of funds from the Louisiana Board of Regents, President John Crain announced Thursday.
According to a budget message issued by Crain, the Board of Regents met Wednesday and decided on the formula for dividing funds among higher education institutions. That formula has SLU losing almost $1.4 million from the state despite efforts by legislators and Gov. John Bel Edwards to stabilize higher education funding during multiple legislative sessions, the president said.



;
"I am also disappointed that I have not been able to discern a rational and succinct explanation for this that I can share with our campus community and other interested stakeholders," he wrote.
In his message, Crain said he was pleased that Southeastern had passed its GRAD Act performance measures for the final year of the act. The act allows higher education institutions to raise tuition if they meet certain performance requirements.
"Given our GRAD Act results and ensuing tuition autonomy, we are evaluating whether we will request from our Board of Supervisors the authority to increase tuition again this coming fall semester," he wrote.
Crain said SLU gets nearly 82 percent of its enterprise resources through self-generated tuition and fees and only about 18 percent of its resources from the state of Louisiana.
"As a result, more than ever in the history of our institution, we are the masters of our own destiny," he said.
"The quality of the educational opportunities and experiences we offer to our students, as well as our customer services, drive student enrollment, which is far more important than the Regents' funding formula," he continued.
He said he would continue providing updates about the funding distribution for institutions, the partially-funded TOPS scholarship awards for students and the potential tuition increase at Southeastern. He urged people to be patient as the university looks at budget requests during these and future developments.

18 2016-07-01
Hammond

Southeastern Louisiana University faces $1.4 million reduction in state funds


HAMMOND, La. —Despite the best efforts of the governor of Louisiana, the Louisiana Legislature and the State Board of Regents, Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond faces a reduction in state funds of $1.4 million, said University President John Crain.

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The possibility of another increase in tuition at Southeastern remains a possibility. Students are understandably concerned.

"I'm struggling as it is right now to try to pay for college because I didn't get TOPS (Taylor Opportunity Program for Students) or anything," said Cody Pollard, as he studied in the university student union. "To raise the tuition again would definitely have an impact on me, and I am getting married soon, so paying off student loans for a while, it'd be hard. It would be difficult."

Funding for higher education basically escaped the state legislature's budgetary ax unscathed. Wednesday, the State Board of Regents approved the funding distribution formula for colleges and universities around Louisiana. It was not good news for Southeastern.

By letter Thursday, Crain said that the formula results in a $1.4 million reduction in state funds to SLU.

"We are evaluating whether we will request from our Board of Supervisors the authority to increase tuition again this coming fall semester," Crain wrote in a Campus Budget Update dated June 30.

"I am also disappointed that I have not been able to discern a rational and succinct explanation for this that I can share with our campus community and other interested stakeholders."

Gov. John Bel Edwards made it clear to the Board of Regents Wednesday he wants to avoid tuition increases at the state's colleges and universities.

"We cannot continue to put more and more of the burden on our students and on their families through tuition, which is what happened through those annual double digit tuition increases we've had for years," Edwards said.

Facing the prospect of another increase in tuition with only a few short weeks before fall registration, students don't really know what to expect.

"Just trying to do everyday life, so I do get some PEL grants, but even then it's only going to go so far," said SLU student Kayla Breaux.

"I think it's ridiculous. I think you should just keep it the same or lower it, because, I mean, it's really hard for families to be able to pay for their kids being able to go to school and everything," said student Marcus Flavors.

Right now, 82 percent of Southeastern University's enterprise resources are self generated through tuition and fees. Only 18 percent comes from the state, so the $1.4 million reduction is a hit, leaving families and students in a quandary. Important decisions must be made by both the university and the students as the fall semester rapidly approaches.

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18 2016-06-30
Baton Rouge

Southeastern graduate schedules international flutists festival


Southeastern Louisiana University music performance graduate student Andres Chavez has scheduled an international meeting of flutists in Colombia.

The International Meeting of Flutists at the Cultural and Environmental Festival “A la Sombra del Tatama” is set for July 7-10 in Chavez’s hometown of Santuario Risaraldo and features master classes, conferences and concerts.

Chavez has studied at Southeastern since 2015, where he is a tutor of music and principal flutist of the Southeastern Chamber Orchestra.

He played in the orchestra of the International Festival of Pipers in the World Quito-Ecuador Centre in 2010, 2011 and 2012, and in 2013, he was invited to play in the Flute Orchestra of the Americas.

It was his participation in the International Festival of Pipers that gave him the idea to start a festival in Colombia. He coordinated his first festival in 2014 with CORPOCAM, a nonprofit organization that promotes sustainable development of agriculture, culture and environment.

“For every country, culture plays an important role in society, and festivals, where people go to learn and share, are necessary to improve our skills and relations in the world,” Chavez said. “After years of negotiations, Colombia is closer than ever to achieving peace, and we need these spaces where people can share and work together.”

For information or to make a donation, email andres.chavez@southeastern.edu.


18 2016-06-30
Hammond

DAYNE SHERMAN: NAMING TOPS SABOTEURS


When John Bel Edwards was inaugurated governor on January 11, he needed several wins to put Louisiana back on the right path. The most important reforms were the expansion of Medicaid, stabilizing the state budget, and preventing destructive cuts to higher education and the Taylor Opportunity Program for Students (TOPS).

After three ignoble legislative sessions in a row, some positive reforms occurred. Yet much was left undone when the real logjam didn’t end, and the clock ran out on the last special session late in the evening of June 23.

Of these essential reforms, only the Medicaid expansion was successfully implemented. No one can honestly say the governor failed to advocate for needed initiatives. However, real progress met resistance in the House.

I’m not going to sugarcoat it. There has been no respite for higher education or the popular TOPS program. Colleges and universities are in a desperate position heading to the fall semester, and many smart students and faculty are looking for a way out of Louisiana. How could anyone blame them for leaving?

But diagnosing a problem only does so much toward repairing the damage. In this case, I believe Gov. Edwards should immediately employ four steps to correct the malevolence in the Legislature.

First, veto the front-loading of TOPS. In other words, spread the current funding between semesters, which is the most responsible thing to do. There’s no reason to give students a false hope with full funding in the fall and 40 % funding in the spring term. This plan, which passed in the final minutes of the third session, is a craven political move to prevent legislators from feeling the heat between now and January 2017.

Second, take the veto pen to all of the pet projects in the districts of the most delusional and spiteful representatives. The worst offenders, the most committed obstructionists, are as follows: Democrat Neil Abramson (New Orleans), Republicans Cameron Henry (Metairie), Speaker Taylor Barras (New Iberia), Lance Harris (Alexandria), John Schroder (Covington), Valarie Hodges (Denham Springs), Barry Ivey (BR-Central), Jim Morris (Oil City), Beryl Amedee (Houma), Mike Johnson (Bossier City), Alan Seabaugh (Shreveport), and Jay Morris (Monroe). If these mossbacks really want small government, as they claim, then certainly they’ll be happy to lose taxpayer-funded capital outlay pork slated for their backyards.

Third, go to House districts and explain to citizens exactly how boneheaded legislators backed the Louisiana Association of Business and Industry’s agenda instead of the needs of the people living in the region. This must be an all-out media blitz. Don’t be shy. Tell the people what mischief has been caused by Neil Abramson et al.

Last, visit every college and university campus in the state and explain to the remaining students, parents, staff, and faculty how the obstructionists fought plans to save TOPS and protect higher education. Name names.

The citizens of Louisiana need to know who sold them out. From my view, it wasn’t John Bel Edwards kicking the can down the road. Rather, it was a group of well-organized saboteurs in the Louisiana House of Representatives.

It’s time to hold legislators accountable for their gross negligence. Voters must know who tried to hamstring the state’s future, destroy higher education along with TOPS, and cripple the newly elected governor for no better reason than partisan political games.

Dayne Sherman is a professor and author of two novels. He blogs at TalkAboutTheSouth.com.


18 2016-06-30
Hammond

SOURCE: SOUTHEASTERN COULD FACE ANOTHER $1.3 MILLION CUT TODAY


HAMMOND---Southeastern supporters are holding their breath, awaiting the outcome of today’s Board of Regents meeting that could spark more financial doom for the university of the Northshore.

Reliable sources tell ActionNews17.com that today’s Regents meeting could deliver even more cuts to Southeastern Louisiana University. That news comes just days after the Legislature adjourned, reportedly “sparing” higher ed from budget cuts. However, news reports indicate higher education officials have been warned that they could face another round of cuts.

The Advocate reported Tuesday evening that higher ed officials have been “tentatively warned to expect to withhold about five percent as a precautionary measure.” The report indicates that number is “not yet set in stone.”

At issue is the proposed funding formula for the upcoming year. A source speaking on the condition of anonymity told AN17.com late Tuesday that if the formula is applied as it is currently set, Southeastern would face an estimated $1.3 million cut when the Regents meet Wednesday to set budgets for the state colleges and universities. In a newsletter emailed to members of the SLU Alumni Association on Monday, Southeastern’s ROAR Network alluded to the possibility that the funding formula details “were not favorable” for the university; however, it did not specify the expected funding impact.

“It’s insane,” the source told AN17.com, offering a lengthy list of ways Southeastern has curbed spending and made due with the limited resources it has.

Also included in the ROAR Network bulletin was word that due to the funding uncertainty and changes pending in the TOPS scholarship program, Southeastern will likely be forced to consider a tuition increase this fall. Such an increase would require a vote of the university’s Board of Supervisors.

The Board of Regents will meet Wednesday morning, starting at 10 a.m., in Baton Rouge. The meeting is scheduled to stream online at http://streaming.louisiana.gov, in the “Upcoming Events” section.

18 2016-06-29
Hammond

SLU mulls tuition increase


By Lauren Langlois staffwriter@hammondstar.com | 0 comments
While waiting to learn how the Louisiana Board of Regents will distribute funding to universities, Southeastern officials are exploring whether they should propose a tuition increase under the Louisiana GRAD Act.
In a budget update message posted Monday, President John Crain provided information about the university's funding situation after lawmakers concluded a second special session to fill in the state's budget deficit for the fiscal year that will start Friday.


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Higher education funding came out of the session without a funding cut, but Crain said there have been preliminary talks on how those funds should be distributed under a complex formula from the Board of Regents, he said.
Many of the scenarios discussed have institutions in the University of Louisiana System, including Southeastern, getting less money than last year, while other institutions would get more, he said.
The Board of Regents is supposed to meet Wednesday to discuss funding distribution, President Crain said.
In the past, slight changes to how the funds are divided among colleges and universities would not affect institutions as heavily, he said. But with years of reduced state aid for higher education, small adjustments can hurt, he said.
"[Institutions] are a lot more sensitive to changes," he said.
This is the last year universities could raise tuition under the GRAD Act that allows for tuition rises if institutions meet certain performance requirements and are comparable to peer universities, he said. Southeastern has not reached its cap for raising its tuition, so the university is looking at whether an increase is a feasible option, he said.
"We're crunching the numbers to see how that would look," he said.
One preliminary calculation is that it could be raised by 9 percent, he said.
The university increased its tuition by about 10 percent last fall. Oficials said it was necessary to maintain programs and services. Like other universities in the state, Southeastern has faced a series of cuts in state aid since 2008.
With higher education funding looking uncertain, university officials are looking at whether to take advantage of the act's final year to raise tuition, which is $2,639 per semester for 12 credit hours, not counting fees.
"We have always had one of the lowest tuitions in the state," he said.
A tuition increase would need approval from the UL System's Board of Supervisors. President Crain said a special committee could meet within the next few weeks to consider a tuition rise if it is proposed.
Crain also discussed the status of the state scholarship program TOPS, which is 70 percent funded. Legislators passed an amendment that would fully fund the scholarships for the fall semester but would only cover about 40 percent of the awards in the spring.
Gov. John Bel Edwards has said he is considering vetoing that amendment.
Crain said about 40 percent of Southeastern's students depend on TOPS, which is the state's third largest number of students getting the scholarships.

18 2016-06-23
Baton Rouge

Southeastern student wins scholarship


Southeastern Louisiana University communication major Danita Winfrey, of Baton Rouge, recently received a scholarship from the Baton Rouge Area Association of Black Journalists.

The scholarship covers the registration, airfare and hotel costs for Winfrey to attend the National Association of Black Journalists Convention and Career Fair in Washington, D.C., Aug. 3-7, a news release said.

The Baton Rouge Area Association of Black Journalists was founded in 2012 with a mission to promote and support black journalists and mentor and provide scholarships to student journalists.

GET
18 2016-06-23
Baton Rouge

Local students named to SLU honors list


Students from Livingston and Tangipahoa parishes were named to the spring honors list at Southeastern Louisiana University.

Students with a 3.50 or better GPA are on the president’s list, dean’s list students have a 3.20 to 3.49 GPA and honor roll students a 3.00 to 3.19 GPA.

Honors list students must be full-time undergraduates carrying at least 12 credit hours and have no grade below a C, according to a news release.

LIVINGSTON PARISH
Albany
PRESIDENT’S LIST: Alison C. Carroll, Diedra C. Chavers, Katie M. Delaneuville, Fabein Disedare, Erin J. Hermann, Alyssa N. Hoover, Tramaine D. Keith, Emily G. Leeper, Jamie Mayeux, Kayli E. Payne, Rachael A. Portier, Joshua W. Prokop, Cody D. Sanders, Clarissa R. Smith and Brice W. Wagner.

Dean’s list: Hannah R. Cardaronella, Ariel B. Cook, Taylor B. Damare, Mark C. Moody, Schuylar M. Ramsey and Savannah B. Thompson.
HONOR ROLL: Joseph E. Duplessis, Connor A. Glascock, Sarah D. Hess and Kerrie H. Long.

Denham Springs
PRESIDENT’S LIST: Monica N. Alford, Karisa M. Almond, Anna R. Arceneaux, Jessica A. Aubin, Dakota L. Ball, Jason G. Ballard, Amanda L. Bergeron, Ryan N. Bernath, Parker J. Berthelot, Hailey M. Bonvillain, Jesseca D. Bonvillain, Katie D. Brignac, Crystal N. Burrell, Hailey M. Callahan, Lindsey K. Callender, Joseph L. Cambre, Lilly N. Cambre, Kristen D. Chambers, Brittany E. Chedraui, Rebecca L. Cody, Zoie B. Cook, Robbin L. Corkern, Shelby L. Cothern, Evan T. Cranford, Seth B. Crnko, Brianna J. Denmark, William R. Dew, Jonathan Dietz, Taryn N. Dixon, Nicholas S. Dolan, Brynne L. Dugas, Santana D. Duncan, Logan J. Dykes, James R. Evans, Alexis R. Fairbanks, Blake A. Farlow, Jensen R. Firmin, David J. Fortner, Zoe A. Foster, Lisa K. Friedrich, Amanda C. Gann, Kristyn M. Gary, Rachel N.Gazzea, Kammy A. Gerkin, Annie J. Goodman, Paige E. Green, Ashton G. Griggs, Chad M. Groger, Shiela F. Gros, Carl D. Guidry, Madison L. Guidry, Karly E. Gunter, Dillon T. Haley, Christy L. Hall, Elizabeth L. Hall, Patrick B. Hardy, Caleb A. Harrell, Aimee E. Harris, Victoria A. Hart, Victoria A. Harthcock, Amy L. Havard, Bailey J. Hennesy, Letitia Hester, Ashley Higginbotham, Margaret R. Hinson, Megan M. Hull, Martin A. Hutchins, Kaitlyn A. Jackson, Kayleigh B. Johnson, Ashley Jones, Sidney B. Kent, Gabrielle T. Kling and Ryan K. Lafleur.

Also, Reanna L. Lanoux, Lauren E. Larson, Kyu Lee, Shanna M. Lentz, Kelsey A. Lougon, Kaci L. Maggio, Rachel McCrory, Benjamin T. McGrew, Karlee E. McKernan, Leslie G. McNabb, Marykatherine E. Melfi, Tyler W. Mellenthin, Jennifer Miller, Leah B. Miller, Brennan L. Morris, Tiffany A. Nevels, Aja Newman, Madison C. O’Neal, Jensen A. Ortego, Kevin M. Paninski, Aaron T. Patterson, Katie F. Patterson, Austin O. Polk, Cody B. Pollard, Karson R. Pope, Haley M. Porter, Holli A. Portier, Matthew B. Rayburn, Kylie N. Roberson, Alyssa E. Roberts, Carrigan J. Robinson, Nicole M. Rodemann, Lee-Ann J. Ryan, Krista N. Schelter, Kaisey N. Seegmiller, Brooke E. Settoon, Jacob S. Shaffett, Malayne A. Sharp, Casey E. Shelton, Holly N. Sonnier, Sarah D. Starkey, Abbie M. Stevenson, Olivia J. Streat, Spencer J. Suggs, Sterling M. Suggs, Tanner J. Swain, Taylor A. Swain, Brittany N. Talbert, Meagan E. Thames, Kori N. Tilyou, Joseph P. Trosclair, Hans J. Troxclair, Jay A. Tulk, Taysha J. Tutt, Caleb H. Walls, Justin Webb, Laurel E. Williams, Britany M. Williard, Kayla D. Wilson, Erica L. Woolley, Emily R. Wright and Heidi Zuelke.

DEAN’S LIST: Carleigh C. Adams, Peyton K. Addison, Alexandra Alello, Ghassan C. Alkadi, Devyn A. Allen, Kayla R. Babin, Anna Benton, Mary C. Bernard, Alexi R. Booth, Kaleigh D. Caruso, Logan G. Cormier, Claire A. Dimaria, Patrick A. Dolan, Savannah M. Douglas, Darian B. Drude, Matthew C. Erwin, Amber N. Ferguson, Drew G. Forbes, Joshua L. Ford, Leah E. Fournier, Claudio V. Franc, Ray W. Fuller, Michael A. Gardner, Brooke Gonzales, Adaline J. Griggs, Aaron J. Guidry, Brooklne S. Hadley, Raymond B. Hardison, Carsyn M. Harris, Dalton L. Holdman, Michael D. Ivy, Ashley N. Jacobs, Dakota D. Lang, Molly C. Lesage, Taylor J. Lilley, Celena C. Long, Austin N. Loup, Layton C. Lynch, Mackenzie C. Martone, Zachary C. Matherne, Kurdeshia C. Meyers, Hanna E. Mikesell, Laney R. Miley, Carley A. Miller, Glen M. Mills, Morgan L. Mincey, Jeremiah D. Muse, Christian H. Nethery, Tiffany M. Oneill, Lindsey M. Oufnac, Amanda M. Patterson, Grayson S. Payne, Gage M. Pickett, Tra M. Pinion, Kaylie H. Pinkerton, Stephen A. Prescott, Victoria M. Reynolds, Matthew A. Richard, Courtney S. Richoux, Zachary P. Savoy, Jamie L. Smith Markey, Eric V. Tallo, Emma E. Tedder, Brett D. Thames, Alexandra L. Thompson, Kaleb A. Tutt, Courtney R. Warren, Blayke G. Weatherford, Katelyn P. Whittington, Jake R. Williams, Daniel E. Wingate and Joshua R. Wingate.

Honor roll: Ivy A. Ainsworth, Grace M. Atwell, Lauren N. Barnett, Bryan J. Berry, Sierra Bobo, Cerah E. Byrd, Courtneyann S. Campagna, Allison A. Campbell, Kyle M. Cedotal, Adinah E. Cobb, Luke T. Dalberg, Berkley P. Dean, Savannah N. Everhart, Claire N. Fournier, Christina R. Fritchie, Hallie M. Fuentes, Nicole Futch, Benjamin R. Genre, William A. Geoghagan, Mattie E. Gibson, Hayli M. Gillette, Larsen L. Glover, Samantha N. Graves, Brianne N. Hall, Sydney N. Hamilton, Cameron S. Harris, Spencer R. Herring, Joshua D. Hinkel, Courtney J. Hutchinson, Faith M. Jackson-Nixon, Venecia D. James, Tracy Kearney, Nathan R. Landry, Kaitlin R. Ma, Tyler N. Miller, Luke W. Millet, Alexis J. Montgomery, Steven B. Moore, Bailey K. Murray, Amanda L. Quick, Haley E. Robert, Kayla E. Sagely, Joseph M. Sceroler, Jest E. Schertzer, Madeline M. Scivicque, Katie A. Simmons, Shelby R. Stevens, Treasure A. Tate, Ramon C. Viada, Sarah L. Vickers, Kelsi D. Walker and Christopher M. Webster.
French Settlement
PRESIDENT’S LIST: Kayla R. Andrews, Clara E. Krzykwa, Rae L. Major, Destinee N. Morales, Brianna N. Reeves and Jenna R. Vincent.

HONOR ROLL: Dalton L. Aydell and Duncan P. Martin.

Holden
PRESIDENT’S LIST: Alexa L. Arnett, Holli C. Bankston, Sarah Brogle, Brooklynn D. Cherry, Randi M. Corbett, Nicole M. Dimitri, Fabian Edwards, Haley E. Fletcher, Katie L. Graham, Tyler J. Hasson, Megan D. Lanoy, Taylor A. McLean, Ivy L. Pierson, Sara E. Stevens and Deanna E. Woessner.

Dean’s list: Tiffany A. Ambrose, Aaron T. Carlton, Lauren A. Clardy, Matthew Dye, Breanna Finnell, Cody M. Herron, Madison E. Mizell, Kayla D. Navarre and Gabrielle R. Reynolds.
HONOR ROLL: Hayli D. Azuara, Leigh A. Cannino, Brianna L. Castleberry, Kaitlyn J. Methvien, Colton M. Ray and Alexandra C. Sanders

Livingston
PRESIDENT’S LIST: Gabrielle L. Achord, Ashleigh Balfantz, Cory L. Boudreaux, Josie M. Brock, Kaleb D. Brock, Selena E. Brown, Grace L. Cole, London E. Cropper, Madison N. DeFranceschi, Emily A. Duffy, Sarah K. Easley, Zachary M. Edwards, Lance E. Finnell, Jonathan C. Gordon, Emily N. Guitreau, Bridget M. Kellum, Erin E. Lavergne, Kyle Lewis, Whitney L. Lobell, Justin McLin, Campbell B. Palmer, Ross D. Roddy, Shelbi B. Spier, Bethany M. Stoner, Samuel H. Taylor and Taylin B. Underwood.

DEAN’S LIST: Caleb Alexander, Kara M. Broussard, Anna C. Dixon, Amanda H. Henson, Sierra E. Merritt and Ambriehlla M. St. John.

HONOR ROLL: Cheyenne L. Carter, Benjamin W. Cutrer, Cadie L. Guitreau, Alex R. McMorris, Rose E. Overton and Carlie N. Whittington.

Maurepas
PRESIDENT’S LIST: Clyde J. Austin, Victoria E. Bovia, Kaitlyn W. Carroll, Julian C. Ellis, Joshua T. Hughes, Chaz A. Montaldo, Simone M. Odom and Jessica N. Penalber.

DEAN’S LIST: Katie L. Balfantz and Britany M. Webber.

HONOR ROLL: Journey M. James and Megan M. Penalber.

Springfield
PRESIDENT’S LIST: Andrew L. Benton, Robert J. Brown, Taylor A. Brown, Tarez A. Cowsar, Savannah R. Davidson, Stephany A. Davidson, Maia A. Delatte, Kaylee Y. Dimm, James C. Egle, Michael K. Fontenot, Justin M. Greaud, Marrie C. Hills, Miranda J. Lobell, Madison M. Paulus, Taylor M. Picou, Brooke A. Singer and Robert C. Winn.

DEAN’S LIST: Caraline D. Abels, Ali A. Brumfield, Kaitlin A. Didier, Adile Gendusa, Zachary C. Husser, Latricia A. Manning and Justine E. Threeton.

HONOR ROLL: Regina R. Brown, Hannah M. Harper, Kristopher J. Lanoux and Carly L. Shields.

Walker
PRESIDENT’S LIST: Cody Arceneaux, Bailey L. Armstrong, Morgan J. Arthur, Grant Aucoin, Victoria A. Bankston, Taylor N. Barras, Tabitha M. Berard, Kathryn O. Bokun, Kevin T. Bokun, Christopher K. Bowman, Sara J. Breaux, Brennan M. Burrick, Patrick A. Byrd, Mackenzie J. Caillouet, Calyn B. Cain, Madeline C. Carter, Jessie N. Castle, Hunter J. Chaney, Preston W. Chaney, Danielle G. Coniglio, Zachary P. Cox, Paige L. Creel, Kristin N. Curtis, Paige R. Devall, Emily M. Devillier, Jessica E. Dupart, Raegan E. Fontenot, Deven N. Gautreau, Lauren M. Gibson, Rachel C. Gill, Makenzie L. Glascock, Christian T. Gonzales, Samuel T. Gordon, Emily C. Guercio, Jarod L. Hopper, Nicole R. Hunt, Lydia Hunter, Garrett M. Jones, Trent K. Kinchen, Madison L. Lane, Melanie A. Lane, Jimmy B. Leblanc, Melody A. McIntosh, Ryan M. Miller, Kara A. Norris, Seth J. Oufnac, Bailee A. Owens, Lianet Perez, Shelby R. Phillips, Jessie B. Ratliff, Avery L. Renfrow, Jessica R. Robinson, Sara E. Rushing, Rachel H. Russin, Morgan E. Sanders, Baylie N. Stears, Sydney R. Stewart, Landon J. Stringer, Jordyn M. Tolar, Ross J. Tomko, Garrett C. Voisin, Robert C. Warren, Bailey M. Williams, Emily K. Williams, Jessica N. Williams and Sarah E. Winner.

DEAN’S LIST: Luke B. Blocker, Regan M. Cascio, Lindsey D. Cheek, Joshua R. Crawford, Melissa A. Dugas, Emily J. Fink, Joley M. Garner, Brianne M. Guidroz, Madison S. Jannise, Lindsey H. Johnson, Keith D. Luther, Meredith A. Moore, Brittanie R. Pevito, Samantha E. Reine, Anna M. Robertson, Gretchen M. St.Pierre, Micheala E. Thorpe and Kristi E. Touchet.

HONOR ROLL: Matthew A. Adams, Mikayla R. Anderson, Maggie C. Beck, Hillary A. Brumfield, Joshua B. Chapman, Regan V. Davis, Maia Carmelita A. Dominguez, Reese C. Dugas, Bryant P. Griffin, Kelsey N. Harris, Christopher M. Hubert, Joseph T. Lockhart, Madelyn P. Paternostro, Amy W. Sanders, Taylor M. Sharp, Kristen Shugart, Jerica E. Stepter, Lynnsie M. Taylor and John T. Wilson.

Watson
PRESIDENT’S LIST: Lila M. Bordelon, Vernon L. Johnson and Cassidy D. Roddy.

TANGIPAHOA PARISH
Amite
PRESIDENT’S LIST: Maggie A. Adams, Alexis N. Baham, Nicholas J. Blouin, Emma A. Brabham, Alexandra N. Butterworth, Jessica L. Casanova, Sydni F. Casanova, Emily U. Coker, Jacob Cruse, Charity E. Cutrer, Jamie L. Este, Molly E. Flynn, Rosemary E. Flynn, Harold D. Henderson, Breanna L. Higgins, Paige L. Imbraguglio, Marcie C. Jenkins, Taylor N. Joiner, Seth D. Leto, Richard T. Mathis, Jr., Kenneth K. Miller, Lauren V. Murphy, Ashton E. Richard, Lacey S. Robbins, Devan M. Rodriguez, Rebecca S. Schilling, Jacob M. Sharkey, Nicole L. St. Martin, Tara D. Tyree, Darian M. Vining, Gavin T. Vining, Demi L. Wells and Torrie D. Williams.

DEAN’S LIST: Eric R. Ballard, Rebekah L. Linder, Richard A. McShan, Samantha D. Rushing, Christian K. Smith, Amanda D. Tate, Dakota P. Taylor and Jessica Young.

Honor roll: Michael J. Foster, Jordan A. Gabrielcich, Rebecca C. Lee, Megan M. Molinary, Christine P. Sanders, Peggy L. Schwander, Michael A. Smith, Austin Todd, Joshua T. Volkmann, Morgan C. Warren and Taylor N. Williams.
Fluker
PRESIDENT’S LIST: Kamen L. Carter.

DEAN’S LIST: Collin W. Kent.

Folsom
PRESIDENT’S LIST: Lucie J. Caire.

Hammond
PRESIDENT’S LIST: Khudija Aftab, Kimberly M. Aguillard, Lawrence R. Allan, Heather M. Allen, J’olie E. Allen, Sarah K. Allen, Kendall M. Alvis, Jasmine J. Anderson, James Anstiss, Alyssa M. Arceneaux, Joshua H. Asoodeh, Deborah Ayme, Binaya Bajgain, Bailey M. Barringer, Vivek Basnet, Isabella Bendana, Madison L. Bentivegna, Jenna A. Berger, Grace K. Bernard, Kelly A. Bernard, Katy L. Bertrand, Kiran Bhatta, Abiral Bhattarai, Prashanna Bhattarai, Nischay Bist, Bibidh Bista, Tracy M. Boudoin, Erin E. Brady, Stephen J. Breaux, Jennifer M. Brescher, Sean C. Brown, Landry M. Bullock, Lucia Bustamante, Brandi R. Callais, Cierra J. Calloway, Malik A. Chaney, Madison C. Chauvin, Oshu B. Chhetri, Andrei Ciolacu, Cory G. Clapp, Austin A. Coffin, Mikiala V. Colbert, Javen M. Coleman, Connor J. Collura, Jordan E. Colona, Carmen N. Coon, Emily J. Cothern, Seth A. Courtney, Andrew J. Cowan, James E. Currington, Aayush R. Dahal, Adrianna Dalton, Ruth A. Darouse and Devin M. Dauzat.

Also, Chelsey A. Davis, Haley O. Davis, Jamie F. Davis, Jessica L. Davis, Olivia M. Davis, Benjamin E. Depriest, Monique C. Desouge, Lyndsey N. Devaney, Taylor M. Drude, Taylor G. Ducote, Brooke Duhon, Natalie Duran, Sailor T. Dusenberry, Brittany A. Dykes, Emily A. Egan, Joel B. Epperson, DeShant’e R. Epps, Abbgail Erebia, Joshua R. Escamilla, Kaitlin N. Farkas, Heart D. Faust, Kristen L. Favalora, Taylor C. Fernandez, Michael W. Frank Jr., Jedarrien L. Frazier, Howard A. Funk, Victoria M. Gainous, Bibek Gautam, Aiden C. Genovese, Saugat Ghimire, Maria L. Goddard, Larshell A. Green, Meghan K. Green, Prakash Hamal, Skylar S. Hanson, Theresa M. Harriford, Myles D. Haydel, Austin M. Henderson, Lana K. Henry, Claudia C. Hodges, Devin K. Holck, Mark R. Holt, Abigail Horst, Pamela Hubbard, Maddison L. Hutches, William L. Hyde, Amber S. Ingram, Alexis L. Inman, Candyce Jackson, Ashley E. Jacobsen, Mary Danse Jarratt, Jonathan G. Jee, Brittany D. Jefferson and Edmund H. Jenkins.

Also, Megan L. Johnson, Paige C. Johnson, Taylor Johnson, Gerriane D. Jones, Kelsie L. Jones, Margaux M. Kaltenbacher, Ashish Karanjit, Utsab J. Karkee, Binisha Karki, Deep S. Karki, Suyogya Karki, Amandeep Kaur, Steven A. Kellis, Callie A. Kelly, Michelle L. Kendall, Jeetendra Khadka, Januka Khanal, Kurt R. Kiley, Samantha J. King, Taylor R. Kinnison, Corinne P. Kirkland, Savannah M. Klier, Mahitha M. Koduri, Ragan S. Kofoed, Kenneth L. Kropog, Abby A. Kuhn, Savannah D. Laborde, Nisha Lama, Sristi Lamichhane, Alexis P. Laplante, Amber M. Lasher, Elise S. Laurent, Amy L. Le, Rebecca L. Leblanc, Tori P. Leblanc, Kayla P. Lee, Kristopher S. Lee, Seul Lee, Marisa A. Leger, Branden P. Lessard, Katherine L. Lirette, Kelsea D. Locicero, Samantha M. Lopez, Chelsea V. Magee, Yash Malla, Blake D. Martin, Silent M. McCarthy, Kody G. McGregor, James D. McGuire and Caitlin J. McHodgkins.

Also, Jenna N. McHugh, Hannah G. McNemar, Andrea V. Mena, Mauricio A. Mena, Cecilia M. Mercier, Anthony Miller, Mallory A. Milton, Amanda B. Miner, Subash Mishra, Jonah C. Mollere, Frank Mons, Carl A. Monvoisin, Angie M. Moyer, April A. Mullins, Darby E. Murphy, Hannah M. Nelson, Andrea L. Nershi, Naresh Neupane, Katie M. Noonan, Allison R. Norman, Sholitha Nunnery, Paul Obermann, Chibueze I. Onyeagusi, James M. Ostarly, Tika D. Pahadi, Courtney R. Palisi, Tiara M. Panyanouvong, Subrat Parajuli, Marie A. Parrill, Amit Patel, Angela N. Patton, Kriston Pauley, Mark Pavlyuk, Casey E. Peacock, Ronald J. Pellegrin, Savannah B. Perrin, Adrianna D. Peters, Chance M. Phillips, Kyra E. Phillips, Memoree’ M. Plaisance, Prayush Pokharel, Destiny A. Ponder, Brijesh Pradhananga, Kathryn L. Protsman, Niraj Puri, Swikar N. Pyakurel, Hope E. Ramirez, Daniela Raygadas Dominguez and Umesh Regmi.

Also, Kristin N. Ribando, Mikaylia D. Rideaux, Taylor A. Ridgedell, Sarah E. Robert, Caitlin E. Robinson, Gabriela S. Rodriguez, Marina N. Rodriguez, Santiago Rodriguez, Angie A. Rojas, Taylor R. Romero, Freddie Rosario, Chalines Rosario, Leslie C. Ruiz, Naomi M. Russell, Samantha A. Ryals, Isabella J. Ryder, Scott G. Sanders, Cassandra L. Schwiebert, Miranda M. Sciortino, Danielle V. Shearer, Pankaj Sherchan, Nicholas D. Shipman, Mikayla M. Shippy, Sahara Shivakoti, Anish Shrestha, Bijay Shrestha, Rahul Shrestha, Siddhanta Shrestha, Justin J. Sims, Wade E. Smith, Brittany M. Smith, Samantha M. Smith, Magdalena Spinu, Joshua E. Sponholz, Charles I. Squires, Cinia K. Stutes, Samantha D. Sullivan, Joel T. Sutton, Avishkar Tamang, Lelia K. Tate, Rajan Thapa, Shreya Thapa, Ryan M. Thomas, Madison B. Thompson, Breanna M. Threeton, Aabishkar Timalsina, Natalia Timotina, Uddhab Tiwari, Dominique Toups, Mikaela R. Treptow, Cetera X. Tuesno, Everlyne C. Tuimur, Veronica M. Turk, Joseph W. Tzeng, Kevin W. Tzeng, Andrea R. Villarreal, Nathan N. Visel, Brandon K. Webb, Stephanie D. Wells, Kristin A. White, Kristin Wiggins, Evian J. Williams, Kathryn A. Williams, Sharrona S. Williams, Alan M. Williamson, Kasey D. Winder, Sungkyung Woo, Mercy Yang and Yutong T. Yu.

DEAN’S LIST: Regan M. Adcock, Apurba Adhikary, Weston E. Arnold, Samantha N. Balfantz, Briana Baugher, Megan Beard, Olivia M. Bell-Hanegan, Christian J. Bellows, Ethan R. Blouin, Scott T. Brame, Brandon W. Burt, Savankumar M. Chaniara, Olivia J. Connart, Carol A. Constant, Cory M. Costanza, Kayla K. Coston, Bryce J. Cothern, Abigail K. Daigle, Thelma J. Dawson, Mckenzie L. Desandro, Anjil Dhamala, Jacob A. Dupuis, Samikiya L. Evans, Elise C. Falgout, Jenna L. Flanagan, Malik Fland, Emily R. Freese, Tergel G.Davaatotgonbaatar, Blair C. Gallon, Kaylee D. George, Megan L. Goelz, Arron D. Gomez, Courtney L. Greer, Madison J. Hall, April D. Harper, Maya A. Harris, Hannah E. Hawkins, Corey R. Hayden, Alex M. Herbert, David C. Hunt, Nicholas R. Johnson, Ronald J. Kennedy, Ryan S. Kenny, Kayla Klein, Gabriel D. Knight, Melissa Knox, Michael L. Lamarca, Calyn M. Landaiche and Lillia A. Lara Sanchez.

Also, Landon F. Lauderdale, Tanner C. Leblanc, Elizabeth I. Ma, Kayla J. Magee, Christopher Miley, Macy R. Miley, Brittany Mohamed, Hannah M. Moody, Haeun Mun, Hannah R. Myers, Bach V. Nguyen, Abby E. Norris, Tyler J. Nunez, Baleigh C. Olah, Chinwendu S. Onyeagusi, Joshua J. Ormand, Brooke A. Ort, Jacob S. Pardue, Matthew S. Peluso, Catherine M. Pier, Brhea N. Pitre, Lisa Proffit-Rau, Nicole K. Quebedeaux, Zeaira E. Reed, Christopher M. Rhodes, Tyler M. Roddy, Travis R. Romero, Katelyn M. Roy, Reid P. Shorter, Aakriti Shrestha, Sara E. Simms, Akilah T. Spears, Robyn E. Sykes, Brindley J. Tallia, Jonathan M. Taylor, Jay E. Tenhundfeld, Ryan D. Thompson, Vy T. Tran, Krystal L. Waddell, Osha B. Weary, Benjamin J. West, Sidney M. West, Domonique A. White, Brandon T. Williams, Brett R. Williams and Brandon M. Woods.

HONOR ROLL: Samuel J. Abene, Samson B. Ajayi, Bonnie B. Baham, Robert T. Banks, Brittani S. Barksdale, Tinitra T. Bates, Amanda M. Bittola, Aaron Blue, Faith A. Bolling, Eryn E. Brannagan, Dimetirous Campbell, Layne S. Carroll, Auriell Celestine, Edwin Q. Clark, Miranda L. Coe, Shallia Connerson, Chelsea D. Cook, Noah W. Courtney, Ronjae Cunnikin, Tanab N. Devkota, Evan Dichiara, Sanel Dragovic, Jonathan C. Durbin, Kameron Eckland, David W. Ferguson, Mollie S. Foster, Alexis N. Garnette, Anup Ghimire, Stephen E. Gilmore, Ivy R. Gonzales, Caitlin Y. Hampton, Nathan Harris, Taylor R. Hawkins, Brenan J. Haynes, Nathan L. Hedrich Martin Rae, Jonathan J. Hill, Raymond L. Holt, Carly M. Jenkins, Will’Nesha S. Johnson, Landon J. Joiner, Kohl A. Kent, Mahesh Khanal, Campbell P. Kirn, Maggie L. Klein, Jared M. Landry, Lindsay N. Lightfoot, Joshua R. Magee, Robert J. McClelen, Morgan Methvien, Hunter S. Metrejean, Courtany N. Mitchell, Christiano N. Mouswaswa, Chamille T. Muse, Saidatulai A. Oyebola, Dashawn L. Petrie, Elise M. Phares, Lynzeryus J. Railey, Jordan S. Recatto, Kaylee M. Rivera, Alyxanna G. Roberts, Brigette N. Sanabia, Mary A. Shafer, Swastika Sharma, Braxton D. Sharp, Thomas Shepard, Monica R. Shurden, Madison R. Sibley, Gloria E. Stovall, Jennifer L. Terry, Dylan M. Vaughn, Laine V. Vicaro, Megan Waguespack, Sulin Wang, Erika Wiedemann, Jon’Vielle A. Williams and Aaron A. Zell.

Husser
PRESIDENT’S LIST: Eric C. Chapman.

DEAN’S LIST: Sarah J. Calabresi.

HONOR ROLL: Carter L. Capdeboscq, Lane H. Taillon and Amber R. Vernon.

Independence
PRESIDENT’S LIST: Justin B. Archote, Latasha L. Baker, Brittany L. Bates, Kalie F. Beckers, Catherine L. Costa, Vada M. Crosby, Daphne D. Hebert, Kaitlyn E. Jenkins, Nydoria Jones, Kendall R. Lee, Cameron P. Loria, Joe R. Phetsomphou, Taylor K. Reitz, Johnny P. Robertson, Cassie M. Sons, Matthew O. Spano, Garrett C. Vitrano and Brianna L. Ziebarth.

Dean’s list: Amber S. Arnone, Joshua R. Byars, Robert L. Gilliam, Lyndsee C. Goodwin, Arthur J. Helmer, Sydney R. Hutchison, Darryl B. Miles, Matthew D. Stevens and Van E. Ziebarth.
HONOR ROLL: Stormi Reid, Anthony M. Stire and Catherine C. Thomas.

Kentwood
PRESIDENT’S LIST: Raini A. Blackwell, Page A. Clemons, Katherine A. Davis, Tristan Gill, Rachel P. Gonzales, Logan N. Johnson, Austin M. McDaniel, Emily E. McNabb, Yulet Silva, Brody W. Simmons, Alliyah N. Sims, Philicia R. Travis, Dar’Rell K. Walker, Bradley D. Watson, Blaine G. Williams and Brelynn G. Williams.

DEAN’S LIST: Garrett M. Blades, Haley E. Brister, Rod’Neishia L. Brumfield, Madelyn M. Cook, Blake M. Freeman, Kathryn F. Fussell, Buford “Trey” A. Golden, Olivia M. Goll, Sarah E. Gulotta, Donis M. Lambert, Matthew C. Lea, Cierra J. McDaniel, Reagon K. McNabb, Hunter E. Oliver, Keller M. Payne, Kelsey R. Payne, Stewart H. Phillips, Domonique A. Saxon and Deandre K. Walker.

HONOR ROLL: Scotti M. Dykes, Jestini D. Fox, Darah M. Givens and Devin L. King.

Loranger
PRESIDENT’S LIST: Devyn T. Alford, Matthew T. Allen, Tiffany L. Armstrong, Hailey N. Baldwin, Justin W. Bankston, Kileigh T. Bethel, Kassidy L. Braddy, Anthony J. Burkett, Madison B. Cooper, David A. Fairburn, Amanda P. Fitzgerald, Jennifer M. Goetz, Julia E. Graf, Christopher A. Graham, Chandler M. Guess, Zachary D. Kamm, Mikhailo Levitskiy, Welton B. Lewis, Joshua Magliolo, Ashley R. Nelson, Elizabeth A. O’Neil, Caitlin G. Overmier, Amber K. Pecoraro, Timothy P. Sander, Julia L. Smith, Shayna R. Tycer and Caroline G. Whiting.

DEAN’S LIST: Sharon F. Adams, Tanner N. Anthony, Monique T. Burris, Rachael M. Dalgo, Chris J. Dominique, Angelena R. Fairburn, Ashlen M. Francois, Jeremy P. Haase, Dakota J. Jenkins, Robert C. Jones, Nicole E. Knight, Jason J. Licciardi, Catherine A. Millet, Lyman A. Mizell, Peyton L. Reycraft, Cole F. Stevens and Jessica L. Thomas.

HONOR ROLL: Cody D. Addison, Wallace B. Bahm, Dakota L. Bankston, Lauren A. Domangue, Stephanie Garcia Marquez, Hycy S. Giacone and Jake M. Ingraffia.

Natalbany
PRESIDENT’S LIST: Jasmine D. Webb.

DEAN’S LIST: Louis J. Milazzo.

HONOR ROLL: Brianna S. Cyprian and Marilyn E. Strahan.

Ponchatoula
PRESIDENT’S LIST: Ariane L. Adams, Faith M. Allen, Maria A. Alphonso, Oleg Balaban, Brooke N. Balser, Tara L. Barbe, Jessica L. Bass, Brandi L. Bastian, Ashleigh B. Bergeron, Luke J. Bleakley, Ryan G. Byers, Sydney K. Cali, Claudia H. Chatellier, Mallory L. Clark, Maghan K. Coker, Leah M. Dahmer, Cody D. Davis, Jennifer L. Deblanc, Taylor A. Denham, Michelle A. Doescher, Savanah M. Edwards, Brandi Erwin, Toby D. Everett, Kaci L. Ezell, Shannah N. Fuhrmann, Ivyleigh H. Garland, Brandon S. Gauthier, Evan E. Gautier, Adam C. Hebert, Cierra M. Heckmann, Christina N. Hicks, Kayla J. Hoover, Brittany M. Howes, Christopher T. Hudspeth, Elizabeth A. James, Sabrina James, Leanne E. Keen, Victoria R. Kinchen, Sarah M. Kron, Micaela E. Lanus, Lorena L. Lea, Glenn T. Loup, Crystal A. Lowe, Elisa Martinez, Tabitha McDowell, Jacob A. Mercante, Dylan R. Meyers, Markie A. Morris, Alexandra N. Morse, Jill C. Munchausen, Victoria Novitsky, Aurora Y. Olvera, Amy J. Oncale, Emily Kate N. Perrin, Sadey M. Pfister, Brittany K. Puma, Abigail M. Ragusa, Jenna K. Reno, Connie D. Rezentes, Jeana M. Rhoads, Danielle J. Ricks, Taylor E. Roberts, Brittany N. Saltzman, Shelbie L. Savoy, Elizabeth C. Schilling, Kyle J. Smith, Talicia X. Smith, Rebecca D. Spano, Stephanie M. Stafford, Landon M. Starkey, Rachel D. Sullivan, Ashley N. Tassin, Kristen D. Theard, Timothy Thibodaux, Jonathan P. Vales, Nathan C. Waller, Benjamin M. Wells, Rebecca L. White, Amber N. Wise, Jessica A. Wood, Colin F. Wylie, Nicholas W. Wylie, Luke G. Yoes, Amber N. Young and Casey N. Zweifel.

DEAN’S LIST: Kailey A. Aveton, Mariah L. Benson, Storm B. Coates, Gabrielle N. Crocker, Daniel E. Cuevas, Christopher A. Dill, Jaira Dove, Justin Fernandez, Morgan M. Fontenot, Elizabeth E. Ford, Dana J. Hendrix, Madison A. Hoover, Laura E. Huggett, Kayci Kenney, Amanda Y. Kern, Kailey M. King, Rebecca G. Kron, Kodi J. Labat, Samantha L. Lamonte, Gregory A. Langham, Mallarey E. Luttmann, Candis L. McLaurin, Laken E. McMorris, Michael T. Misuraca, Ramon D. Moore, Nathan Murphy, Kinsey E. Nichols, Joseph Palmisano, Halle A. Parmentier, Vidhi S. Patel, Taylor B. Ribando, Stephanie L. Sanford and Ashton L. Wilde.

HONOR ROLL: Katelyn D. Arbour, Sydney E. Balado, Kayla R. Beadle, Grace Berisford, Pamela M. Brehm, Danielle E. Broadhead, Abigail J. Coates, Madelyn E. Coates, Allison K. Davis, David L. Derks, Megan E. Dettwiller, Hannah N. Fletcher, Thomas J. Hlubin, Justin J. Joseph, Julia M. Kesterson, Joshua J. Knox, Chad Liberto, Shayne C. Narro, Alexis M. Rodrigue, Kacie L. Sanders, Kyle J. Schafer, Jessica T. Sundquist, Gabrielle M. Turgeau, Mathew J. Wells, Noel E. Wilson and Hannah B. Winburn.

Robert
PRESIDENT’S LIST: Brooke L. Dawson, Jordon R. Divincenti, Braie L. Peterson, Brooke A. Robertson and Baleigh R. Vinyard.

DEAN’S LIST: Clayton D. Cutrer, Tracy C. Giannobile, Camber T. Robertson, Joshua C. Sapp and Gabrielle R. Zrinski.

HONOR ROLL: Kaycee M. Everett, Matthew R. Hand and Danielle N. Magruder.

Roseland
PRESIDENT’S LIST: Venisha Burton, Breanna E. Prevost and Bryce J. Tassin.

DEAN’S LIST: Tiffany B. Bel and Cassidy R. Smart.

Tangipahoa
HONOR ROLL: Keyadda J. Brim.

Tickfaw
PRESIDENT’S LIST: Tonykea Alford, Matthew C. Banta, Joshua T. Bishop, Damian M. Boldt, Jordan J. Bonfiglio, Brighton M. Boudreaux, Gregory M. Davis, Adam J. DiBenedetto, Nicholas A. Granat, Dagean Hardy, Logan P. Lamonte, Shelbi R. Neal, Brittany L. Ridgel, Austin D. Sanders, Jacob R. Smith, Jessica D. Smith, David Tanis, Madison Tucker and Kevin W. Walden.

DEAN’S LIST: Michelle N. Accardo, Seth Guerra, Stormy L. Jones, Carlie A. Vaccaro, Garrison C. Williams and Nicole M. Zimmer.

HONOR ROLL: Grace L. Bravata, Diontae J. Cannon, Kayleigh A. Catalanatto, Tomas R. Herrera, Meagan L. McDonald, Kady J. Navarra, Brittany A. Watts and Emily C. Wilcox.


18 2016-06-17
Hammond

Upward Bound students learn about public service


Hammond City Councilman Lemar Marshall and his wife, Mia Marshall, visited the Southeastern Louisiana University Upward Bound program Sunday to encourage students to consider public service during and after college.
More than 200 students attended the special presentation that included the Marshalls' experiences leading to their current positions, which for the councilman is serving the city of Hammond and the Hammond Youth Education Alliance and for his wife is serving at the Tangipahoa Regional Arts Center.



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Students asked them how they prepared for college and what motivated them to serve the public.
Teanna and Deanna Lee, twin sisters in the program from St. Helena College and Career Academy, said they really enjoyed talking with the Marshalls.
"They were very friendly, funny and related everything they talked about to us," Lee said.
Deanna added she was inspired by how they pushed each other to do better.
18 2016-06-16
Hammond

SLU SUSTAINABILITY CENTER EARNS AWARD FROM USGBC LOUISIANA


HAMMOND – The Southeastern Louisiana University Sustainability Center has been awarded the Operational Excellence Champion Award by the Louisiana Chapter of U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC Louisiana).
Director of the Southeastern Physical Plant Byron Patterson accepted the award on behalf of his team for its efforts to make the campus as energy efficient as possible.
USGBC is a nonprofit organization that houses Green Business Certification Inc., the only group to administer project certifications and professional credentials and certificates within the framework of the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED Green Building Rating System. LEED designation is the international standard for environmentally sound buildings.
The USGBC cited the Southeastern team for implementing energy efficient technologies that are saving energy and money for the university.
“Byron Patterson and his team at Southeastern are dedicated to consistently improving campus facilities, creatively engaging stakeholders and enthusiastically sharing their expertise and sustainability knowledge with students, the regional community and beyond,” said Shannon Stage, executive director of USGBC Louisiana. “They have established a standard of energy efficiency that universities around the state are trying to emulate. The Sustainability Center on Southeastern’s campus is a teaching tool unlike any other in our area.”
The university instituted the Sustainability Center in order to save operating dollars and reduce waste going to landfills, while at the same time providing an invaluable learning component for students involved in energy, mechanical and construction engineering technology.
“Budget cuts over the last several years forced us to think in terms of economics,” said Patterson. “With the strong financial support of our Student Government Association, we’ve started initiatives that have reduced commercial energy dependence and have had a significant return on our investment.”
Among the elements of the Sustainability Center are solar panels on a number of university buildings that generate hot water, as well as electricity; a strong recycling program designed to reduce waste going to landfills by 80 percent; a tree and plant farm, in which the university cultivates its own plants and trees for landscaping on campus; a composting area that converts landscape waste into useable mulch and compost; and rainwater retention ponds that provide irrigation for plants and support a geothermal system for one of the center’s technology-rich classrooms.
The Environmental Education Development Outreach within the Sustainability Center, which is under consideration for LEED certification, was designed by engineering technology students for use in research, education and other educational activities. The room includes numerous monitoring tools constructed by students to determine performance of the solar panels, wind turbine, and geothermal system.
“The center provides our students with a hands-on, real-world learning environment and research opportunities,” explained Lu Yuan, interim head of the Department of Computer Science and Industrial Technology. “With several types of energy technologies, our students have the ability to make adjustments to these devices and observe in real time how the energy output is affected. It’s a proving ground to help determine what works best and can be implemented to save energy costs.”

PHOTO:
SUSTAINABILITY LEADERSHIP AWARD TO SOUTHEASTERN – Members of Southeastern Physical Plant staff display the Operational Excellence Champion Award presented by the Louisiana Chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council for the university’s Sustainability Center. Pictured are, from left, Physical Plant Director Byron Patterson; Carlos Doolittle, manager of grounds, landscape and recycling; Assistant Director Mark Whitmar; and Associate Director Chris Aspiron.
18 2016-06-13
Hammond

SLU Sustainability Center earns award


Southeastern Louisiana University Sustainability Center has earned the Operational Excellence Champion Award from the Louisiana Chapter of U.S. Green Building Council.
Physical Plant Director Byron Patterson accepted the award on behalf of his team for its efforts to make the campus as energy efficient as possible.
The council is a nonprofit organization that houses Green Business Certification Inc., the only group to administer project certifications and professional credentials and certificates within the framework of the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED Green Building Rating System. LEED designation is the international standard for environmentally sound buildings. The council cited the Southeastern team for implementing energy efficient technologies that are saving energy and money for the university.
"Byron Patterson and his team at Southeastern are dedicated to consistently improving campus facilities, creatively engaging stakeholders and enthusiastically sharing their expertise and sustainability knowledge with students, the regional community and beyond," said Shannon Stage, state executive director for the council.
"They have established a standard of energy efficiency that universities around the state are trying to emulate. The Sustainability Center on Southeastern's campus is a teaching tool unlike any other in our area," she said.
The university instituted the Sustainability Center to save operating dollars and reduce waste going to landfills, while at the same time providing a learning component for students involved in energy, mechanical and construction engineering technology.
"Budget cuts over the last several years forced us to think in terms of economics," Patterson said. "With the strong financial support of our Student Government Association, we've started initiatives that have reduced commercial energy dependence and have had a significant return on our investment."
Sustainability Center has solar panels on buildings that generate hot water and electricity, a recycling program designed to reduce waste going to landfills by 80 percent, a tree and plant farm for the university's landscaping, a composting area that converts landscape waste into useable mulch and rainwater retention ponds that provide irrigation for plants and support a geothermal system for one of the center's technology-rich classrooms.
The Environmental Education Development Outreach within the Sustainability Center, which is under consideration for LEED certification, was designed by engineering technology students for use in research, education and other educational activities. The room includes numerous monitoring tools constructed by students to monitor the solar panels, wind turbine and geothermal system.
"The center provides our students with a hands-on, real-world learning environment and research opportunities," explained Lu Yuan, interim head of the computer science and industrial technology department. "With several types of energy technologies, our students have the ability to make adjustments to these devices and observe in real time how the energy output is affected. It's a proving ground to help determine what works best and can be implemented to save energy costs."

18 2016-06-09
Baton Rouge

Top graduates lauded at Southeastern ceremony Photo provided by Tonya Lowentritt -- Southeastern Louisiana University faculty members David Armand, A


Top graduates were honored at the annual honors convocation for Southeastern Louisiana University’s College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences on April 20.

Among the honorees were:

AMITE: Nicole St. Martin, Outstanding Senior Award in Psychology

DENHAM SPRINGS: Blayke Weatherford, Outstanding Senior in Music Performance; Tara Hymel, Outstanding Senior Award in Music Education; Elisabeth Odom, Outstanding Senior in General Studies; and William Dew, Outstanding Senior in Communication

HAMMOND : Priyanka Singh, F. Dale Parent Outstanding Senior Award in Sociology

PONCHATOULA : Aurora Olvera, Outstanding Senior in Fine Arts, Ceramics and Outstanding Senior in Spanish; and Rian Earnest, Martina Buck Award in History

WALKER : Nicole Hunt, Marc P. Riedel Outstanding Senior Award in Criminal Justice.

Faculty members honored with awards at the convocation were Jason Landrum, Excellence in Teaching; Margaret Gonzalez-Perez, Excellence in Research; David Armand, Excellence in Artistic Activity; and Amber Narro, Excellence in Service.

The college also honored inductees into the university’s chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, a national honor society, and the university’s honor society, the Thirteen Club.
18 2016-06-09
Baton Rouge

SLU’s Phi Kappa Phi holds induction ceremony Photo provided by Tonya Lowentritt -- Southeastern Louisiana University Phi Kappa Phi inductees and awar


Southeastern Louisiana University’s chapter of the Phi Kappa Phi national honor society inducted nearly 50 students and faculty on April 21.

Students must be in the top 10 percent of their senior or graduate class or a second semester junior in the top 7.5 percent of his or her class to be inducted into Phi Kappa Phi.

Maria Alphonso, of Ponchatoula, College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, and Amber Lasher, of Hammond, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, received outstanding junior awards.
Rahul Shrestha, of Hammond, received the Lou Ballard Endowed Scholarship.

Faculty and alumni inducted included Agnieszka Gutthy, of Tickfaw, professor of foreign languages; Catherine Tijerino, of Hammond, assistant professor of library science; and Julie Perise, of Ponchatoula, Southeastern Alumni Association.

Inductees and award winners include:

Livingston Parish
DENHAM SPRINGS: Christina W. Westbrook

WALKER: Emily Bushnell
Tangipahoa Parish
HAMMOND: Maria Alphonso, Fernanda S. Chagas, Utsab Karkee, Katie Kruse, Ariana E. Rupp, Rahul Shrestha, Brittany Speakman and Catherine Tijerino

INDEPENDENCE: Kimberly A. Clements and Catherine Costa

PONCHATOULA: Kayleigh D. Odor, Chibueze I. Onyeagusi and Julie P. Perise

TICKFAW: Alisa Colona and Agnieszka Gutthy


18 2016-06-09
Hammond

New features return to Columbia Theatre


Showcasing up-and-coming bands and screening classic movies were successful new features with the Southeastern Louisiana University's Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts did this season, Roy Blackwood says, and the plan is to bring them back for the 2016-2017 season.
The Columbia's small professional staff is working to finalize the season schedule by July and plans to include the Silver Screen, a series of classic and new movie showings, and the New Artist Concert Series, featuring up-and-coming musicians, said Blackwood, executive director.

;
Both new projects last year brought in crowds, particularly young people, to the historic theater in downtown Hammond, he said.
"We'll probably build that bigger this year," Blackwood said Monday.
The 2015-2016 season saw the return of the Pajamas and Play series that was cut three years ago because of funding reductions, and it is also coming back for '16-'17.
"I have big hopes for Pajamas and Play," he said.
Children can come in pajamas and leave with cookies and milk. This past season featured "Red Riding Hood" by Missoula Children's Theatre and "Princess Thimbelina" from Bits 'N Pieces Puppet Theatre.
Blackwood said he heard from many who missed the shows after Pajamas and Play was cut.
He would like to have the American Spiritual Ensemble perform at Columbia too.
Booking performers can be tricky with costs and schedules, but Blackwood said the challenge is part of the fun of running a theater.
"There's a lot of moving parts," he said.
Columbia has its traditional main stage performances, including opera, chamber orchestra, choral and wind symphony shows and rents out space for performers. It also hosts events for the annual arts celebration Fanfare, which Blackwood helped start 30 years ago.
Owned and run by the university, the Columbia has seen its funding cut by 60 percent since 2008 due to higher education taking a hit in state aid. The theater has had to operate on a smaller budget for performances and a smaller staff, he said.
"We've dealt with tremendous budget cuts," he said.
On top of funding cuts, Columbia has dealt with lower numbers of ticket buyers compared to the past. Before the recession, a dedicated group of theater-goers would spend money on season tickets. But that dedicated group shrank with the economy, he said.
However, Blackwood believes he is starting to see the number of ticket buyers steadily increase since the slump. The theater has picked up the slack with more fundraising and a lot of marketing to get people in its 830 seats, he said.
While the number of people buying tickets has picked up, Blackwood said Columbia is not making as much revenue as it costs to put on performances. Being a 501-C3 nonprofit, the theater this spring has also had to face state sales tax under legislation passed to generate revenue and fill in a budget deficit. Nonprofits have to pay sales tax in certain situations for a certain period of time, including on the theater's revenue going back to April 1. Blackwood said paying sales tax will likely cause prices to go up slightly.
"There will be a small bump," he said.
He has been executive director of this medium-sized theater for five years. Columbia Theatre first opened as a vaudeville house in 1928. After the stock market crashed, vaudeville disappeared as a form of entertainment and the building continued as a movie theater, showing silent films and then talkies, he related
In the lobby, visitors can see an original projector from back when the Columbia was a movie theater.
By the 1990s, the building was about to be torn down, but a group of business and civic leaders and university officials came together to save it from extinction.
"The theater was really up against the wrecking ball," he said.
The group succeeded in resurrecting the Columbia in 2002, having received state funds thanks to the work of the late Sen. John Hainkel, Jr. They combined the original structure with a former tire store that was next door and the old JC Penney store on the other side of the Columbia's building.
Blackwood said he tries to get shows that appeal to a broad audience since the Hammond area has diverse demographics while also bringing in a variety of specialty shows to meet different tastes. He also tries to keep ticket costs low compared to other venues, he said.
A historic theater like Columbia is rare for this size community and in this age, he said, and the staff members take a lot of pride in their work. The main goal is to get as many people, especially newcomers, watching a show inside the theater so they can appreciate it too, Blackwood said.
"The secret to this whole thing is selling tickets," he said.
18 2016-06-08
Baton Rouge

Top graduates lauded at Southeastern ceremony


Top graduates were honored at the annual honors convocation for Southeastern Louisiana University’s College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences on April 20.

Among the honorees were:

AMITE: Nicole St. Martin, Outstanding Senior Award in Psychology

DENHAM SPRINGS: Blayke Weatherford, Outstanding Senior in Music Performance; Tara Hymel, Outstanding Senior Award in Music Education; Elisabeth Odom, Outstanding Senior in General Studies; and William Dew, Outstanding Senior in Communication

HAMMOND : Priyanka Singh, F. Dale Parent Outstanding Senior Award in Sociology

PONCHATOULA : Aurora Olvera, Outstanding Senior in Fine Arts, Ceramics and Outstanding Senior in Spanish; and Rian Earnest, Martina Buck Award in History

WALKER : Nicole Hunt, Marc P. Riedel Outstanding Senior Award in Criminal Justice.

Faculty members honored with awards at the convocation were Jason Landrum, Excellence in Teaching; Margaret Gonzalez-Perez, Excellence in Research; David Armand, Excellence in Artistic Activity; and Amber Narro, Excellence in Service.

The college also honored inductees into the university’s chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, a national honor society, and the university’s honor society, the Thirteen Club.

18 2016-06-08
Baton Rouge

Hammond student earns Southeastern Dean’s Award Photo provided by Tonya Lowentritt -- Several residents of Hammond were honored with awards at Southe


Anthony Miller, of Hammond, was among five students to receive Southeastern Louisiana University College of Nursing and Health Sciences’ highest honor, the Dean’s Award, at the college’s annual honors convocation April 25 in the Student Union Theatre.

Miller studies in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Studies.

Each department presented the Significant Partnership Award in recognition of contributions to the educational programs in the college. Awards included the Health Transition Alliance Program at North Oaks Health System, Kinesiology and Health Studies; and North Oaks Health System, School of Nursing.

Students honored at the ceremony include:

Livingston Parish
DENHAM SPRINGS: Kevin Klingman, Outstanding Graduate in Health and Physical Education

WALKER: Josie David, Outstanding Graduate Award in Counseling
Tangipahoa Parish
HAMMOND: Devin Brown, Outstanding Graduate Award in Counseling; Anthony Miller, Dean’s Award in Kinesiology and Health Studies and Outstanding Graduate in Athletic Training Award; and Jessica Osborn, Graduate Scholar in Health Studies Award

KENTWOOD: William Blackburn, Outstanding Graduate Award in Communication Sciences and Disorders

PONCHATOULA: Sarah Koger, Outstanding Graduate in Fitness and Human Performance Award
18 2016-06-08
Baton Rouge

Assistant principal recognized with award for dissertation Photo provided by Charie Worley -- From left are Jennifer Sughrue, doctoral program direct


Charie Worley, assistant principal at Donaldsonville High School, received the Dr. Preston B. Allison Outstanding Dissertation Award at Southeastern Louisiana University on May 14.

The award is given for excellence in conducting and writing research.

Her dissertation is titled “Black Female Superintendents in Louisiana: Professional and Personal Experiences that Impact and Impede the Advancement in Educational Leadership.”

“In a nutshell, it came down to who you knew and who you were affiliated with socially, with economic status being the biggest influence,” Worley said.

Worley is a Donaldsonville native. She holds a bachelor of science in secondary education from Southern University, a master’s of educational leadership from Nicholls State University and a doctorate of education from Southeastern Louisiana University.
18 2016-06-01
New Orleans

St. Tammany college notes for June 1, 2016 Photo provided by LSUMary Catherine Srofe Photo provided by LSUMary Catherine Srofe Photo provided by Mich


SLU REGISTRATION: Registration for summer and fall courses at Southeastern Louisiana University is open for all current students. Beginning freshmen and transfer students with fewer than 30 credit hours will be able to register once completing orientation. Summer classes begin June 1; fall classes start Aug. 17. For guidance in course selection, call the Center for Student Excellence at (985) 549-3981. For information, contact the Office of Records and Registration at (985) 549-5636.

SOUTHEASTERN LOUISIANA UNIVERSITY: A feature story by Brittany Robinson of Slidell has won a regional Emmy award for writing from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. The story was recognized in the NATAS Suncoast Region, which comprises universities, television stations and production entities in Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana and Puerto Rico. The story, “Twin Spans Rebuilt,” covers the massive Hurricane Katrina destruction of the Interstate 10 twin span bridges between New Orleans and Slidell in August 2005. The story shows how rebuilding the twin spans with a new design led to the reopening of the new $803 million bridge in September 2011. Robinson wrote and produced the story for the Southeastern Channel’s news magazine show, “Southeastern Times,” to commemorate the 10-year anniversary of Katrina. Two other Southeastern Channel students won honorable mention recognitions from NATAS for their work. Grace Jovanovic of Slidell won an honorable mention for photography for her videography work in the music video “Stolen Dance” and also in the editing category for her editing composite. Dominique Brogle, of Destrehan, won an honorable mention for newscast for the March 5, 2015, episode of the student program, “Northshore News.” Brogle is a producer, anchor and reporter for the newscast.
18 2016-05-31
Monroe

Southeastern finance students win national competition


HAMMOND — A team of finance students at Southeastern Louisiana University has won the national Community Bank Case Study competition conducted by the Washington, D.C.-based Conference of State Bank Supervisors, a nationwide organization of banking regulators from all states and U.S. territories.

The team of four Southeastern undergraduate students worked cooperatively with Hammond-based First Guaranty Bank in one of Southeastern’s newest Real-World Ready courses, a campus-wide initiative to incorporate more hands-on, experiential learning into students’ curriculum.

“Congratulations to the Southeastern students for their competition win,” said Michael L. Stevens, CSBS senior executive vice president. “Each of the case studies tells us a valuable story about a real community bank and its impact on small businesses and their local community.”

The competition encouraged students to explore community banking by partnering student teams with local banks to conduct original case studies, explained Danielle Lewis, associate professor of finance who served as faculty adviser for the team. The goal of the competition, she said, was to build a fundamental understanding of the community banking business, something few undergraduate students would gain through their regular course work.

“We are extremely pleased that our team won this national honor,” said Antoinette Phillips, interim dean of the College of Business. “It is recognition of the dedication and high quality of our students, as well as the mentoring expertise of our faculty.”

Lewis said she selected an “all-star” team of finance students who have distinguished themselves as outstanding students and leaders.

The team included seniors Nicholas Byrd of Denham Springs, Tarez Arceneaux Cowsar of Springfield, Joseph Edwards of Monroe, and Andrea Villarreal of Mexico. Edwards and Villarreal both graduated from Southeastern in May and were each awarded the President’s Medal for Academic Excellence for maintaining perfect 4.0 grade point averages in their studies. Each of the students will receive a $1,000 scholarship and the opportunity to present their case study at the annual CSBS-Federal Reserve Community Bank Research and Policy Conference in the fall. Their paper will also be published in a special journal featuring the case studies.

“This was a great opportunity for undergraduates to gain first-hand knowledge of the banking industry,” Lewis said. “The students learned to sharpen their research, analytical skills, problem solving and to enhance their communication skills.”

First Guaranty Bank was pleased to partner with Southeastern on the project, said Vice President and Chief Credit Officer Randy S. Vicknair. Two of the students – one an employee at the bank and the other an intern – approached Vicknair along with Lewis to discuss the bank’s participation. Lewis said the bank was receptive to the idea.

“We’re a community bank, and we pride ourselves in being a good community partner. After running the idea past the bank’s leadership, we had no reluctance in working with the group,” Vicknair said. “Our primary concern was maintaining confidentiality, which did not turn into a problem since we were providing very general banking data and industry-specific information.”

“If it were not for FGB’s willingness to be transparent with data, we could not have worked on so many quantitative models,” Lewis added. “The loan level data made all the difference in our report.”

Twenty-three teams from across the country participated, and the Southeastern team was the only one from Louisiana.

Lewis explained that the students divided the work among themselves, each carrying the responsibility of certain tasks. Often they worked in pairs in order to utilize checks and balances.

“They took their roles very seriously,” she explained “They met frequently, in person and via email, to ensure all were on the same page and progressing toward the deadline they faced.”

The competition required the students to address three areas: an assessment of the impact of the institution’s small business lending efforts on the community, an analysis of how the bank’s small business lending affects financial performance, and an evaluation of the institution’s management of small business lending. They were required to prepare a 25-page report and to submit a 10-minute video highlighting the team’s case study findings.

The students look back on their experience and see the valuable opportunity they had to advance their knowledge of finance and how a community bank works.

“I gained valuable banking analytical skills that I otherwise would not have received in my finance curriculum,” said Cowsar. “We weren’t running a simulated business or working to pass a test. To us, FGB was our client, and we needed to provide them with a solid project. We put our hearts into the work.”

Villarreal’s job focused on helping to develop the economic impact study, working on the statistical part of the project, reviewing and editing the final paper and developing the graphs and footnotes that were an integral part of the product.

Edwards served as one of the main writers of the paper and conducted some of the interviews with bank professionals included in the study. “These men were so knowledgeable, and we all learned so much just from being around them,” he said. “I learned new research methods that will make me a better student and job candidate moving forward.”

Developing the video that complemented the paper was the primary job of Byrd, who filmed the interviews and found video clips from other sources.

“I learned how working with a team on such a project requires efficiency and communication,” said Byrd. “We would present our findings to each other and challenge each other’s work to make sure we got it right. I probably learned the most from the time spent working with my teammates.”

“The students were impressive; they did an excellent analysis with targeted questions that demonstrated a good understanding of banking,” Vicknair said. “The final document was absolutely helpful to the bank, showing that First Guaranty had an approximate $1 billion dollar economic impact from our 21 branches located in multiple areas throughout Louisiana.”

All of the students expressed appreciation to their instructor Lewis: “She spent many hours and late nights giving us guidance and teaching us,” Byrd said. “Dr. Lewis was amazing,” added Cowsar. “She communicated with us frequently to make sure we were moving in the right direction. We are so thankful for her support.”
18 2016-05-31
New Orleans

Baton Rouge, New Orleans, Lafayette area Business Honors for May 29, 2016


he Operational Excellence Champion Award to Byron Patterson, director of physical plant services at Southeastern Louisiana University, for his dedication to campus energy efficiency;
18 2016-05-26
New Orleans

Former student accuses college teacher of sexual harassment


NEW ORLEANS — A former student is suing Southeastern Louisiana University, alleging a teacher was guilty of sexual harassment.

Kala Chenier filed a complaint May 3 in U.S. District Court Eastern District of Louisiana against Southeastern Louisiana University, Sedgwick Claims Management Services and University of Louisiana System Management Board, alleging they violated the Civil Rights Act, gender discrimination, sexual harassment and sexual assault.

According to the complaint, while Chenier was a student at Southeastern from August 2014-May 2015, she was subjected to a hostile environment, including the harassment and assault by her former teacher, Dr. Richard Miller.

The suit says she reported Miller’s behavior and met with Dr. Christopher Beachy and Dr. Penny Shockett to discuss her concerns but no actions were taken. As a result, the complaint states, she has suffered loss of educational opportunities and/or benefits and has and will continue to incur attorney fees and costs of litigation.

The plaintiff alleges the defendants failed to adequately respond, in violation of their own policies, and failed to enact and/or disseminate and/or implement proper or adequate procedures to prohibit or remedy discrimination.

Chenier seeks trial by jury, compensation for damages, punitive damages, costs, interest, statutory/civil penalties, attorney fees, legal costs, and all other relief the court deems appropriate. She is represented by attorney Kenneth C. Bordes of New Orleans.

U.S. District Court Eastern District of Louisiana Case number 2:16-cv-04125
18 2016-05-20
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN CONFERS DEGREES FOR MORE THAN 1,100 STUDENTS


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University conferred degrees on 1,120 graduates Saturday, May 14, at the university’s spring commencement exercises.
Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards provided the keynote address. Edwards was elected the 56th governor of the state last year and assumed office in January.
Edwards, a native of Amite in Tangipahoa Parish, told the graduates that their achievements will empower them to make a real difference in the world. Southeastern, he said, has given you the knowledge and experience to be successful.
“Whatever you do, be thankful for what you have learned here at Southeastern,” Edwards added.
He also encouraged the graduates to make a decision to stay in Louisiana.
“The opportunities here in Louisiana are unlimited, boundless and exciting,” he said. "“Don'’t give up on your state; the time is now, and opportunities are out there. Seize them.”"
Candidates for associate, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees were honored.
In his welcome, President John L. Crain noted that the 1,120 individuals being recognized at commencement included 382 men and 738 women who were receiving 15 different degrees; and representatives from 23 states and 18 countries.
The university awarded its highest academic honor, the President’s Medal for Academic Excellence, to 20 students with the highest cumulative grade point average in the university’s five colleges. All medal recipients are graduating with a 4.0 grade point average.
Medal recipients were:
College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences – arts major Jenna Lynn Hildebrand of¬¬ Abita Springs; music major Tara Denise Hymel of Denham Springs; psychology major Amanda Marie Lopiparo of River Ridge; and English majors Kirsten Lynn Mixon of Zachary, Ivy Lenore Pierson of Holden and Katherine Grace Wall of Jennings.
College of Business – finance majors Joseph Michael Edwards of Monroe and Andrea Renee Villarreal of Mexico; accounting majors Kayla Jane Hoover of Ponchatoula, Nitish Khanal of Nepal, and Angie Mae Moyer of Hammond; management major Veronica Loper Klug of Denham Springs; and business administration and accounting major Eduardo Andrés Ricks of Lacombe.
College of Education and Human Development – elementary education major Quinley Marie Arceneaux of Denham Springs and elementary and special education mild/moderate grades 1-5 major Heather Gail Mills from Luling.
College of Nursing and Health Sciences – communication, sciences and disorders major Jenna Lauren Barcelona of LaPlace; athletic training major Anthony Joseph Miller of Hammond; and kinesiology major Carley Marie Short of Slidell.
College of Science and Technology –mathematics major Christopher Wayne Alexander of Baton Rouge and chemistry major Binit Sharma Poudel of Nepal.
Students receiving associate, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees were:
Louisiana
TANGIPAHOA PARISH
Masters Degrees
Amite -- Nikki M. Lombardo, Educational Leadership; Kyle B. Volkmann, English;
Hammond -- Shaun C. Baxley, Music; Blair M. Boudreaux, Nursing; Devin A. Brown, Counselor Education; Andreina Colina, Music; Wesley H. Craven, Organizational Communication; Katelyn M. Daigle, Psychology; Aliah N. Esmaeili, Counselor Education; Heather N. Gonzalez, Organizational Communication; Megan M. Hetrick, Health & Kinesiology; Te’Quina L. Jones, Counselor Education; Sangho Ko, Music; Stephen J.
Leitz, Executive MBA; Daniel W. Leonard, Health & Kinesiology; Lori E. McAfee, Organizational Communication; Megan McMillin, Communication Sciences & Disorders; Stacy C. Perrone, Special Education; Alex C. Soileau, Communication Sciences & Disorders; Maria R. Thaut, Communication Sciences & Disorders; Jonathan Thomas, Music; Kacie D. Walker, English; Yi Wei, Integrated Science & Technology; Jamie White, Educational Leadership;
Independence -- Kimberly A. Clements, Educational Leadership;
Kentwood -- Earnestine R. Banks, Special Education; Cody M. Wilson, Educational Leadership;
Loranger -- Derek P. Duvic, Integrated Science & Technology;
Ponchatoula -- Amy C. Dunn, Educational Leadership; Bonnie M. Ezell, Educational Leadership; Erin T. Gill, Nursing; Brandy N. Miller, MAT SPED Erly Interven Birth-5; Eboney T. Pegues, Executive MBA; Robert A. Perez II, Music; Paige G. Robertson, Educational Leadership;
Tickfaw -- Alisa B. Colona, Educational Leadership; Matthew R. Jordan, History; Jamie H. Rhoto, Educational Leadership;

Bachelors Degrees
Amite -- April D. Assavedo, Supply Chain Management; Jacob S. Campo, General Studies; Tanya L. Crowe, Business Administration; Molly E. Flynn, Communication; Michael J. Foster, Management; Megan M. Molinary, Art; Nicole L. St. Martin, Psychology; Shenika N. Turner, Sociology;
Hammond -- Stephanie E. Amerson, Family & Consumer Sciences; Michelle L. Aycock, General Studies; Deborah Ayme, Communication; Vivek Basnet, Political Science; Christian J. Bellows, Communication Sciences & Disorders; Jenna A. Berger, Nursing; Nikos J. Boulahanis, Management; Eamon S. Bradley, Finance; Scott T. Brame, Marketing; Yontellia M. Brown, Family & Consumer Sciences; Angela N. Caballeros, General Studies; Hannah M. Carmichael, Kinesiology; Christine M. Catalinotto, English Education; Scott J. Chaisson, Jr., Communication; Zachary J. Clarke, Chemistry; Javen M. Coleman, Art; Kaitlyn E. Corkern, Early/Childhood Education Grades PK-3; Seth A. Courtney, Criminal Justice; David E. Cox, Chemistry; Bipul Dangol, Biological Sciences; Alexander C. Davis, Engineering Technology; Haley O. Davis, Management; Hannah D. Dean, Art; Jayme L. Downs, Early/Childhood Education Grades PK-3; Jon C. Durbin, Accounting; Emily A. Egan, English; Joel B. Epperson, General Studies;
Also, Jordan D. Ernst, General Studies; Blair B. Evans Burmaster, General Studies; Zera S. Flores, Management; Alexis N. Garnette, Family & Consumer Sciences; Prashant Ghimire, Computer Science; Saugat Ghimire, Physics; Dea’Lana M. Glasco, Elementary Education Grades 1-5; Dario Gomez, Management; Prakash Hamal, Chemistry; Skylar S. Hanson, Nursing; Rasheed K. Harrell, General Studies; Rebecca E. Hausknecht, Communication Sciences & Disorders; Myles D. Haydel, General Studies; Sholitha N. Hayes, Social Work; Brenan J. Haynes, Accounting; Veronica M. Holstein, Health Education & Promotion; Mark R. Holt, Psychology; Pamela J. Hubbard, Accounting; John R. Hughes, Jr., General Studies; Alexander A. Jackson, Criminal Justice; Candyce Jackson, Social Work; Alexis D. Jarreau, Athletic Training; Allyson N. Jenkins, General Studies; Timothy Y. Johns, Marketing; Constance S. Johnson, Management; Allison L. Joiner, Music; Kelsie L. Jones, Mathematics; Margaux M. Kaltenbacher, Management; Suyogya Karki, Physics;
Also, Chelsea O. Kessenich, Communication; Januka Khanal, Biological Sciences; Mahesh Khanal, Computer Science; Nitish Khanal, Accounting; Savannah M. Klier, Biological Sciences; Amy L. Le, Communication Sciences & Disorders; Branden P. Lessard, Occupational Health, Safety, and Environment; Cote C. Licciardi, Criminal Justice; Kelsea D. LoCicero, Kinesiology; Elizabeth I. Ma, General Studies; Aaron M. Manguno, General Studies; Jeffery Martin, Jr., General Studies; Gabrielle M. McAllister, English Education; Caitlin J. McHodgkins, Kinesiology; Charles E. McLin, Business Administration; Anthony J. Miller, Athletic Training; Brittany M. Mohamed, Art; Breeanna M. Morris, Criminal Justice; Angie M. Moyer, Accounting; Naresh Neupane, Finance; Frank M. Newton, Jr., Sport Management; Allison R. Norman, Communication Sciences & Disorders; Baleigh C. Olah, Marketing; Morufat O. Oyebola, Management; Saidatulai A. Oyebola, Business Administration; Suraj Pathak, Finance; Terangi T. Phifer, Kinesiology; Chance M. Phillips, English; Sagar Pokhrel, Physics; Destiny A. Ponder, Accounting; Christopher J. Powell, General Studies; Rohan Pradhan, Finance; Jenny E. Price, Mathematics; Kathryn L. Protsman, General Studies; Tracy N. Ratliff, General Studies;
Also, Jerica N. Robinson, General Studies; Leslie C. Ruiz, Communication Sciences & Disorders; Isha M. Ryan, Communication; Janet D. Scott, General Studies; Nancy O. Scott, History; Christopher K. Sefah, Management; Kaia O. Severan, Psychology; Binit Sharma Poudel, Chemistry; Rajeeb Sharma, Physics; Swastika Sharma, Computer Science; Danielle V. Shearer, Communication; Mikayla M. Shippy, Accounting; Reid P. Shorter, Management; Apsana Shrestha, Chemistry; Tiffany A. Slaven, Athletic Training; Jeff Smiley, General Studies; Byron K. Smith, General Studies; DeVenney J. Smith, Psychology; Kala S. Smith, Marketing; Shakari N. Steele, Psychology; Denzel J. Thompson, Industrial Technology; Uddhab Tiwari, Physics; Cetera X. Tuesno, Social Work; Claire R. Tunstall, Psychology; Veronica M. Turk, General Studies; Kayren V. Vicknair, Marketing; Dyamin A. Victorian, Management; Andrea R. Villarreal, Finance; Megan R. Waguespack, Accounting; Sulin Wang, Management; Brett R. Williams, Biological Sciences; Kadarius M. Williams, General Studies; Lovenia A. Williams, Biological Sciences; Caleb D. Young, Physics;
Independence -- Kalie F. Beckers, Biological Sciences; Roseiland S. Brown, General Studies; Robert L. Gilliam, Jr., Art; Joe R. Phetsomphou, Management; Taylor K. Reitz, Social Work; Amber L. Remondet, General Studies; Johnny P. Robertson II, Business Administration; Matthew D. Stevens, Political Science; Anthony M. Stire, General Studies; Sarah M. Watts, Spanish; Van E. Ziebarth, Biological Sciences;
Kentwood -- Alycia M. Berry, Art; Cierra J. McDaniel, Communication Sciences & Disorders; Emily E. McNabb, Communication Sciences & Disorders; Joseph C. Ramsey, Industrial Technology; Domonique A. Saxon, Management; Dar’rell K. Walker, General Studies; DeAndre K. Walker, Athletic Training; Bradley D. Watson, Management;
Loranger -- Sharon F. Adams, Accounting; Hailey N. Baldwin, Communication Sciences & Disorders; Anthony J. Burkett, Accounting; Amanda P. Fitzgerald, Accounting; Megan L. Haase, Biological Sciences; Elizabeth A. O’Neil, General Studies; Anthony J. Perret, Engineering Technology;
Natalbany -- Jasmine D. Webb, General Studies;
Ponchatoula -- Kailey A. Aveton, Art; Brooke N. Balser, Criminal Justice; Zoe R. Bardwell, Art; Ashleigh B. Bergeron, Nursing; Seth C. Bleakley, Psychology; Ryan G. Byers, General Studies; Joshua L. Davis, Management; David L. Derks, Jr., Nursing; Daniel M. Doescher,
Accounting; Michelle A. Doescher, Accounting; Ryhesha M. Dunn, General Studies; Blake C. Haulbrook, Industrial Technology; Leslie A. Heidel, Kinesiology; Carrie B. Holmes, Elementary Education Grades 1-5; Kayla J. Hoover, Accounting; Kaydi J. Hoppel, Management; Jeffrey M. Horn, Social Studies Education; Leanne E. Keen, Sociology; Kari A. Kennedy, Middle School Education Grades 4-8; Sarah A. Koger, Kinesiology; Amanda A. Liner, General Studies; Jim L. Michel, History; Sheri S. Miller, Elementary Education Grades 1-5; Aurora Y. Olvera, Art; Blair E. Perise, Early/Childhood Education Grades PK-3; Christine L. Pevey, Health Education & Promotion; Aimee J. Sandifer, Elementary Education Grades 1-5; Stephanie L. Sanford, Nursing; Amanda M. Semple, General Studies; Christa C. Sevin, General Studies; Nicholas A. Smith, Music; Rebecca D. Spano, Art; Christinea E. Thacker, Sociology; Shelby L. Wells, Kinesiology; Jessica A. Wood, Kinesiology; Tabitha R. Young, Art;
Robert -- Kelt A. Ellis, Supply Chain Management; Carl M. Roques, Computer Science;
Roseland -- Venisha Burton, Social Work;
Tickfaw -- Jacob C. Darouse, Computer Science; Samantha L. Lott, Elementary Education Grades 1-5; Kady J. Navarra, Accounting; Austin D. Sanders, Management; William E. Scurich, General Studies;

Associate Degrees
Independence -- Hannah R. Gros, Industrial Technology;
Tickfaw -- Dagean W. Hardy, Industrial Technology;


PHOTOS:

GOVERNOR ADDRESSES SLU GRADS – Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards addresses graduates at the spring commencement ceremony at Southeastern Louisiana University Saturday. (Photo by Randy Bergeron/SLU Public Info)

MEDAL WINNERS – Southeastern Louisiana University honored students who distinguished themselves in their chosen fields of study with the university’s highest academic honor, the President’s Medal for Academic Excellence. Honored were, front row from left, Angie Mae Moyer from Hammond, Andrea Renee Villarreal from Mexico, Jenna Lauren Barcelona, from LaPlace, Eduardo Andres Ricks from Lacombe, Carley Marie Short from Slidell, and Anthony Joseph Miller from Hammond. Back row, from left, are Southeastern President John L. Crain, Pamela Egan of the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors, Nitish Khanal of Nepal, Kayla Jane Hoover of Ponchatoula, Joseph Michael Edwards of Monroe, and Louisiana Representative Robbie Carter. (Photo by Randy Bergeron/SLU Public Info)

MEDAL WINNERS 2 – Southeastern Louisiana University honored students who distinguished themselves in their chosen fields of study with the university’s highest academic honor the President’s Medal for Academic Excellence. Honored were, front row from left, Tara Denise Hymel of Denham Springs, Kirsten Lynn Mixon of Zachary, Ivy Lenore Pierson of Holden, Katherine Grace Wall of Jennings, Heather Gail Mills of Luling, and Binit Sharma Poudel of Nepal. Back row, from left, are Southeastern President John L. Crain, Pamela Egan of the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors, Jenna Lynn Hildebrand of Abita Springs, Christopher Wayne Alexander of Baton Rouge, Quinley Marie Arceneaux of Denham Springs, and Louisiana Representative Robbie Carter. (Photo by Randy Bergeron/SLU Public Info)

EXCITED GRADUATE – Kayren Vicknair, a marketing major from Hammond, waves to family and friends at Southeastern Louisiana University’s commencement ceremony Saturday. (Photo by Randy Bergeron/SLU Public Info)
18 2016-05-19
Hammond

2016 graduates: Denham Springs High School


D ENHAM SPRINGS —The Denham Springs High School Class of 2016 graduated Sunday, May 15, 2016, during a ceremony at Southeastern Louisiana University Center in Hammond.

Honor graduates: Dylan Nicolas Achord, Morgan Leigh Alexander, Ailar Arasteh, Kaylan Allessandra Arcediano, Sammy Salahi Asbahi, Daniel Henderson Ayres, Lauryn Olivia Bagley, Noah Aaron Bata, Destiny Marie Beane, Nancy Jean Bercegeay, Lauren Elizabeth Bordelon, Daylen Mitchel Borne, Jessica Paige Borne, Sydney Frances Breaux, Anna Claire Breland, Jhon Caenin Brooks, Caleb Scott Broussard, Brady Thomas Burkett, Michelle Kaye Calamari, Dalton Joseph Cambre, William Jeter Carmouche IV, Kassie Leanne Chemin, Kacey Nadine Chopin, Kyle Michael Dear, Megan Marie Dixon, Mason Aydell Dugas, Hannah Elise Duhe, Kali Marie Elftmann, Alyssa Facundus, Bailey Nicole Fairess, Christen Rene’ Farris, Tristin Lin Fluharty, James William Fontenot III, Lauren Elizabeth Foster, Whitney Claire Fourrier, Emily Claire Fuson, Paris Annemarie Gil, Bailey Ryan Gill, Hannah Marie Graham, Jensen James Granier, Alexis Nicole Griffin, Ariah Keona Gross, Victoria Leigh Guidry, Raven D’Shay Gunter, Hannah Haggenmacher, Elizabeth Regina Haley, Camden Marc Hilliard, Noah William Holbrook, Emily Brianna Jackson, Halie Brooke Jackson, Cade Mitchell Johnson, Lauren Brooke Johnson, Leigh Ann Judge, Hunter Dalton Kirkes, Krystian Mary Kreamer, Michael Joseph Lachney, Ainsleigh Claire LaCombe, Julianna Deblieux Lafitte, Evan Thomas Landry, Madeleine Dianna Landry, Daven Lucas Lavigne, Lauryn Alexis Daisy LeBlanc, Aliese Alexandra Lemoine, Skylar Rene’ Louque, Madison Brooke Lovette, Mikah Joy Luce and Susan Katheryn Lynch.

Also, Caitlyn Marie May, Kailin Rene May, Morgan Lee McClendon, Evan Blake McDermitt, Cohen Lamar McIntyre, Morgan Elizabeth Miller, Madison Paige Mincey, Sarah Elizabeth Mitchell, Kali Olivia Montgomery, Amber Michelle Morrison, Hannah Marie Nelms, Kelsey Rae Louise Nelson, Claire Victoria Nettles, Victoria Leigh Page, Jordan Daniel Paline, Travis Ray Pasquier, Kristian Rage Payne, Sarah Rebekah Payne, Alexis Cheyenne Pearson, Kaycie Renee Prejean, Breanna Lynn Price, Chloe Paige Pultz, Jacob Riley Ramagos, Anniah Patrice Ranel, Brooklyn Leigh Rauls, Manuel Rene Rivera-Flores, Colin Heyward Roark, Austin James Roberts, Haley Brooke Roberts, Sydney Alexis Roberts, MaKayla Corrin Rodriquez, Grant Michael Schiltz, Keeara Lakia Scott, Allison Elizabeth Seay, Austin Blaine Shirley, Jacob Michael Siegel, Brooklyn Rose Smith, Tristan James Spedale, Makenzie Layne Stafford, Alexander David Stant, Elisabeth Mary Sutton, Courtney Elizabeth Tallo, Vincent That Ton, John Robert Vaughn, Stack Gerald Vu, Kade Michael Waddell, Baylee Layne Waldrop, Brennan Michael Wall, Owen Mitchell Wilkerson, Erica Elizabeth Wilson, Harley Don Wisdom and Shelby Lynn Zganjar.

Other graduates: Michael Keenan Ackerman, Bryce Michael Albarracin, Matthew Brent Alder, Ross James Alexander, William James Alford, Austin Blake Allen, Kylie Brooke Allgood, Cade Robert Amedee, Michael Tate Anderson, Tijuan Devonte Anderson, Cameron Walt Angele, Vaughan Alan Angelloz, Heath Anthony Arnold, Alexandra Diana Artigue, Devin Paul Averett, Stoney Aycock, Hana Elizabeth Badran, Brian Anthony Baham, Natalie Brooke Bain, Autumn Hope Baker, Christopher Robert Ballard, Zachary Joseph Banker, Meagan Nicole Barker, Chance Anthony Barlow, Timothy James Basham, Veolaca Pateis Beauchamp, Anthony Kyle Bellew Jr., Jared Dylan Bennett, Troy Alan Bennett, Nicholas Ross Berthelot, Jada Lou Blair, Blake Joseph Blanchard, Andie Leanne Blount, Shatiah Shaza Bolden, Falen Renee Bordelon, Daniel Botello, Brittany Mishele Bowman, Justin Allen Branton, Holly Elizabeth Breaux, Laynee Aline Breaux, Taylor Paige Brian, Ashlynn Elizabeth Bridges, Caitlyn Michelle Brignac, Ashleigh Marie Brooks, Philip Michael Brown, Sarah Faye Brown, Zachary Thomas Burke, Chloe Alexandra Burkett, Andrew Riley Burks, Hannah Colleen Cahill, Emily Elizabeth Calhoun, Caleb Michael Callender, Zachary Taylor Carcelli, Jesse Laine Carpenter, Larie Tegan Carr, Zane Barker Carraway, Ryan Shay Carreca, Dakota Neil Spagna Carrier, Hayden Lane Carter, Jaycelin Breann Carter, Brice Daniel Case, Dustin Cade Cash, Myles Kimble Chadwick, Tevin Alexander Charrier, Miracle Tylyric Chrisentery, Justice Scott Cleaver, Bryce Evan Coleman, Jordon Christopher Collier, Kyla Rachele Cox, Connor Reece Crenshaw, Hannah Claire Crow, Cathryn Elyse Cruise, Nicolas John Cummings and Nicholas Hugh Cupit.

Also, Dakota Ezekiel Davis, Haley Marie Davis, Sundra Shakia Davison, Taylor Mae Deane, Taylor Thomas DePoy, Rachel Nicole Dillard, Chelsea Pilar Dominguez, Nicholas Brock Droge, Cole James Dubois, Sean Issac Ducote, Christel Rae Dugas, Stephen Paul Duplantis, Lyndon Jade Duplechin, Jazzmyne Nicole Durham, Zachary Glen Duvall, Chyanne Monteria Dyson, De’Juantae Denzel Edwards, Kyle Brady Edwards, William Ennis, Claudia Maria Magali Estrada, Kathryn Elaine Etheridge, Joshua Lance Fangue, Skylar Jene’ Farrow, Harlie Dale Felder, Jayla Brie’ Fields, Devin Scarlet Floreth, Cody Layton Fontenot, Landon Michael Fontenot, Hunter Jeffery Forrest, Chandler Terrance Fredricks, Skylar Frias, Bailea Browning Fucich, Joseph Sidney Fuentes, Lauren Rae Fussell, Jessica de Armas Gakiya, Wendy Marlene Garibay, Damon Andree Gates, Brittney Lynn Gauthier, Sarah Elizabeth Gibbs, Patricia Anne Gilbert, Francisco Eleison Gonzalez-Corella, Dykeithon Darquell Grace, Patrick Jean Graffagnini, Rachel Elizabeth Greeley, Aryanne Nicole Griggs, Shawn Nicholas Guercio, James Nicholas Hall, Tori Lynn Hall, Brittany Marie Hampton, Cody Andrew Hampton, Caroline Michelle Harris, Joshua Terrell Haynes, Connor Reese Hebert, Kelsey Rose Hebert, Madison Elizabeth Hedrick, Dylan Michael Helmke, Austin James Heltzel, Bailey Jean Henderson, Matthew Juan Henry, Bailey Elise Hidalgo, Joseph Evan Hinton, Garrett Marshall Hodge, Craig Joseph Hodges, Gayge Auston Hodges, Layton Joseph Hollingsworth, Jasmine Lashae Hookfin, Jessica Lauren Hoover, Karlie Elizabeth Hoover, Charles Dakota Houghton, Clarissa Darlene Howell, Kylie Elizabeth Hudson, Tyler Cole Hufstetler, Justin Drake Hussey, Joshua Paul Hutchinson and Kyle Patrick Hyde.

Also, Kristin Nicole Jarreau, Marcus Jenkins, Zy’Neshia Antineque D.N. Jennings, Imani Renee Johnlouis, Eddie Deondre Johnson, Summer Michele Johnson, Thomas Andrew Johnson, David Austin Keener, Thomas Lyon Kelton, Dylan Lee Kesner, Brandon Paul Kidder, Torez Tyreon Kinchen, Jerad Thomas Knazs, Brittany Rene Kohn, Nikki Lauren Kuhn, Conner Meclay Labatut, Jingxu Lan, Nathaniel Jordan Lanier, Cole Patrick Latil, Devin Michael Leader, Trevor LeBlanc, Alaina Elizabeth Loga, Parker Stephen Lovett, Christian Gage Macaluso, Morgan Marie Machen, Lucas Charles Madere, Stacy Renee Magana, Micah Joseph Major, Alvin Elmo Maney III, Caitlyn Marie Marple, Kennedi Raissa Marshall, Chandler Ethan Martin, Jada Ja’ni Martin, Brittany Shay Mccaa, Charles Dana McCartney, Shianne Suezanne McClain, Joseph Charles McEvoy, Chaz Keenan-Cordell McGowan, Lexi Noelle McMorris, Juliette Jewel Mikell, Joseph Kyle Miller, McKenzie Leigh Miller, Melodee Lynn Miller, Landon Daniel Millet, Gabriele Mekel Mobley, Azarious Jabbar Moody, Jacob Parks Moore, Dallis Terrell Morgan, David Morgan IV, James Alfred Morgan IV, Gerren Marcelle Moses, Matthew Glenn Mulina, Autumn Lynn Munoz, Kylah Marie Murphy, Travis Cade Murry, Travis Tai Nguyen, Travis Michael Nickels, Mikuela Renee’ Nieto, Jamara Javan Norbert, Adam Blaise Norris, Shawn Michael Norris, Altoris Leandre Odom, Sebastian Zane Ortego, Joshua Caleb Pace, Taylor Alexis Pace, Sommer Mikendra Page, Trey Michael Parent, Chance William Parkin, Kishan Jayesh Patel, Tamara La’Nell Patterson, Londyn Lee Patty, Kristopher Charles Paulin, Jerry Jacob Payne, Jordan Rachel Payne, Kayleigh Ree Perry, Paige Marie Phillips, Ethan Gaige Philpot, Garrett Steven Phipps, Tanner Allen Pittman, Brian Colton Pomeroy, Dakota Austin Porter, Megan Danyell Posey, Savannah Nicole Powell, Austin Lee Prevost, Christian Wayne Purpera and Brandon Earl Purvis.

Also, Brandy Nicole Quebodeaux, Rebecca Leigh Ramirez-Baker, MaKayla Kathryn Ray, Austin Reese Rea, Hannah Marie Ready, Bradley Thomas Reed, Chelsea LeeAnn Reed, Kade Ellis Reed, Hannah Lea Rhodus, Raphineas Gerard Riley Jr., Jennifer Gomez Rivera, Nicole Anne Rizzo, Tameisha Nicole Robinson, Caleb Alexander Roddy, Haydee Jaqueline Rodriguez, Charity Elisabeth Rogers, Samantha Marie Roshto, Leland Hahn Roy, Taylor Ashton Roy, Jakhari Mantrell Rushton, Adam Brody Ryan, Shana Jeri Samek, Malachai Adrian Sanders, Ella Diana Sasser, Rachel Mackenzie Scardina, Samantha Renee Schmidt, Timothy Lane Schuler, D’Andre George Scott, Heather Lynn Scott, Lakia Deondria Scott, Sydney Michelle Scott, Chrislyn Elizabeth Seals, Troy Joseph Seals, Callon Jade Self, Alan Spencer Seymour, Grant David Shackelford, Caleb Ryan Sharp, Timothy Wayne Shatswell, Marles Cole Simoneaux, Alexander Judd Sisson, Zachary Michael Smart, Rebecca Alexandra Smith, Samuel James Smith, Danny Cole Sparacino, Paul Bailey Spiers, Caden Lee Stockton, Domonisha Michelle Talbert, Zeth Tristen Taylor, Cheryl Ann Teal, Haleigh Dawn Theriot, Brandon De’Anthony Thomas, Nathanial Lee Thomas, Robert Lewis Thomas, Alexander James Tindle, Sydney Elise Tolliver, Jacquelyn Kate Townsend, Michael Taylor Trepagnier, Richard Wilfred Trum IV, Kaleigh Danielle Turner, Michael Brandon Vance, Sydney Katherine VanVeckhoven, Alanna Donelle Varnado, Dylan James Varnado, Victoria May Varnado, Jonathan Thomas Vu, Jared Keith Wall Jr., Reagan Evan Wallace, Aubrie Josephine Walters, Jordyn Alivia Wesley, Sharon Bree Wesley, Ashley Nicole Wheat, Christina Marie White, Cole James White, Ian Samuel White, Dylan Taylor Whittington, Grace Alexandra Williams, Lucas Jason Williams, Sara Marie Williams, Terrellyn Marion-Evet Williams, David Bret Willis, Savannah Leigh Woodward and Stephen Austin Zier.
18 2016-05-12
Hammond

SLU honors Baton Rouge students with Dean’s Award


Jordan Hale, of Baton Rouge, was among five students to receive Southeastern Louisiana University College of Nursing and Health Sciences’ highest honor, the Dean’s Award, at the college’s annual honors convocation on April 25 in the Student Union Theatre.




Hale studies in the School of Nursing.


Each department presented the Significant Partnership Award in recognition of contributions to the educational programs in the college. The Department of Health and Human Sciences presented the Dean’s Award to the Pennington Biomedical Research Center.

Baton Rouge students honored at the ceremony included Jeni Frick, Emma LeDew Award in Communication Sciences and Disorders; and Jordan Hale, Dean’s Award in Kinesiology and Health Studies.

18 2016-05-12
Hammond

Hammond Westside students learn the three Rs


Kaylin Cruise’s second-graders at Hammond Westside Elementary Montessori received lessons in reducing, reusing and recycling from Southeastern Louisiana University teacher candidates Kaylee George and Lacey Robbins on April 19.

The lessons were in honor of Earth Day, celebrated April 22.

George repurposed old cereal boxes to make puzzles for each student, teaching the children to reduce waste.

18 2016-05-11
New Orleans

St. Tammany business briefs for May 11, 2016


SMALL-BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT: Staff members with the Louisiana Small Business Development Center at Southeastern Louisiana University, named the top center in the nation last year by the Small Business Administration, took several awards at the state LSBDC meeting recently held in New Orleans. Director William Joubert was named to the Million Dollar Club in recognition of his helping to raise more than $1 million in capital for area businesses and entrepreneurs. Assistant director Sandy Summers received the Outstanding Service Provider Award. Senior business consultant Wayne Ricks received the Job Creator Award for his assistance in helping area businesses get established or expand. Business consultant Brandy Boudreaux received the LSBDC’s Rookie of the Year Award and was named to the Million Dollar Club.

18 2016-05-10
Baton Rouge

SLU’s Phi Kappa Phi honors BR student


Southeastern Louisiana University’s chapter of the Phi Kappa Phi national honor society inducted nearly 50 students and faculty on April 21.

Students must be in the top 10 percent of their senior or graduate class or a second semester junior in the top 7.5 percent of his or her class to be inducted into Phi Kappa Phi.

Inductees and award winners include Amelia Lapeyrouse, of Baton Rouge.
18 2016-05-10
Baton Rouge

Zachary student lauded at SLU ceremony


Top graduates were honored at the annual honors convocation for Southeastern Louisiana University’s College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences on April 20.

Among the honorees was Kirsten Mixon, of Zachary, Outstanding Senior in English — Creative Writing.

Faculty members honored with awards at the convocation were Jason Landrum, Excellence in Teaching; Margaret Gonzalez-Perez, Excellence in Research; David Armand, Excellence in Artistic Activity; and Amber Narro, Excellence in Service.

The college also honored inductees into the university’s chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, a national honor society, and the university’s honor society, the Thirteen Club.
18 2016-05-10
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCE STUDENTS HONORED


HAMMOND – Five students received Southeastern Louisiana University College of Nursing and Health Sciences’ highest honor, the Dean’s Award, at the college’s annual honors convocation held April 25 in the university’s Student Union Theatre.
The Dean’s Award in the Department of Health and Human Sciences was presented to Jenna Barcelona of LaPlace. Dean’s Awards in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Studies went to Anthony Miller of Hammond, Allison Ostendorf of Covington and Carley Short of Slidell; the School of Nursing Dean’s Award was presented to Jordan Hale of Baton Rouge.
The Significant Partnership Award was presented by each department in recognition of contributions to the educational programs in the college. Dr. Amanda Staiano, representing the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, accepted the award from the Department of Health and Human Sciences for collaboration with Southeastern on research into activity levels in children. The Health Transition Alliance Program at North Oaks Health System, represented by North Oaks Education Director Nicole Barnum, was honored by the Kinesiology and Health Studies Department for the cooperative health coaching project. The School of Nursing honored North Oaks Health System for their general support of the nursing program; accepting that award was Chief Nursing Officer Shelly Welch.
Students honored at the ceremony are listed below by geographic area.
ASCENSION PARISH
Prairieville: Chase Cole, the Evelyn Davis Award in Nursing.

LIVINGSTON PARISH
Denham Springs: Kevin Klingman, Outstanding Graduate in Health and Physical Education.
Walker: Josie David, Outstanding Graduate Award in Counseling.

ST. TAMMANY PARISH
Covington: Gabrielle Lester-Lubrano, School of Nursing Leadership and Service Award; Allison Ostendorf, Dean’s Award in Kinesiology and Health Sciences; Aimee Simoneaux, the Pyburn Award for the Outstanding Senior in Family and Consumer Sciences.
Madisonville: Ryan Woods, Outstanding Graduate in Health Education and Promotion.
Mandeville: Cederic Scotto, Graduate Scholar Award in Kinesiology.
Slidell: Sophia Epling, Outstanding Graduate in Exercise Fitness Award; Carley Short, Dean’s Award in Kinesiology and Health Studies.

TANGIPAHOA PARISH
Hammond: Devin Brown, Outstanding Graduate Award in Counseling; Anthony Miller, Dean’s Award in Kinesiology and Health Studies and Outstanding Graduate in Athletic Training Award; Jessica Osborn, Graduate Scholar in Health Studies Award.
Kentwood: William Blackburn, Outstanding Graduate Award in Communication Sciences and Disorders.
Ponchatoula: Sarah Koger, Outstanding Graduate in Fitness and Human Performance Award.

WASHINGTON PARISH
Bogalusa: Vera Wilson, the Doctor of Nursing Distinguished Scholar Award
Franklinton: Jasmine Wilson, Outstanding Student in Social Work Award.

PHOTOS:
SOUTHEASTERN HONORS PENNINGTON BIOMEDICAL
Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge was recognized by the Southeastern College of Nursing and Health Sciences as a significant partner with the university’s Department of Health and Human Sciences. Pictured are Southeastern Assistant Professor Holly Kihm, left, and Dr. Amanda Staiano of Pennington.

SOUTHEASTERN HONORS NORTH OAKS FOR PARTNERSHIPS
North Oaks Health System was honored by the Southeastern College of Nursing and Health Sciences with two Significant Partnership Awards at the college’s annual convocation for their support of the Health Transition Alliance Program and for the School of Nursing. Pictured are, from left, Ralph Wood, assistant dean of the college; Shelly Welch, senior vice president of patient services and chief nursing officer at North Oaks; Nicole Barnum, North Oaks education director; Eileen Creel, head of the Southeastern School of Nursing; and SLU nursing instructor Rhonda Pecaroro.

SOUTHEASTERN HONORS COLLEGE OF NURSING STUDENTS (Ascension)
Chase Cole of Prairieville was recognized at Southeastern Louisiana University’s College of Nursing and Health Sciences recent honors convocation with the Evelyn Davis Award in Nursing.

SOUTHEASTERN HONORS COLLEGE OF NURSING STUDENTS (Livingston)
Two residents of Livingston Parish were honored at the Southeastern Louisiana University College of Nursing and Health Sciences annual honors convocation. Kevin Klingman, left, of Denham Springs received the Award for Outstanding Graduate in Health and Physical Education, while Josie David of Walker received the Outstanding Graduate in Counseling Award.

SOUTHEASTERN HONORS COLLEGE OF NURSING STUDENTS (St. Tammany)
Several students from St. Tammany Parish were honored with awards at the Southeastern Louisiana University College of Nursing and Health Sciences annual convocation. Pictured, from left, are Ryan Woods of Madisonville, Outstanding Graduate in Health Education and Promotion Award; Aimee Simoneaux of Covington, the Pyburn Award in Family and Consumer Sciences; Allison Ostendorf of Covington and Carley Short of Slidell, the Dean’s Award in Kinesiology and Health Sciences; Gabrielle Lester-Lubrano of Covington, the School of Nursing Leadership and Service Award; and Sophia Epling of Slidell, Outstanding Graduate in Exercise Science Award.

SOUTHEASTERN HONORS COLLEGE OF NURSING STUDENTS (Tangipahoa)
Several residents of Hammond were honored with awards at Southeastern Louisiana University’s College of Nursing and Health Sciences honors convocation. Recognized were, from left, Jessica Osborn, the Graduate Scholar in Health Studies Award; Anthony Miller, the Dean’s Award in Kinesiology and Health Sciences and the Outstanding Graduate in Athletic Training Award; and Devin Brown, the Outstanding Graduate in Counseling Award.

SOUTHEASTERN HONORS COLLEGE OF NURSING STUDENTS (Washington)
The Southeastern Louisiana University College of Nursing and Health Sciences honored two students from Washington Parish at its annual convocation. Vera Williams, left, received the Doctor of Nursing Practice Distinguished Scholar Award, and Jasmine Williams of Franklinton received the Outstanding Social Work Student Award.
18 2016-05-10
Hammond

Southeastern students participate in The Big Event


HAMMOND – Approximately 600 Southeastern Louisiana University students put in a day of community service in the City of Hammond and nearby communities on Saturday (April 23) as part of the university’s sixth annual Big Event.
Sponsored by the Student Government Association, the Big Event is intended to give students the opportunity to help the communities and organizations that support Southeastern in many ways, said SGA President Alexis Quakenbush.
“You are definitely making a difference in our community,” Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs Jim McHodgkins said to the students assembled in the Student Union mall before going to their assignments. “You are showing our residents the Southeastern spirit of giving back.”
The students included individual volunteers and representatives of several student organizations and worked at sites such Zemurray Park, the Iowa Neighborhood Association, several Hammond fire stations, Special Olympics, Child Advocacy Service, First Christian Church and the Southeastern campus among others.
Jobs included beautification and landscaping projects, clean-up efforts in downtown Hammond, cleaning and polishing the city’s fire engines, sorting materials and conducting inventory for non-profit organizations.
“We’re so pleased with the work these students have done in the church and on the grounds,” said Lorraine Faust, treasurer at First Christian Church who worked with the students. “This is the second year we’ve had the Southeastern students, and they are a big help to us. Everything just sparkles.”
Faust said the church tends to have an older congregation, so the volunteer help by the students is greatly appreciated.
“They did a fantastic job,” said Capt. Bryan Needham, after looking at the shinning fire truck the ladies of Alpha Omicron Pi had just cleaned and polished. “Their work is much appreciated.”
The Big Event was originally scheduled in March but was postponed due to inclement weather.

PHOTOS:
SLU STUDENTS LION UP FOR THE BIG EVENT -- Approximately 600 Southeastern students joined forces for “The Big Event” Saturday, a day of community service. The students worked on the Southeastern campus as well as in area churches, parks, fire stations, humane shelters and other locations as their way of giving back to the communities that support them. This was the sixth year the SLU Student Government Association sponsored The Big Event.

SPRUCING UP – Southeastern Louisiana University students Scott Cooper of Mandeville, left, and Paul Haddican of Marrero prune the bushes in front of First Christian Church in Hammond as part of the Student Government Association-sponsored Big Event. The two are members of the SLU Hall Council and volunteered their efforts to help clean the grounds of the church.

ALL CLEAN AND POLISHED – The ladies of Southeastern Louisiana University’s chapter of Alpha Omicron Pi pose on the Hammond Fire Department’s SLU fire truck after putting in a morning washing and polishing the vehicle. Their efforts were part of the Student Government Association-sponsored sixth annual Big Event.
18 2016-05-10
Hammond

Southeastern LSBDC staff win state awards


HAMMOND – Staff members with the Louisiana Small Business Development Center at Southeastern Louisiana University – named the top center in the nation last year by the Small Business Administration – took several awards at the state LSBDC meeting held in New Orleans recently.
Director William Joubert was named to the Million Dollar Club in recognition of his helping to raise more than $1 million in capital for area businesses and entrepreneurs. He has received that recognition, as well as the $5 Million Club honor, several times previously. He has also been named a LSBDC State Star and serves as director of the Southeastern Louisiana Business Center.
Assistant Director Sandy Summers received the Outstanding Service Provider Award, a new award that recognizes LSBDC employees for an outstanding commitment to quality service. A certified training professional, Summers coordinates the center’s educational and training programs and maintains contacts with area chambers of commerce, economic development organizations and other agencies that frequently co-host programs.
Senior Business Consultant Wayne Ricks received the Job Creator Award for his assistance in helping area businesses get established or expand, efforts that resulted in helping to create approximately 90 new jobs in 2014-15 for the region. He was also named to the $3 Million Club. Ricks has been honored in the past by being named a State Star twice, and to the $1 Million Club and the $5 Million Club.
Business Consultant Brandy Boudreaux received the LSBDC’s Rookie of the Year Award and was named to the Million Dollar Club. Her areas of expertise include include medical, pharmaceutical and hospital consulting, imports and exports, and small business bookkeeping and financial administration.
The Southeastern LSBDC is one of 10 such centers in the state and serves businesses and employers throughout the five-parish region of Livingston, St. Helena, St. Tammany, Tangipahoa and Washington parishes.

PHOTO:
LSBDC STAFF HONORED – Members of Louisiana Small Business Development Center who were recognized at the recent state meeting are, from left, Director William Joubert, Business Consultant Brandy Boudreaux, Assistant Director Sandy Summers, and Senior Business Consultant Wayne Ricks.
18 2016-05-09
Hammond

SLU launches its Safe Campus app


HAMMOND, LA (WAFB) -
Southeastern Louisiana University has launched a Safe Campus App for students, faculty and staff.

The app was created by the school’s computer science students at the request of the university’s Emergency Preparedness Committee.

The purpose of the app is to provide students, faculty and staff on campus with simple instructions and recommendations for what to do during an on-campus emergency. It addresses procedures for situations such as active shooter, bomb threats, fire, explosion, shelter in place, campus lockdown, evacuation, physical injury, sexual assault, weapons on campus and weather emergencies.

The app also allows users to directly contact the University Department from the home screen as well as links embedded inside of different sections in the app.

The Safe Campus App is a new addition to the university’s comprehensive Southeastern Campus Alert System.

“Safety for our campus community is of paramount importance,” says Sam Domiano, Vice President for Administration and Finance who chairs the committee. “The directives on the app were designed so that they’re appropriate for individuals to review so they’re prepared for any potential emergency, but also so that they can be accessed immediately for instructions on how to protect yourself, who to contact and how to assist victims should a situation arise.”

The app was designed by Professor Ghassan Alkadi’s computer science software engineering students Joshua Asoodeh, Ryan Craft, Alexander Gonolfi and Joshua Valladares.

It is free for download for any smart phone or device at southeastern.edu/safecampusapp.

Students, faculty and staff can also register for the Southeastern Emergency Alert System at southeastern.edu/about/safe_campus/alert/.

Copyright 2016 WAFB. All rights reserved.
18 2016-05-09
Hammond

Southeastern student pursues Broadway career


Performing has been a part of Provence Hatfield’s life since she was a young child.
As the daughter of traveling musicians Florence and Ricky, Hatfield was born and raised with a love for music. Little did she know that at the age of 23 she would be off to New York to participate in a broadway integrated program at Open Jar Institute.

18 2016-05-02
Hammond

GIVING BACK: Hundreds of SLU students take on community projects


Approximately 600 Southeastern Louisiana University students put in a day of community service in the City of Hammond and nearby communities on Saturday as part of the university’s sixth annual Big Event.
Individual volunteers and representatives of several student organizations worked at Zemurray Park, the Iowa Neighborhood Association, several Hammond fire stations, Special Olympics, Child Advocacy Service, First Christian Church, the Southeastern campus and more.
Jobs included beautification and landscaping projects, clean-up efforts in downtown Hammond, cleaning and polishing the city’s fire engines, sorting materials and conducting inventory for non-profit organizations.
“We’re so pleased with the work these students have done in the church and on the grounds,” said Lorraine Faust, treasurer at First Christian Church who worked with the students. “This is the second year we’ve had the Southeastern students, and they are a big help to us. Everything just sparkles.”
Faust said the church tends to have an older congregation, so the volunteer help by the students is greatly appreciated.
“They did a fantastic job,” said Capt. Bryan Needham, after looking at the shinning fire truck the ladies of Alpha Omicron Pi had just cleaned and polished. “Their work is much appreciated.”
The Big Event was originally scheduled in March but was postponed due to inclement weather.
Sponsored by the Student Government Association, the Big Event encourages students to help those who support Southeastern in many ways, said SGA President Alexis Quakenbush.
“You are definitely making a difference in our community,” Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs Jim McHodgkins said to the students assembled in the Student Union mall before they went to their assignments. “You are showing our residents the Southeastern spirit of giving back.”
18 2016-05-02
Hammond

GOVERNOR EDWARDS TO ADDRESS SOUTHEASTERN COMMENCEMENT


HAMMOND – Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards will provide the keynote address at Southeastern Louisiana University’s graduation ceremonies at 10 a.m. on Saturday, May 14, at the University Center.
The university will confer approximately 1,100 degrees on students who are graduating with bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees.
Edwards was elected the 56th governor of the state last year and assumed office in January. A native of Amite, he served eight years as an Airborne Ranger with the U.S. Army. While in the service, he commanded a rifle company in the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, N.C.
In 2008, he was elected to the Louisiana House of Representatives from District 72, representing parts of East Feliciana, St. Helena and Tangipahoa parishes and served as a member of the Northshore Delegation, which includes districts that cover Southeastern. A Democrat, he served as chairman of the House Democratic Caucus and as minority leader in the House of Representatives. Edwards served for eight years in the House until the Louisiana voters elected him governor.
Edwards graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1988 and earned his law degree from the LSU Paul M. Hebert Law Center, earning the honor Order of the Coif, a scholastic society recognizing excellence in legal education. His civil law practice is located in his hometown of Amite.
18 2016-04-29
Baton Rouge

Authors share tale of Hammond’s origins


HAMMOND — Members of the Southeast Louisiana Historical Association and their guests gathered for the group’s Annual Spring Meeting on

April 20 were taken on a pictorial trip through Hammond’s first 50 years of existence by authors who recently published a history of the city through the “Images of America” series.

The group, meeting at the Hammond Regional Arts Center, also learned about new discoveries of Native American presence in the Florida Parishes area from researcher Jason Thompson who had several dozen artifacts that he has found in the area on display.

Eric Johnson and Catherine Tijerino explained in their opening remarks that the book, “Hammond,” is a pictorial recounting of the city’s history from its founding in the late 19th century until the end of the 1940s. The authors said that they combed through thousands of pictures before selecting what eventually became the book’s content.

“We set out to do a complete history of Hammond, but we had so much material we had to stop at the first 50 years because that is all the publishers would take,” Johnson said.

The pair said they may publish a second book to complete the story of Hammond.

Accompanying their retelling of Hammond’s history was a slide show featuring many pictures from the book but additional pictures that did not make it into the historical account published in the “Images of America” series. “The publishers didn’t like some of the pictures we chose, and some were in such bad shape that they couldn’t be used, but we loved them anyway and decided to show them to you tonight,” Johnson said.

Johnson and Tijerino’s story starts with Peter Hammond, a native of Sweden who arrived in Louisiana in the mid-19th century and acquired a large tract of land that would later become today’s city. Hammond is buried, with members of his family and a favorite slave boy, on a quiet residential street in the city that adopted his name.

Peter Hammond, the authors related, took advantage of the vast forests on his tract to make an early living. A man of the sea, Peter Hammond provided pitch, pine tar, lumber and masts for the shipbuilding industry with his products being shipped on the nearby Natalbany River at Wadesboro near today’s Springfield.

Continuing the story, the speakers said the second leading influence in Hammond’s history was Charles Emery Cate who purchased land from Peter Hammond and built a sawmill and shoe factory in what is now the heart of Hammond. Cate would later sub-divide blocks in the fledgling city and build homes for settlers who began moving into the area.

After Peter Hammond gave rights-of-way through his land to the first railroad to come through the area, the little town began to flourish. During the Civil War, Cate’s factory was burned by U.S. troops who raided the area. However, at war’s end the town began to grow again with many jobs centered on the timber industry which continued to flourish.

Johnson and Tijerino said the railroad soon became the symbol of Hammond and the depot, which is still in use today, became something of the town’s center. The strawberry industry began soon after the Civil War years and within several decades was the mainstay of commerce in Hammond, a community that was eventually dubbed, “the Strawberry City.”

Strawberry buyers from throughout the nation would descend on Hammond in the spring to purchase the sweet berries grown throughout what is now Tangipahoa and Livingston Parishes. The historians said the berries grown in the region were the best in the United States and were famous in major cities all over the country.

Strawberry buyers and other out of town visitors who were attracted to Hammond because of its climate, scenic beauty, exceptionally clear artesian water and the ozone in the air, frequented the early hotels that sprung up in the city and became and important piece of the its history, Johnson said.

Tijerino said fire was a frequent problem in early Hammond. Fire destroyed the two most famous early hotels in Hammond, the Kidder Hotel and the Oaks Hotel. The Oaks stood on North Oak Street near the railroad tracks and was the precursor of several hotels that were built on the spot. The last hotel there, the Casa de Fresa, burned down in the early 1970s.

The authors told a story that was new to most of those listening to their lecture. In the 1880s, a famous soprano with the New York Metropolitan Opera, Julia Heinrich, was killed in a freak accident near the railroad station. Johnson said that the singer, enroute to New Orleans, was standing on the loading platform when a train struck a wayward baggage cart that then struck her.

Johnson, director of the Linus A. Sims Memorial Library on the Southeastern Louisiana University campus and Tijerino, a library staff member, had many more stories to tell and pictures to show during their lecture. For example, after all the fires the town eventually founded a volunteer fire department and required that commercial buildings be build with brick or stone. Many of those buildings are still in use in Downtown Hammond today. Hammond’s first brick house was built in 1895, and Johnson and Tijerino had a picture of it.

According to the authors, student activism is not new. They showed a picture of students marching down the town’s main street in 1907 demanding a new school. They eventually got their new school, but not until 1914.

The authors conceded that time did not allow them to tell all the tales they could about Hammond’s developmental years. Their story ended with the World War II years and two stunning photos: one of them of then Southeastern Louisiana College female students picking strawberries and the other of a German prisoner of war assigned to work in Hammond. The women had to pick the strawberries because most of the men were fighting a war, Johnson explained.

Following their talk, the authors signed copies of their book for historical association members.

Thompson, who spoke to the group at last year’s Annual Spring Meeting, said he has found new Native American artifacts from a period of approximately 3-5,000 years ago. He has found spear points, arrow heads, scraping stones and a rock carving, one of only two such objects found in this area. He said that while working to unearth ancient artifacts he makes it a practice to leave the land the way he found it.

Thompson said he plans to continue his field studies of Native Americans in the region and is doing field work along the Tangipahoa, Tickfaw and other area rivers.

Sam Hyde, director of the Center for Regional Studies at Southeastern, told the gathering the center continues to receive collections and to prepare them for public’s use. He said the center recently acquired records of contracts for indentured servants that go back to the 16th Century — material he had never seen before. Hyde said that an invitation is always out for those seeking to learn more about local history through the holdings at the Center.
18 2016-04-28
Baton Rouge

Applications open for SLU’s summer writing project


Applications are being accepted for participation in the Southeastern Louisiana Writing Project’s Invitational Summer Institute in Teaching Writing.

SLWP is one of the sites for the National Writing Project, which has offered the institutes since 1992 through Southeastern Louisiana University. Summer Institute Fellows from across all curricula and grade levels come together in a comfortable setting to write, study the teaching of writing and share best practices.

Designed for teachers who use writing in their classrooms, the institute will meet at SLU from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. July 6-7 for introductory workshops on writing; at the Writing Retreat in the French Quarter July 11-15; and again at Southeastern July 18-20.

“This program is for teachers who use writing in their instruction, who are eager to share what they have learned and who want to learn from other experienced classroom teachers,” explained Richard Louth, SLWP director and professor of English at Southeastern.

Teachers selected to attend the institute study the teaching of writing, reflect on their own writing and share their best teaching practices with each other, Louth explained.

Participants will work on personal and professional writing and also will develop workshops on teaching writing that can be used as professional development in their local schools.

As summer fellows at Southeastern, participants will enroll in a three-hour graduate course, Workshop in the Teaching of Writing. Participants who complete the course will receive a $900 stipend to partially cover their tuition and lodging in the French Quarter during the Writing Retreat.

Enrollment is limited. Applicants should submit a résumé that includes contact information including phone numbers and email addresses, the school and grade level where the applicant teaches, a brief description of writing activity in their classrooms and a letter of nomination from a supervisor or from a member of the SLWP. Applications should be addressed to Dr. Richard Louth, SLU Box 10327, Hammond, 70402 or by email to rlouth@seoutheastern.edu.

For information, call (985) 549-2012 or 2100 or visit southeastern.edu/slwp.

18 2016-04-28
Baton Rouge

SLU dance company to hold auditions


Southeastern Louisiana University’s resident student dance company, Dance Performance Project, will hold auditions for Southeastern students and community dancers May 6-7 for an upcoming dance concert.

Called “Bayourella: A Story of Forgiveness,” the fall event, will be directed by dance instructor Skip Costa. Selected choreographers are Haley Morgan and Joe Matherne, Baton Rouge; Lindsy Brown, El Paso, Texas; Lily Marcus, Denham Springs; Forrest Duplantier, Covington; and Courtney Self, Conway, Arkansas.

Auditions are open to current Southeastern students and students enrolled at Southeastern for summer and fall 2016, as well as high school community dancers in 11th or 12th grade, Costa said. Students attending the audition will be taught several short movement phrases.

For details, email Dance Coordinator Martie Fellom at martie.fellom@southeastern.edu.
18 2016-04-28
Hammond

Construction projects progress at University


BY LAUREN LANGLOIS staffwriter@hammondstar.com | 0 comments
Constructors are working on the structural steel frame of Southeastern Louisiana University’s new Computer Science and Technology Building that is projected to be ready for use by the summer of 2017.
Kenneth Howe, facility planning director for the university, said the project will be done in one phase and the construction crew is working on putting up the structural steel frame of the 70,000 square-foot building.

The new building is the biggest construction project going on at SLU.
Also the eight residential buildings that are about 10 years old are being repainted and air conditioning is being added, among other upgrades, Howe said.The biggest part of the work will to enclose the exterior hallways that will also be air-conditioned, he said.
Self-generated housing fees will pay for the residential hall renovations that are expected to cost $5.8 million, he said.
The new science and technology building is projected to cost about $24 million and will be covered by state capital outlay funds.
Meanwhile across the street from campus, the Baptist Collegiate Ministry is progressing with its upgrades. According to Director Matt Middlecamp, renovations are on schedule and should be finished in time for next spring semester.
Most of the renovations, which should cost about $800,000, are being done to the interior of the building on Dakota Street across from the stadium. The building is dated and the ministry is looking to modernize and add more space for offices, meetings and recreation, he said.
18 2016-04-28
Hammond

Honors bestowed on SLU students


Residents of Livingston and Tangipahoa parishes were among students honored at Southeastern Louisiana University’s annual academic convocation, sponsored by the College of Business, on April 21.

Honorees include Casey Shelton, of Walker, distinguished graduate in marketing; Andrea Villarreal, of Hammond and a native of Mexico, distinguished graduate in finance; and Gabriela Pacheco Molina, of Hammond and a native of El Salvador, distinguished graduate in supply chain management.
18 2016-04-27
Hammond

Biology undergraduates teach genetics


Biology undergraduates from Southeastern Louisiana University and Northshore Technical Community College presented genetic concepts and safe lab practices to St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic High School students earlier this week.
According to Dr. Tara Turley-Stoulig, instructor in the department of biological sciences at Southeastern, undergraduates were tasked with preparing the younger students for hands-on experiments that will take place Monday and Friday.


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“This week, we covered the primer module. This included teaching students about genetics, genetic diseases, GMOs and lab practices,” Turley-Stoulig said.
“Next week, we will have our two practical modules. These will expose students to laboratory experiments using concepts from the primer modules.”
The experiments will involve students isolating DNA from common snack foods, setting up chain reactions and creating gels to identify whether samples contain GMOs, she said.
Turley-Stoulig said high school outreach promotes the Connect to Success program, which allows Northshore Technical Community College students to seamlessly transfer to Southeastern while maintaining all credits.
Students from both colleges were involved in teaching primer modules, and the practical modules will take place on each campus.
“Students who might not be able to enroll directly at Southeastern because of their ACT score or any other reason can enroll at NSTCC and easily transfer later on,” Turley-Stoulig said.
“We want to raise awareness to show students they can take that path.”
The modules also expose high school students to research work done at Southeastern and potential careers relating to biological sciences.
“At this time, STEM fields have great need. We want to expose students early to the experiences that lie out there,” she said.
Khiem Phan, a senior biology major at Southeastern, enjoyed sharing his love for biology with St. Thomas Aquinas students. He said the simplified lessons were meant to expose students to concepts and foster an interest in science.
“The most rewarding part was being able to use what I have learned in a very deep level of biological sciences and summarizing them in a much simpler way so students could understand easily,” he said.
Phan and other participating undergraduate students applied for program in the fall.
Cell biology and genetics were prerequisite courses required for participation, he said.
Phan and Turley-Stoulig agreed scheduling was the biggest roadblock they encountered. Since two high school classes were involved in the modules, special considerations had to be taken to ensure everyone was in the classroom at the same time.
Sick students and short class times also challenged the student teachers, making it difficult to relay all necessary information to the classes.
Despite setbacks, the primer modules were successful, Turley-Stoulig said.
“The students seem interested,” she said. “The feedback from the class has been good.”
Turley-Stoulig said the biology department staff and students hope to reach out to other local high schools in the near future.
18 2016-04-27
New Orleans

Where do you get the best college food in Louisiana?


HAMMOND, LA (WGNO) - It's simply the best. The best college food in the state of Louisiana.

That's according to the experts, the students who eat it every day.

WGNO News with a Twist features reporter Wild Bill Wood traveled to Hammond to find out why the food at Southeastern Louisiana University tastes not just good, but simply the best.

It's not just rated number one in the state, it's ranked number 77 in the country.

The ranking comes from a national college marketing research firm and is based on student reviews.

It takes into account meal plan costs and student access to healthy, quality food.

It's food that crosses a wide range of cuisines, and the menus have to meet a student body full of dietary preferences.

No other Louisiana college or university made the top 100 list.

The students at Southeastern Louisiana University answered questions about the variety in the meals their schools serves them.

They answered questions about quality and freshness of everything they get to eat.

And they also chimed in about prices.

Southeastern recently expanded its student union to transform the dining experience.

The restaurant there is called Mane Dish. And the menu is always changing.

It offers "all you care to eat" dining, a food court and food from a few big name national chains that everybody loves to go to.
18 2016-04-27
New Orleans

Several St. Tammany natives snare Southeastern Louisiana top awards


Southeastern Louisiana University's College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences honored top graduates at its annual honors convocation April 20. Departmental awards and scholarships were presented to the following:

Abita Springs' Jenna Hildebrand, Outstanding Senior Award in Graphic Design.

Covington's Marley Stuart, Bev Marshall Award in Creative Writing; Kaylin Guillory, Ralph R. Pottle Sr. Honor Scholarship.

Mandeville's Chance Phillips, Outstanding Senior in English – Language and Literature.

Slidell's Fernanda Chagas, Outstanding Senior in Graphic Design.

Also at the convocation, the college honored four faculty members with awards. Recognized were Jason Landrum, Excellence in Teaching; Margaret Gonzalez-Perez, Excellence in Research; David Armand, Excellence in Artistic Activity; and Amber Narro, Excellence in Service. The college honored inductees into the Southeastern chapter of Phi Kappa Phi national honor society and the university's honor society the Thirteen Club.
18 2016-04-26
Hammond

SLU COLLEGE OF EDUCATION HONORS TOP STUDENTS


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University student Kate Induni of DesAllemands was named Outstanding Elementary Student Teacher, and Kasey Wahl of Slidell was named Outstanding Secondary Student Teacher by the College of Education at its honors convocation April 21.
The college also announced the recipients of departmental honors, scholarships, grants and new members of the Phi Kappa Phi, Kappa Delta Pi, and Phi Alpha honor societies and Southeastern’s own Thirteen Club honor society.
The list of students receiving honors and scholarships included:
BOGALUSA – Bethani Robertson, Outstanding Graduate in Early Childhood Education, PK-3.
DENHAM SPRINGS – Quinley Arceneaux, nominee for Outstanding Elementary Education Student Teacher Award; Tara Hymel, Outstanding Graduate in Music Education.
DES ALLMANDS –Kate Induni, Outstanding Elementary Education Student Teacher Award.
LEAGUE CITY, TEXAS –Allison Etzel, Outstanding Graduate in Elementary Education, 1-5 and nominee for Outstanding Elementary Education Student Teacher Award.
LULING – Heather Mills, Outstanding Graduate in Elementary/Special Education.
MANDEVILLE – Katie Chaisson, nominee for Outstanding Elementary Education Student. Teacher Award; and Caroline Pixberg, Outstanding Graduate in Middle School Education, 4-8.
METAIRIE – April Valore, nominee for Outstanding Elementary Education Student Teacher Award.
PONCHATOULA – Alexandra Niel, Outstanding Graduate in English Education.
PRAIRIEVILLE – Samantha Matherne, Outstanding Graduate in Social Studies Education.
SLIDELL – Kasey Wahl, Outstanding Secondary Education Student Teacher Award.

Photos:

SOUTHEASTERN COLLEGE OF EDUCATION HONORS – Samantha Matherne, left, of Prairieville, was recognized at the Southeastern Louisiana University College of Education’s annual honors convocation April 21. Matherne was recognized as the Outstanding Graduate in Social Studies Education. Congratulating her is Interim Dean Shirley Jacob.

SOUTHEASTERN COLLEGE OF EDUCATION HONORS (EAST BATON ROUGE) –Quinley Arcenaux, left, and Tara Hymel, both of Denham Springs, were recognized at the Southeastern Louisiana University College of Education’s annual honors convocation April 21. Arceneaux was recognized as a nominee for Outstanding Elementary Education Student Teacher Award, and Hymel was recognized as Outstanding Graduate in Music Education.

SOUTHEASTERN COLLEGE OF EDUCATION HONORS (ST. TAMMANY) – Kasey Wahl, left, of Slidell was named the Outstanding Secondary Student Teacher at the Southeastern Louisiana University College of Education’s annual honors convocation April 21. With her is Interim Dean Shirley Jacob.

SOUTHEASTERN COLLEGE OF EDUCATION HONORS (ST. TAMMANY) – Caroline Pixberg, left, of Mandeville, was recognized at the Southeastern Louisiana University College of Education’s annual honors convocation April 21. Pixberg received the Outstanding Graduate in Middle School Education Award. Congratulating her is Interim Dean Shirley Jacob.
18 2016-04-26
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN STUDENTS HONORED AT BUSINESS CONVOCATION


HAMMOND – Several students at Southeastern Louisiana University were honored Thursday (April 21) at the annual academic convocation sponsored by the College of Business.
Interim Dean Antoinette Phillips also recognized those students inducted into Beta Gamma Sigma honor society and Southeastern’s own honor society, the Thirteen Club.
Students recognized with awards included:
Livingston Parish: Casey Shelton of Walker, Distinguished Graduate in Marketing.
St. Tammany Parish: Kaliff Daire of Lacombe, Distinguished Graduate in Accounting; Eduardo Ricks of Lacombe, Distinguished Graduate in Business Administration.
Tangipahoa Parish: Andrea Villarreal, resident of Hammond and native of Mexico, Distinguished Graduate in Finance; Gabriela Pacheco Molina, resident of Hammond and native of El Salvador, Distinguished Graduate in Supply Chain Management.
Washington Parish: Amanda Kellar of Bogalusa, Outstanding Academic Award in Economics.

Photos:
SOUTHEASTERN COLLEGE OF BUSINESS HONORS LIVINGSTON STUDENT – Casey Shelton of Denham Springs, right, was recognized with the Distinguised Graduate in Marketing Award at Southeastern Louisiana University’s College of Business Honors Convocation. Pictured with her is Interim Dean Antoinette Phillips.

SOUTHEASTERN COLLEGE OF BUSINESS HONORS ST. TAMMANY STUDENTS –
Eduardo Ricks, left, and Kaliff Daire, both of Lacombe, were recognized with awards at Southeastern Louisiana University’s College of Business Honors Convocation. Ricks received the Distinguished Graduate in Business Administration, while Daire was honored with the Distinguished Graduate in Accounting Award. With them is Interim Dean Antoinette Phillips.

SOUTHEASTERN COLLEGE OF BUSINESS HONORS TANGIPAHOA STUDENTS –Hammond resident Gabriela Pacheco Molina, right, a native of El Salvador, was recognized as the Distinguished Graduate in Supply Chain Management at Southeastern Louisiana University’s College of Business Honors Convocation. With her is Interim Dean Antoinette Phillips. Not shown is Andrea Villarreal of Hammond, a native of Mexico.

SOUTHEASTERN COLLEGE OF BUSINESS HONORS WASHINGTON PARISH STUDENT – Amanda Kellar of Bogalusa, right, was honored with the Outstanding Academic Award in Economics at Southeastern Louisiana University’s College of Business Honors Convocation. With her is Interim Dean Antoinette Phillips.
18 2016-04-26
Hammond

Survey on professors’ pay released


American Association of University Professors has released an annual faculty compensation survey showing the average salaries for male and female instructors, assistant professors and associate professors.
Institutions voluntarily give data about compensation, and this survey has information from 1,023 institutions from all 50 states and Puerto Rico, including Southeastern Louisiana University. More than 385,000 faculty members are included in the survey.

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The report was released April 11, showing, on average, full professors at Southeastern make $77,500, associate professors make $66,200, assistant professors make $58,600 and instructors make $44,400.
The survey also breaks it down by gender to show pay equity in each category. On average, women make more than men as instructors at Southeastern, but men out-earn women in all other faculty categories.
Male full professors at SLU make on average $78,700, compared to female professors who make $74,500. For associate professors, men earn $69,200 while women make $63,000. Assistant professors who are male make on average $61,600 while females in the same category make $57,200. For instructors, women out earn men, making on average $44,900 while male instructors make $43,400.
The survey calculates the “salary equity” ratio of each rank by taking the average female salary and dividing it by the average male salary, then multiplying it by 100. A ratio of 100 shows parity while more than 100 shows the average male salary is below the average salary for women. A ratio that is less than 100 shows the average male salary is higher.
The ratio for instructors is 103.5, while full professors have a ratio of 94.6, associate professors have a ratio of 90.9 and assistant professors have a ratio of 92.9.
The survey also shows the compensation for faculty that includes an institution’s contribution to benefits as well as salary. Average compensations at Southeastern are $62,900 for instructors, $81,300 for assistant professors, $92,000 for associate professors and $106,700 for full professors.
The survey for Southeastern had a 100 count for full professors, 106 count for associate professors, 47 count for assistant professors and 227 count for instructors.
18 2016-04-26
Hammond

Upward Bound students solve science questions


Teens spent hours pondering scientific questions and then presented the fruits of their research at the Upward Bound STEM Fair Saturday to get a leg up in science, technology, engineering and math fields.
The young researchers came from Tangipahoa, St. Helena, Washington and Jefferson parishes to Southeastern Louisiana University’s biology classroom where they unfolded their science posters on tables for fellow students and judges to study.
Guest observers were former mayor Mayson Foster; Ron Abel, director of the Upward Bound Program; and Emily Maska, who is active in the homeschooling program Classical Conversations.
This is the first year in the program for Dalila Granados, a Hammond High Magnet School student who says it has been a great experience.
“It really helps me do things I never thought I do,” she said.
Upward Bound is for high schoolers who will be the first in their family to get a postsecondary education or who come from a low-income household. They attend classes on English, math and other subjects at Southeastern on Saturdays and during the summer so they will be ready to flourish in college.
Granados said classes have given her a better understanding of what she is learning in school. She is able to recap complicated algebra material and has learned how to use powerful words when writing.
Her favorite class is the project-based science fair class that has taught her to not fear public speaking and that science can be entertaining.
“It’s actually a really fun class,” she said.
For her project, she explored whether all liquids evaporate at the same rate. She looked at salt water, orange juice, rubbing alcohol and cola and found rubbing alcohol evaporated the fastest because of its molecular structure.
Granados plans to attend LSU and study to be a pediatrician. She will be the first in her immediate family to attend college after high school.
“It makes me feel really proud of myself,” she said.
Getting to attend a postsecondary school was not a realistic option for her mother nor her father because of time and money constraints, she said.
While Upward Bound has been around since the 1980s, this is just the second year for its science fair class, Abel said.
Wendy Stevens, assistant director for the program, said the project-based learning class not only teaches students about scientific researching but has also given them more opportunities to pursue STEM.
Student Lily Tanner presented her project at a Southeastern showcase and, as a result, a professor invited her to work in his lab. Another student, Amber Lazier, got to present her work to the American Chemical Society, Abel said.
“They did it all, and we just provide the space and support,” Stevens said.
Each science fair class will have a first-, second- and third-place winner, along with an overall winner from Saturday’s science fair who will be announced a later date. Another science fair through the program will take place for the summer session, she said.
18 2016-04-25
Baton Rouge

SLU groups, Northshore Choral Society set concert


The Southeastern Louisiana University Chorus, Concert Choir and Women’s Chorale will join the Northshore Choral Society for “Lord Nelson Mass” for a performance at 7:30 p.m. May 3 in the Columbia Theatre the Performing Arts, 220 E. Thomas St., Hammond.

The concert is sponsored by the Department of Fine and Performing Arts. The conductors will include Brian Martinez, Southeastern director of the University Chorus/Northshore Chorale, and Alissa Mercurio Rowe, director of choral activities.

Tickets are $10; $5 for SLU faculty and staff, and free for students with ID. Tickets are available at the Columbia Theatre box office or by calling (985) 543-4371.

ontact the Department of Fine and Performing Arts at (985) 549-2184.
18 2016-04-25
Baton Rouge

World-renowned violinist Ilya kaler to perform at SLU


The Southeastern Louisiana University Chamber Orchestra’s Spring Concert on Monday, April 25, will feature world-renowned violinist Ilya Kaler, a three-time gold medal winner at international competitions.

The concert will start at 7:30 p.m. in the Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts, 220 E. Thomas St., Hammond. General admission tickets are $12; $8 for faculty, staff and seniors; Southeastern students with their student ID and youngsters 12 and younger are admitted free.

Kaler has won gold medals at three of the world’s prestigious violin competitions: the Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow, Sibelius Competition in Helsinki, and the Paganini Competition in Genoa. She is currently professor of violin at the DePaul University School of Music in Chicago.

For tickets, call (985) 543-4371 or visit columbiatheatre.org. For more information, call (985) 549-2184.
18 2016-04-22
Hammond

Event piques interest in science behind cars


More than 250 children got to build mini cars, race those cars and learn the science behind automobiles during the “Racing Towards the Future: STEM” event Saturday at Southeastern Louisiana University’s Pennington Center.
TESLA provided an S Series vehicle, which was driven all the way from Georgia, and Jim Helm, private aviator for the New Orleans Saints, brought over a Bat Mobile that children could touch and take photos with, according to Dr. Dwan Mabry, ACOG.
Dr. Mabry is president of Hammond-Northshore Chapter of Jack and Jill of America and chair of South Louisiana Center of Excellence.
TESLA and the South Louisiana Jack and Jill of America Center of Excellence partnered with Southeastern Louisiana University Training with Primary Sources program, Northshore Technical College’s nursing and automotive departments, 100 Black Men of Metro New Orleans, United Way, Nu Delta Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Hammond Youth Education Alliance and STEM NOLA to put on the educational activities for ages 2 to 19 and parent workshops.
The children wrote “Speedy Recovery” letters to patients at the North Oaks Medical Center and those letters were later handed out to the pediatric, Ob/Gyn and Medicine units, Dr. Mabry said.
“Through the letter writing, children learned that they can make a positive impact in their communities,” she said.
With April being “National Distracted Driver” Awareness Month, the teens discussed the dangers of texting and driving.
Parents attended workshops on The Future of Education in Louisiana, health education and more.
Speakers included Theresa Hamilton, chief academic officer for the Tangipahoa Parish School System; Dr. Jordan Ahrend, of Southeastern’s Training with Primary Sources program; Timolyn Simms of Open NOLA; Nate Amoth, engineer for TESLA; Jack and Jill Regional Director Consuela Guillory Adams; and Helm.
Local winners in the research and speech competitions, Chandler Mabry Hill, Samuel Echols, Taylor Flagg and Dakota Shelvin, received awards.
“It is so important that we continue to provide events that will engage and excite children about Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math,” Dr. Mabry said. “Indeed, the quality of our future and the future of our children’s children depends largely on efforts to find safer methods of transportation, means of protecting our OZONE layer and our natural resources.”
Money for the annual event was raised by organizers by selling deep-fried Orios at the Strawberry Festival in Ponchatoula. Dr. Mabry said Jack and Jill of America organizes a big event for members every year, rotating in different locations.
18 2016-04-21
Baton Rouge

SLU anthropologist to discuss Tanzania


Kellen Gilbert, an associate professor of anthropology at Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond, will deliver a lecture about what it means to be human at 2 p.m. Wednesday in Room 2207 of the student union. It is free and open to the public.

Gilbert spent the past academic year on leave in Tanzania. Her lecture will draw upon her research and experience in Africa, considered the cradle of mankind, according to a news release.

The lecture will discuss life on the southern slope of Mount Kilimanjaro; wildlife; cultures such as the Massai; and places such as Olduvai Gorge in Tanzania, considered one of the most important anthropological sites in the world, the release said.
18 2016-04-20
Hammond

Urban farmer shares tips


Under the ample shade of Friendship Oak at Southeastern Louisiana University, a handful of students got some pointers on sustainable farming Monday from urban farmer Jamal Elhayek.
Elhayek, founder of Supporting Urban Agriculture, discussed strategies for dealing with pests in an environmentally safe way. The talk was part of a series of events the university is holding to mark Earth Day, which is Friday.
He started the organization in 2012 after seeing food deserts in the lower Ninth Ward neighborhood of New Orleans. The term “food desert” was coined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for areas where residents are far from fresh food options.
“We are in a food desert for sure,” he told five Southeastern students who are interested in sustainable agriculture. Residents in the area have few stores where they can buy groceries and those stores mostly have processed foods, he said.
Now, Whipple Urban Farm and Charbonnet Project are SUA farms located in the Ninth Ward. Their goal is to increase access to fresh food through sustainable agriculture and business practices. Elhayek is the lead farmer, and the team also includes a farm hand and a carpenter.
Mostly, the farms grow various greens and brassica, a group that includes cabbage, cauliflower, kale and brussel sprouts among others. They also grow herbs, okra and various peppers and recently added a fig tree.
His approach to ants and other pests used to be more hands-on, Elhayek said, but over the years he has learned to interfere in nature as little as possible. “I finally just let it go,” he said.
If a person were to use a product to get rid of insects, he recommended using spinosad, an insecticide that is considered organic in some states, or diatomaceous earth, which is a powdery substance made of finely crushed sea shells that can kill insects. Neither does well in the rain, he warned.
He employs “bait cropping,” which lures ants and other pests to a specific crop, such as sunflowers, to protect his production. He has also bought ladybugs, which love to eat aphids.
When he first became interested in “food justice,” he had no experience of farming but wanted to help solve the inequities of food access by bringing fresh produce to poor communities, Elhayek said. He got to work organizing SUA and now oversees the two farm sites that sell directly to consumers through community-supported agriculture relationships. In exchange for supporting a farm, a consumer gets a box of produce.
The farm may not solve the social problem by itself, he said, “but it might help out the neighbors,” and that makes a difference.
Students talked to him about Southeastern’s one-year-old community garden at the university’s Sustainability Center. Several campus organizations started that garden in the past school year to provide a place to grow fresh produce for students.
He encouraged patience as it takes a while for farms to begin really producing.
18 2016-04-19
Hammond

SLU continuing hiring, spending freezes for now


In response to reports that higher education institutions could be cut by $46 million, President John Crain said Southeastern Louisiana University will continue its hiring and spending freezes, as well as hold off on salary raises.
The updated budget proposal Gov. John Bel Edwards presented to lawmakers Tuesday reflects revenue raising measures from the special session held earlier this year. However, the state is still facing a shortfall of $750 million for next fiscal year.


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Based on past cuts, Crain said Southeastern’s share of the $46 million will likely be about $1.7 million, which is about what the university was told to expect. The university will continue its plan to absorb that potential loss in funding by holding off on filling vacant positions and spending on certain expenses, as well as holding off on salary raises.
He said while any cut is bad, the $46 million is significantly less than what was originally expected. However, the shortfall of $180 million for the state scholarship program TOPS is causing concern for many in higher education, he said.
The program only has about $110 million in the proposed budget before lawmakers when it needs almost $300 million to be fully funded next year, he said.
In a mass email to staff, he said the university has the third largest number of TOPS recipients. About 4,200 students or one third of undergraduates depend on the scholarship program, he said.
Colleges and universities have rarely seen TOPS being short on funding, but the Louisiana Office of Student Financial Assistance does have a procedure where scholarships for students with the highest qualifications and need for help are prioritized first, he said.
Among the bills in the legislative session dealing with TOPS is one that would change allocation when the program is not fully funded so that students would get scholarships on a pro-rata basis.
18 2016-04-18
Baton Rouge

Southeastern Theatre to present ‘Oedipus’


The classic ancient Greek play “Oedipus,” as adapted by Irish writer Frank McGuinness, will be presented at 7:30 p.m. April 19-22 at Southeastern Louisiana University’s Vonnie Borden Theatre in Hammond.

The play, written by the Greek playwright Sophocles about 430 B.C., is being presented by Southeastern Theatre. General admission tickets are $10; $5 for seniors and non-Southeastern students; and free for Southeastern students with university ID.

Tickets are available 30 minutes prior to show time in the Vonnie Borden Theatre Box Office, located in the main lobby of D. Vickers Hall.

For information, call (985) 549-2184.

18 2016-04-18
New Orleans

Ribbons cut on new Southeastern Louisiana University Student Union


With an over-sized pair of scissors in hand, Southeastern Louisiana University President John L. Crain cut a wide ribbon to mark the official opening of the university's newly renovated and expanded War Memorial Student Union. Students, university officials, alumni and guests gathered in the union's mall area for the ribbon-cutting, the primary event associated with the week-long celebration.

"This is a great day for Southeastern," Crain said.

He described the facility as transformative for the campus.

"I have been through a fair number of building projects on campus during my 15 years in administration, and I can honestly say this is the first project that has completely exceeded my expectations," he said. "This facility is a tremendous asset for our university, our students and our community."

Crain recognized the partners who helped make the facility possible, including the Student Government Association for their efforts in 2006 in initiating a self-assessed fee to fund the venture; former Southeastern President Randy Moffett and members of the administration; food service provider Aramark; Follett Bookstore; architects Holly and Smith of Hammond for their design; and Lincoln Builders of Ruston, general contractors for the facility.

The Student Union was originally built at its current location in 1965 and underwent considerable renovation and expansion in 1983. Work on the current project began in 2012 as part of a $32 million three-phase, student-funded initiative.The project saw approximately 90,000 square feet of existing space renovated and the addition of 90,000 square feet of new construction.

"No longer is the Student Union a pass through from class, but it has become the place to meet, hang out and eat," SGA President Alexis Quackenbush said. "All of our student services, such as the health and counseling services, bookstore, and others are now located in one place. And our food service was recently named the best of any college in Louisiana and among the top 100 in the nation."

Former SGA President Aron Walker, now business operations manager for KIPP Schools in New Orleans, was one of the primary movers to start the funding of the project in 2006.

"It was a process that required educating our students," he said. "Our former students noted that it was their responsibility to initiate this challenge, even though most would never see the end results. We met with the Greeks and other student groups and organized a 'get out the vote' campaign to pass the proposal. It's gratifying to see the end result in this beautiful facility."

In addition to the student services, the union includes the Lion's Den Food Court, which offers a variety of fast food options; the Mane Dish, dining facility offering freshly cooked and prepared foods; a large ballroom that can be sized to accommodate a variety of functions; and offices for the vice president for student affairs, Student Government Association, Career Services, Lions Roar newspaper, and other operations.

Submitted by Tonya Lowentritt.
18 2016-04-15
Hammond

SLU HOSTS US ARMY WAR COLLEGE EISENHOWER PROGRAM APRIL 18-19


HAMMOND – The United States Army War College Eisenhower Series Program, an annual program that examines current national security and military issues, returns to Southeastern Louisiana University on Monday and Tuesday, April 18 and 19.
A team of experts from the U.S. Army and Air Force will hold a series of panel discussions on a wide range of national and international military topics, including strategic challenges confronting America in the second decade of the 21st century. All presentations are free and open to the public. The program is sponsored by the Department of History and Political Science.
The opening panel discussion and reception will be held at 6 p.m. Monday (April 18) in the conference center of the Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts. A second panel discussion will be held at 10 a.m. on Tuesday (April 19) at the Southeastern Student Union Theatre.
“The panel members are able to address current government policies, although they are not necessarily bound to champion those policies,” said William Robison, head of the Department of History and Political Science. “They are encouraged and expected to share their personal views based on their own experiences, research and reflection.”
Participants in the panels are Lt. Col. Tom Asbery of the Army Corps of Engineers, most recently serving as deputy division commander of the Pacific Ocean Division and Commander of the Honolulu District at Fort Shafter, Hawaii; Col. Lance D. Clark of the U.S. Air Force, a member of the faculty of the U.S. Army War College with a specialty in installation engineering and emergency services support; Col. Nicholas F. Lancaster, who most recently was staff judge advocate for the U.S. Army Special Operation Command at Fort Bragg, N.C.; and Lt. Col. Antonio M. Paz, a specialist in psychological operations who most recently commanded the 5th Battalion, 1st Special Warfare Training Group at Fort Bragg, N.D.
“We are very pleased to have this program on campus once again. The last several visits have been extremely informative, and we look forward to another opportunity for Southeastern faculty, staff and students, as well as members of the surrounding community, to learn more about American military policy from the experts,” said Robison. “The service personnel who represent the U.S. Army War College are always extremely engaging and very knowledgeable.”
Robison expressed his gratitude to Southeastern alumnus Judge Jimmy Kuhn, retired justice with the Louisiana First Circuit Court of Appeal, for helping make the event possible.
The U.S. Army War College, located in Carlisle Barracks, Pa., represents the highest level of education offered by the military services. It is designed to equip carefully selected senior officers and civilians with the competencies required of strategic leaders of the United States Armed Forces. The original Army War College was established Nov. 27, 1901.
Each year a few students and faculty at the U.S. Army War College participate in the Eisenhower Series College Program (ESCP) and travel outside Carlisle Barracks to engage in discussions with other students, academics, and the public about national security issues and the employment of military assets.
The Eisenhower Series College Program (ESCP) is the U.S. Army War College’s communication and outreach program designed to encourage dialogue on national security and other public policy issues between its students and the public. The program focuses its efforts on students and faculty at academic institutions, professional organizations, civic groups, business organizations, and local media.
18 2016-04-15
Hammond

MANDA’S YARBOROUGH SPEAKS AT APRIL 21 SLU MARKETING BREAKFAST


HAMMOND – Robert Yarborough, chief executive officer of Manda Fine Meats, will serve as the guest speaker at Southeastern Louisiana University’s annual Marketing Breakfast on Thursday, April 21.
Sponsored by the Department of Marketing and Supply Chain Management and the Southeastern Marketing Association, the meeting will be held at 7:30 a.m. in the Student Union Ballroom.
The program is open to students and the general public. Tickets are $8 until 5 p.m. April 20 and increase to $10 for purchases at the door. Tickets can be ordered and prepaid online at
https://connect.southeastern.edu/2016-spring-marketing-breakfast.
A 1976 graduate of Southeastern with a degree in marketing, Yarborough is co-owner of Manda Fine Meats. He also serves as chair of the University Medical Center Management Corp. and is on the LSU Board of Supervisors.
Yarborough has held leadership positions with other associations and businesses, including president of the Louisiana Grocers Manufacturers Representative Association and board chairman of the Louisiana Meat Processors Association, the Southwest Meat Association in College Station, Texas, the Louisiana Livestock Sanitary Board, and Business First Bank.
Yarborough has also held leadership positions with a number of non-profit organizations such as the Family Board of Greater Baton Rouge, the Metro Area YMCA, Greater Baton Rouge Food Bank Capital Campaign, and the Baton Rouge General Hospital Foundation.
For more information on the lecture, contact the Department of Marketing at 985-549-2277.
18 2016-04-13
Baton Rouge

SLU seniors’ artwork on display for exhibit


The spring Senior Exhibition will be on display Thursday through May 14 at Southeastern Louisiana University’s Contemporary Art Gallery.

The gallery will host an opening reception from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Thursday.

The exhibit will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Thursday; from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday; and from 8 a.m. to noon Friday. It is free and open to the public.

SLU seniors completing their bachelor’s degrees in visual art and design will showcase their artwork. Featured pieces will include ceramics, painting, drawing, photography, animation, video art, printmaking, sculpture and graphic design.

For more information, contact the gallery at (985) 549-5080.
18 2016-04-13
Baton Rouge

SLU fraternity chapter honored with top award


Epsilon Phi Chapter of Delta Tau Delta Fraternity at Southeastern Louisiana University has received the Hugh Shields Flag, presented to the top 10 chapters across the United States.

The Shields flag is the highest award the national fraternity can bestow upon a chapter and is based on overall performance and programming in the areas of academics, finances, recruitment, membership education, operations, campus leadership, service and alumni relations, a news release said.

The award marks the 16th time the chapter has been named among the fraternity’s top 10.

The chapter conducted a number of community service projects during 2015, including involvement in charitable causes such as Relay for Life, Adopt-a-School, the Hammond, Louisiana Police Union Ball and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, the fraternity’s national philanthropy, chapter President Justin Archote, of Independence, said.

Campus service included work at the Southeastern Laboratory School, Chefs Evening, Champagne Bingo, Lion Nation Celebration and the Big Event, a day of giving back to the university community.

Members from Baton Rouge include Landon Brown, Matthew Guillot, Grayson Jackson, Josh Porche and Zachary Rogers and Claudio Franc.
18 2016-04-12
Baton Rouge

SLU sets ‘Riding Hood’ auditions


HAMMOND — Auditions for the Missoula Children’s Theatre production of “Red Riding Hood” are set for 3 p.m.-5 p.m. Monday at the Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts, 220 E. Thomas St.

A nonprofit educational theater troupe, Missoula Children’s Theatre has been a hometown arts favorite since 1992, often as part of Fanfare, Southeastern Louisiana University’s October arts festival.

Students wishing to audition must arrive by 3 p.m. and stay for the entire two-hour session. The first rehearsal begins 15-30 minutes after the audition and lasts until 7:30 p.m. Rehearsals will be conducted 3 p.m.-7:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and noon Saturday at the Columbia Theatre.

“Red Riding Hood” will be performed at the Columbia Theatre as part of the Pajamas and Play series in two performances at 2 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. Saturday, April 16. Tickets are $15 for adults and $10 for children and are available by calling (985) 549-4371 or visiting columbiatheatre.org.

“Children in grades kindergarten through high school may audition,” said Roy Blackwood, executive director of Columbia Theatre. “Approximately 50 to 60 local students will be cast to appear in the show with a Missoula tour actor-director. Missoula will cast the young actors on Monday and get started right away teaching them lines, staging, songs and movement. By Saturday, the children will be ready to perform, complete with professionally designed costumes and scenery.”
18 2016-04-12
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN CELEBRATES NEW, IMPROVED STUDENT UNION


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University will celebrate completion of its newly renovated and expanded War Memorial Student Union project with a week’s worth of special offers and activities culminating with an official grand opening ceremony on Thursday, April 14. The campus and community are invited to take part in the festivities and attend the ribbon-cutting that will take place at 12 p.m. between the Student Union and Fayard Hall.
Refreshments and tours will be available immediately following the ceremony. In addition, various offices located throughout the Student Union will host open houses from 1 to 3 p.m.
The completed project is part of a $32 million student-funded initiative that expanded and renovated the existing Student Union. The new additions now house a Lion’s Den food court on the first floor, the Mane Dish dining facility on the second floor, and ballrooms and meeting spaces on the third floor. The renovated facility also houses the Center for Student Excellence, the University Counseling Center, the University Health Center, University Bookstore, Document Source and the offices for the Division of Student Affairs.
“While our students have positively embraced the new Student Union and all its amenities, we want our area residents to also know what we can offer,” said Robin Parker, director of marketing and strategic initiatives for the Office of Auxiliary Services. “The new union is beautifully designed and offers considerable space for conferences, receptions and other events.”
Starting Monday, April 11, a number of special events will be held in conjunction with the grand opening celebration. The University Bookstore will offer a 15 percent discount to anyone wearing green or gold and will also invite guests to register for a gift basket door prize drawing. Students will be treated to various dining promotions with discounts throughout the week. Follett, the organization that operates the bookstore, and Aramark, the university’s food service provider, will hold a drawing for an Apple Watch. And Campus Activities Board will be distributing free popcorn on Thursday prior to the ribbon cutting.
All registrations for drawings must be completed prior to the 12 p.m. ribbon cutting, and winners need not be present.
Two book signings are also scheduled during the week at Southeastern’s bookstore. On Tuesday, April 12, from 1 to 3 p.m., Sim’s Memorial Library Director Eric W. Johnson and Catherine H. Tijerino, head of cataloging, will sign their book “Hammond,” a largely pictorial work that covers the history of Hammond from its founding to 1950. On Thursday, April 14, at 12:30 p.m., Southeastern Director of Public and Governmental Affairs Erin Cowser will sign her children’s book “Lion Up with Roomie.” The first fifty copies of her book will be given away.
For additional information, contact Event and Conference Services at (985) 549-2094.

PHOTO:
STUDENT UNION CELEBRATION - Southeastern Louisiana University will celebrate completion of its newly renovated and expanded War Memorial Student Union project with a week’s worth of special offers and activities culminating with an official grand opening ceremony on Thursday, April 14, at 12 p.m.
18 2016-04-08
Hammond

Southeastern’s Delta Tau Delta chapter earns top award


HAMMOND – Epsilon Phi Chapter of Delta Tau Delta Fraternity at Southeastern Louisiana University is the recipient of the prestigious Hugh Shields Flag, presented to only the top 10 chapters across the United States.
The Shields flag is the highest award the national fraternity can bestow upon a chapter and is based on overall performance and programming in the areas of academics, finances, recruitment, membership education, operations, campus leadership, service and alumni relations.
Other awards won by the chapter included excellence in academics, chapter growth, alumni programming, and programming for life beyond college. The awards were given at the fraternity’s annual Southern Division Conference held recently in Charleston, S.C.
The award marks the 16th time the chapter has been named among the fraternity’s top 10.
The chapter conducted a number of community service projects during 2015, including involvement in several charitable causes such as Relay for Life, Adopt-a-School, the Hammond, LA Police Union Ball, and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, the fraternity’s national philanthropy, said chapter president Justin Archote of Independence. Campus service included work at the Southeastern Laboratory School, Chefs Evening, Champagne Bingo, Lion Nation Celebration and the Big Event, a day of giving back to the university community. The chapter also sponsored programs on professional etiquette and suicide awareness, among other topics.
“We are truly excited about the awards that Epsilon Phi received at Southern Division,” said Archote. “I could not be more proud of everything the chapter does on a daily basis, and it comes down to the character of the men that make up this organization.”
Members of the chapter include the following by city or town:

Ama: John Dolese;
Amite: Seth Leto;
Baton Rouge: Landon Brown, Matthew Guillot, Grayson Jackson, Josh Porche and Zachary Rogers, Claudio Franc;
Bourg: Evan Lapeyrouse;
Central: Antonio Ragusa;
Covington: Dominic Armantrout, John Gremillion, Mark Gremillion, Griffin Hakenjos, Brody McDaniel and Richard O’Connell;
Donaldsonville: Trey Capello, and Matthew Reed;
Franklinton: Geron Persaud;
French Settlement: Zachary Edwards and Cade Martin;
Galliano: Ivy Gonzales;
Gonzales: Brennen Waguespack and Tristyn Wheeler;
Hammond: Christopher Hudspeth, Tanner LeBlanc, Joshua Ormand, and Brody Stevens;
Houma: Beau Moore;
Independence: Justin Archote;
Kenner: Cameron Pigeon;
Kentwood: Brady Watson;
Mandeville: Ryan Fonseca, Kevin McNeill, John Scholvin, and Christian Shreve;
Pearl River: Brent Bourgeois;
Ponchatoula: Storm Coates, Daniel Cuevas, Austin Henderson, Josh Magee, and Braie Peterson;
Prairieville: Ross Michel
Robert: Chris Dill
Slidell: Kristian Burns, Johnny Harris, David Nicoletti, Brendan Sundrud, and Oliver Young Hernandez;
Sun: William Busby;
Walker: Chase Corley.
18 2016-04-07
Hammond

SLU student from Slidell wins broadcasting scholarship


HAMMOND – A Southeastern Louisiana University student was recognized with a top scholarship for her achievements by the Louisiana Association of Broadcasters.
Communication major Miranda Fleig of Slidell, a student production director at KSLU radio, received the LAB scholarship at LAB’s recent Prestige Awards luncheon in Baton Rouge.
The 2016 scholarship marked the third consecutive year that a Southeastern student has received the scholarship.
“This honor to Miranda recognizes the personal and intense efforts she has placed in her work at our university radio station,” said Karen Fontenot, dean of the College Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. “The fact that Southeastern students have won these scholarships for the past three years attests to the quality of teaching, real-world experience and professional preparation they have received at the university.”
A native of Baltimore, Fleig will receive a $4,000 scholarship to be used next year as she completes her studies in communication and prepares for graduate school. With a strong background in science, she hopes to combine that interest with her radio experience and earn a master’s degree in science communication.
Fleig serves as KSLU’s on-air broadcaster with a five-day per week morning show. She hosts the blues show “Dirt Road” and the progressive rock show “Perpetual Change.” As the student production manager, she also puts together promo spots and weekend shows.
“I love that I can talk to the public about things relevant to our community,” she said. “In radio, there is so much work behind the scenes, and I love producing shows and making sure the sound and content meet professional levels. I see this as a career opportunity or at least a valuable skill I can use in the future.”
KSLU-90.9FM, the only public educational radio station on the north shore, was recognized in 2014 as the Best College Radio Station in the South by the Southeast Journalism Conference held annually to evaluate university work in student print and broadcast media.
18 2016-04-07
Hammond

SLU student from Slidell wins broadcasting scholarship


HAMMOND – A Southeastern Louisiana University student was recognized with a top scholarship for her achievements by the Louisiana Association of Broadcasters.
Communication major Miranda Fleig of Slidell, a student production director at KSLU radio, received the LAB scholarship at LAB’s recent Prestige Awards luncheon in Baton Rouge.
The 2016 scholarship marked the third consecutive year that a Southeastern student has received the scholarship.
“This honor to Miranda recognizes the personal and intense efforts she has placed in her work at our university radio station,” said Karen Fontenot, dean of the College Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. “The fact that Southeastern students have won these scholarships for the past three years attests to the quality of teaching, real-world experience and professional preparation they have received at the university.”
A native of Baltimore, Fleig will receive a $4,000 scholarship to be used next year as she completes her studies in communication and prepares for graduate school. With a strong background in science, she hopes to combine that interest with her radio experience and earn a master’s degree in science communication.
Fleig serves as KSLU’s on-air broadcaster with a five-day per week morning show. She hosts the blues show “Dirt Road” and the progressive rock show “Perpetual Change.” As the student production manager, she also puts together promo spots and weekend shows.
“I love that I can talk to the public about things relevant to our community,” she said. “In radio, there is so much work behind the scenes, and I love producing shows and making sure the sound and content meet professional levels. I see this as a career opportunity or at least a valuable skill I can use in the future.”
KSLU-90.9FM, the only public educational radio station on the north shore, was recognized in 2014 as the Best College Radio Station in the South by the Southeast Journalism Conference held annually to evaluate university work in student print and broadcast media.
18 2016-04-07
Hammond

I remember Dr. Clea Parker



Be sure to let Clea Parker in when he comes,” my mom said on the phone because she was running late shopping. “He’s going to repair the clock.”

My parents were antique enthusiasts. I think they respected anything that was not disposable and lasted more than 24 hours.













































































































































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In the early 1970s, my father bought my mother a grandfather clock that was mounted in an oak cabinet. The clock required that the bullet-shaped counter-weights be pulled every 24 hours so that the pendulum could keep the mechanism working. We kids were not supposed to open the cabinet and touch the weights.


But one day, the clock stopped. I decided that I had seen my mother pull the weights a thousand times. It looked easy enough and so I decided to reset the clock. I set the time correctly and pushed the pendulum. But not matter how hard I tried, the clock would not work. I had pulled the chains too far and the weights had become locked into place.


The first time I remember meeting Dr. Parker was that day when he came to undo my breaking of the clock. He was an amiable man who knew what he was doing. He removed the weights and took the clock out of the case. Then he opened his tool box and tinkered here and there.


I was fascinated. The clock repairman was amazing to me. He chatted as he worked and told me more about clocks than I wanted to know. Soon, he had the clock bonging again at the appropriate half-hour and hour marks. I was out of the doghouse.


A few weeks later at the Southeastern Louisiana University Laboratory School auditorium, the president of the university was to address the students. I was amazed to see the clock repairman standing at the lectern with his kind eyes and easy voice speaking to us children.


So, I thought the clock repairman and the university president are one and the same – kind of like Clark Kent by day, Superman by night. This was how I first came to know Dr. Clea Parker.


Dr. Parker first became president about the time that Southeastern earned university status going from Southeastern Louisiana College to Southeastern Louisiana University. He was an amazing change agent for the university in a time of prolific growth in size and stature.


Iconic campus buildings of today owe their existence to the foresight of Dr. Parker who was instrumental in gaining legislative approval for the construction of the University Center, the School of Nursing building in Baton Rouge, the Teacher Education Center/Laboratory School, D Vickers Hall, the Health and P.E. Building, Sims Memorial Library, and the Athletic Building.


Dr. Parker was a fairly frequent visitor to our sporting goods store. I am not sure why. He was not, to my knowledge, a hunter or fisherman. Yet he understood the local pulse, and I suspect he made his rounds at the local establishments to meet the community people. He and my dad would talk and laugh together, usually about Lions sports. He was always such a gentleman.


Dr. Parker believed in being involved in all areas of the university. He knew students’ names and families and went out of his way to talk to them.


I remember at a university “Senior Day” when I was in high school, he saw me walking past the administration building. He called, “Mr. Abel” and I walked over to talk to him. He welcomed me to the school and told me how much he admired my parents. He admonished me to attend Southeastern after high school and said I could come see him if I had any problems. This “open door” policy had him regularly visiting with students in the dining halls, classroom buildings, and throughout the campus grounds.


Sadly, by the time I graduated, Dr. Parker had retired from his position as president.


But his influence on me and my family remained.


Ultimately, all four Abel children achieved either bachelors or graduate degrees at Southeastern.


Now as a 25-year university employee, I am the recipient of Dr. Parker’s legacy.


I think of him on many occasions. He administered the university and made great strides almost singlehandedly, with little in the way of the structure that now exists to help an overburdened president.


The last time I personally spoke to Dr. Parker was after my mother’s death. I had inherited the old grandfather clock, and it was not working.


I called our old family friend, and he came quickly.


The clock was cleaned and adjusted.


He admired our old house on Church Street and told me stories about former occupants of it that he knew. Before he left, he gave me instructions on how to keep the old clock running for many years.


It still keeps great time to this day, and I think of him when it strikes its deep chimes.


His expertise in clockworks is a type of his success as a university president. He understood all the various parts of Southeastern, how they fit together, and how to keep them moving. The clock repairman was a true educator who kept the gears and cogs of our beloved University in tip top order and he left it in shape to tick-tock for many years.


* * *

18 2016-04-06
Hammond

SLU’s Sims Library celebrates 50th anniversary Wednesday


HAMMOND –Southeastern Louisiana University’s Sims Memorial Library will celebrate its 50th anniversary as a Federal Depository Library at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, April 6. The celebration will take place in the Library’s first floor lobby. Door prizes will be given and light refreshments will be served.
In January of 1966, Congressman James H. Morrison sponsored the library’s designation as a Federal Depository. Since then, the library has received and made available selected publications from all three branches of the Federal government. These publications are accessible by the general public, and the full text of many recent titles can be seen online via links in the library’s catalog.
The April 6 celebration will focus on the beginning of each decade of the library’s tenure in the Federal Depository Library Program (FDLP): 1966, 1976, 1986, 1996, 2006, and 2016. Well-known local historian C. Howard Nichols will speak about historic events during those years, and Southeastern Communication Professor Joe Burns will provide an overview of the popular music from each year.
A display of books and government documents highlighting events from those years will be available for viewing throughout April, as will the commemorative plaque awarded to the library by the U.S. Government Publishing Office in recognition of this milestone anniversary.
18 2016-04-06
Hammond

Southeastern author Armand reads from new memoir today


HAMMOND – David Armand, an award-winning novelist and Southeastern Louisiana University English instructor, will do a reading from his new memoir, My Mother’s House, at the university’s Writing Center on Tuesday, April 5, at 2 p.m.
The Writing Center is located in room 210 of D Vickers Hall. The reading is free and open to the public.
Set in the South of his youth, My Mother’s House recounts Armand’s early memories of being born to a schizophrenic mother, then given up for adoption, only to be raised in a home with an alcoholic and abusive step-father. In the autobiographical work, he attempts to paint his seemingly negative experiences with a sympathetic and understanding brush.
“A gut-wrenching personal narrative of family love and loss, My Mother’s House is the compelling story of Armand’s relationship with his mother and also a penetrating critique of the American mental health system,” said Sheryl St. Germain, author of Navigating Disaster. “I recommend it to anyone interested in learning what it’s like to lose someone you love to mental illness.”
The book is available through Amazon and other booksellers.
Armand is the author of the award-winning novel The Pugilist’s Wife, and has written two other novels, The Gorge and Harlow.
18 2016-04-06
Hammond

University invites all to celebrate new union


Southeastern Louisiana University will celebrate completion of its newly renovated and expanded War Memorial Student Union project with a week’s worth of special offers and activities culminating with an official grand opening ceremony April 14.
The campus and community are invited to take part in the festivities and attend the ribbon-cutting that will take place at noon between the Student Union and Fayard Hall.


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Refreshments and tours will be available immediately after the ceremony. Various offices in the Student Union will host open houses at 1-3 p.m.
The completed project is part of a $32 million student-funded initiative that expanded and renovated the existing Student Union. The new additions now house a Lion’s Den food court on the first floor, the Mane Dish dining facility on the second floor, and ballrooms and meeting spaces on the third floor.
The renovated facility also houses the Center for Student Excellence, the University Counseling Center, the University Health Center, University Bookstore, Document Source and the offices for the Division of Student Affairs.
“While our students have positively embraced the new Student Union and all its amenities, we want our area residents to also know what we can offer,” said Robin Parker, director of marketing and strategic initiatives for the Office of Auxiliary Services. “The new union is beautifully designed and offers considerable space for conferences, receptions and other events.”
Starting April 11, the University Bookstore will offer a 15 percent discount to anyone wearing green or gold and will invite guests to register for a gift basket door prize drawing. Students will be treated to dining promotions with discounts throughout the week. Follett, the organization that operates the bookstore, and Aramark, the university’s food service provider, will hold a drawing for an Apple Watch.
All registrations for drawings must be completed before the ribbon cutting at noon April 14, and winners need not be present.
At the bookstore April 12 from 1 to 3 p.m., Sims’ Memorial Library Director Eric W. Johnson and Catherine H. Tijerino, head of cataloging, will sign their book “Hammond,” a largely pictorial work that covers the history of Hammond from its founding to 1950.
At the bookstore April 14 at 12:30 p.m., Erin Cowser will autograph copies of her children’s book, “Lion Up with Roomie.” The first 50 copies of her book will be given away. Cowser is director of public and governmental affairs.
18 2016-04-06
Hammond

SLU STUDENT FROM SLIDELL WINS BROADCASTING SCHOLARSHIP


HAMMOND – A Southeastern Louisiana University student was recognized with a top scholarship for her achievements by the Louisiana Association of Broadcasters.
Communication major Miranda Fleig of Slidell, a student production director at KSLU radio, received the LAB scholarship at LAB’s recent Prestige Awards luncheon in Baton Rouge.
The 2016 scholarship marked the third consecutive year that a Southeastern student has received the scholarship.
“This honor to Miranda recognizes the personal and intense efforts she has placed in her work at our university radio station,” said Karen Fontenot, dean of the College Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. “The fact that Southeastern students have won these scholarships for the past three years attests to the quality of teaching, real-world experience and professional preparation they have received at the university.”
A native of Baltimore, Fleig will receive a $4,000 scholarship to be used next year as she completes her studies in communication and prepares for graduate school. With a strong background in science, she hopes to combine that interest with her radio experience and earn a master’s degree in science communication.
Fleig serves as KSLU’s on-air broadcaster with a five-day per week morning show. She hosts the blues show “Dirt Road” and the progressive rock show “Perpetual Change.” As the student production manager, she also puts together promo spots and weekend shows.
“I love that I can talk to the public about things relevant to our community,” she said. “In radio, there is so much work behind the scenes, and I love producing shows and making sure the sound and content meet professional levels. I see this as a career opportunity or at least a valuable skill I can use in the future.”
KSLU-90.9FM, the only public educational radio station on the north shore, was recognized in 2014 as the Best College Radio Station in the South by the Southeast Journalism Conference held annually to evaluate university work in student print and broadcast media.
18 2016-04-06
Hammond

I remember Dr. Clea Parker


“Be sure to let Clea Parker in when he comes,” my mom said on the phone because she was running late shopping. “He’s going to repair the clock.”

My parents were antique enthusiasts. I think they respected anything that was not disposable and lasted more than 24 hours.

In the early 1970s, my father bought my mother a grandfather clock that was mounted in an oak cabinet. The clock required that the bullet-shaped counter-weights be pulled every 24 hours so that the pendulum could keep the mechanism working. We kids were not supposed to open the cabinet and touch the weights.
But one day, the clock stopped. I decided that I had seen my mother pull the weights a thousand times. It looked easy enough and so I decided to reset the clock. I set the time correctly and pushed the pendulum. But not matter how hard I tried, the clock would not work. I had pulled the chains too far and the weights had become locked into place.
The first time I remember meeting Dr. Parker was that day when he came to undo my breaking of the clock. He was an amiable man who knew what he was doing. He removed the weights and took the clock out of the case. Then he opened his tool box and tinkered here and there.
I was fascinated. The clock repairman was amazing to me. He chatted as he worked and told me more about clocks than I wanted to know. Soon, he had the clock bonging again at the appropriate half-hour and hour marks. I was out of the doghouse.
A few weeks later at the Southeastern Louisiana University Laboratory School auditorium, the president of the university was to address the students. I was amazed to see the clock repairman standing at the lectern with his kind eyes and easy voice speaking to us children.
So, I thought the clock repairman and the university president are one and the same – kind of like Clark Kent by day, Superman by night. This was how I first came to know Dr. Clea Parker.
Dr. Parker first became president about the time that Southeastern earned university status going from Southeastern Louisiana College to Southeastern Louisiana University. He was an amazing change agent for the university in a time of prolific growth in size and stature.
Iconic campus buildings of today owe their existence to the foresight of Dr. Parker who was instrumental in gaining legislative approval for the construction of the University Center, the School of Nursing building in Baton Rouge, the Teacher Education Center/Laboratory School, D Vickers Hall, the Health and P.E. Building, Sims Memorial Library, and the Athletic Building.
Dr. Parker was a fairly frequent visitor to our sporting goods store. I am not sure why. He was not, to my knowledge, a hunter or fisherman. Yet he understood the local pulse, and I suspect he made his rounds at the local establishments to meet the community people. He and my dad would talk and laugh together, usually about Lions sports. He was always such a gentleman.
Dr. Parker believed in being involved in all areas of the university. He knew students’ names and families and went out of his way to talk to them.
I remember at a university “Senior Day” when I was in high school, he saw me walking past the administration building. He called, “Mr. Abel” and I walked over to talk to him. He welcomed me to the school and told me how much he admired my parents. He admonished me to attend Southeastern after high school and said I could come see him if I had any problems. This “open door” policy had him regularly visiting with students in the dining halls, classroom buildings, and throughout the campus grounds.
Sadly, by the time I graduated, Dr. Parker had retired from his position as president.
But his influence on me and my family remained.
Ultimately, all four Abel children achieved either bachelors or graduate degrees at Southeastern.
Now as a 25-year university employee, I am the recipient of Dr. Parker’s legacy.
I think of him on many occasions. He administered the university and made great strides almost singlehandedly, with little in the way of the structure that now exists to help an overburdened president.
The last time I personally spoke to Dr. Parker was after my mother’s death. I had inherited the old grandfather clock, and it was not working.
I called our old family friend, and he came quickly.
The clock was cleaned and adjusted.
He admired our old house on Church Street and told me stories about former occupants of it that he knew. Before he left, he gave me instructions on how to keep the old clock running for many years.
It still keeps great time to this day, and I think of him when it strikes its deep chimes.
His expertise in clockworks is a type of his success as a university president. He understood all the various parts of Southeastern, how they fit together, and how to keep them moving. The clock repairman was a true educator who kept the gears and cogs of our beloved University in tip top order and he left it in shape to tick-tock for many years.
* * *
Ron Abel is a lifelong Hammond resident.
18 2016-04-04
Associated Press

Southeastern Louisiana University has named Errol Gauff as its new women's basketball coach


HAMMOND, Louisiana — Southeastern Louisiana University has named Errol Gauff as its new women's basketball coach.

Director of Athletics Jay Artigues announced Gauff as head of the program on Saturday. In a news release, Artigues says Gauff's hire is pending approval by the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors.

Artigues says they were looking for someone who could provide long-term stability to the program and serve as a positive role model for their student athletes.

Gauff has spent the previous two seasons as an assistant coach on the Southeastern men's basketball staff under head coach Jay Ladner.

He replaces Yolanda Moore, a two-time WNBA champion with the Houston Comets, who served two seasons as coach of the Lady Lions compiling an 11-47 record.
18 2016-04-04
Baton Rouge

California trombonist brings unique sounds to SLU


Contemporary music trombonist Weston Olencki will perform at 7:30 p.m. Thursday in Pottle Auditorium on the Southeastern Louisiana University campus in Hammond.

The event, presented by SLU’s Department of Fine and Performing Arts, is free.

Olencki is a San Francisco-based trombonist and multi-instrumentalist.

For more information, call Schuessler at (985) 549-2184.

Olencki is a member of Fonema Consort and has performed with Ensemble Dal Niente, wasteLAnd, wildUP!, the San Francisco Contemporary Music Players and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s MusicNOW.

“Weston’s performances boldly push forward notions of what the trombone is capable of in creating sound worlds of impeccable and refined energy and beauty,” said Philip Schuessler, instructor of music theory and composition at Southeastern.

He said the program will include bold contemporary music by some of today’s most forward-looking composers, such as Katherine Young, Kurt Isaacson, Aaron Cassidy and Evan Johnson. One of Schuessler’s pieces, “Pendula,” will be performed during the concert, as well.

The concert will also feature a preconcert discussion about the music and a post-concert question-and-answer session with the audience.

For more information, call Schuessler at (985) 549-2184.
18 2016-03-31
Baton Rouge

SLU announces schedule for summer music program


The Southeastern Louisiana University Community Music School has announced its Southeastern Music Celebration 2016 schedule, a series of summer programs for young musicians.

Summer Music Celebration 2016 includes a middle school band camp, guitar workshop, chamber music workshop, as well as a brand-new beginners’ string orchestra workshop, said Community Music School Director Jivka Duke.

“We are very excited about the upcoming summer programs. The musical growth we have seen in the students who attend regularly has been truly rewarding, and we are thrilled that more and more students attend every year,” Duke said.

Musicians in grades five through eight have until May 1 to register for the middle school band camp, which is scheduled June 20-24, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., with a concert at 7 p.m. on June 24 at the Pottle Music Building. Tuition is $225, which includes lunch each day, as well as dinner on June 24. Registration is open until the first day of camp; however, a $20 late fee will apply to registrations postmarked after May 1.

Southeastern’s Associate Band Director Paul Frechou will coordinate the middle school band camp. Along with the concert band, the camp will also offer private lessons and master classes, jazz combos, lessons in improvisation and theory classes.

The chamber music and guitar workshops are scheduled from 9 a.m. to noon for June 27 to July 1. Tuition is $170, which includes lunch on July 1. Registration is open until the first day of the workshops, however a $20 late fee will apply to registrations postmarked after May 20.

Students participating in the guitar workshop will learn how to approach and arrange music that is typically presented by experienced musicians. This workshop is open to guitar students age 10 and older with at least one year of previous guitar experience. Enrollment limit is 20. Pat Kerber, Southeastern’s guitar instructor, will teach this workshop.

The chamber music workshop is open to violin, viola, cello and piano students of any age who have at least one year of previous experience. The workshop will focus on chamber music repertoire, including but not limited to duets, piano trios and quartets.

The beginners’ string orchestra workshop will take place from June 27 to June 30. The workshop, suitable for first to third year violin, viola, cello and bass students, will be taught by Duke. Through various fun activities students will improve upon their sight-reading and performance skills, as well as their knowledge of music theory.

Tuition for the beginners’ string orchestra workshop is $125. Students may register until the first day of the workshop; however, a $20 late fee will apply to registrations postmarked after June 1.

The CMS also will offer private instrumental and vocal lessons from June 6 to July 21.

For more information on or to register for any of these programs, visit www.southeastern.edu/smc or call (985) 549-5502.
18 2016-03-31
Baton Rouge

Gumbo-making becomes interactive experience


New Orleans native Taylor Dupré, a 2014 graduate of Zachary High School, can add published author to her résumé.

The 19-year-old Southeastern Louisiana University education major visited Sarah Charbonnet’s second-grade class at Rollins Place Elementary on March 23 to read her book “Gumbo on the Bayou.”

Written by Dupré at age 16 while taking the college-level Z-Star course, the Cajun tale is about two alligators named Boudreaux and Thibodeaux, who live on the bayou in Louisiana.

Boudreaux asks Thibodeaux for some food, and when Thibodeaux refuses, Boudreaux comes up with a clever plan to trick his friend into making a delicious gumbo.

“The assignment required students to take a classic fairy tale and rewrite it as a modern story with an ethnic twist,” Zachary High Z-Star instructor Debby Lowery said.

Z-Star, a class for juniors and seniors who want to become teachers, was the perfect avenue for Dupre, who at age 14 was writing plays and taking drama classes.

Her tale was based on the folk story “Stone Soup” about hungry strangers convincing local townspeople to share their food.

“I didn’t even know how to make gumbo when I wrote it. I had to call my grandfather and ask him what ingredients go into making a pot of gumbo,” Dupré said.

Dupré said she wrote the story in a night and earned an A on the project. Later, at the suggestion of a friend, she sent her story to American Star Books, which agreed to illustrate and publish it as a children’s book.

Since then, Dupré has been invited to read “Gumbo” to children in Zachary and around the state.

“It was suggested that as a fun way to get youth involved, I would bring props with me, ingredients from the book, and have students volunteer adding the ingredients into a gumbo pot as I named them in the story,” said Dupré, who now travels around with a pot, a plastic crawfish, salt, Tony’s seasoning, okra, a bag of flour and a few other gumbo requirements.

“The students seemed to really listen and stay engaged throughout the story,” said Yolanda Williams, director of personnel for Zachary schools.

Dupre is in her second year at Southeastern and works at Global Wildlife Center in Folsom. She enjoys working with children as well as creative writing in her spare time.

Her plans, however, do not include teaching creative writing but math or science instead.

“I do plan to write another children’s book, though,” Dupré said.

Zachary Superintendent Scott Devillier, who was present at the reading, said the school district purchased each of Charbonnet’s students a copy of “Gumbo on the Bayou,” which Dupré autographed for the students.
18 2016-03-31
Hammond

ROAR NETWORK OF SLU SUPPORTERS WARNS OF MORE CUTS


Late last week Southeastern received welcome news. The $70+ million remaining shortfall in the current fiscal year state budget will NOT result in additional reductions to higher education.

Southeastern will still have to absorb $2.1 million to make up for non-payment of the full TOPS spring semester funding owed from the state, however, that amount could have been exceedingly greater. While no budget cut is ever good news, we are certainly pleased that we are not also being asked to also take a larger cut to help make up any of the additional $70 million shortfall.

We are grateful to the Governor and thankful for those in Baton Rouge who worked diligently in order to prevent an even larger budget cut to higher education in the current fiscal year.

Our collective efforts can now shift toward addressing next year's budget shortfall, which is even more daunting. As Legislators work through the ongoing Regular Session and inevitably meet for a second Special Legislative Session afterward, we will keep our ROAR Network members informed and aware. With the need to capture and create new revenue for next fiscal year, your engaged dialogue with Legislators and decision-makers will continue to be invaluable.
18 2016-03-31
New Orleans

Best college grub in Louisiana? SLU takes title


Which Louisiana college serves the best food? Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond is at the top of the menu.

Nicholls State University in Thibodaux ranked second in the state, and Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge was third. Grambling University and Loyola University in New Orleans round out the top five. SLU was the only university in the state to rank among the top 100 nationally, coming in at No. 77.

See state rankings.
Complied by Niche.com, a Pittsburgh company that runs a ranking and review site primarily for universities, the ranking of campus food programs was based on student reviews from more than 1,700 public and private four-year colleges and universities. Among the criteria considered were hours of operation, costs, healthy and organic options, overall quality and variety of offerings.

Connie Davis, director of the office of auxiliary services at SLU, said the student union on the Hammond campus was expanded recently with the goal of transforming the dining experience for students. "After much research, we found that trends in campus dining include a central location that offers both healthy and delicious options with affordable variety for the students and campus community."

The Mane Dish restaurant in the new union has an ever-changing menu that can be customized to the consumer's preferences, Davis said. In addition to Mane Dish, which offers all you care to eat meals made on site, SLU maintains a food court featuring a variety of national vendors, the university said.

See national rankings.
Virgina Tech in Blacksburg is ranked first in the country, followed by Washington University in St. Louis and University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
18 2016-03-30
Hammond

Interim provost named


Tena Golding has been appointed interim provost and vice president for academic affairs at Southeastern Louisiana University, President John Crain announced.
Golding will take on the position June 1 when Bourg, who was serving in the role, returns to being a faculty member. Golding has been a long-time mathematics professor and for many years served as the director of the Center for Faculty Excellence. She has also served as interim department head of mathematics, President Crain said in a campuswide email message.
“Dr. Golding is a highly respected member of our campus community, having served as an outstanding academician and faculty member during her career at Southeastern. She brings to this new role strong administrative and organizational skills as well as a thorough knowledge of the operations of the Division of Academic Affairs,” he wrote.
Crain said Golding has worked on many Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges reaffirmation committees and is knowledgeable of the commission’s accreditation principals. She played an important part to get SLU’s reaffirmation from SACSCOC.
Dr. Golding’s appointment is subject to approval from University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors.
The university will do a national search for a permanent replacement in the next few weeks for the position, Crain said.
18 2016-03-30
Hammond

Red sand represents victims of trafficking



To raise awareness about human trafficking, Southeastern Louisiana University’s Sociological Association will host the Red Sand Project on April 2, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Cate Square.
People will be invited to fill in sidewalk cracks with red sand and document it on social media using #RedSandProject.


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The red sand represents all human trafficking victims who fall through the cracks, said association President Sarah Basile.
“Their voices deserve to be heard, and SSA wants to promote awareness for these victims by providing the opportunity for others to participate in our event,” she said.
Since 2014, sidewalk interventions have taken place in cities throughout the United States and all over the world, she said.
For more information about the event or ordering red sand, contact Basile, sarah.basile@southeastern.edu.
18 2016-03-28
Hammond

Business Recovery Center sets up shop at Hammond chamber office


Southeastern Louisiana University’s Small Business Development Center, the U.S. Small Business Administration and the Louisiana Department of Economic Development announce Business Recovery Centers are helping businesses impacted by recent severe storms, tornados and flooding.
“The Small Business Development Center at Southeastern, along with local chambers of commerce, parish government and Tangipahoa Economic Development, will offer disaster relief assistance for business owners,” said Bill Joubert, director of the Southeastern Small Business Development Center. “If your business is looking to apply for federal disaster aid, or if owners have general questions about the application process, contact Southeastern’s SBDC at 985-549-3831 or lsbdc.slu@lsbdc.org.”

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Specialists can meet individually with each business owner, he said.
No appointment is necessary, and all services are provided free of charge.
Businesses of any size and private, nonprofit organizations may borrow up to $2 million to repair or replace damaged or destroyed real estate, machinery and equipment, inventory, and other business assets, Joubert said. These loans cover losses that are not fully covered by insurance or other recoveries.
In Tangipahoa Parish, a center is located in the Greater Hammond Chamber of Commerce office at 400 NW Railroad Ave., Hammond, on weekdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
“Offering the chamber office as a resource provides a great opportunity for us to support our partners with the SBA, LED and LSBDC,” Chamber President & CEO MelissaBordelon said. “We are eager for all of our Louisiana businesses to be back on their feet and ready to grow!”Other nearby centers are at the Greater Covington Center, 317 N. Jefferson Ave., Covington, on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and the YMCA at 411 Avenue B, Bogalusa, on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.. The centers are not open today due to this being Good Friday.
Business owners may also apply online using SBA’s secure website at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela or get help from SBA representatives at any Disaster Recovery Center in Louisiana. Disaster loan information and application forms are also available from SBA’s Customer Service Center by calling (800) 659-2955 or emailing disastercustomerservice@sba.gov.
Individuals who are deaf or hard-of-hearing may call (800) 877-8339.
18 2016-03-28
Hammond

Employers eye Southeastern students


BM and the FBI were among the nearly 40 employers that took part in Southeastern Louisiana University’s annual Tech-Connect Career Fair to recruit interns and future employees for a myriad of high-demand positions.
Held on campus Wednesday, the event attracted more than 300 students, most of whom are taking courses in the computer science and industrial department. The department offers degrees in computer science, occupational safety, health and environment; engineering technology with several concentrations such as energy engineering, construction and mechanical engineering; and management-oriented industrial technology programs.


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“The number of vendors attests to the value area employers place on our graduates in these fields,” said Lu Yuan, interim head of the department.
“The fair enables the participating employers to find quality candidates in a more efficient way through direct interaction with our students,” Yuan said. “It helps our students, especially graduating seniors, stay prepared and focused in getting ready for these employment and internship opportunities. In addition, the event provides an avenue for our faculty to strengthen existing relationships with industry partners and to build new ones.”
Recent Southeastern computer science graduate Ranjan Poudel was at the fair representing GCR, a Baton Rouge company that provides consulting and technology solutions to businesses and government in the areas of disaster management, aviation and security and several other areas.
“We love the opportunity to visit Southeastern. We’re well aware of Southeastern’s high quality programs and students,” he said. “We just hired four interns and we’re looking for more.”
18 2016-03-23
Hammond

Children, teens can audition April 11 for Missoula Children’s Theatre


HAMMOND – Auditions for the Missoula Children's Theatre production of “Red Riding Hood” will be held on Monday, April 11, from 3 to 5 p.m. at the Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts.
A non-profit educational theater troupe, Missoula Children’s Theatre has been a hometown arts favorite since 1992, often as part of Fanfare, Southeastern Louisiana University’s October arts festival.
“Children in grades kindergarten through high school may audition,” said Executive Director of Columbia Theatre Roy Blackwood. “Approximately 50-60 local students will be cast to appear in the show with a Missoula tour actor/director. Missoula will cast the young actors on Monday and get started right away teaching them lines, staging, songs and movement. By Saturday, the children will be ready to perform, complete with professionally designed costumes and scenery.”
Students wishing to audition must arrive by 3 p.m. and stay for the entire two-hour session. The first rehearsal begins approximately 15-30 minutes after the audition and lasts until 7:30 p.m.
“Since it is a group audition, no advance preparation is necessary – but a smile never hurts,” said Blackwood. “Students should just be ready to come and have a good time.”
Rehearsals will be conducted Monday through Friday from 3-7:30 p.m. and Saturday at noon at the Columbia Theatre, 220 E. Thomas St. in downtown Hammond.
“Although not all cast members will be needed at every session, those auditioning must have a clear schedule for the entire week and, if selected, be able to attend all rehearsals required for their role,” said Blackwood. “A detailed rehearsal schedule will be distributed at the conclusion of the audition.”
“Red Riding Hood” will be performed at the Columbia Theatre as part of the Pajamas and Play series in two performances on Saturday, April 16, at 2 and 5:30 p.m. All cast members must be available for all scheduled performances and rehearsals.
Tickets for the public performances are $15 for adults and $10 for children. They are available online at columbiatheatre.org or at the box office, 985-549-4371.
The Missoula Children’s Theatre is a non-profit organization based in Missoula, Mont. This season, more than 65,000 young people across the globe will take to part in Missoula productions.
For additional information, contact the Columbia Theatre at 985-543-4366 or visit columbiatheatre.org.
18 2016-03-21
Hammond

Retirement party celebrates Southeastern alumni director


Kathy Pittman, longtime director for the Southeastern Louisiana University Alumni Association, is known for hosting impressive parties. On Thursday, her friends, associates and family threw a big bash for her.
The occasion marked her retirement from a post she has held for 20 years.
The Alumni Center was packed full of people catching up with one another, particularly Pittman, who stood by the entrance to greet everyone.
The party featured prominent locals, including Hammond Mayor Pete Panepinto, former Hammond Mayor Mayson Foster and Ponchatoula Mayor Bob Zabbia, but also childhood friends, including Cecilia Giannobile. Even Pittman’s eighth-grade teacher was in the crowd, she said.
Friends and associates spoke of the retiree’s undying school pride and ability to throw amazing parties that bonded alumni together, as well as the many school traditions that began under her leadership, such as the Golden Silence memorial ceremony for deceased alumni, students, faculty and staff. She also was instrumental in getting the university’s football program reinstated after it was cut in the 1980s.
Jackie Dale Thomas, who served as the association’s board president in 1999-2000, and Kim Hunter Reed, who served as executive assistant to the university’s president in 1995-2000, shared memories of working alongside Pittman.
“She and I have been two peas in a pod,” Reed told the crowd.
Reed, who now is senior consultant for HCM Strategies, and Pittman saw the creation of many new traditions, including Golden Grads and Rock ‘N’ Roar Fest, both of which began in 1997.
“We had so much fun together,” she said, adding it is hard to imagine the university without Pittman there.
The retired director said Southeastern has always been a part of her life. She can remember riding her bike to the campus to climb on the Friendship Oak when she was young. She naturally attended Southeastern and was involved in many extracurricular activities that made the job of creating and hosting events for the university easy, she said.
“I was very prepared for this job,” she joked.
Thomas said Pittman has been a part of her fondest memories -- like when Pittman asked her to run for board president-- and she has been there for sad times. Pittman was the one who had to tell her the tragic news of the death of their good friend Sally Goodwin in a car accident.
“I can only imagine how hard that was for her,” Thomas said.
Pittman was also there when Thomas suffered an aneurysm years ago and was a supportive friend to get her through the difficult time. A way to know whether someone is a good pal is to disagree on things but still be close, she said.
“That’s a true friend and this is a true friend,” she said.
Mayor Panepinto signed a resolution to honor Pittman for all she has done for the university.
“You’re one of our jewels in Hammond,” said Lacy Landrum, director of administration for the city.
U.S. Sen. Bill Cassidy’s office issued a recognition for the retired director, noting her positive mark on Southeastern and the community.
18 2016-03-21
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN LIBRARIANS AUTHOR BOOK ON HAMMOND


HAMMOND – Two members of the staff at Southeastern Louisiana University’s Sims Memorial Library have authored a book on the history of the city of Hammond.
Library Director Eric W. Johnson and Catherine H. Tijerino, head of cataloging, selected the photos and wrote the book “Hammond,” part of the book collection of Images of America published by Arcadia Publishing of Charleston, S.C. Arcadia is the largest publisher of local history works in the country.
The largely pictorial book covers the history of Hammond from its founding to 1950 and includes nearly 220 photos collected from historical archives and private collections. Informative captions accompany each photo.
“We received tremendous assistance in putting this book together,” Johnson said. “Special recognition goes to Drs. Sam Hyde and Keith Finley of the university’s Center for Southeast Louisiana Studies, who permitted us access to the various historical photo collections they maintain. The Judge Leon Ford III collection in the center was the source of many of the photos we used.”
Johnson said local historians C. Howard Nichols and Tom Davidson were especially helpful in sharing their extensive knowledge of the local history.
The book is available at area booksellers and other stores, through Amazon and from the publisher at acadiapublishing.com.
The two authors are scheduled to do a book signing at Southeastern’s bookstore on Tuesday, April 12, from 1 to 3 p.m.
18 2016-03-17
Hammond

SLU promotes campus pride with new initiative


Southeastern Louisiana University is launching Lion Up Tuesdays to showcase pride in the university among faculty, staff and students.

“We will be encouraging everyone on campus to help promote pride in Southeastern through the wearing of green and gold on Tuesdays,” said Athletics Director Jay Artigues, who chairs the university’s Green with Pride Committee.

The new #TeamSoutheastern initiative will include team leaders on patrol on the campus every Tuesday, thanking people with donated prizes and presenting “pride citations” for those best showing off their Lion pride, Artigues said.

He said local businesses that display their Southeastern support also are slated to receive recognition in the future as part of #TeamSoutheastern.
18 2016-03-15
Baton Rouge

Southeastern to present senior dance concerts


Southeastern Louisiana University’s Department of Fine and Performing Arts’ dance company, Dance Performance Project, will present a series of four senior concerts directed by instructor and Artistic Director Keith “Skip” Costa Tuesday-Thursday in Vonnie Borden Theatre on campus in Hammond.

General admission tickets to each 30-minute concert are $5 and will be available one hour prior to the performances. For more information, contact Costa at Keith.Costa@southeastern.edu.

The concert schedule is:

7 p.m. Tuesday — “Humanity in a Mad World” by senior Christa Sevin, of Chalmette. Dancers in the piece include Connie Adams, of Houma; Faith Allen and Stephanie Amerson, of Ponchatoula; DeShante Epps, of New Orleans; Tyron’E Hawkins, of Baton Rouge; Lily Marcus, of Denham Springs; Samantha O’Neil, of Slidell; Leah Reeb, of Chalmette; Jaquan Warren, of Franklinton; and Demi Wells, of Amite.

7 p.m. Wednesday — “The Next Element,” by senior Joseph Matherne, of Luling. Assistant artistic director is Forrest Duplantier, of Covington. Dancers performing include Courtney Self, of Conway, Arkansas; Alexis May, of Walker; Lindsy Brown, of El Paso, Texas; Hayley Jordan, of Baton Rouge; Haley Bruch, of Mandeville; Marcus and Wells.

6:30 p.m. Thursday — “This is Love” by senior Millenique Brown, of New Orleans. Dancers performing include Desiree Acosta, of Destrehan; Michaela Thanars, of Slidell; Amerson, Brown, Epps, Hawkins and Warren.

8 p.m. Thursday — “A Dancer’s Choice” by senior Leah Reeb. Dancers performing include Samantha O’Neill, of Slidell; Casey Zweifel, of Avondale; Mollie Norton, of New Orleans; Cierra Calloway, of Houma; Amerson, Warren, Thanars, Hawkins, Jordan and Sevin.
18 2016-03-14
Baton Rouge

Floodwaters enter SLU's University Center, close to flowing over basketball court


to flowing over basketball court



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Kaden Jacobsen, 7, of Madisonville learns about his curiosity with high water as the Bogue Falaya River rises in Covington at N. Florida Street Friday, March11, 2016. (Photo by David Grunfeld, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
David Grunfeld, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune
Print Email Jim Derry, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune By Jim Derry, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune
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on March 11, 2016 at 1:50 PM, updated March 11, 2016 at 1:52 PM
Less than one week after seven state girls basketball champions were crowned at Southeastern Louisiana University's basketball arena, flooding in the Hammond area has surrounded – and entered – the University Center.

Pictures shown by the SLU Police Department and WBRZ-TV in Baton Rouge show not only the water filling up the entrances, but water in the arena nearly at court level, which sits about six inches above the cement floor.


The Hammond area received about a foot of rain from Thursday morning through Friday, and many rescues needed to be made to save Tangipahoa Parish residents from their flooded homes.

Rene Abadie, director of public relations for SLU, said in a press release Friday afternoon that the university sustained "minimal damage," except "around the University Center on University Avenue and North Campus where there is more standing water than typically seen after a major rain event.

"This seems to be related to city drainage issues in the area, with rainwater getting into the sewage system and causing it to backup into the University Center. City crews have been working to fix the drainage problem."


The school canceled classes Thursday and Friday and postponed events scheduled for Saturday.
18 2016-03-14
Hammond

SLU BEGINS ANNUAL PLACEMENT OF CHRISTMAS TREES IN MARSH


RECYCLING CHRISTMAS TREES -- Southeastern Louisiana University senior Amanda Bergeron of Walker tosses into the pile one of the hundreds of Christmas trees that were deployed to the university’s Turtle Cove Environmental Research Station in Pass Manchac on Friday (March 4). The trees will be used in a research experiment to determine their effectiveness in collecting sediment to fill the logging ditches located in the Manchac Swamp.
18 2016-03-14
Hammond

OLYMPIAN HOLLIS CONWAY DELIVERS MOTIVATIONAL SPEECH AT SLU


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University will present Olympian Hollis Conway on Tuesday, March 15, at 1 p.m. in the Student Union Theatre. The two-time Olympic medalist will give a presentation titled “Overcoming Obstacles: Reaching Your Maximum Potential.”
Sponsored by the Department of Kenisology, the presentation is free and open to the public, however attendees are asked to bring canned food or other items to donate to the Southeastern Food Pantry.
Conway was one of the world’s most dominating athletes. A two-time Olympic medalist in the high jump, his 1991 jump of 7 feet 10.5 inches still stands as the American indoor record 25 years later.
Born in Chicago, Hollis was the last of seven children of parents who separated often and moved frequently, eventually to Detroit and then to Shreveport. With instability at home, Hollis sought success in the athletic arena. After trying basketball and football, he found track and field and the high jump.
Conway grew from a skinny junior varsity kid to a college athlete at the University of Louisiana-Lafayette, to the best high jumper in US history. Today Hollis is an in-demand public speaker, as well as an author, husband and father.

PHOTO:
OLYMPIAN TO SPEAK AT SOUTHEASTERN - Southeastern Louisiana University will present Olympian Hollis Conway on Tuesday, March 15, at 1 p.m. in the Student Union Theatre. The two-time Olympic medalist will give a presentation titled “Overcoming Obstacles: Reaching Your Maximum Potential.”
18 2016-03-10
Hammond

BURNS DISCUSSES LATIN INFLUENCE ON CHICANO ROCK


HAMMOND -- Joseph Burns, a professor of communication at Southeastern Louisiana University will speak on “Chicano Rock and the Influence of Latino Music on Rock Stars” on Thursday (March 10) at 2 p.m. on the third floor of Sims Memorial Library.

Burns is host of KSLU's syndicated show "Rock School.” His lecture will focus on the sounds of East Los Angeles, Southern California and little towns where Latin

rhythms were blended with American rock and roll. Richie Valens, Trini Lopez, Sam the Sham and the Pharaohs, The Champs, and Santana were all musicians of Latin descent who became wildly successful in American popular music

Free and open to the public, the lecture is part of the library-sponsored series on Latino Americans. A complete schedule of the entire series along with other information can be found at southeastern/libguides.com/LatinoAmericans.

“Latino Americans: 500 Years of History” is part of an NEH initiative, “The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square.” The programs are funded by a grant from the American Library Association and the National Endowment for the Humanities. For more information, contact Eric Johnson at Sims Library at 985-549-3962 or via e-mail at Eric.Johnson@southeastern.edu.
18 2016-03-10
Hammond

Southeastern students volunteer in ’Big Event’ Saturday


HAMMOND – Approximately 550 Southeastern Louisiana University students will gather on campus Saturday (March 12) before fanning out to area cities and towns to participate in the Big Event, a massive community service initiative sponsored by the Student Government Association.
The students, individual volunteers as well as members of more than 40 student organizations and university teams, will be working at area job sites that include local non-profits and charitable organizations, said SGA President Alexis Quackenbush.
“The Big Event is one big day of community service in which the Southeastern students give back to the surrounding area,” said Quackenbush. “It is our way for the entire student body and campus to express gratitude to area residents, businesses and agencies that support us throughout our college careers. It truly is a unifying experience for all the students involved.”
This is the sixth year that Southeastern students are participating in the Big Event, a project initiated by Texas A&M University that has spread to approximately 80 universities nationwide. It is considered the largest single day of service where college students give back to their communities.
Among the agencies being assisted this year are the Louisiana Children’s Discovery Center, First Christian Church, Hammond Junior High Magnet School and the Tangipahoa African American Heritage Museum and others.
The students will assemble in the Student Union breezeway with a 7 a.m. registration and begin working at their job sites at 8 a.m.
Southeastern was recently recognized for its service activities by students and other members of the campus community by being named for five consecutive years to the President’s Honor Roll for Community Service by the Corporation for National and Community Service.
18 2016-03-07
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN CELEBRATES MARCH AS WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH


HAMMOND – The Southeastern Louisiana University Department of History and Political Science will coordinate Women’s History Month throughout March with a series of free lectures and presentations.
“As in the past, we will present a variety of interesting and intriguing topics through lectures, films and other presentations that focus on an interdisciplinary approach to women’s history,” said William Robison, head of the Department of History and Political Science. “We are pleased that colleagues with the Sims Memorial Library and the Department of Languages and Communication are joining us in providing a diverse program throughout the month.”
Most of the programs will be held on campus or at area Tangipahoa Parish library branches. A special “Lafayette Lagniappe” is scheduled at the end of the month in Lafayette.
The schedule for Women’s History Month includes:
March 9, 2 p.m., Student Union Theatre, Professor of History and Political Science Margaret Gonzalez-Perez presents “Hidden Women.” A specialist in the area of female terrorism, she will look at women of other countries who live as men, not out of sexual preference but because women in these societies suffer economic, political and societal discrimination.
March 14, 5 p.m., Tangipahoa Parish Library, 380 N. Fifth St. in Ponchatoula, “Julie and Julia.” Southeastern graduate Karen Williams of the LSU Department of English will host a viewing of the movie “Julie and Julia” and discuss its significance to women’s history. The 2009 historical comedy-drama illuminates the history of post-World War II women as it depicts the life of famed author and chef Julia Child and modern New York office worker Julie Powell, who sets out to cook all of Child’s 254 recipes from “The Art of French Cooking.”
March 16, 12:30 p.m., Sims Memorial Library, Library Director Eric Johnson offers another lecture in a series of presentations in the library’s Latino-American History Series. “Latinas on Broadway” will review Latina stars who have made important contributions to America Theatre and will look at the collective impact they have had in both drama and musical theater. Videos will be featured along with excerpts from original cast records of shows.
March 16, 6:30 p.m., Tangipahoa Parish Library, 314 E. Thomas St. in Hammond, Robison will discuss “Women in Civil War Films.” The presentation will include discussion of film clips from the Silent Era to the present, ranging from the early sound films “Only the Brave” and “Gone with the Wind” to more modern films such as “The Conspirator” and “Lincoln.”
March 21, 12:30 p.m., Student Union Theatre, independent musician and photographer Natasha Sanchez of New Orleans will present “Louisiana: The State of My World,” an adventurous tour of the state through songs, stories and photographs covering her journeys from Algiers to Zwolle and parts in between.
March 21, 5 p.m., Tangipahoa Parish Library, 204 NE Central Avenue, Amite. The film “Suffragette” will be presented in its entirety followed by a discussion led by Robison. The 2015 drama sets a fictional story within the pre-world War I campaign for women’s suffrage in Great Britain.
March 23, 12:30 p.m., Student Union Theatre. Professor Carol Madere of the Department of Languages and Communication will present “How Depictions of Careers for Women Have Evolved on Television.” She will explore how representations of women on television have progressed from the wise matriarch of “The Donna Reed Show” to the conflicted FBI-agent-in- training of “Quantico” and consider whether reality TV shows like “The Bachelor” are setting women back.
March 23, 7 p.m., Lafayette Lagniappe: South Regional Library, 6101 Johnston St. in Lafayette. Professor Robison presents “Mary Magdalene, the Da Vinci Code, and History.” The lecture will compare the scriptural Mary Magdalene and her many artistic, fiction, and mythological manifestations.
For additional information about Southeastern’s Women’s History Month, contact the Department of History and Political Science at 985-549-2413 or wrobison@southeastern.edu.
18 2016-03-04
Baton Rouge

Chef’s Evening in Hammond to offer wide range of local fare


Get a true “taste of the Northshore” at this year’s Chefs Evening at Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond.

Inventive and traditional area restaurants, unique niche food and grocery stores, distillers, brewers and bakeries have signed on for the food extravaganza March 13 at SLU’s Student Union Ballroom.

From 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., guests can sample popular cuisine, trendy beverages and wines.

Participants include: Aquistapace’s Covington Supermarket, Aramark Classic Fare Catering, Benedicts Catering, Buddies Bar and Grill, Cate Street Seafood Station, Champagne Beverage, Cocoa Bean Bakery and Café, Crescent Bar, Don’s Seafood, Eddie’s Frozen Custard, Gnarly Barley, Hammond High Magnet ProStart, Iron Horse Sports Grille & Spirits, Jacmel Inn, Jim Carey Distribution, PJ’s Coffee — University Avenue and West Thomas Street, Rotolos Pizzeria, The Boston Restaurant, Tope La, Trey Yuen and more.

Tickets start at $75 and can be purchased to Chefs Evening or to both Chefs Evening and the President’s Toast, hosted by President John Crain at the University Residence.

To order individual tickets, patron tables or for information, call (985) 549-2239, email chefsevening@southesastern.edu or visit the website www.southeastern.edu/chefsevening.

Funds raised help support school scholarships and academic programs directly.
18 2016-03-04
Hammond

Crain: Time is ticking for state’s legislators


With the March 9 deadline approaching to close a major mid-year budget gap, Southeastern Louisiana University President John Crain said he is anxiously waiting to see what will happen to measures that would raise revenue for the state.
He is particularly interested in seeing what lawmakers will do with a measure to increase the state sales tax.


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The Senate voted to extend House Bill 62’s expiration date from October 2017 to April 2021. It is scheduled to be debated today on the House floor.
Crain said higher education officials are eyeing other bills that would raise revenue in order to spare colleges and universities from more funding reductions, as well as House Bill 122 that includes some cuts to higher education.
However, lawmakers appear stalled in a debate taking place behind closed doors regarding how much to cut versus how much to raise, he said.
“They are running out of time,” he said, after speaking Wednesday to the Hammond Rotary Club.
He talked about Southeastern’s rising dependence on tuition because of several cuts in state aid it has absorbed. Since 2008, the university’s public funding has been cut 11 times.
In that same period, the university has raised its tuition by 115 percent, he said.
“Enrollment is more than ever a driver of our resources,” he said, adding that enrollment has remained relatively flat over the years.
The university is hearing from students who say they cannot afford to remain enrolled after tuition increases, Crain said.
Along with more student loan debt, students have seen programs at SLU disappear because of funding problems, he said.
“How did our state get in this situation,” he said.
The university president pointed to the repeal of the Stelly Plan in 2008 that reduced tax revenue and the many tax breaks the state hands out to businesses as reasons Louisiana is chronically short on money.
Recent drops in oil prices have aggravated the situation even more, he said.
For the fiscal year ending June 30, the state is in the hole by about $900 million and next fiscal year is projected to have a deficit of $2 billion.
Crain said the best case scenario for Southeastern is a cut of $1.6 million to the general fund.
That is on top of having to partially cover the shortfall in the funding for the public scholarship program TOPS, costing $2.1 million.
He urged those who are concerned about higher education to call their state senators and representatives about protecting colleges and universities’ funding.
The Southeastern Alumni Association has a lobbying group ROAR Network, and people can sign up to get legislative updates at ciclt.net/southeastern.
18 2016-03-04
Hammond

Rock ’n Roar on Saturday


Southeastern Louisiana University’s annual campus-community festival Rock ’n Roar will be Saturday.
In its 20th year, the festival showcases Southeastern’s academics and fun atmosphere for more than 2,600 visiting District 8 Literary Rally high school students, alumni and community friends, said Kathy Pittman, director of the Southeastern Alumni Association.


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“With no charge for admission to Rock ’n Roar, patrons of all ages can enjoy educational displays by Southeastern’s departments, food, music and more,” she said.
Scheduled from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the new Student Union, the festival will also offer art, baseball and dance camps for children.
Art education students will offer a hands-on art camp for children ages 6-12 from 9 to 11 a.m., with a check-in time of 8:30 a.m. The camp, which costs $15, will take place in Clark Hall.
A camp for young baseball enthusiasts is scheduled for 9 to 11 a.m., with a check in time of 8:30 a.m. at Alumni Field on campus. The camp is open to children ages 6 to 12 for a $15 fee. Participants are asked to bring their own bat and glove.
The Lionettes, Southeastern’s dance team, will host a dance camp for children ages 5-12 from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., with check-in at 8:30 a.m. at the Kinesiology and Health Studies Building. The camp’s $15 fee includes refreshments. Participants are asked to dress comfortably and wear tennis shoes. The camp will conclude with a performance by participants in the Kinesiology and Health Studies Building at noon.
Advance registration and payment is requested for all camps. Space is limited, so reservations should be made early. Camp applications are available online at southeastern.edu/roarfest or at the Alumni Center, 500 W. University Ave., (985) 549-2150.
Rock ‘n’ Roar will also feature various children’s games and activities.
Call (985) 549-2150 or 1-800-SLU-ALUM for details.
18 2016-03-03
Baton Rouge

Students shine in SLU chemistry competition


Three students represented Hammond Westside Elementary Montessori School in the You Be the Chemist Challenge at Southeastern Louisiana University on Jan. 29.

Taylor Crawford, Noah Holman and Nathan Gendron, sixth-graders in Alanna Langla’s and Angela Bradford’s classes, were among the top 20 scorers selected to participate in the challenge to earn a first-, second- or third-place finish. Gendron finished first out of more than 300 students.

The You Be the Chemist Challenge is an interactive academic contest that encourages students in fifth through eighth grades to explore chemistry concepts and their real-world applications, a news release said.

18 2016-03-03
Baton Rouge

Chef’s Evening in Hammond to offer wide range of local fare


Get a true “taste of the Northshore” at this year’s Chefs Evening at Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond.

Inventive and traditional area restaurants, unique niche food and grocery stores, distillers, brewers and bakeries have signed on for the food extravaganza March 13 at SLU’s Student Union Ballroom.

From 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., guests can sample popular cuisine, trendy beverages and wines.

Participants include: Aquistapace’s Covington Supermarket, Aramark Classic Fare Catering, Benedicts Catering, Buddies Bar and Grill, Cate Street Seafood Station, Champagne Beverage, Cocoa Bean Bakery and Café, Crescent Bar, Don’s Seafood, Eddie’s Frozen Custard, Gnarly Barley, Hammond High Magnet ProStart, Iron Horse Sports Grille & Spirits, Jacmel Inn, Jim Carey Distribution, PJ’s Coffee — University Avenue and West Thomas Street, Rotolos Pizzeria, The Boston Restaurant, Tope La, Trey Yuen and more.

Tickets start at $75 and can be purchased to Chefs Evening or to both Chefs Evening and the President’s Toast, hosted by President John Crain at the University Residence.

To order individual tickets, patron tables or for information, call (985) 549-2239, email chefsevening@southesastern.edu or visit the website www.southeastern.edu/chefsevening.

Funds raised help support school scholarships and academic programs directly.

18 2016-03-03
Hammond

Bank CEO to deliver annual talk


The retired chairman and chief executive officer of Bank One of Louisiana, now Chase Bank, will deliver Southeastern Louisiana University’s James and Evelyn Livingston Business Ethics Lecture on March 8.
G. Lee Griffin, who most recently served as the LSU Foundation president, will speak on “Put It in Writing – Planning Is Not an Option” at 7 p.m. in the Student Union Ballroom A.


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Admission to the lecture, presented by the College of Business, will be free and open to the public.
A graduate of LSU, where he earned a master’s degree in economics and finance, Griffin also holds a bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Texas at Austin. He has been named to the LSU Alumni Association Hall of Distinction and the E.J. Ourso College of Business Hall of Distinction.
Griffin has been a member of numerous organizations, including the Louisiana Bankers Association and the boards of American Bankers Association, Baton Rouge Area Foundation, Baton Rouge Symphony Orchestra, Capital Area United Way, Council for a Better Louisiana and the Greater Baton Rouge Chamber of Commerce.
His involvement in health includes serving with the Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center, and the Pennington Biomedical Research Foundation.
“We are pleased to present another professional with strong business ethics as this year’s Livingston lecturer,” said College of Business Interim Dean Antoinette Phillips. “Mr. Griffin is an example of a successful individual who generously gives back in service to his community. This is a great opportunity for our students to hear from someone who guides a major corporation.”
The lecture series was founded in 1984 by Hammond businessman John O. Batson in memory of his long time friend and associate James Livingston.
The lecture also honors Livingston’s late wife, Evelyn, who was an active community volunteer for many years.
18 2016-03-02
Baton Rouge

Olympic medalist to give talk at SLU student union


A two-time Olympic medalist will talk about overcoming obstacles during a March 15 presentation at Southeastern Louisiana University.

Olympian Hollis Conway will present “Overcoming Obstacles: Reaching Your Maximum Potential” at 1 p.m. March 15 in the Student Union Theatre.

Sponsored by the Department of Kinesiology, the presentation is free and open to the public; however, attendees are asked to bring canned food or other items to donate to the Southeastern Food Pantry.

A two-time Olympic medalist in the high jump, Conway’s 1991 jump of 7 feet 10.5 inches still stands as the American indoor record 25 years later, a news release said.

Born in Chicago, Hollis was the last of seven children of parents who separated often and moved frequently, eventually to Detroit and then to Shreveport. With instability at home, Hollis sought success in the athletic arena. After trying basketball and football, he found track and field and the high jump.

Conway grew from a thin junior varsity student to a college athlete at the University of Louisiana-Lafayette, to the best high jumper in U.S. history. Today, Hollis is a public speaker, as well as an author, husband and father.
18 2016-02-25
Hammond

FORMER CEO DELIVERS SLU’S LIVINGSTON ETHICS IN BUSINESS LECTURE


HAMMOND – The retired chairman and chief executive officer of Bank One of Louisiana, now Chase Bank, will deliver Southeastern Louisiana University’s James and Evelyn Livingston Business Ethics Lecture on Tuesday, March 8.
G. Lee Griffin, who most recently served as the LSU Foundation president, will speak on “Put It in Writing – Planning Is Not an Option” at 7 p.m. in SLU Student Union Ballroom A. The lecture is presented by the College of Business and is free and open to the public.
A graduate of LSU, where he earned a master’s degree in economics and finance, he also holds a bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Texas at Austin. He has been named to the LSU Alumni Association Hall of Distinction and the E.J. Ourso College of Business Hall of Distinction.
Griffin has been a member of numerous organizations, including the Louisiana Bankers Association and the boards of American Bankers Association, Baton Rouge Area Foundation, Baton Rouge Symphony Orchestra, Capital Area United Way, Council for a Better Louisiana and the Greater Baton Rouge Chamber of Commerce. His involvement in health includes serving with the Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center, and the Pennington Biomedical Research Foundation.
“We are pleased to present another professional with strong business ethics as this year’s Livingston lecturer,” said College of Business Interim Dean Antoinette Phillips. “Mr. Griffin is an example of a successful individual who generously gives back in service to his community. This is a great opportunity for our students to hear from someone who guides a major corporation.”
The lecture series was founded in 1984 by Hammond businessman John O. Batson in memory of his long time friend and associate James Livingston. The lecture also honors Livingston’s late wife Evelyn, who was an active community volunteer for many years.
18 2016-02-24
Hammond

Iconic Friendship Oak at SLU undergoing treatment


Friendship Oak, the iconic symbol of Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond, is undergoing extensive preservation treatment including removal of decking that has surrounded the tree for years. The work also calls for pruning dead wood, fertilizing and applying insecticide, the university said.

The massive live oak, at the North Oak Street entrance end of Friendship Circle, has been part of the university's landscape for almost a century and is one of 23 named live oaks on the campus. The tree has long been a meeting area for students, especially in the early years of SLU's history when it was near the original student union, and before that when its branches sheltered the "pop stand" where students would get soft drinks and snacks, according to the university.

Carlos Doolittle, who supervises landscape, grounds and recycling at Southeastern, said the decking around the tree had to be removed because it covered a crucial root area. It was not be replaced. "We're also reminding visitors and others that climbing on the tree or its ground-level branches is not allowed because doing so can cause damage, " he said.

Licensed arborists with Biggz Tree Care of Baton Rouge are doing the tree preservation work, the university said.

Doolittle said trees on campus are continually assessed for health and safety. That sometimes results in the removal of trees that are declining or posing a safety hazard. In the Student Union Park and nearby landscapes, 46 new shade trees and 20 ornamental landscape trees will soon be planted, thanks in part to a grant from the Student Government Association.
18 2016-02-23
Hammond

SLU STUDENTS WILL BRING HEAT TO LEGISLATURE WEDNESDAY


HAMMOND – Students and supporters of Southeastern Louisiana University will join colleagues from other colleges and universities throughout the state on February 24 for “Higher Ed Day at the Legislature,” a demonstration of unity in the face of possible major cuts to higher education budgets.
Scheduled at noon on the steps of the Capitol in Baton Rouge, the demonstration is being sponsored by the Council of Student Body Presidents (COSBP), which recently expressed its concerns in a resolution urging state leaders to provide financial resources and greater support for higher education.
“We are encouraging as many students, alumni and other supporters to be a part of this effort that will call attention to the rising costs of public post-secondary education for students and the declining support from the state over the past seven years,” said Southeastern Student Government Association President Alexis Quackenbush.
She said SGA has obtained use of a shuttle bus and is hoping to arrange car pools and additional transportation for other participants. Students interested in riding the shuttle can sign-up on the SGA website (southeastern.edu/admin/sga/). News about the event can be followed on social media via #BringHEAT of #LAHigherEd.
COSPB has asked participants to “wear red for higher ed” in a show of solidarity.
The rally is entitled “Bring H.E.A.T.” – an acronym for “Bring Higher Education All Together – and will include brief comments from alumni representatives, current students, high school students and others, including legislators and business representatives. Adding to the event will be the Southern University Marching Band, the “Human Juke Box.”
Inside the Capitol, representatives of the various universities and systems will be staffing tables intended to provide additional information for the public and legislators.
18 2016-02-18
Hammond

SOUTHEASTERN’S SIMS LIBRARY HOSTS SERIES ON LATINO AMERICANS


HAMMOND – Southeastern Louisiana University’s Sims Memorial Library will host a free, six-week series on Latino Americans beginning Feb. 17.
Offered in conjunction with the Tangipahoa Parish Public Library and the Hammond Regional Arts Center and titled “Latino Americans: 500 Years of History,” the series will feature two documentary film screenings with scholar-led discussions about the history of Latino Americans from 1946 to 1980. Lectures on Latino American arts, a reading for children, and a dance demonstration are also planned.
Southeastern is one of approximately 200 libraries, museums, and art and historical associations across the country to host the programs, which will run through March 19. Eric Johnson, program coordinator and director of Sims Library, obtained a grant from the American Library Association and the National Endowment for the Humanities, which made the programs possible.
“’Latino Americans: 500 Years of History’ is a national grant initiative that provides DVDs of the documentary series shown on PBS, discussion guidelines, resource guides, and Web support,” said Johnson. “I decided to focus on the arts because of the excellent opportunities both in Hammond and in the greater New Orleans area, and to give the series a different focus from other programs across the country.”
Instructor in Foreign Languages Marianna Kunow will serve as the project scholar, leading the video discussions and providing a reading at the parish library. Programs scheduled are at Sims Library unless otherwise noted and are as follows:
• Feb. 17: “The New Latinos (1946 - 1963),” video and discussion, 6:30 p.m.
• Feb. 18: “From Zorro to Machete: The Story of Latinos in Hollywood,” Dr. Jason Landrum, 2 p.m.
• Feb. 24: ‘The Mexican Muralists and Chicano Variations,” Dr. Marianna Kunow, Hammond Regional Arts Center, 5 p.m.
• March 2: “Prejudice and Pride (1965-1980),” video and discussion, 6:30 p.m.
• March 5: Latin American Dance Demonstration, Javier’s Dance Company, Tangipahoa Library Ponchatoula Branch, 1 p.m.
• March 10: “Chicano Rock and the Influence of Latino Music on Rock Stars,”Dr. Joe Burns, 2 p.m.
• March 16: “Latinas on Broadway,” Eric Johnson, 12:30 p.m.
• March 19: Children’s Reading, Tangipahoa Library, Hammond Branch, 1 p.m.
“Latino Americans: 500 Years of History” is part of an NEH initiative and The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square. The PBS documentary film series was produced by WETA Washington, D.C.; Bosch and Co. Inc.; and Latino Public Broadcasting (LPB); in association with Independent Television Service (ITVS).
For more information about the series, contact Johnson at 985-549-3962 or via e-mail at Eric.Johnson@southeastern.edu.
18 2016-02-18
Hammond

Student petition not likely to silence ministries


A petition has been circulating on Southeastern’s campus or the past week calling for a ban or the relocation of religious groups such as Consuming Fire Ministries.
The church group from Mississippi preaches on college campuses across the Southeast including at Louisiana State University and Southeastern Louisiana University. To do so, the ministry has to get permission from the university through an application process.
Pastor Britt Williams of at Consuming Fire Ministries says he has been preaching on college campuses for 30 years, and this is not the first time he has seen this type of opposition.
“Any concept or speech that challenges the moral or political status quo must be silenced, and I think that is sad,” he said. “Christianity aside, from a constitutional or political position, as someone who is constantly using my right to express myself….. the whole trend in America today is to silence someone who offends you.”
The petition started by students calls Consuming Fire Ministries a hate group that has become a nuisance to campus.
“This ‘ministry’ has proven time and time again to be negative in nature, as one that targets the students of Southeastern Louisiana University, bullying and [borderline] harassing both individuals and group of students for a variety of different reasons. Justifying themselves with “freedom of speech”, this group parades itself as a righteous cause in the name of religion,” the petition reads. ”However, based on both their words and actions they have proven themselves [innumerable times] to be nothing more than a hate group. Their judgmental, assaultive speech is rooted in malicious intent and is a detriment to the efforts and integrity of this academic institution.”
Williams said these students have redefined hatred to take away free speech.
“They define hatred as you disagree with me,” he said. “Over the years, there is just a growing and unparalleled disdain and hatred for the biblical Jesus and his word and his law. Our basic message is the gospel. We are just preaching that man stop sinning and turn to God.”
Dr. Barbara Forrest, a philosophy professor at Southeastern and recognized expert on the First Amendment, said it is the group’s constitutional right to exercise free speech on public property.
“That petition is not going to get anywhere,” she said. “The university can set certain conditions about their appearances, but they can’t ban them.”
The Southeastern Student Handbook justifies banishment of groups only if they fail to follow demonstration guidelines or their speech threatens the safety of the students.
“No harmful acts, destruction or defacement of property, or physical assaults of persons will be allowed. This includes threats and/or intimidation aimed at particular individuals and creating in them a realistic fear for their personal safety or the security of their property,” the handbook states.
Although she too has been annoyed at times by the religious group, Forrest said she knows they are not hurting anyone. She noted that the First Amendment ensures the right of people to express unpopular opinions.
“What they are saying is very unpleasant and can be offensive, but it does not violate the Constitution,” she said. “We can’t always ban people because we don’t like what they say. It sounds like the students need to do a little more research.”
Telling people they are going to hell may hurt their feelings, but they do not have to listen, she said.
“They may just want to try to ignore us. They can maybe take five minutes and walk around the free speech area,” Pastor Williams said. “I was taught if someone said something I didn’t like to walk away.”
According to the Southeastern Student Handbook under “University Policy on Public Speech, Assembly and Demonstrations”, “Free discussion of ideas of either controversial or non-controversial nature shall not be curtailed. These freedoms, however, are not absolute. Colleges and universities have well-established rights to regulate time, place, and manner so that activities do not intrude upon or interfere with the academic programs and administrative processes of the University.”
Southeastern may restrict public demonstrations as protected in the Sonnier v. Crain court case. In 2007, Sonnier tried to speak on Southeastern’s campus without applying seven days prior to his public demonstration. When he was escorted from campus, he sued Southeastern for violation of his First Amendment right. After the case made it all the way to the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals, the court denied Joiner and ruled in favor of Southeastern Interim President Crain.
Because of this case, Southeastern can restrict public demonstrations to two hours, require a seven-day application period, request personal information and designated areas of public assembly. These areas include the Student Union Annex, the grassy area in front of the Pennington Student Activity Center and the Presidential Plaza area north of the Student Union.
The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education has given the Southeastern campus a red light for rating which deems it as an institution that “has at least one policy that both clearly and substantially restricts freedom of speech. A ‘clear’ restriction is one that unambiguously infringes on what is or should be protected expression. In other words, the threat to free speech at a red light institution is obvious on the face of the policy and does not depend on how the policy is applied.”
Pastor Williams said he is thankful to Southeastern for allowing the members of his group to express themselves and he has no problems with the application process. He said he is content with the opportunity to express his right of free speech.
“It’s something we cherish and something our forefathers promoted,” he said.
18 2016-02-17
Baton Rouge

SLU library to host series on Latino Americans


Southeastern Louisiana University’s Sims Memorial Library is hosting “Latino Americans: 500 Years of History,” a free, six-week series on Latino Americans .

The series is offered in conjunction with the Tangipahoa Parish Library and the Hammond Regional Arts Center. It will feature two documentary film screenings with scholar-led discussions about the history of Latino Americans from 1946 to 1980, lectures on Latino American arts, a reading for children and a dance demonstration.

Foreign languages instructor Marianna Kunow will serve as the project scholar, leading the video discussions and providing a reading at the parish library. Programs include:

THURSDAY: “From Zorro to Machete: The Story of Latinos in Hollywood,” Dr. Jason Landrum, 2 p.m.

WEDNESDAY: “The Mexican Muralists and Chicano Variations,” Dr. Marianna Kunow, Hammond Regional Arts Center, 5 p.m.

MARCH 2: “Prejudice and Pride (1965-1980),” video and discussion, 6:30 p.m.

MARCH 5: Latin American dance demonstration, Javier’s Dance Company, Tangipahoa Parish Library, Ponchatoula Branch, 1 p.m.

MARCH 10: “Chicano Rock and the Influence of Latino Music on Rock Stars,” Dr. Joe Burns, 2 p.m.

MARCH 16: “Latinas on Broadway,” Eric Johnson, 12:30 p.m.

MARCH 19: Children’s reading, Tangipahoa Parish Library, Hammond Branch, 1 p.m.

The programs were made possible through a grant from the American Library Association and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

For information, call Sims Library Director Eric Johnson at (985) 549-3962 or email Eric.Johnson@southeastern.edu.
18 2016-02-17
Hammond
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