11/14/2018
ULS NEWS ARTICLES

Today's News

University of Louisiana System

17 2018-08-31
Natchitoches

Fans will compete in “Cook-Off” at NSU vs. Grambling game


As a part of the exciting Northwestern vs. Grambling football weekend, Sept. 7-8, a “cook-off” will be held for fans and supporters of both schools.

Greg Burke, director of athletics at Northwestern, and Paul Bryant Sr., director of athletics at Grambling, will serve as celebrity chefs for the chicken and spare ribs contest.

A $25 entry fee for the contest, prizes will be awarded to the first, second and third place winners. To enter and for more information, contact: Donta Latchie, (318) 471-7922, Rev. Steven Harris, (318) 419-0802 or Van Erikson at NSU Foundation Center, (318) 357-4415.


17 2018-06-26
Baton Rouge

State officials to lecture 400 rising high school seniors


BATON ROUGE, La (LOCAL 33) (FOX 44) - Guest speakers from across the state will give nearly 400 young men a lesson about the importance of leadership, civic involvement and personal growth in a panel discussion Tuesday.
According to a media alert, state and local officials are among those guest speakers who will address the Louisiana Boys State Program high school seniors on Tuesday, June 26 at Northwestern State University.
The informative allocution begins at 9:15 a.m. sharp.



Sponsored by the Louisiana Department of the American Legion, Louisiana Boys State (LABS) is described as "the premier leadership development program for young men in the state of Louisiana."













During the program, the rising high school seniors are dubbed as delegates who are tasked with creating a functional mock government of the city in an effort to develop leadership skills, instill the importance of civic engagement and promote public service.
17 2018-05-14
Natchitoches

NSU recognizes top graduates in morning, afternoon ceremonies


Northwestern State University recognized top graduate from the College of Arts and Sciences, the Louisiana Scholars College and the Gallaspy College of Education and Human Development prior to morning commencement ceremonies Friday, May 11.

Top Graduates Morning Ceremony:

Top Grads Morning 2018
Honorees were, seated from left, Oni Melendez of Cartagena, Colombia; Alanna Benoit of Thibodaux, Amanda Curry of Minden, Kristen Eusay of Anacoco, Ashley Rico of Natchitoches, Alexis Rice of Luling, Christina Arrechavala of Kenner and Amanda Simmons of Haughton. On the second row are Aaron Rogers of Amarillo, Texas; Candice Smith of Pineville, Natalie Borowski of Gretna, Maria Rome of Baton Rouge, Katie Rayburn of Pineville, Kylie Nodorft of Wylie, Texas; Jacqueline Rutherford of Deridder, Alicia Foy of Grayson and Molly Baker of Melrose with NSU President Dr. Chris Maggio and commencement speaker Jim Clinton. On the back row are Kailey Leach of Many, Sabrina Ross of Many, Alexander Butler of Bossier City, Conner Dillon of Leesville, Katherine Speicher of Glen Burnie, Maryland, and Abby Hinds of Many.

Top Graduates Afternoon:

Top Grads Afternoon 2018
From left are commencement speaker Jim Clinton, Kiera White of Bossier City, Jessica Mango of Leesville, Robert Jones of Minden, Jessica Love of Shreveport, Kaytie Proctor of Little Elm, Texas; Rachel Opbroek of Keithville, David Moritz of Cedar Park, Texas, and Jeremy Jones of Natchitoches with NSU President Dr. Chris Maggio and Rep. Terry Brown, who was a (1968) Golden Jubilee Graduate.


17 2018-05-14
Shreveport

NSU choir packs bags for international competition in Hungary


NATCHITOCHES, La. (KALB) - From Natchitoches to Budapest; Sunday morning Northwestern State University's Chamber and Lyrica choirs are packing their bags for Hungary!


This is NSU's first time competing in an international choral competition.

"This small choir at Northwestern is going to be able to compete with some of the best out there," said NSU sophomore Morgan McCrory.

It's a dream scenario for Rapides Parish High School alumni Morgan McCrory and Michael Martin.

"Only being 20 years old and going to compete in an international competition, it blows me away," said NSU Sophomore Michael Martin.

But, it was the demons audition tapes that blew competition organizers away, allowing them to bypass the first rounds for choral competitions in Budapest, Hungary.

"We are now in the finals with at least 20 other choirs," said NSU Director of Choral Activities Nicholaus Cummins. "I've seen the list they come from everywhere from China to the U.S., so there are choirs from all around the world competing with us."

Cummins said it's a fierce competition.


"You have seven judges that are literally fine combing every little detail that you do in your music and you are being rated by that," Cummins said.

But, the students feel their teacher has prepared them.

"Our program is completely memorized and he pushes us hard every single time to get it memorized faster and faster," Martin said. "So, that way it is completely polished."

Still, the road to Hungary hasn't been easy.

"We had a member of our choir pass away," McCrory said.

In January exchange student Orlando Gonzalez was diagnosed with stomach cancer and was gone by April.

"He was 33 and he had already gotten a degree in Colombia in business but his passion was music," Cummins said.

Which he brought to the class.

"He instilled a passion in all of these students about music," Cummins said. "He loved every kind of music, regardless of what it was."

It's a love Cummins wants them to carry on.

"Something I am going to say to them before they go out on stage is remember Orlando is supposed to be with us and he is with us," Cummins said. "Maybe not in body, but in spirit."

And McCrory hopes to make Orlando proud in Budapest.

"When we sing our pieces we keep him in our heart and we think of him, and we think of his struggle," McCrory said. "We have this piece called 'Gather at the River' and it is just very touching and very emotional and I think that will translate into the music."


The group's trip will last 12 days. While overseas they will also stop by Krakow, Poland. If they win first place at the competition there is a cash prize up for grabs. They could also be invited back next year, all expenses paid.


17 2017-10-20
Shreveport

NSU celebrating homecoming 2017


NATCHITOCHES, LA (KSLA) -
Northwestern State's homecoming week will culminate with the big game between the NSU Demons and the University of Central Arkansas Bears.

And there is no shortage of events leading up to that match-up.

The Natchitoches university will hold its annual homecoming parade Friday evening. The procession will circle the entire campus.

It will end with a pep rally at Collins Pavilion.

Prior to the parade, there will be an alumni golf tournament, a luncheon and an art exhibit.

Click here for a full list of events.


17 2017-08-30
Natchitoches

NSU to send team to Texas


NATCHITOCHES, La. - Northwestern State University is putting together a team of students, faculty and staff volunteers to assist victims of Hurricane Harvey in Houston and southeast Texas.

“We in Louisiana are all too aware of how devastating a flood can be and the one in Houston is catastrophic,” said Dr. Curt Phifer, a professor of biology at NSU who is organizing the relief initiative. “Last year, people from all over the U.S. came to Louisiana to help flood victims in the Denham Springs and Baton Rouge area and just over 10 years ago, teams came to help Louisianans affected by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. This is our chance to return the favor.”

A flood relief group will travel to Houston or nearby areas Friday, Sept. 1 to work with relief agencies through the weekend. All students, faculty and staff are invited. Volunteers must provide their own transportation to be part of an organized car pool. Phifer is working to arrange for tools, housing and meals but volunteers may need to bring an air mattress, sleeping bag, sheets and towels. More details will be available as plans are finalized.

Anyone who would like to contribute to the team’s expenses for food, gas, globes and supplies can donate through the NSU Foundation in the care of the Disaster Relief Fund or by bringing donations directly to the NSU Alumni Center on University Parkway.

For more information on participating in the relief effort, contact Phifer at phifer@nsula.edu. The link to NSU’s Disaster Relief page is northwesternalumni.com/donations/nsu-disaster-relief-fund.


17 2017-08-30
Natchitoches

Part-Time Job Fair rescheduled for Sept. 13


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Office of Job Location and Development has rescheduled its Part-Time Job Fair for Wednesday, Sept. 13 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Friedman Student Union Ballroom. The event had been scheduled for Thursday, Aug. 31.

There is no charge to participate, but businesses should register by going to ccs.nsula.edu/job-fair-registration.

All majors at NSU are welcome to participate. Students should bring resumes to the job fair.



For more information, contact Karen Loach at loachk@nsula.edu or at (318) 357-5430.


17 2017-08-30
Natchitoches

Lyrica Baroque to perform Sept. 6


The ensemble Lyrica Baroque will perform at Northwestern State University Wednesday, Sept. 6 at 7:30 p.m. in Magale Recital Hall. Admission is free and open to the public.The ensemble Lyrica Baroque will perform at Northwestern State University Wednesday, Sept. 6 at 7:30 p.m. in Magale Recital Hall. Admission is free and open to the public.

Lyrica Baroque includes Jaren Atherholt on oboe, Benjamin Atherholt on bassoon and Angela Park on piano. The group is a unique gathering of musical talent who perform as a special kind of chamber ensemble. By blending the most compelling aspects of chamber music and opera, Lyrica Baroque represents a new expression of classical music, one that appeals to chamber music lovers, opera lovers, and symphony lovers alike.

The ensemble members will give a masterclass on Sept. 6 at 2 p.m.



For more information on the ensemble, go to lyricabaroque.com.


17 2017-08-30
Natchitoches

New nursing certificate program approved for NSU


NATCHITOCHES – A Post Master’s Certificate in Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) at Northwestern State University has been approved by the State Board of Regents.

The certificate program is for registered nurses holding a Master of Science in Nursing to obtain additional certification and licensure to provide mental health services to prevent or treat psychiatric disorders. The structure of the program will vary depending upon coursework completed during the student’s previous graduate work.

“We are offering the certificate to MSN prepared nurses, using a hybrid delivery. Much of the course will be online, but there will be some class meetings,” said Director of Graduate Studies and Research in Nursing and Associate Professor of Nursing Dr. Connie Hale. “MSN nurses who are actively practicing APRNs (advance practice register nurses) can earn this certificate in as little as four semesters, while non APRN prepared nurses with an MSN can earn it in as little as five semesters.”



According to the National Alliance on Mental Health, one in five adults in the U.S. experiences mental illness, and one in 25 lives with a serious mental illness. NAMI found that 26% of homeless adults in shelters, 70% of youth in the juvenile justice system, and 24% of state prisoners have mental health disorders that need treatment. NAMI also estimates that 18-22 veterans die every day from suicide, the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S. and the third leading cause of death for those aged 10-24.

Hale said a PMHNP is an advanced practice registered nurse who possesses specialized knowledge and skills to provide comprehensive mental health care to individuals, families and populations across the lifespan who are at risk of developing and/or have a diagnosed psychiatric disorder or mental health problem. Community partners and stakeholders responded overwhelmingly in support of the proposed expansion of the program during a formal meeting, hosted by NSU, to share their needs for psychiatric mental healthcare providers and the use of PMHNPs, according to Hale.

Student interest in the proposed post-graduate certificate will be from registered nurses who hold a graduate nursing degree. According to the Louisiana State Board of Nursing, of the 3,179 licensed NPs in Louisiana in 2015, only 157 worked in psychiatric mental health/substance abuse, leaving a large number of nurse practitioners that would need post-graduate certificate options if they ever choose to enter that field of practice.

“The program is open to nurses throughout the state, but focuses on central and northern Louisiana,” said Hale. “Interest in this program has been great, and applications continue to come in.”

For more information, go to nsula.edu/academics/nursing-allied-health/nursing-program.


17 2017-08-18
Baton Rouge

NSU honors “Above and Beyond,” long-term employees


Personnel marking 25 years of employment with Northwestern State University were recognized during the university’s annual faculty/staff luncheon. Recognized were, from left, Dr. Barb Duchardt, Davey Antilley, Sonny Carter, Terry Isbell, Jana Lucky, Dale Wohletz, Yvette Ceasar-Williams, Curtis Brossett, Martha Alford, Clyde Downs and Juddy Hamous, congratulated by NSU President Dr. Chris Maggio. Not shown are Ann Deshotels, Mary Beth Tarver and Dr. Lynn Woods.

Several Northwestern State University employees were recognized with Above and Beyond Awards during the university’s annual faculty/staff luncheon. The honor acknowledges personnel who go the extra mile in service to the university, their departments and/or special projects. From left are Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Vickie Gentry congratulating Barbara Prescott, Tammy Armstrong, Cathy Trichel, Curtis Desselles, Marilyn Barr, Perry Johnson, Melissa Turlington, Sid Hall, Frank Hall and NSU President Dr. Chris Maggio. Not shown are Kathy Trichel, Catherine Faucheaux and Roni Biscoe.

Dr. Pete Gregory was recognized for 55 years of service to Northwestern State University. He is the university’s longest-serving employee and received a standing ovation from his colleagues during recognition at the university’s annual faculty/staff lunch. NSU President Dr. Chris Maggio offered congratulations.

Carl Jones, left, and Dr. Vicki Parrish, right, were recognized for having reached 40 years of employment with Northwestern State University. They were congratulated by NSU President Dr. Chris Maggio during NSU’s annual faculty/staff lunch.

Cecil Knotts was recognized during Northwestern State University’s annual faculty/staff lunch for having reached 35 years of employment with the university. NSU President Dr. Chris Maggio offered congratulations on the honor. Also marking 35 years were, not shown, Bill Brent, Rosetta Paterson and Dr. M’Lou Barnett.

Northwestern State University personnel marking 30 years of employment were recognized at Northwestern State University’s annual faculty/staff lunch. From left are Brett Knecht, Dr. Margaret Kilcoyne, Dr. Helaine Razovsky, Dolly Dupree and Ann Spillman, congratulated by NSU President Dr. Chris Maggio. Not shows are Terrie Sebren and Carl Cooley.
17 2017-08-18
Natchitoches

NSU honors “Above and Beyond,” long-term employees


Personnel marking 25 years of employment with Northwestern State University were recognized during the university’s annual faculty/staff luncheon. Recognized were, from left, Dr. Barb Duchardt, Davey Antilley, Sonny Carter, Terry Isbell, Jana Lucky, Dale Wohletz, Yvette Ceasar-Williams, Curtis Brossett, Martha Alford, Clyde Downs and Juddy Hamous, congratulated by NSU President Dr. Chris Maggio. Not shown are Ann Deshotels, Mary Beth Tarver and Dr. Lynn Woods.

Several Northwestern State University employees were recognized with Above and Beyond Awards during the university’s annual faculty/staff luncheon. The honor acknowledges personnel who go the extra mile in service to the university, their departments and/or special projects. From left are Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Vickie Gentry congratulating Barbara Prescott, Tammy Armstrong, Cathy Trichel, Curtis Desselles, Marilyn Barr, Perry Johnson, Melissa Turlington, Sid Hall, Frank Hall and NSU President Dr. Chris Maggio. Not shown are Kathy Trichel, Catherine Faucheaux and Roni Biscoe.

Dr. Pete Gregory was recognized for 55 years of service to Northwestern State University. He is the university’s longest-serving employee and received a standing ovation from his colleagues during recognition at the university’s annual faculty/staff lunch. NSU President Dr. Chris Maggio offered congratulations.

Carl Jones, left, and Dr. Vicki Parrish, right, were recognized for having reached 40 years of employment with Northwestern State University. They were congratulated by NSU President Dr. Chris Maggio during NSU’s annual faculty/staff lunch.

Cecil Knotts was recognized during Northwestern State University’s annual faculty/staff lunch for having reached 35 years of employment with the university. NSU President Dr. Chris Maggio offered congratulations on the honor. Also marking 35 years were, not shown, Bill Brent, Rosetta Paterson and Dr. M’Lou Barnett.

Northwestern State University personnel marking 30 years of employment were recognized at Northwestern State University’s annual faculty/staff lunch. From left are Brett Knecht, Dr. Margaret Kilcoyne, Dr. Helaine Razovsky, Dolly Dupree and Ann Spillman, congratulated by NSU President Dr. Chris Maggio. Not shows are Terrie Sebren and Carl Cooley.
17 2017-06-29
Natchitoches

SWEPCO completes $200,000 grant to Northwestern State


Public Service Commissioner Foster Campbell and Northwestern State University President Dr. Chris Maggio announced the first phase of Valley Electric / SWEPCO financial aid to NSU for university endowments, scholarships and grants.

Campbell presented Maggio with a check for $31,000 to complete a $200,000 grant arising from Valley Electric capital credits accumulated over the co-op’s 70 years of service.

Maggio said the $200,000 from SWEPCO / Valley Electric will be used to match $80,000 in State Board of Regents funding, bringing the total donation to $280,000.

“Since it purchased Valley Electric in 2010, SWEPCO has refunded $25 million in capital credits owed to the families and businesses that were Valley members during its 70 years of operation,” Campbell said.

“The Public Service Commission voted last year to dedicate what remains of the capital credits to NSU.

“Put another way, all efforts to find the Valley Electric members who were owed money are concluded, and the remaining one percent is going to NSU for endowments, scholarships and grants.”
SWEPCO bought Natchitoches-based Valley Electric in October 2010. As part of the $100-million transaction, Valley’s board of directors pledged to honor Valley’s $25 million in “patronage capital credits” owed to its members.

Patronage capital credits are accumulated by electric co-op members as their share of co-op earnings.
SWEPCO conducted two rounds of payments to return the credits to Valley members and their heirs.

“We exhausted all efforts to return this money to its owners,” said SWEPCO President Venita McCellon-Allen said. “We are happy to close the books on these credits now by providing this important support to the university.”

Maggio said the Valley/SWEPCO money will be dispersed in three ways to maximize its impact:
$120,000 will be used to establish two endowment funds, the “Valley Electric/SWEPCO First Generation Endowed Scholarship” and the “Valley Electric/SWEPCO Endowed Professorship” in the NSU College of Business and Technology; and $80,000 will be allocated to the NSU Columns Fund for student scholarships, support for faculty and staff, and capital improvements.

The first-generation scholarship will support students who are the first in their family to attend college. The endowed professorship will enable the university to recruit and retain faculty whose research, teaching and/or public service contribute to their department and the institution.

State matching contributions from the Board of Regents Support Fund will provide an additional $40,000 for each of the two endowment funds, bringing the total impact of the Valley/SWEPCO contribution to $280,000.

Campbell started talks between Valley Electric and SWEPCO early in 2009 after Valley changed its wholesale electricity supplier and its rates rose dramatically. With his backing and that of both companies, Valley members voted overwhelmingly in January 2010 to merge operations with SWEPCO.

“Rates were down almost 30 percent the first month after the sale and have remained roughly 20 percent lower than they would have been had SWEPCO not taken over,” Campbell said.

In 2015, on the fifth anniversary of the transaction, Campbell said the former Valley members had saved $64 million on their electric bills since SWEPCO bought the co-op in 2010.

SWEPCO also pledged to improve service in the eight-parish Valley territory. McCellon-Allen said SWEPCO has invested $17 million to improve Valley facilities, including development of an electronic map of the territory to help crews restore power during outages.


17 2017-06-29
Natchitoches

Students learn about governmentat Boys and Girls State at NSU


Five rising seniors from the Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts are attending Boys State and Girls State on Northwestern State University’s campus from June 25-July 1.

From Natchitoches, the seniors attending are Jake Stultz, Russ Stultz and Bryce Moulton. Olivia Gotte of Iota and Ariana Yelverton of Rayville are attending, as well.

Sponsored by the Louisiana Department of the American Legion, Boys State is the premier leadership development program for young men in Louisiana. The program is dedicated to providing a hands-on experience where participants can learn about the Louisiana political system while gaining experience in becoming effective leaders in their school, community, state and country.




17 2017-06-29
Natchitoches

NSU signs agreement with Nepali business school


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University has developed an agreement with the Kathmandu College of Management, an institution in Nepal where administrators aim to promote student exchanges, dual degree programs and cultural experiences for students and faculty interested in gaining a global perspective. KCM is considered one of the premier management schools in Nepal offering bachelor’s and master’s degrees in business management, marketing and communications.



“They are interested in student exchanges as early as next spring, preferably business students,” said Dr. Patrice Moulton, who coordinated the agreement and oversaw its signing with administrators in Nepal and in the U.S. However, it takes a certain type of student to immerse themselves in a third world country, Moulton said. “It will take a student with the right mindset for traveling in that part of the world.”



Both institutions agree to discuss further proposals for future collaboration, including the possibility of brief exchange visits, joint publications or research and online course delivery options.



Moulton and her husband, Dr. Michael Moulton, both NSU faculty, and their son Bryce have travelled extensively in Nepal doing philanthropy work. Last year they developed an agreement with the Institute of Crisis Management Studies in Nepal to create opportunities for academic cooperation and joint research.



“KCM is considered a progressive school,” Moulton said. “They are interested in dual degrees and have partnerships with other international universities. One of their goals is for their university to be the university in Nepal that has a global presence, not just in sending students out but also in accepting students into their institution.”


17 2017-05-05
Associated Press

Northwestern State's Board Names Maggio as New President


BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — A familiar face is taking over the helm at Northwestern State University in Natchitoches.

The Board of Supervisors for the University of Louisiana System on Thursday named Chris Maggio president of the school over another finalist, William Wainwright.

Maggio has worked at Northwestern State for close to 30 years, most recently serving as acting president.

In a statement, Maggio said it's an honor for him to take the role as president full time and he looks forward to collaborating with "students, faculty and staff to ensure the university continues on its positive trajectory."

Maggio replaces Jim Henderson, who led Northwestern State prior to beginning his new role as UL System President and CEO in January.
17 2017-05-05
Baton Rouge

Maggio named Northwestern State President


BATON ROUGE —Dr. Chris Maggio was appointed as president of Northwestern State University Thursday by the Board of Supervisors of the University of Louisiana System. The appointment is effective May 12.

Maggio was selected as the university’s 19th president in a unanimous vote of the board following a four-month national search. He has served as acting president since Jan. 1. He succeeded Dr. Jim Henderson, who became president of the University of Louisiana System, which governs NSU and eight other universities.

“The cornerstone of my presidency will be the passion and fervor that I bring to the office. There will not be a minute's pause in the momentum and success our university has experienced,” said Maggio. “I appreciate the confidence the Board of Supervisors has placed in me. It is an honor to take the role as president full time and I look forward to collaborating with students, faculty and staff to ensure the university continues on its positive trajectory."

Maggio was named vice president for the student experience at Northwestern State in September after serving as interim vice president for just over a year. He maintained his role as vice president for the student experience while serving as acting president.

“Chris is passionate about the university and with his experience and knowledge I am confident he will be a positive leader for the entire community," said UL System President and CEO Dr. Jim Henderson.

Over the past four months, Northwestern State worked with Northwest Louisiana Technical College and Central Louisiana Technical Community College to develop a work-based learning program that will allow individuals to earn an associate of science degree in engineering technology while they are employed with a sponsoring manufacturer.

The university signed 2+2 agreements with Bossier Parish Community College, Louisiana State University-Eunice and South Louisiana Community College, making it easier for traditional and non-traditional students to transfer credit hours to NSU.

Earlier this year, online programs in paralegal studies, radiologic sciences and criminal justice were ranked among the top 10 in the nation for quality and affordability.

The university worked to provide additional campus housing with the groundbreaking of a $10 million rehabilitation project for Varnado Hall which will be transformed into a 21st century living/learning residential college for students in the School of Creative and Performing Arts and is expected to be open for the fall semester. The university has also worked with developers who are developing new student housing adjacent to the Natchitoches campus.

Northwestern State’s nursing program continued to expand by offering clinicals in Natchitoches and offering clinical classes in DeRidder.

The university has a new driving range in the works and irrigation improvement underway at the Robert Wilson Recreation Complex, clean up initiatives and seawall repair on Chaplin’s Lake and improvements at the Jack Fisher Tennis Complex. There have also been upgrades in Kyser Hall and in facilities at the Health and Human Performance Building.

“Dr. Maggio has dedicated the last 29 years to building strong relationships with our students, faculty, alumni, legislators and other key stakeholders,” said Scott Andrews, vice-president of the NSU Foundation Board of Directors, who was a member of the Board of Supervisors Presidential Search Committee. “There is no one better equipped to successfully lead NSU through the current challenges facing all institutions of higher education in Louisiana.”

Maggio has been a fixture at campus activities and events, ball games and performing arts programs, interacting with students, faculty and staff while advocating for NSU on higher education issues at the state level.

He has long been a supporter of the nation’s military and earlier this year initiated a program to honor veterans at all home basketball games.

Maggio has been actively engaged in recruiting, traveling to schools and events all over the state, and his approachability resonates with current and prospective students.

“Outstanding is one of the first words you think of when you think of Dr. Maggio as the president of Northwestern,” said NSU Alumni Association President Monty Chicola. “But there were so many other words that instantly jump into your mind. Seasoned, tested, proven, worthy, leader, purple blooded, students first, knowledgeable and ready. He will be to Northwestern as president as the beloved mayors have been to the City of Natchitoches. The university and the city will keep getting better.”

Northwestern State has recorded enrollment increases for the past two years. Enrollment for the Fall 2016 semester was 9,819 students, a seven percent increase over the previous fall, the highest growth rate of any University of Louisiana System institution. Spring enrollment was 9,191 students, an increase of 6.1 percent over the spring 2016 semester.

“Dr. Maggio will make a great president because he's got the legislative connections, experience and love for this university that will drive Northwestern State forward,” said Student Government Association President John Pearce of Livonia. “He will maintain traditions while also bringing in new ideas.”

As vice president, Maggio led the Dean of Students and the Offices of Admissions, Recruiting, Financial Aid, Student Activities and Organizations, First Year Experience and Leadership Development, Judicial Services, Counseling and Career Services, Student Life, the Student Activities Board, Student Government Association and Greek Life.

Maggio served as assistant vice president of external affairs for university advancement from 2013 until 2015. He has been a staff member at Northwestern State since 1988. He was named Dean of Students and assistant provost for student success in 2007. Maggio was selected as director of alumni affairs in 1999, director of alumni and development in 2003 and executive director of the NSU Foundation in 2005.

Under Maggio’s leadership, the NSU Foundation completed its first capital campaign in Northwestern’s history, exceeding a campaign goal of $18.84 million and raising $31 million to support the university. He has also been a faculty member in the Department of Health and Human Performance for more than 20 years as an instructor, assistant professor and associate professor.

During his career at NSU, Maggio also served as director of admissions and recruiting and director of enrollment services. He joined the staff at Northwestern State as women’s track and field coach.

Maggio is a 1985 summa cum laude graduate of Northwestern State. As a senior, he was elected Mr. NSU by his fellow students. Maggio earned his master’s of education at NSU. He received a doctorate in developmental education from Grambling State University.
17 2017-05-05
Lafayette

UL System names familiar face as next NSU president


Northwestern State University's new leader is no stranger to the school or to Natchitoches.

On Thursday, Chris Maggio was named the 19th president of the university in Natchitoches, where he has worked for nearly 30 years.

Most recently he served as acting president, stepping into the leadership role Jan. 1 after Jim Henderson became president of the University of Louisiana System.

During his time at NSU, Maggio's roles have included work in athletics, alumni relations and student affairs. He was vice president of the student experience when he was tapped for acting president. He has maintained both roles since January.

"I've given my professional life to Northwestern, and it has been a joy to come to work every day," Maggio said in a UL System release. "It is an honor to take the role as president full time, and I look forward to collaborating with students, faculty and staff to ensure the university continues on its positive trajectory."

READ MORE: Here's how much Louisiana college leaders get paid | Who wants to be a college president in Louisiana?

A search committee narrowed the field of candidates to two finalists, Maggio and William Wainwright, after public interviews on campus last week. Wainwright is chancellor of Northshore Technical Community College.

The UL System Board of Supervisors interviewed finalists at a special meeting Thursday and named Maggio president.

His familiarity with the campus was something Maggio emphasized in his interview. He said keys to Northwestern State's success are faculty innovation, an engaged student body and community partnerships, according to a release.

“The cornerstone of my presidency will be the passion and fervor that I bring to the office," he said in a university release. "There will not be a minute's pause in the momentum and success our university has experienced."
17 2017-05-04
Natchitoches

Nominations open for Hall of Distinguished Educators


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Gallaspy College of Education and Human Development Alumni Advisory Board is seeking nominations for the Hall of Distinguished Educators for 2017. Nominees must have graduated from Northwestern State’s College of Education at least 30 years prior to nomination. Inductees will be honored during a brunch and induction ceremony at the Teacher Education Center during Homecoming festivities.



The deadline to submit nominations is July 28.



Anyone who would like to nominate an outstanding College of Education alumnus who has had a distinguished career in education should send the nominee’s resume and other documentation outlining the reason for the nomination to NSU Gallaspy College of Education and Human Development, Northwestern State University, Natchitoches, LA 71497.



Additional information is available by calling (318) 357-6278.


17 2017-05-03
Natchitoches

NSU, BPCC update EMT-UPSA articulation agreement


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University and Bossier Parish Community College updated a 9-year-old agreement that allows BPCC students who complete their Emergency Medical Technician – Paramedic training to transfer those credits towards partial fulfillment of degree requirements in unified public safety administration (UPSA), specifically the fire and emergency medical services administration concentration, at NSU.



Administrators signed an addendum to update the course matrix Tuesday to ensure that all coursework is current.



“If our programs are good, they are dynamic and they are changing and they need to be updated from time to time,” said BPCC Chancellor Dr. Rick Bateman.



In addition to faculty and staff from both institutions, several emergency medical services professionals attended the signing program at BPCC.



“One thing we are not surprised by is the level of engagement we have with the community,” Bateman said. “Folks here have a commitment to our regional university.”



NSU’s Acting President Dr. Chris Maggio noted the many articulation agreements between BPCC and NSU and lauded faculty for their willingness to cooperate and put students first.



“We could not do this without the collaboration and the academic excellence apparent at BPCC,” Maggio said. “Our NSU faculty respect the education that students receive at BPCC and we jump at the chance to formalize these articulations.”



UPSA is a unique program that was developed to fill a void in the education of fire service members, said Dr. Joe Morris, head of NSU’s Department of Criminal Justice, History and Social Science. NSU UPSA program coordinator Jack Atherton is a retired federal prison warden who has first-hand experience in dealing with emergency management, crisis intervention, emergency preparedness and catastrophic damage and injury mitigation and prevention. BPCC students who complete their EMT Paramedic training get 25 credit hours towards their UPSA degree, Morris said.



For information on NSU’s UPSA program or other degree programs available in the Department of History, Criminal Justice and Social Sciences, visit cjhss.nsula.edu.


17 2017-05-03
Natchitoches

LSNA recognizes NSU nursign faculty


NATCHITOCHES – The Louisiana State Nurses Association recognized Northwestern State University College of Nursing faculty Maxine Johnson and Diane Webb for belonging to the organization’s first group of fellows and for supporting the organization in their districts for at least 25 years. Webb was honored as LSNA volunteer for the organization in thanks for many years of continuing education as a lead nurse planner, self study author and other activities.



Johnson is director of planning, grants and development for the College of Nursing and School of Allied Health. Webb is adjunct faculty in the graduate nursing program. The two were recognized at the LSNA House of Delegates during the organization’s first awards luncheon.



The Shreveport District Nurses Association was well represented at program with 14 seated delegates. NSU Nursing Faculty Dr. Danita Potter is the new LSNA secretary, Tammy Randol and Deborah Hickman are on the nominating committee and Dr. Amy Garcie is on the audit committee.
17 2017-05-03
Natchitoches

Folk Festival ranked as top tourism event


NATCHITOCHES – The Southeast Tourism Society has named the 38th annual Natchitoches-Northwestern State University Folk Festival one of the STS Top 20 Event in the Southeast for July 2017. This year’s Natchitoches-NSU Folk Festival will be July 14-15. The STS Top 20 Festival and Event Awards have highlighted programs around the Southeast since 1985.


Travel industry experts select 20 events per month, and STS publicizes them throughout the United States. The complete list is published on two websites: EscapeToTheSoutheast.com and Travel Media Press Room, according to Dr. Shane Rasmussen, director of the Louisiana Folklife Center.

“The 2017 Festival theme “Keeping Tradition Alive!” celebrates the ways in which so many outstanding artists young and old are tapping into the power and artistry of the old ways, revitalizing and reimagining tradition as they make it their own,” Rasmussen said. “As the artists taking part in the 2017 Festival demonstrate, Louisiana folk culture is vibrant and diverse.”

The folk music of many culture groups will be featured, with Cajun music by Ray Abshire and Steve Riley and the Mamou Playboys, French Creole la la music by Goldman Thibodeaux and the Lawtell Playboys, Zydeco by Geno Delafose and French Rockin’ Boogie and Gerard Delafose and the Zydeco Gators, traditional Delta tunes by the Back Porch Band, bluegrass by the Clancey Ferguson Band, Texas swing by the Caddo Creek Band, and blues by Hezekiah and the Houserockers, the Wayne “Blue” Burns Band and Ed Huey.

Saturday’s activities include three stages of live music, Cajun dance lessons, dancing, narrative sessions, KidFest, a Cajun accordion workshop, and traditional crafts. Outside demonstrations include blacksmithing, working cattle dogs and horseshoeing. Traditional crafts such as wood carving, Czech Pysanky eggs, Spanish moss dolls, pine needle baskets and handmade furniture will be exhibited on Saturday only, from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. in Prather Coliseum.

The 38th Annual Natchitoches-NSU Folk Festival is supported in part by grants and donations from the Cane River National Heritage Area, the City of Natchitoches, the Lower Mississippi Delta Initiative of the National Park Service, Natchitoches Historic District Development Commission, New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation, Inc. and the Shreveport Regional Arts Council.

For more information about the Festival or the Louisiana State Fiddle Championship, contact the Louisiana Folklife Center at folklife@nsula.edu or (318) 357-4332. For more information about Natchitoches, contact the Natchitoches Convention & Visitors Bureau at (800) 259-1714.


“The Southeast Tourism Society’s Top 20 Festival and Event list is an excellent guide for the Southeast’s visitors, residents and travel writers. The events selected represent the best, and often most unique, activities in our region,” said Bill Hardman, president and CEO of the Southeast Tourism Society.



Events considered for the STS Top 20 recognition must be at least three years old and have attendance of at least 1,000. Nomination forms and deadlines are available at SoutheastTourism.org or by calling (770) 542-1523.



STS, founded in 1983 and headquartered in Atlanta, Ga., is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting tourism to and within 12 states – Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia.
17 2017-05-02
Natchitoches

Sprezzatura: Art and Fashion at NSU’s Orville Hanchey Gallery


Over 100 people attended “Sprezzatura”, a Senior Exhibition put on by NSU student Ethan Stelly on April 24. The show was an interesting fusion of art and fashion as 10 models displayed a wide variety of looks, all made from scratch by Stelly. The show’s models were fellow NSU students who were joined by Ms. Jan Frederick and NSU CAPA Director Dr. Handel. In addition to being a superb designer, Ethan Stelly is also interested in a variety of other arts. The exhibition featured 18 art pieces, ranging from paintings to fiber art and mixed media. The models took their turns in his creations accompanied by live cello music.

After completing his studies at NSU, Ethan will go on to working in theater in Ohio where he will also pursue a graduate degree in Fashion Design. The Natchitoches Parish Journal wishes him all the best in his future endeavors.


17 2017-05-02
Natchitoches

NSU recognizes outstanding research on 30th annual Research Day


Northwestern State University recognized individuals for excellence in research during the schools’ 30th annual Research Day. The awards capped off a day of oral and poster presentations that addressed topics in the varied disciplines of computer information systems, engineering technology, music, public health, cultural studies, English, science, Cuba, psychology and film. Some presentations were live streamed for the benefit of distance-learning students.

Kirsten Fontenot of Zachary was recognized with the Phi Kappa Phi Student Research Award, which recognizes outstanding research, distinguished artistic performance or creative work completed by a student or team of students while enrolled at NSU.

Fontenot is a senior in the Louisiana Scholars’ College majoring in liberal arts with a concentration in scientific inquiry. Her research, which she intends to publish in an undergraduate chemistry academic journal, was titled “Protein-Protein Docking Analysis of Ebola Virus Cell Bending and Entry.” Her faculty sponsor is Dr. Massimo Bezoari. She intends to attend medical school this fall.

“My research is on blocking Ebola virus infection using computer software to model the proteins involved in infection,” she explained. “Modeling the interactions between the proteins show where exactly the proteins will interact with each other. That information can be utilized to synthesize small molecules that can bind in those interaction sites and stop or prevent Ebola virus infection.”

Jessica Cross of Natchitoches was recognized with the Student Design Award for creating the poster and program cover for Research Day 2017. Cross is a senior in the Department of Fine and Graphic Arts with a concentration in graphic communications.

Paul Christopher was this year’s recipient of the Dr. Mildred Hart Bailey Faculty Research Award, which recognized a member of the faculty for outstanding research or distinguished artistic performance and/or creative work substantially completed during the last three years. The projects are evaluated for scholarly or creative significance, national, regional or local impact, originality and ingenuity of project design and critical recognition by experts in the field.

Christopher is an associate professor of cello and music theory in the School of Creative and Performing Arts. His research topic is “Musique Concrete Instrumentale.”

Keynote speaker Dr. Richard Jensen, an internationally recognized authority on the history of terrorism, spoke on “Terrorism from Anarchism to Al Qaeda and ISIS.” Jensen, A professor in the Louisiana Scholars College who is retiring after this semester, dedicated his lecture to the late Dr. Jean D’Amato Thomas, former faculty and noted researcher. Jensen was winner of last year’s Dr. Jean D’Amato Thomas Lifetime Achievement Award.

Research Day was chaired by Dr. Margaret Cochran.


17 2017-05-02
Natchitoches

State Farm funds AR/VR lab for CIS students


NATCHITOCHES – An new augmented reality/virtual reality computer lab at Northwestern State University will help students in the computer information systems program familiarize themselves with cutting edge software that industry experts predict will one day be intrinsic to business, education, healthcare, design, manufacturing, retail, transportation, entertainment and other facets of every day life. The new AR/VR lab was funded by a grant from State Farm Insurance, a long-time NSU corporate partner.



Augmented reality technology inserts virtual objects and information into the real world, typically through a smart phone app such as Erasmus. Virtual reality technology immerses users into a virtual world via a headset such as Oculus Rift or Google Cardboard and a personal computer. AR/VR technology blurs the line between what is real and what is computer-generated.



Curtis Penrod, coordinator of NSU’s computer information systems program, said the AR/VR lab will help students leap into the high-tech, leading-edge hardware and software and give them a competitive edge in the job market. CIS faculty Dr. Begona Perez-Mira and Sarah Wright wrote the grant to fund the lab.



“This is the technology of the future,” Penrod. “We are market-responsive, but we are also looking towards the future.”



In acknowledging State’s Farm’s support of the lab, Penrod said the technology would be applicable to the company for its capabilities in sharing information, enhanced training experiences and examining claims.



“This is about using technology in a new way to get ahead of the curve. We want our students to take this knowledge to State Farm and our other partners,” Penrod said.



NSU’s partnership with State Farm has been in place for 20 years with a pipeline of computer information specialists joining the company as interns and full-time employees in State Farm’s corporate office. Several State Farm agents in the area are NSU alumni and were present for the grant presentation last week.



Kevin Garrett, a State Farm Agency field executive from Oklahoma City, congratulated the students and faculty on the new lab and said his company is getting younger and younger.



“You may not realize how high in demand you are,” Garrett said. “When I think about virtual reality and augmented reality, it’s about how we can impact people’s lives. State Farm is committed to education.”



During the program, several business students were recognized for successfully competing in the Phi Beta Lambda state leadership conference and will advance to the national competition in Anaheim, California, in June. Phi Beta Lambda (Future Business Leaders of America) is the premier student business organization in the world that helps members prepare for careers in business and business-related fields. Those students are Katelyn Marchand of Gonzales, Ciara Gibbs of Slaughter, Taylor Poleman of Shreveport, Julie Breaux of Gonzales, Virginia Falgoust of Natchitoches, Michelle McIntyre of Bossier City, Oscar Alan Thompson of Leesville, Maggie Harris of West Monroe and Sharonda Demars of Natchitoches.



Also recognized were students who won first place in competition at the Association of Information Technology Professionals (AITP) national collegiate conference. Alba Maloff of San Pedro Sula, Honduras, and Nicholas Fisher of Iowa won first place in Microsoft Office Solutions, marking the 17th time in as many years that an NSU CIS major has won first place at the national competition. Thirteen NSU students attended the conference with Perez-Mira, faculty sponsor of NSU’s AITP chapter. More than 460 students and faculty from 48 colleges and universities attended the conference.



Those accomplishments illustrate the breadth and depth of of NSU’s programs in business and computer information systems that corporate partners such as State Farm find invaluable, administrators said.



Last year, NSU’s CIS program earned a $40,000 State Farm grant that funded the creation of mobile application and networking labs updated with new computers, laptops, iPads and other devices.



Northwestern State’s CIS degree program prepares individuals for high demand, lucrative careers as user support specialists, systems analysts, programmers, CIS managers, network and computer systems administrators, software developers and dozens of other related opportunities. CIS careers are ranked near the top for growth opportunities, career satisfaction and entry-level salaries. The program is nationally recognized for excellence in systems analysis and design, database design and development, Internet web design and development and object-oriented programming.



The mission of State Farm is to help people manage the risks of everyday life, recover from the unexpected, and realize their dreams. State Farm and its affiliates are the largest providers of auto, home and individual life insurance in the United States. Its 18,000 agents and more than 65,000 employees serve more than 83 million policies and accounts – nearly 81 million auto, home, life, health and commercial policies, and nearly 2 million bank accounts. Commercial auto insurance, along with coverage for renters, business owners, boats and motorcycles, is available. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company is the parent of the State Farm family of companies. State Farm is ranked No. 35 on the 2016 Fortune 500 list of largest companies. For more information, please visit http://www.statefarm.com.




17 2017-05-02
Natchitoches

ROTC recognizes cadets' scholastic, military achievements


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University Department of Military Science hosted an awards program to recognize outstanding cadets in the school’s Reserve Officer Training Corp. The department hosts a program for cadets at the conclusion of each semester to recognize military and academic achievements and present scholarships.



The Spring 2017 program also included a farewell to MSG Randy Angel, senior military instructor, who has been selected for promotion will attend the Sergeants Major Academy this summer before moving to serve the Army in his new rank. He was presented with the Meritorious Service Medal.



President’s List cadets who earned 4.0 grade point average were Autumn Mitchell, John Ham and Karl Marzahl.



Dean’s List cadets who earned a 3.5-3.99 grade point average were Michael Kingsley, Sonia Ortiz, Scott Stearns, Taylor Andrews, Savannah Carter, Mary-Kathryn Fuller, Ronicia Howze, Taimata Luafalemana, Thomas Marlbrough, Logan DeOre, Kari Taffi, Kelsey Bolden and Toby Boudreaux.



Honor List cadets who earned a 3.0 by 3.49 grade point average were Shaffer Kimball, TeAmara Judkins, Joey Wills, Albert Tuiel, Tucker Ellis, Jaelon Davis, Steven Bryant, Adam Barnes, Crystal Smith, Kendrick Shavers, Danny Hatcher and Briyonna Collins.



MS IV (senior level) cadets and their honors are as follows.



Cadet Captain TeAmara Judkins, Battalion S2, military intelligence: Cadet Honors Award, Recruiting Award and Field Training Exercise Award;



Cadet Shaffer Kimball, Battalion S1, adjutant: Superior Cadet Award, Cadet Honors Award, ROTC Honors, Gold Medal Athlete, Intramural Sports Recognition, Commendation Medal Award, Leadership Excellence Award, Recruiting Award, Field Training Exercise Award, Color Guard Award and Ranger Challenge Award.



Kimball will be the trainer for the Ranger Challenge team next fall. He also received the Colonel Tom Baker Award, which recognizes an outstanding senior cadet who exhibits exemplary traits of dedication and leadership.



Cadet Command Sergeant Major Michael Kingsley: ROTC Honors, Gold Medal Athlete, Commendation Medal Award, Leadership Excellence Award, Field Training Exercise Award and Ranger Challenge Award. Kingsley will be Battalion Commander next fall.



Cadet Lieutenant Colonel Autumn Mitchell (Battalion Commancer): ROTC Honors, Commendation Medal Award, Leadership Excellence Award, Recruiting Award, Field Training Exercise Award, PMS Character Award and completion certificate for the Cadet Leadership Course.



Mitchell also received the Military Order of World Wars, which recognizes a cadet who excels in all military and scholastic aspects of the ROTC program, and the Military Excellence Award of the American Legion, which recognizes a cadet who displays military leadership, discipline, character and citizenship.



Cadet Mark Ordoyne, who will commission next year, received a certification of completion for the Cadet Leader Course.



Cadet Joshua Perkins, S6, communications officer, who will commission next year, received a certificate for the Cadet Leader Course.



Cadet Major Scott Stearns, S3, operation/training officer: ROTC Honors, Gold Medal Athlete and Field Training Exercise Award.



Cadet Alexander Stewart, Company First Sergeant, will be S4 supply officer next fall. He received the Silver Medal Athlete Award, Commendation Medal Award, Leadership Excellence Award and the Field Training Exercise Award. He also received the Reserve Officers Association and Lions Club Award.



Cadet Major Sonia Ortiz, Battalion Executive Officer: ROTC Honors, Commendation Medal Award, Leadership Excellence Award, Field Training Exercise Award, Color Guard Award and completion certificate for the Cadet Leader Course. She is also this year’s recipient of the ROTC Award of the Scottish Rite of Freemasonry.



MS III (junior level) cadets and their honors are as follows.



Cadet First Lieutenant Taylor Andrews, ROTC Honors, Cadet Achievement Medal, Leadership Excellence Award, Recruiting Award, Field Training Exercise Award and Color Guard Award. Andrews currently serves as Platoon Leader and will be Battalion Executive Officer next fall. He also received the Award of the Military Officers Association of America and the Veterans of Foreign Wars Award, which recognizes demonstrated achievement and concentrated effort in military and academic subjects with demonstrated capability and diligence in the ROTC program.



Cadet Steven Bryant: Cadet Scholar Award, ROTC Honors, Bronze Medal Athlete, Cadet Achievement Medal, Leadership Excellence, Recruiting Award, Field Training Exercise Award and Color Guard Award. Bryant will be the Assistant S4 in the fall.



Cadet Savannah Carter: Superior Cadet Award, ROTC Honors, Intramural Sports Recognition, Commendation Medal Award, Recruiting Award, Field Training Exercise Award and Color Guard Award. Carter also received the ROTC Award of the Association of the United State Army. Carter will be S2 in the fall.



Cadet Dominitra Charles: Platinum Medal Athlete (perfect score of 300 on the Army Physical Fitness Test) and the Recruiting Award.



Cadet Jaelon Davis: Cadet Honors Award, ROTC Honors, Leadership Excellence, Recruiting Award, Field Training Exercise Award and a completion certificate for Cadet Initial Entry Training. Davis also received the Leadership Award of the Military Order of the Purple Heart. Davis will serve as Assistant S6 at LSU-S in the fall.



Cadet Tucker Ellis: Cadet Honors Award, ROTC Honors, Bronze Medal Athlete, Intramural Sports Recognition, Cadet Achievement Medal, Leadership Excellence, Recruiting Award, Color Guard Award and Ranger Challenge Award. Ellis also received the award of the Military Order of World Wars, which recognizes a cadet who excels in all military and scholastic aspects of the ROTC program. Ellis will served as the Battalion’s Command Sergeant Major in the fall.



Cadet Mary-Kathryn Fuller: ROTC Honors Award, Field Training Award and completion certificate for Cadet Initial Entry Training. Fuller will serve as Assistant S1 in the fall.



Cadet Brandon Homan: ROTC Honors and Recruiting Award. Homan will be the Assistant S2 at LSU-S in the fall.



Cadet Ronicia Howze: ROTC Honors, Commendation Medal Award, Recruiting Award, Field Training Award and Ranger Challenge Award. Howze also received the Spirit Award of the United Services Automobile Association. Howze will be the Battalion’s S1 in the fall.



Cadet Taimata Luafalemana: ROTC Honors, Bronze Medal Athlete, Commendation Medal Award, Leadership Excellence, Recruiting Award, Field Training Exercise Award and Ranger Challenge Award. Luafalemana also received the award of the Military Order of Foreign Ward of the United States. Luafalemana will serve as the Battalion’s S6 in the fall.



Cadet Thomas Marlbrough, a platoon leader: ROTC Honors, Cadet Achievement Medal, Leadership Excellence, Recruiting Award, Field Training Exercise Award.



Cadet Aliona Salter: ROTC Honors, Recruiting Award and completion certificate for the Cadet Initial Entry Training. Salter also received the award of the Reserve Officers Association. Salter will serve as the Company’s First Sergeant in the fall.



Cadet Albert E. Tuiel: Cadet Honors Award, ROTC Honors, Leadership Excellence, Recruiting Award, Field Training Exercise Award and Color Guard Award. Tuiel will serve as Assistant S3 in the fall.



Cadet Brittanie Williams: ROTC Honors, Intramural Sports Recognition, Commendation Medal Award, Leadership Excellence, Recruiting Award, Field Training Exercise Award and the Ranger Challenge Award. She is also the recipient of the Patriotic Award of the Knights of Columbus. Williams will serve as Battalion S3 in the fall.



Cadet Joey Wills: Cadet Scholar, ROTC Honors, Leadership Excellence Award, Recruiting Award and Color Guard Award. Wills will serve as Assistant S3 next semester.



MS II (sophomore level) cadets and their honors are as follows.



Cadet Adam Barnes: Cadet Scholar, ROTC Honors, Leadership Excellence Award, Recruiting Award and Field Training Exercise Award. Barnes is also the recipient of the National Sojourners Award, which recognizes an outstanding cadet who has contributed the most to encourage and demonstrate Americanism within the corps of cadets. Barnes was also recognized as the Most Improved Cadet.



Cadet Joe Brown: ROTC Honors, Intramural Sports Recognition and Leadership Excellence Award.



Cadet Cameron Coleman: Recruiting Award.



Cadet Logan DeOre: ROTC Honors, Field Training Exercises Award and the award of the General Society of the War of 1812.



Cadet Dale Granier: Cadet Achievement Medal, Leadership Excellence and Color Guard Award. Granier is also received the award of the Reserve Officers Association.



Cadet John Ham: ROTC Honors, Intramural Sports Recognition, Commendation Medal Award, Field Training Exercise Award and the Ranger Challenge Award. Ham also received the Military History Award of the Association of the United State Army.



Cadet Karl Marzahl: Superior Cadet Award, ROTC Honors, Silver Medal Athlete Award, Intramural Sports Award, Perfect Attendance Award, Commendation Medal Award, Field Training Exercise award, Color Guard Award and Ranger Challenge Award. Marzahl is also recipient of the award of the American Veterans of World War II, which recognizes diligence, demonstrated military excellence and outstanding accomplishments during the year, and the American Legion Award for Scholastic Excellence. Marzahl also received the Sergeant York Award for the cadet who does the most to support the program.



Cadet Kari Taffi: ROTC Honors and Intramural Sports Recognition



MS I (freshman level) cadets and their honors are as follows.



Cadet Kelsey Bolden: Perfect Attendance Award.



Cadet Toby Boudreaux: ROTC Honors, Perfect Attendance Award, Cadet Achievement Medal and Color Guard Award. Boudreaux also received the award of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War.



Cadet Mackenzie Buie-Grace: Cadet Achievement Medal, Leadership Excellence and the Recruiting Award.



Cadet Briyonna Collins: Cadet Honors Award, ROTC Honors, Intramural Sports Recognition and Leadership Excellence Award.



Cadet Jo Anna Fisher: Perfect Attendance Award.



Cadet Danny Hatcher: Cadet Honros Award and Color Guard Award.



Cadet Jessica A. Hooten: ROTC Honors and Leadership Excellence Award.



Cadet Christian Linn: Cadet Achievement Medal, Leadership Excellence Award and Recruiting Award.



Cadet Larancion Magee: Cadet Achievement Medal and Ranger Challenge Award. Magee is also receiving the award of the Military Order of the World Wars, which recognizes a freshman or sophomore who excels in military and scholastic aspects of the ROTC program and intends to continue in the ROTC program.


17 2017-05-02
Natchitoches

Phi Kappa Phi holds spring 2017 induction ceremony


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society hosted an initiation ceremony for new members. Phi Kappa Phi is the nation’s oldest, largest and most selective all-discipline honor society.



Phi Kappa Phi’s mission is to recognize and promote academic excellence in all fields of higher education and engage the community of scholars in service to others. Senior level and graduate students are selected from the top 10 percent of their classes. Junior level students are selected from the top 7.5 percent. Faculty, professional staff and alumni who have achieved scholarly distinction are also eligible.



Initiates are listed as follows.



Abbeville -- Jabain August;



Alexandria -- Shelby R. Laborde and Rachel N. Lavergne;



Austin, Texas – Erica Ervin;



Baton Rouge -- Shondra Hines and Dakota A. Newman;



Benton -- Elizabeth P. Jones and Jenna L. Smith;



Bertram, Texas -- Alexana Karina Torres;



Bossier City -- Thresa Hargrave, Morgan L. Hudson, Gina M. Masson, Kiera J. White and Haneen Zeidan;



Bradenton, Florida -- Alexandra M. Latham;



Burleson, Texas -- Addison D. Pellegrino and Donato Susca;



Carencro -- Sarah K. Clavelle;



Charlottesville, Virginia -- Courtney Lazore;



Colfax -- Christina M. Nessmith;



Coushatta -- Caroline G. Doughty;



Destrehan -- Kristen Richmond;



Deville -- Brianna Elizabeth Ashley;



East Windsor, New Jersey -- Andreia, Martins;



Franklin -- Brandon P. Ware;



Glen Burnie, Maryland -- Katherine, Speicher;



Gretna -- Natalie Borowski;



Haughton -- Shannon D. Walls;



Hendersonville, Tennessee -- Amy K. Williams;



Hineston -- Terri A. Smith;



Houma -- Shelby L. Glynn;



Houston, Texas -- Alyssa, Jacobs;



Jonesville -- Coleen E. Cagle;



Keithville – Alexis Britt;



Kenner -- Christina Arrechavala;



Lafayette -- Avery C. Monrose and Carl E. Tapo Sr.;



Lake Arthur -- Rayce A. Mayor;



Lake Charles -- Alyce M. Jimney, Laura Wilkins;



Lamar, Colorado -- Kaylee J. Weakley,



Leesville -- Hannah Coleman and Karli Daigle;



Longview, Texas -- Kelli Breanne Hickerson and Samantha Morris;



Lucas, Texas -- Bailey M. Martin;



Luling -- Alexis M. Rice;



Mamou -- Abigail L. Saucier;



Mandeville -- Jimmy D. Gill Jr.;



Many -- Angelica Elena Galban, Sabrina C. Ross and Samantha A. Simmons;



Marrero -- Chance M. Creppel;



Monroe -- Lisa M. Hale, Aaron D. Hunt and Brittany M. Jackson;



Natchitoches -- Dr. Kirsten A. Bartels, Abbigail Barton, Susan K. Bernath, Joanna, Boydstun, Kaysee, Carrere, Kaylee N. Chronister, Khirsten L. Doolan, Alicia Foy, Luis A. Gallo Quintero, Angela D. Gourdon, Angel C. Greer, Abby Lou Hinds, Alba E. Maloff, Hunter M. Martin, Andrew Mcalister, Paola Mendez Ruiz, Jordan Reich, Maria, Rome, Jacqueline D. Rushford, Taylor L. Whitehead, Annie E. Wright and Emily C. Zering;



Oak Grove -- Lana R. Kelly;



Oberlin -- Deana May;



Pineville -- Angela T. Brouillette, Caleb Howell and Faith E. Normand;



Ponchatoula -- Sandy L. Yaeger;



Princeton, North Carolina -- Jennifer D. Peedin;



Rayville -- Emily M. Rawls;



Ruston -- William T. Davis;



Shreveport -- Amye Jacquelyn Flair, Michelle M. Frederick, Michelle H. Hardin, Emily Jackson, Bethany M. Jones, Elizabeth B. Lewis, Christine Mettenbrink, Madison F. Milligan, Jared A. Perkins, Taylor Poleman, Richard Scott, Terri Scott, Albert E. Tuiel Jr.;



Spring, Texas -- Hailee M. Rhodes;



Sulphur -- Tina M. Honea;



Sunset -- Emma A. Warren;



Swartz -- Brittany Taraba, Jean D. Taraba;



Texarkana, Texas -- Elane M. Jewell;



Thibodaux -- Nia I. Walker;



Virginia Beach, Virginia -- Kristi N. Lafoon;



West Monroe -- Kayla A. Telano;



Winnfield -- Andrew M. Harrel;



Woodworth -- Slade Allen;


17 2017-05-02
Shreveport

NSU to hold concealed carry class


NATCHITOCHES, La. - If you want to obtain a Louisiana concealed handgun permit you can take a course this weekend at Northwestern State University.

The NSU Office of Electronic and Continuing Education will offer a Louisiana Concealed Carry Class from 8 a.m.
until 6 p.m. Saturday, May 6 in South Hall on the NSU campus and at the Natchitoches Shooting Range.

The class is for those age 21 or older. The cost is $80 plus a $20 range fee.

The course will cover pistol shooting fundamentals, safe handling, use of force laws and related topics. Space is limited to 20 students.

For more information, call (318) 357-6355, (800) 376-2422 or go to nsula.edu/ece/non-credit-programs.

17 2017-05-01
Natchitoches

Northwestern State Students place first at AITP National Collegiate Conference


Northwestern State University students Alba Maloff of San Pedro Sula, Honduras, and Nicholas Fisher of Iowa won first place in Microsoft Office Solutions at the Association of Information Technology Professionals (AITP) National Collegiate Conference in St. Louis.

Harvey Briggs of Monroe was in the top 20 in Security. This is the 16th time in 17 years a NSU computer information systems major has won first place at the national competition.



To read more please log in or subscribe to the digital edition http://www.etypeservices.com/Natchitoches%20TimesID577/
17 2017-05-01
Natchitoches

Kilcoyne named named dean of the College of Business and Technology at NSU


Dr. Margaret Kilcoyne has been named dean of the College of Business and Technology at Northwestern State University. The appointment is subject to approval by the Board of Supervisors for the University of Louisiana System. She was selected from a field of 34 applicants.

Kilcoyne has been a faculty member and administrator at Northwestern State since 1986. She will direct degree programs within the School of Business and Department of Engineering Technology. The School of Business includes bachelor’s programs in accounting, business administration, computer information systems and hospitality management and tourism as well as a business analytics post baccalaureate certification.

The Department of Engineering Technology includes an associate degree in engineering technology, bachelor’s degree programs in electronics engineering technology and industrial engineering technology, a pre-professional program in pre-engineering and post baccalaureate certifications in project management and quality control.

“Dr. Kilcoyne has effectively served the University as a faculty member and director for the School of Business,” said Dr. Vickie Gentry, interim provost and vice president for academic affairs. “She is highly regarded by her faculty who supported her appointment to the position of Dean of the College of Business and Technology. She is a dedicated administrator who will lead her faculty in accomplishing the mission of Northwestern State.”

She has served as interim dean since 2015. From 2012 to 2015, Kilcoyne was director of the School of Business after nine months as acting director.

The College of Business and Technology had an enrollment of 1,390 last fall, an increase of more than 10 percent over the fall 2015 semester.

“I am pleased to have the opportunity to lead the College of Business and Technology and appreciate the confidence (Acting President) Dr. (Chris) Maggio and Dr. Gentry have placed in me,” said Kilcoyne. “I look forward to working with our faculty, students, stakeholders and business and industry to strengthen and expand programs in the College of Business and Technology.”

From 2010 to 2012, Kilcoyne was coordinator of assessment and academic services and a full professor in the College of Science, Technology and Business.

From 2005 until 2010, Kilcoyne was director of business programs and an assistant professor, directing and coordinating five degree programs.

Kilcoyne joined Northwestern State's faculty as an adjunct instructor and was named an instructor and coordinator of the Office of Cooperative Education in 1989. In 1998, she was promoted to an assistant professor and director of the Office of Cooperative Education.

Last year, she was inducted into Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society. Kilcoyne held the Noble Morrison Endowed Professorship in 2011. In 2009, she received the NSU Alumni Association's Excellence in Teaching Award for the College of Business.

Kilcoyne has received a number of honors for her research and teaching from her peers. The Association for Business Communication Southwestern United States honored her with the Marlin C. Young Outstanding Teacher Award in 2015 and the 2014 Outstanding Educator Award – Federation of Business Disciplines. She was named the 2013 Governor’s Technology Educator of the Year. In 2011, Kilcoyne received the ABIS Distinguished Paper Award and in 2010, she received the ABC-Southwest Outstanding Researcher Award.

She has co-authored more than 50 national and international publications in professional journals or proceedings/book of readings on the state, regional, national or international level. Kilcoyne has obtained more than $1 million in grants to benefit Northwestern State.

She is a charter member of the Northwestern State Business Women’s Association and a member of Phi Beta Delta and Beta Gamma Sigma honor societies, the Association of Business Information Systems and Delta Pi Epsilon.
17 2017-04-28
Natchitoches

NPJ interviews finalists for NSU Presidency


The NPJ had some one-to-one time with the two finalists selected for final interviews with the University of Louisiana System’s Board of Supervisors on May 4 in Baton Rouge. Dr. Chris Maggio and Dr. William Wainwright are the finalists in the running for the Presidency of Northwestern State University after a round of interviews with the NSU Search Committee April 27. The NPJ asked the following questions to get to know the finalists a little bit better.



Q: How will you, as the new president, make sure more of NSU’s public and foundation dollars are spent with local vendors and not out of town and out of state?



Wainwright: I would lean on the university’s procurement policy, but at the end of the day it’s about the quality. When you look at the overall success and image of Natchitoches, it’s clear we have the quality locally to support our institution.



Maggio: On top of the relationships I have with the business and industry leaders in Natchitoches, I will strive to recruit the best and the brightest to NSU. The university will continue to partner with the community on projects and focus on creating an innovative student experience. It’s important to get the students involved in the local community. What attracts students isn’t just NSU, but the locale and you’ll continue to see this collaboration between NSU and Natchitoches in the years to come.



Q: NSU and Natchitoches value preservation and progress. What’s your take on the balance of these two important aspects in our area?



Wainwright: When you look at the history of the university and the city, what’s been preserved to date is fundamental to the success of both. Ensuring students, faculty alum and external stakeholders understand the importance of preservation is key. This can be demonstrated through the curriculum, student life and civic responsibility.



Maggio: It’s so important that we continue to maintain our identity and our commitment to historical preservation. It’s important to find the balance where history meets progress. I can see University Parkway becoming an innovation corridor. It’s amazing the history Natchitoches has to offer and the programming NSU can provide. With ties to the community through the Natchitoches Northwestern Symphony Society, the Sports Recreation Center and beautification projects, NSU can bring its resources to aid the community in preservation.



Q: With the media interviews taking place in AA Fredericks, and with the College of Creative and Performing Arts (CAPA) being such a large part of Northwestern, what’s the most creative thing you’ve ever done?



Wainwright: Although it shocked my wife, I handled the majority of the interior design when we opened a new STEM campus at the Northshore Technical Community College in February. From the stained glass, to the writeable walls, outdoor classrooms and creative spaces, it was one of the most creative endeavors I’ve participated in recently.



Maggio: The CAPA students have gotten me out of my comfort zone and I became part of a production for a cameo role in the performance of a skit from High School Musical during the Lady of the Bracelet Pageant.
17 2017-04-28
Shreveport

Finalists named for Northwestern State University President


NATCHITOCHES, LA - The Northwestern State University Search Committee selected two finalists, Chris Maggio and William Wainwright, to present to the Board of Supervisors for the University of Louisiana System for consideration. The Board will meet May 4 in Baton Rouge to interview the finalists and select a president.

"We had a productive two days introducing and, in some cases, reintroducing Northwestern State University to three qualified semifinalists, UL System President and CEO Jim Henderson said. "The Board has a tough choice ahead of it. Our two finalists have roots at Northwestern and both are capable of leading this institution into a bright future."

The Committee considered three semifinalists during a two-day process that included student, faculty, staff and community meetings on Tuesday and interviews today.

"It was an honor to serve on the presidential search committee and I am proud of the finalists we chose to present to the Board," Student Government President John Pearce said. "We chose student-minded candidates who can build on Northwestern's positive trajectory."

Voting members of the search committee include UL System board members Edward Crawford, Lola Dunahoe, Pam Egan, Jimmie Martin, Shawn Murphy, Alejandro Perkins, Mark Romero, Winfred Sibille and Student Board Member Antonio Torres. Also serving as a voting member is NSU Faculty Senate President Marcia Hardy.

Serving as advisory, non-voting members are NSU Student Government Association President John Pearce, NSU Foundation President Scott Andrews, NSU Alumni Association President Monty Chicola and community member Gail Jones. UL System President and CEO Jim Henderson serves as the non-voting committee chair.

UL System President and CEO Jim Henderson led NSU prior to beginning his new role in January. Finalist Chris Maggio is serving as the university’s acting president.
17 2017-04-26
Natchitoches

CenturyLink executive to receive honorary doctorate from NSU


NATCHITOCHES, La. - Northwestern State University will award an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters to alumnus Stewart Ewing as part of Spring Commencement Exercises.

Ewing is executive vice president and chief financial officer for CenturyLink and a 1973 graduate of Northwestern State University’s School of Business.

On Friday, May 12 Ewing will be the graduation speaker at both the morning ceremonies at 10 a.m. and the afternoon ceremonies at 3 p.m.

The Board of Supervisors for the University of Louisiana System has approved the awarding of the honorary doctorate.

Acting President Dr. Chris Maggio said, “Mr. Ewing is an exemplary alumnus of Northwestern State University and an extraordinary role model for current students in the NSU School of Business. He is extremely active in civic and charitable activities and has fostered a culture of giving and volunteerism among CenturyLink employees.”

Ewing, who is the longest-serving chief financial officer of all Fortune 500 companies in the nation, joined

CenturyLink in 1983 as vice president of finance, became vice president and controller in 1984 and senior vice president and chief financial officer in 1989. He was elevated to the position of executive vice president and chief financial officer in 1999.

Before joining Century Telephone, which later became CenturyLink, Ewing was associated for 10 years with KPMG, formerly Peat Marwick & Associates in Shreveport.

Ewing has been instrumental in CenturyLink’s transformation from a regional exchange telephone company to a worldwide technology and telecommunications company. He was at the forefront of CenturyLink’s acquisition strategy by negotiating all stages of purchase agreements from financing the acquisitions to regulatory issues to folding new companies into the corporate structure and philosophy.

Also a leader in ensuring that CenturyLink headquarters remained in Monroe, Ewing has helped guide the company to its position of total assets of more than $47 billion and total revenues of more than $18 billion. The company employs more than 42,000 people worldwide, including 2,500 in Monroe.

The Monroe Chamber of Commerce has awarded its Kitty DeGree Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award in
Business to Ewing for outstanding accomplishments as a business leader throughout his career.

He is married to Hillary Kagan, and they have three children and three grandchildren.

17 2017-04-26
Natchitoches

Former Gov. Edwin Edwards lectures to NSU business students


Former Louisiana Gov. Edwin Edwards was a guest lecturer at Northwestern State University Monday in the David Morgan Auditorium of Russell Hall. The state’s only four-term governor spoke to a business administration special topics course taught by Theodore “Ted” Jones, the Charles D. Ragus Endowed Chair at Northwestern State. Edwards discussed his career in politics along with current state, national and international events.
17 2017-04-26
Natchitoches

NSU will host free robotics camps


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Department of Engineering Technology will host free summer robotics camps for beginners and advanced students. There is no charge to attend the campus, but space is limited to the first 12 applicants for each session. The deadline for registration is June 15.



Beginner Camp Sessions are for students ages 7-12. Session I will be held from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. July 10-11. Session II will be held from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. July 13-14. The camp will cover basic electrical circuits, robot building and assembly and basic programming to navigate a robot.



Advanced Camp will be from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. July 17-18 for ages 13-18 and will cover Arduino programming and advanced sensing.



The camps will be held in Williamson Hall. Participants will provide their own lunches.



The program is supported by the Natchitoches Chamber Education Fund and NSU’s ET Department.



To register, email Curtis Desselles at dessellesc@nsula.edu or Dr. Jafar Al-Sharab at jafar@nsula.edu.
17 2017-04-24
Associated Press

Former Gov. Edwin Edwards to Speak at Northwestern State


NATCHITOCHES, La. (AP) — Former Louisiana Gov. Edwin Edwards will be a guest lecturer at Northwestern State University on Monday.

Edwards will speak to a business administration special topics course taught by Theodore Jones, the Charles D. Ragus Endowed Chair at Northwestern State.

The lecture begins at 5 p.m. in the David Morgan Auditorium of Russell Hall. It's open to the public.

Edwards is Louisiana's only four term governor. He served from 1972-1980, 1984-1988 and 1992-1996. Prior to that, Edwards served in Congress, representing Louisiana's Seventh Congressional District from 1965 to 1972.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
17 2017-04-23
Associated Press

Former Gov. Edwin Edwards to Speak at Northwestern State


NATCHITOCHES, La. (AP) — Former Louisiana Gov. Edwin Edwards will be a guest lecturer at Northwestern State University on Monday.

Edwards will speak to a business administration special topics course taught by Theodore Jones, the Charles D. Ragus Endowed Chair at Northwestern State.

The lecture begins at 5 p.m. in the David Morgan Auditorium of Russell Hall. It's open to the public.

Edwards is Louisiana's only four term governor. He served from 1972-1980, 1984-1988 and 1992-1996. Prior to that, Edwards served in Congress, representing Louisiana's Seventh Congressional District from 1965 to 1972.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
17 2017-04-21
Natchitoches

NSU names 2017-18 student media leaders


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Student Media Board selected four students to serve as student media leaders for the 2017-18 academic year. Named were Alec Horton of Garland, Texas, editor in chief of The Current Sauce, NSU’s weekly student newspaper; Katie Rayburn of Natchitoches, editor in chief of Argus, the university’s annual literary magazine; Kierstin Richter of Shreveport, editor of Potpourri, the university yearbook, and Noah Baudoin of Shreveport, general manager of KNWD, NSU’s student radio station.



Horton is a junior majoring in music business. He has been visual editor at the Current Sauce for the past two years supervising photographers, designers and illustrators, editing stories and overseeing the design process of the newspaper. He has also been public relations manager, photo editor and lead photographer. In addition, he has worked as co-coordinator for the Spirit of Northwestern’s media team and is an experienced photographer/videographer. He has been a member of the Natchitoches-Northwestern Symphony Orchestra, the NSU Percussion Ensemble, the NSU Drum Line, the Spirit of Northwestern Marching Band and a vocalist in the FPC-Natchitoches choir.



The Current Sauce is NSU’s independent, student-operated newspaper that covers campus and community activities as well as relevant social issues of interest to students. The Current Sauce is published weekly during the regular semester with special issues during the summer. To view news reported by the Current Sauce, visit nsulastudentmedia.com.



Rayburn is a senior majoring in English with a minor in Spanish, history and global studies. She was junior editor and copy editor for Argus over the past two years and has served as ACDS Anthology editor and self-published a novel. She is president of NSU’s Spanish Club and Demon Dodgeball and is captain and treasurer for the Demon Quidditch team.



Argus is Northwestern State’s award-winning art and literary magazine that showcases the best of student art, poetry and creative writing and celebrated its 40th anniversary this year. Editions are released every spring. Searchable, digital archives of each edition can be accessed through traditions.nsula.edu.



Richter is a sophomore majoring in psychology/addiction studies. She has been a staff writer for Potpourri for the past year and public relations manager this spring. She also served as an NSU Student Ambassador, is a member of Phi Mu Fraternity and has been involved with Focus Ministries and NSU’s Demon Days committee.



The Potpourri is an independent publication that is planned, designed and produced by students. Coverage runs from March to March of each year, allowing the staff to feature many campus events. Searchable digital archives of all Potpourri editions can be accessed through traditions.nsula.edu.



Baudoin is a sophomore majoring in biology. He has served as KNWD’s director of technology for the past year and is a member of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, the Student Activities Board, the JOVE/NASA Research Lab Scholarship program, the American Society of Microbiology and the NSU Demon Crew.



KNWD the Demon 91.7 FM is a student-run, non-commercial radio station that transmits a digital stereo FM signal 24 hours a day to the campus and surrounding area. KNWD provides students with opportunities to acquire radio management skills through studio work, remote broadcasts and with DemonFest, the station’s annual music and arts festival, set this year for April 22-23. For more information, visit the station’s website at knwdradio.org.



Northwestern State’s student media is directed by the Department of New Media, Journalism and Communication Arts. Scholarships are available for some positions and one scholarship is awarded to an incoming freshman interested in working with KNWD or the Current Sauce.



For more information on the Department of New Media, Journalism and Communication Arts visit nsula.edu/newmedia. More on Northwestern State Student Media can be found at nsulastudentmedia.com.
17 2017-04-20
Alexandria

Northwestern State Student Body President Talks TOPS


VIDEO

John Pearce, student body president at Northwestern State University, said the reduction of TOPS awards has created anxiety among students throughout the state. Greg Hilburn/USA Today Network
17 2017-04-20
Natchitoches

Collaborate ... and BIG things can happen


NSU

Northwestern State University, Northwest Louisiana Technical College and Central Louisiana Technical Community College have developed a work-based learning program that will allow individuals to earn an associate of science degree in engineering technology while they are employed with a sponsoring manufacturer.

Students participating in the Advanced Manufacturing Technician (AMT) program will earn the associate degree from Northwestern State with additional courses through the NWLTC-Natchitoches and CLTCC. Applications for the Fall 2017 class are now available.

Administrators and representatives from area industry and economic development organizations gathered Monday as documents were formalized for the program, which was developed so individuals can work while earning an associate degree and apply their new knowledge and skills on the job.


17 2017-04-20
Natchitoches

Former Gov. Edwin Edwards to speak at NSU Monday


Former Louisiana Gov. Edwin Edwards will be a guest lecturer at Northwestern State University on Monday, April 24 at 5 p.m. in the David Morgan Auditorium (Room 107) of Russell Hall. The lecture is open to the public.

Edwards will speak to a business administration special topics course taught by Theodore “Ted” Jones, the Charles D. Ragus Endowed Chair at Northwestern State.

Edwards is Louisiana’s only four term governor. He served from 1972-1980, 1984-1988 and 1992-1996. Prior to that, Edwards served in Congress, representing Louisiana’s Seventh Congressional District from 1965 to 1972.
17 2017-04-20
Natchitoches

NSU students, faculty, staff and alumni take part in ULS Day at the Capitol


BATON ROUGE – Students, faculty, staff and alumni from Northwestern State University participated in the Annual ULS Day at the Capitol Wednesday. NSU representatives joined the eight other University of Louisiana System institutions as they met with legislators and rallied on the Capitol steps to encourage lawmakers to invest in higher education.


17 2017-04-19
Natchitoches

NSU Holds Red River Special Olympics in Natchitoches


NATCHITOCHES, LA (AP) -
Teams from Natchitoches, Sabine, and Red River parishes were met with spectators and cheers on Tuesday during the opening ceremonies for the Red River Special Olympics.

The event was held at Northwestern State University.

According to the release, the track and field competitions were organized by NSU’s President’s Leadership Program with assistance from NSU Athletics, the Natchitoches Jaycees, area law enforcement agencies and other volunteer groups.

“Building communities, Special Olympics works to spread compassion and acceptance in a way that can unite the world,” said Reatha Cox, PLP advisor. “The goal is to awaken everyone – and every community – to each person’s common humanity. This vision of inclusion starts at the local level.”

Special Olympics is a global movement that organizers say unleashes the human spirit through the transformative power and joy of sports.

Copyright 2017 KSLA. All rights reserved.
17 2017-04-19
Natchitoches

State Farm grant will fund virtual reality computer lab


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Computer Information Systems program has been awarded a grant from State Farm Insurance that will fund the creation of an augmented reality/virtual reality computer lab. State Farm officials will be on campus to award the grant at 11 a.m. Wednesday, April 26 in the Natchitoches Room of Russell Hall. Area State Farm Agents and the public are invited to join students, faculty and administrators for the presentation.



The AR/VR lab will provide a quality classroom environment for current and prospective students in the CIS degree program in NSU’s School of Business.



“This lab will help us leap into the high-tech, leading-edge hardware and software needed in the AR/VR environment,” said Curtis Penrod, coordinator of NSU’s CIS program. “With this lab, CIS faculty will remain ahead of the technology innovation curve to provide CIS and Business students with new and innovative technology instruction that will bring leading edge knowledge value to any company hiring our graduates.”



VR/AR is making its way not only into computer information systems but also into all aspects of business, including marketing, simulations, training, customer service and support and general management.



“Several of the top 10 technology companies in the world have invested heavily on this clearly disruptive technology such as Facebook with Oculus Rift, Google with Cardboard and Microsoft with HoloLens,” Penrod said. “We expect this technology to become an integral part of any company in the next five years with claim assessment training for insurance agents, automobile accident simulations and risk assessment among others. Our students have to be prepared to create, modify and deliver solutions to keep their future employers ahead.”



Baragona, a project manager with State Farm and 2003 Northwestern State CIS graduate, facilitated the grant. Since graduating, Baragona has been actively involved in building the relationship between State Farm and Northwestern State and is the campus manager tasked with recruiting new talent from NSU. He has assisted dozens of NSU students in receiving summer internships and full-time employment opportunities at State Farm and assists them through informal mentoring relationships throughout their careers.


Last year, NSU’s CIS program earned a $40,000 State Farm grant that funded the creation of mobile application and networking labs updated with new computers, laptops, iPads and other devices.





Northwestern State’s CIS degree program prepares individuals for high demand, lucrative careers as user support specialists, systems analysts, programmers, CIS managers, network and computer systems administrators, software developers and dozens of other related opportunities. CIS careers are ranked near the top for growth opportunities, career satisfaction and entry-level salaries. The program is nationally recognized for excellence in systems analysis and design, database design and development, Internet web design and development and object-oriented programming.



The mission of State Farm is to help people manage the risks of everyday life, recover from the unexpected, and realize their dreams. State Farm and its affiliates are the largest providers of auto, home and individual life insurance in the United States. Its 18,000 agents and more than 65,000 employees serve more than 83 million policies and accounts – nearly 81 million auto, home, life, health and commercial policies, and nearly 2 million bank accounts. Commercial auto insurance, along with coverage for renters, business owners, boats and motorcycles, is available. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company is the parent of the State Farm family of companies. State Farm is ranked No. 35 on the 2016 Fortune 500 list of largest companies. For more information, please visit http://www.statefarm.com.



For more information on NSU’s CIS programs or the April 26 presentation, visit cis.nsula.edu or contact Penrod at penrodc@nsula.edu.
17 2017-04-18
Natchitoches

NSU Senior Dance Concert to be held Saturday


Northwestern State University’s Theatre and Dance Department will showcase the work of eight graduating seniors at its annual Senior Dance Concert Saturday, April 22 at 7 p.m. in the A.A. Fredericks Auditorium. Admission is free and open to the public.

The concert features original works by Taylor J. Smith of Leesville, Michael Carrier of Lafayette, Annie Dauzat of Watson, Morgan Humphries, Marissa McMickens and Charles Anderson Jr. of Pineville, Logan Terrell of Lake Charles and Scarlett Saizan of Chalmette.

Smith’s “on l'a fait” is a dance movement set to Cajun-French music that begins with a contemporary solo, a percussive tap piece, and concludes with a feel-good jazz funk dance.

“Miss” by Carrier is his debut work that includes musical theatre stylings with influences of old school jazz and character driven motifs. His dance features six stunning dancers, who tell a story of what it means to be a woman in today's world. The music is a variation of Stephen Sondheim's "Ladies Who Lunch," turned into a jazz standard and sung by vocalist Cassandra Wilson.

“Bloom” by Dauzat is a colorful celebration of life to the music of Andrew Bird.

“Second Chance” by Humphries is a high energy, contemporary style dance that shows the battle of wanting a second chance.

Saizan’s “Farewell for Now” is a contemporary piece inspired by the idea of seeing someone again who has passed on.

“Uprooted” by McMickens is a contemporary dance that takes you on a journey through love, loss and acceptance.

“Drop The Bass” by Anderson is a new and refreshingly slayful hip hop piece. In the work five ladies are going to get into formation in this fierce Beyonce medley.

Terrell’s work is “Craft + Strife.”

17 2017-04-17
Natchitoches

NSU students inducted into computer information systems honor society


NATCHITOCHES, La. - Sixteen computer information systems majors and a faculty member were inducted into Northwestern State University’s chapter of Epsilon Delta Pi this week.

Inducted were Bria Beathley of Baton Rouge, Deanna J. Bertrand of Ragley, Laci Bruno of Lafayette, Marvaeya
Edwards of Frierson, Nicholas Fisher of Iowa, Vanessa Griffin of Alexandria, Sidney Jackson of Monroe, Jeremy Jones and Ryan Wright of Natchitoches, Leishlia Lynch of Winnfield, Alba Maloff of San Pedro Sula, Honduras, Jasmine McConnell of Shreveport, Catherine Roberts of Dodson, Harold Simmons of Abita Springs, Brandon Smith of Goldonna and Joey Wills of Pride. CIS faculty member Jason Powell was also inducted.

Epsilon Delta Pi is an honor society in the computing sciences. Membership is by invitation and requires that the student be a major or minor in computer information systems with academic achievements, reputation and creative abilities deserving of recognition.

Northwestern State University's Alpha Pi chapter of Epsilon Delta Pi was chartered in 2002. Assistant Professor of Computer Information Systems Sarah Wright is the chapter advisor.
17 2017-04-17
Natchitoches

Two NSU programs ranked in top 10 for affordability


NATCHITOCHES, La. - Two online programs in Northwestern State University’s Department of Criminal Justice, History and Social Sciences have been ranked in the top 10 most affordable in the country, according to the website guidetoonlineschools.com.

Northwestern State’s pre-law and paralegal studies certificate program was ranked third in the country and the bachelor’s in criminal justice was ranked seventh.

The website analyzed accredited online schools across the nation, taking into consideration academic strength factors along with annual tuition rates in order to provide a list of colleges offering the best value to students. Inclusion on these lists shows high academic standards and a commitment to affordability.

Department head Joe Morris said, “The rankings of the criminal justice and pre-law and paralegal studies program are directly related to the quality of faculty within the Department of Criminal Justice, History and Social Science. All have appropriate academic credentials and have real world experience within the field of criminal justice that brings a wealth of experience into the classroom that cannot be obtained from textbooks. Faculty embody the student first attitude and that is what makes the program great. It provides students a quality education and makes the Criminal Justice program attractive to prospective students.”

Northwestern State has 2 + 2 agreements with 17 institutions and systems allowing students who complete an associate degree to transfer all credit hours to Northwestern State in partial fulfillment of a bachelor’s in criminal justice of unified public safety administration.

Participating institutions are Arkansas Tech University, Baton Rouge Community College, Bossier Parish Community College, The Bush School of Government & Public Service at Texas A&M University, Columbia (Washington) Basin College, Community College of the Air Force, Louisiana Community and Technical College System, Louisiana Delta Community College, Frederick (Maryland) Community College, Louisiana State University at Eunice, Northshore Technical Community College, River Parishes Community College, South Louisiana Community College, SOWELA Technical Community College, Texas Engineering Extension Service, A Member of the Texas A&M University System, University of Texas at El Paso and Yakima Valley (Washington) Community College.

A commissioned full-time law enforcement officer or public safety officer, which includes firemen and EMS personnel, may be eligible for a reduction in fees in several degree programs including criminal justice.

For more information on the certificate in pre-law and paralegal studies or the bachelor’s in criminal justice, go to cjhss.nsula.edu.

17 2017-04-12
Natchitoches

NSU@BPCC Fun Day, crawfish boil Wednesday


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University will host the annual NSU @ BPCC Fun Day on the campus of Bossier Parish Community College from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Wednesday, April 12. NSU will serve crawfish and sweets to BPCC students in the BPCC quad with faculty and administrators on hand to let students know about degree programs and career paths available at the university for those seeking to continue their education by earning a bachelor’s degree at NSU.



“We will be representing NSU in a big way,” said Justin Price, NSU @ BPCC campus coordinator. “We will able to provide information about Northwestern so the students will have a great idea of what we can offer them, both in the classroom and campus life. The students are definitely excited about this event.”



In addition to lunch, BPCC’s Director of Student Life Marjoree Harper said several activities are planned for students’ entertainment.



NSU has a long and productive relationship with BPCC and in the past has created several credit transfer agreements that smooth the transition from the two-year community college to the four-year university.


17 2017-04-12
Natchitoches

NSU SGA unveils Dante bust to honor Henderson


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Student Government Association unveiled a special monument to honor former university president Dr. Jim Henderson Friday.



Following Henderson’s induction into NSU’s Long Purple Line, the university’s alumni hall of distinction, SGA President John Pearce of Livonia and former NSU first lady Tonia Henderson unveiled a bust of Dante Alighieri, the Italian scholar, philosopher and poet of the late Middle Ages who is much admired by Henderson. The bust and a bench named for Dr. and Mrs. Henderson, both NSU alumni, were placed in front of the NSU Student Union in the heart of campus.



The bust of Dante includes a quote from “The Divine Comedy” that reads “Be as a tower that, firmly set, shakes not its top for any blast that blows.”



Henderson, who served as NSU’s president for two years, often drew correlations between Dante’s work and references to NSU, such as the Demon Inferno and the quote “Lasciate ogni speranza voi ch'entrate (Abandon all hope, ye who enter here.).” He also noted that Dante’s use of Italian vernacular, rather than Latin, made his work accessible to individuals outside the upper classes and academia.



The installation was cast by NSU Professor of Art Corbin Covher in a project coordinated by SGA Advisor Shayne Creppel.



During his short but productive tenure at NSU, Henderson developed a strong rapport with students through personal accessibility and social media. He began service at president of the University of Louisiana System on January 1, leading nine state institutions and more than 90,000 students.


17 2017-04-12
Natchitoches

NSU, LSUE will sign criminal justice agreements


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University and Louisiana State University – Eunice will formalize two agreements to facilitate the transfer of credits for student pursuing degrees in criminal justice and unified public safety administration. A signing for the two agreements will take place at 11:30 a.m. Thursday, April 13 at the LSU-Eunice campus.



One memorandum of understanding provides that students who complete the associate of science degree in criminal justice at LSU-E can transfer all credit hours to NSU for partial fulfillment of a bachelor of arts degree in criminal justice.



The agreement will help both traditional and non-traditional students seeking an opportunity to transfer to a four-year program that will accept LSU-E’s criminal justice credits.



The second MOU will allow students who complete LSU-E’s associate degree of applied science in fire and emergency services with a concentration in emergency services technology to transfer credit hours to apply to a bachelor of science degree in unified public safety administration at NSU.



Administrators say the partnership will benefit both traditional and non-traditional students who wish to continue on towards a baccalaureate degree program, increasing their skills and marketability.



The public and area media are invited to attend the signing. For more information, contact Leah Jackson, NSU’s director of Informational Services, at (318) 357-4553 or jacksonl@nsula.edu.


17 2017-04-12
Shreveport

Two NSU programs ranked in top 10 for affordability


NATCHITOCHES, La. - Two online programs in Northwestern State University’s Department of Criminal Justice, History and Social Sciences have been ranked in the top 10 most affordable in the country, according to the website guidetoonlineschools.com.

Northwestern State’s pre-law and paralegal studies certificate program was ranked third in the country and the bachelor’s in criminal justice was ranked seventh.

The website analyzed accredited online schools across the nation, taking into consideration academic strength factors along with annual tuition rates in order to provide a list of colleges offering the best value to students. Inclusion on these lists shows high academic standards and a commitment to affordability.

Department head Joe Morris said, “The rankings of the criminal justice and pre-law and paralegal studies program are directly related to the quality of faculty within the Department of Criminal Justice, History and Social Science. All have appropriate academic credentials and have real world experience within the field of criminal justice that brings a wealth of experience into the classroom that cannot be obtained from textbooks. Faculty embody the student first attitude and that is what makes the program great. It provides students a quality education and makes the Criminal Justice program attractive to prospective students.”

Northwestern State has 2 + 2 agreements with 17 institutions and systems allowing students who complete an associate degree to transfer all credit hours to Northwestern State in partial fulfillment of a bachelor’s in criminal justice of unified public safety administration.

Participating institutions are Arkansas Tech University, Baton Rouge Community College, Bossier Parish Community College, The Bush School of Government & Public Service at Texas A&M University, Columbia (Washington) Basin College, Community College of the Air Force, Louisiana Community and Technical College System, Louisiana Delta Community College, Frederick (Maryland) Community College, Louisiana State University at Eunice, Northshore Technical Community College, River Parishes Community College, South Louisiana Community College, SOWELA Technical Community College, Texas Engineering Extension Service, A Member of the Texas A&M University System, University of Texas at El Paso and Yakima Valley (Washington) Community College.

A commissioned full-time law enforcement officer or public safety officer, which includes firemen and EMS personnel, may be eligible for a reduction in fees in several degree programs including criminal justice.

For more information on the certificate in pre-law and paralegal studies or the bachelor’s in criminal justice, go to cjhss.nsula.edu.

17 2017-04-10
Natchitoches

Five inducted into NSU's Alumni Hall of Distinction, the Long Purple Line


Northwestern State University honored five individuals with induction in the university’s Alumni Hall of Distinction, the Long Purple Line, Friday. Honorees were, from left, world-renowned neurosurgeon Dr. Julian Bailes, noted attorney G.F. Thomas Jr., vocalist and philanthropist Lenn Dohmann Prince, the late Joe Delaney represented by his wife Carolyn and Dr. Jim Henderson, former NSU president and current president of the University of Louisiana System. The five were recognized during a luncheon Friday, attended by alumni, family and friends, in which their lives and accomplishments were highlighted in biographical mini-documentaries. Since 1990, NSU has inducted 125 distinguished alumni into the Long Purple Line, recognizing graduates whose lives and careers had great impact for the university, in the community and beyond.


17 2017-04-07
Natchitoches

Business students earn honors at state PBL conference


NATCHITOCHES – Several students from Northwestern State University’s School of Business successfully competed at the Phi Beta Lambda state leadership conference and will advance to the national competition in Anaheim, California, in June. Phi Beta Lambda (Future Business Leaders of America) is the premier student business organization in the world that helps members prepare for careers in business and business-related fields.



Katelyn Marchand of Gonzales earned first place in the categories of personal finance, cost accounting and accounting for professionals.



Ciara Gibbs of Slaughter earned second place in organizational behavior and leadership.



Taylor Poleman of Shreveport earned first placed in management concepts and accounting principles.



Julie Breaux of Gonzales earned second place in microeconomics and entrepreneurship.



The team of Breaux and Virginia Falgoust of Natchitoches earned first place in business decision making.



Falgoust also earned first place in sales presentation.



Michelle McIntyre of Bossier City earned first place in business communication, cyber security and desktop publishing.



Oscar Alan Thompson of Leesville earned first place in financial concepts and third place in retail management.



Maggie Harris of West Monroe earned first place in entrepreneurship and third place in accounting principles.



Sharonda Demars of Natchitoches earned second place in public speaking.



“This is an external validation that our students are outstanding and that our programs prepare them to be successful,” said Dr. Margaret Kilcoyne, interim dean of NSU’s College of Business and Technology. “We believe in providing a partnership between our students and faculty members giving students the opportunity to enhance and apply their knowledge and skills. Our students could not do what they do without the assistance and guidance of our faculty in the classroom. This is a win for all of us.”



Northwestern State University’s School of Business offers degree programs in accounting, business administration, computer information systems and hospitality management and tourism, as well as internship opportunities, articulation agreements and engagement with service and student organizations. For more information on NSU’s School of Business, visit business.nsula.edu
17 2017-04-07
Natchitoches

Northwestern senior theatre students showcased in New York City


Eight seniors in Northwestern State University’s Theatre and Dance program participated in the program’s first senior showcase in New York City during the university’s spring break.

Northwestern State students Chase Miller of West Monroe, Taylor Smith of Leesville, Jesse Kortus of Shreveport, Annie Dauzat of Watson, Luke Matherne of Monroe, Michael Carrier of Lafayette, Jessi Miller of Mansfield and Marissa McMickens of Pineville were accompanied by Dr. Corey Trahan, director of Northwestern State’s musical theatre concentration, and Professor of Theatre Dr. Vicki Parrish. The students took part in a showcase performance for industry professionals and received six workshops from working professionals.

The group met with NSU alumni Donald Jones Jr., a member of the cast of the Broadway show Aladdin and Bruston Manuel, chief operating officer of RWS Entertainment, J. Casey Barrett, a member of the cast of The Book or Mormon and choreographer Ford Haeuser.

“The experience was surreal,” said Smith. “I've always had expectations of what New York City was like, and I've always known that's the place I would call home one day, but this week solidified that dream for me and gave me a lot of useful insight into the business there.”

According to Dr. Corey Trahan, director of NSU’s musical theatre concentration and an assistant professor of theatre, senior showcases have become standard at colleges and universities around the country.

“Our students have been asking about a senior showcase, so we began researching options,” said Trahan.

Trahan was able to establish a relationship with the New York City-based Actor’s Connection, an organization that provides ongoing training for singers/actors/dancers, and presents university seniors in showcases throughout the year.

The eight students were selected after auditions for Bruce Earnest, producing artistic director of the International Performing Arts Institute and associate dean of the University of Mobile, and Trahan held on the NSU campus last fall. Seniors were chosen based on career potential, strength of their singing/acting/dancing skills and their interest in pursuing a professional performance career.

The showcase was supported with a $7,500 grant from the university’s Organizational Relief Fund. Seniors organized bake sales throughout the year to raise funds.

Trahan said six students were contacted by agents who were interested in professionally representing them in the industry. The agents specialized in managing performers for musical theatre productions, commercials, voice over work, film and entertainment ventures. One student is being considered for the national tour of Motown.

“While I may not want to sign with an agency immediately, knowing that two were willing to take a chance on me boosted my confidence and let me know that I am, in fact, ready to make the big move in the fall after I finish my summer contract,” said Smith.

Smith said one major thing he took away from the showcase was the advice he received from NSU alumni that affirmed his belief in how to approach his career.

“While the career we choose is about making those important connections with people, I can find comfort in knowing that the biggest part of casting is working with good people so that each day of work feels less like work and more like an impact,” said Smith. “That seemed to be the overall goal of casting in the city and a solid through line of advice. Be a good person and you'll do fine. And that's the career I want to be a part of.”

Trahan believes the showcase enhanced the reputation of Northwestern State’s theatre and dance program.

“The Actor’s Connection and many of the New York City agents were impressed with the level of performance shown by the NSU performers,” said Trahan. “I hope to make this an annual event to assist the students with their transition from academia to the professional world.”
17 2017-04-07
Natchitoches

Higher ed leaders gather at NSU for CLCU


Kevin Richard, deputy secretary of the Louisiana Department of Revenue, discussed structural changes to state budget and tax policies during a keynote address to the Conference of Louisiana Colleges and Universities hosted by Northwestern State University Thursday. The event drew leaders in higher education from around the state to discuss state and federal legislative matters, faculty and academic affairs and emerging trends in higher education. Other speakers included Dr. Jim Henderson, president of both CLCU and the University of Louisiana System, and Dr. Joseph Rallo, Louisiana’s commissioner on higher education.


Dr. Dan Reneau, left, was awarded the Trailblazer Award by the Conference of Louisiana Colleges and Universities, hosted at Northwestern State University Thursday. Reneau, who served as president of Louisiana Tech University from 1987-2013 and as interim president of the University of Louisiana System from December 2015-January 2017, has a long and notable career in higher education. He was congratulated by current UL System President Dr. Jim Henderson, who is president of CLCU.


17 2017-04-06
Lafayette

SLCC, NSU team up for criminal justice degree


South Louisiana Community College and Northwestern State University have signed an agreement that helps students earn a degree in criminal justice.

Under the agreement, students who earn an associate degree in criminal justice at SLCC can transfer credit hours towards a bachelor's degree at NSU.

Administrators say the partnership saves students time and money as they pursue a four-year degree in criminal justice.

Today at SLCC, Northwestern State University Acting President Dr. Chris Maggio and SLCC Chancellor Dr. Natalie Harder formalized the agreement in a ceremony.

"We really appreciate that NSU understands that this partnership is needed if we're gonna meet the job demands of this state and also raise educational attainment for the citizens of Louisiana," Harder said.

Maggio said he feels the transition will be "seamless" for students, especially since the program is available online - meaning Acadiana resident don't have to relocate if they don't want to.

"I couldn't be more elated about this agreement," Maggio said. "This is going to provide a pathway and an opportunity for a lot of students. It's a win for students, its a win for the universities, but it's also a win for the state of Louisiana."

Maggio said his university also offers a master's degree in criminal justice, meaning students don't have to stop their education after the bachelor's degree.
17 2017-04-06
Natchitoches

NSU offering nursing clinicals in Natchitoches


The Northwestern State College of Nursing is offering clinical experiences for its bachelor degree program on the Natchitoches campus for the first time this spring.

Nursing students starting their college careers in Natchitoches previously transferred to the Alexandria, Leesville or Shreveport campuses to finish their degrees.

Dr. Theresa Kyzar, assistant professor and Natchitoches campus nursing coordinator, said the response to Natchitoches-based clinicals has been overwhelmingly positive.

“It allows students who are from this part of Louisiana an opportunity to stay here instead of driving to Shreveport or Alexandria,” Kyzar said. “It also allows out-of-area students who start their academic careers in Natchitoches to finish their degrees here instead of commuting or relocating.

“A student can take all classes, labs and clinicals right here in Natchitoches.”

Nursing students participate in clinical experiences at Natchitoches Regional Medical Center as well as other medical outlets like long-term care and acute care facilities.

The Natchitoches campus filled nine of its 10 clinical spots this semester in its initial cohort, and the number of available slots will increase to 20 in the fall and possibly to 30 by the fall of 2018.

NSU’s Natchitoches location already offers clinical experiences for associate degree students.

Nursing dean Dr. Dana Clawson said Natchitoches clincials strengthens the school’s ties to local medical centers.

“The Natchitoches clinicals benefit the Natchitoches Regional Medical Center by providing potential nurses who are exposed to the specifics of that hospital and could possibly be great recruits, especially with the widespread nursing shortage,” Clawson said. “Allowing our students to remain in Natchitoches to complete their degrees was a key factor in this move.

“This is a great addition to our nursing program after offering clinical learning at the Alexandria, Leesville and Shreveport campuses for more than 40 years.”

Kyzar added she doesn’t believe the Natchitoches clinicals addition will affect student enrollment at the other three campuses.

Kyzar said NSU previously lost students who would have obligations at the main campus in Natchitoches, such as student-athletes and ROTC members.

“We’ve had students not choose Northwestern State because they wouldn’t have been able to finish their degrees at the same place,” Kyzar said. “We believe we’re tapping into a new market by offering these clincials in Natchitoches and allowing students to complete their degree in one place.”

The NSU College of Nursing enrollment has grown by more than 10 percent each of the past two semesters.

NSU nursing students have a 96 percent pass rate on the NCLEX in the bachelor’s program and a 93 percent pass rate in the associate’s program.

The nursing school is starting a psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner program this coming fall.
17 2017-04-06
Natchitoches

NSU will offer Red Cross lifeguarding course


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University will offer the American Red Cross lifeguarding course May 5-7 and May 12-14 at the Robert G. Wilson Recreation Complex swimming pool. Participants must be able to attend every class, which will be from 4-7 p.m. Fridays, May 5 and May 12; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays, May 6 and May 13 and 2-6 p.m. Sundays, May 7 and May 14. The deadline to register is Thursday, May 4. The cost of the course is $250.



Participants must meet all of the pre-requisites and requirements listed on the course information sheet and return the following to NSU Rec Complex Pro Shop on or before the registration date:

Completed Application
Signed Letter of Understanding
Proof of Age
Course Fee – checks to be made payable to: NSU Rec Complex


Class size is limited to 15 participants and is filled on a first-come basis. Additionally, registration must be at least 10 participants per session for the course to be held.



Applications can be picked up at the NSU Rec Complex Pro Shop or the City of Natchitoches Recreation Department (MLK Center).



The purpose of the American Red Cross Lifeguarding course is to provide entry-level participants the knowledge and skills to prevent, recognize and respond to aquatic emergencies and to provide care for breathing and cardiac emergencies, injuries and sudden illnesses until EMS personnel take over. It also covers how bloodborne pathogens are spread; how to help prevent exposure incidents and how to recognize, report and follow up on employee exposures to infectious materials. The course content and activities prepare candidates to recognize and respond quickly and effectively to emergencies and prevent drowning and injuries.



Successful completion requires participation in skills practice. The practice sessions will require some strenuous physical activity. You are encouraged to check with your health care professional before participating in the practice sessions. If a medical condition or disability exists that might prevent participation in the activities, or there are questions about fully participating in the Lifeguarding course, please contact Cindy Davis to discuss this before the course begins.



To enroll in the lifeguarding course, participants must be at least 15 years of age before the last scheduled class session and must be able to demonstrate the following skills:



Swim 300 yards continuously, using these strokes in the following order:
- 100 yards of front crawl using rhythmic breathing and a stabilizing, propellant kick. Rhythmic breathing can be performed either by breathing to the side or to the front.

- 100 yards of breaststroke with a pull, breathe, kick and glide sequence.

- 100 yards of either the front crawl or breaststroke. The 100 yards may be a combination of front crawl and breaststroke.

Complete a timed event (1 min 40 seconds) by starting in the water, swim 20 yards using front crawl or breaststroke, surface dive 7-10 feet, retrieve a 10-pound object, return to the surface, swim 20 yards back to the starting point with the object and exit the water without using a ladder or steps.
Tread water for two minutes using the legs only (hands must be above the surface or placed under the armpits.


The skill evaluation will occur on the first day of the course. Participants should bring a swimsuit and towel for the skills evaluation and for every class.



Upon successful completion of the Lifeguarding course, each participant will receive an American Red Cross Universal Certificate indicating Lifeguarding/First Aid, which is valid for 2 years, and an American Red Cross Universal Certificate indicating CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer, which is valid for 2 years, as well as an American Red Cross Universal Certificate indicating Bloodborne Pathogens Training.



For more information or to obtain a registration form, contact Cindy Davis, American Red Cross instructor and director of aquatics at (318) 357-6301 or cindyd@nsula.edu.


17 2017-04-06
Natchitoches

https://www.natchitochestimes.com/articles/2017/04/06/nsu-app-links-user-services-news-events


Northwestern State University unveiled a new mobile app that provides access to several useful links and services, news and events, maps and other features. The app is available on iOS and Android platforms. Users can use the app to track registration and financial aid, listen to KNWD Radio and locate available computers in computer labs.

“There is something in the app for everyone – community members, campus guests, alumni and prospective students. Items include athletics, news and calendar events, housing information, interactive maps, access to student media and more,” said Ron Wright, NSU’s chief information officer.



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17 2017-04-05
Natchitoches

NSU Trumpet, Euphonium/Tuba ensembles perform April 6


The NSU Trumpet Ensemble, NSU Euphonium/Tuba Ensemble and NSU Tuba quartet will present a joint concert on Thursday, April 6 at 7:30 p.m. in Magale Recital Hall. Admission is free and open to the public.

The Trumpet Ensemble is directed by Associate Professor of Trumpet Galindo Rodriguez. Associate Professor of Euphonium Dr. Masahito Kuroda conducts the Euphonium/Tuba Ensemble.

The Trumpet Ensemble will play “Festival Trio” by David Newell and “Festival Overture” by Dmitri Shostakovich and arranged by Caleb Hudson.

The Tuba Quartet will play “Dances” by John Stevens featuring graduate student Keith Sanders of Pineville as soloist. The quartet also includes Brendan Raincrow of Burleson Texas, Jordan Whatley of Paris, Texas, and Travis Pope of Longview, Texas.

Works to be performed by the Euphonium/Tuba Ensemble are “Scarborough Fair” arranged by Reichenbach, “Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring” by J.S. Bach and arranged by Thurston and Joseph Haydn’s “Achieved is the Glorious Work” from “The Creation” arranged by Michael Forbes.




17 2017-04-04
Natchitoches

Contemporary jazz artist Jessy J to perform with NSU Jazz Orchestra April 10


Contemporary jazz artist Jessy J will perform with the Northwestern State Jazz Orchestra on Monday, April 10 at 7:30 p.m. in Magale Recital Hall. Admission is free and open to the public. Galindo Rodriguez directs the Jazz Orchestra.

Jessy J’s song “Tequila Moon” hit the No. 1 spot on the Billboard chart for Jazz. “Tropical Rain” from her 2009 release, reached the top of the Groove Jazz Music chart and also took the No. 1 spot on the Smooth Jazz Top 20 Countdown as well as the R&R and Billboard Jazz charts.

In 2008, Jessy J was named Radio & Records Debut Artist of the Year. She also received the Contemporary Jazz Song of the Year award from R&R and Billboard for “Tequila Moon.” That year, she was featured on the cover of Jazziz Magazine. In 2009, she was on the October cover of Saxophone Journal and Latina Style Magazine.

Jessy J’s Album Hot Sauce debuted at No. 1 on Billboard Jazz in 2011 and was featured in People Espanol and Latina magazine. The album includes performances by jazz legends Joe Sample, Harvey Mason, and Ray Parker Jr.

In 2014, Jessy was invited by producer Gerry Gallagher to record with Latin rock legends El Chicano as well as Alphonse Mouzon, Brian Auger, Alex Ligertwood, Vikki Carr, David Paich, Siedah Garrett, Walfredo Reyes Jr., Lenny Castro, Salvador Santana, Marcos J. Reyes, Pete Escovedo and Peter Michael Escovedo and is featured on saxophone on a cover of a Selena song Thinking Of You that is part of Gallagher's most recent studio album due out this year.

Earning a scholarship to University of Southern California, she obtained a degree in jazz studies and was named the "Most Outstanding Jazz Student." After graduating from USC, she worked in the studio with Michael Bublé. She toured with The Temptations, Jessica Simpson, Michael Bolton and Seal and also performed as a member of the Henry Mancini Jazz Orchestra.
Jessy J has built up a Latin following, lending her hand in Hispanic music programs and performing with the Hispanic Musician Association Orchestra. Jessy J had the opportunity to perform at Carnegie Hall with Paquito D'Rivera as part of the Latin Jazz Project.

The Jazz Orchestra will play “Chicago” by Fred Fisher and arranged by Joe Clark featuring Ronald Rodriguez on piano, Laura Lovell on tenor saxophone and Wes Scholten on trombone, “Old School” by Bob Lark and arranged by Andrew Janak featuring Francisco B. Savas on trumpet, Lovell, Ian Cassidy on alto saxophone and Scholten and “Makin’ Whoopee” by Gus Kahn and Walter Donaldson and arranged by Dave Wolpe. The Jazz Orchestra will also play “What’s New” by Johnny Burke and Bob Haggart and arranged by Wolpe featuring Galindo Rodriguez and Sayas on trumpet and “My Ship” by Ira Gershwin and Kurt Weill and arranged by Dave Rivello featuring Jack Dyre on baritone saxophone.

Jessy J will perform her compositions of “Hot Sauce” and “Tropical Rain” along with “Tequilla Moon,” which she wrote with Paul Brown and “Rainbow Gold,” which was written with Joe Sample. Arrangements are by J.A. Diaz.
17 2017-04-04
Natchitoches

Long Purple Line inductees place high value on service


Even though they work in different professions, the careers of Dr. James Henderson and Gerard F. Thomas Jr. of Natchitoches and Lenn Dohmann Prince of Ruston have been shaped by their willingness to serve others.

Henderson, Prince and Thomas will be honored by Northwestern State University on Friday when they are inducted into the University’s alumni hall of distinction, the Long Purple Line along with Dr. Julian E. Bailes of Chicago and the late Joe Delaney.

Honorees will be honored at a luncheon on April 7 at 11:30 a.m. in the Friedman Student Union Ballroom. Tickets are $20. For more information, call (318) 357-4414 or go to northwesternalumni.com/lpl17.

Henderson has devoted his career to providing educational opportunities to students. He became president of the University of Louisiana System on Jan. 1, overseeing one of the largest university systems in the United States with more than 90,000 students on nine campuses.

Henderson was president of Northwestern State for two years. In that period, NSU increased overall enrollment and improved its retention rate. Enrollment in the fall 2016 semester increased by seven percent to 9,819, the highest total since selective admissions were implemented in 2005. Northwestern State worked to strategically develop new programs that give students access to high demand skills and give employers in the region a competitive advantage.

As NSU’s president, Henderson worked closely with students, faculty, staff, alumni and stakeholders to strengthen the university. He was honored at the spring 2016 commencement ceremony with a resolution from Northwestern State’s Faculty Senate for his “multiple creative and innovative efforts to revitalize the life of the university.”

Henderson was chancellor of Bossier Parish Community College from 2009 - 2014. In that time, BPCC grew its enrollment by more than 84 percent and increased annual certificate and degree completions by 90 percent. He was senior vice president, workforce and economic development/career & technical education for the Louisiana Community & Technical College System from 2005 to 2009.

From 2001 to 2005, he was director of administration and director of workforce development for the Louisiana Department of Labor.

Henderson was in the private sector for 10 years in hotel management.

Prince is a native of Opelousas who began studies at Northwestern State in 1972, where she was a member of the NSU Chorale and played French horn in the NSU Orchestra. She was a member of Delta Zeta Sorority and represented NSU in the 1974 Miss Louisiana Pageant as Miss Northwestern-Lady of the Bracelet. She graduated in 1975 with a bachelor’s degree in vocal performance education and later earned a master’s degree in vocal performance form the University of Louisiana at Monroe.

While living in Albuquerque, New Mexico, Prince continued her vocal studies with teacher and pedagogue Jane Snow, performing in many vocal ensembles in Albuquerque and Santa Fe and with the Southwest Opera Chorus in Albuquerque. While working towards her master’s degree, Prince was awarded a scholarship from the University of Miami to study in Salzburg, Austria, during the Salzburg Opera Festival where she studied and was coached by numerous world-renowned opera performers and teachers.

After moving to Ruston in 1992, Prince was host for many years to Northwestern State’s north-central Louisiana recruiting reception in her home. She was also a member of the Ruston Masterworks Chorus and the soprano soloist for many performances.

Prince and her husband Danny own and operate several businesses in several states, including nursing and rehabilitation centers, pharmacies and therapy companies, as well as Port au Prince restaurant on Lake Claiborne and Port au Prince Cross Lake. The Princes established two endowed professorships at NSU in 2012-13, one music and one in vocal education.

She was inducted into the Mrs. H.D. Dear Sr. and Alice Estelle Dear School of Creative and Performing Arts Hall of Fame in 2016.

Thomas earned a bachelor’s degree from Northwestern State in 1943. He was on active duty in the United States Marine Corps from 1943 to 1946. Thomas received a degree from LSU Law School in 1948.

He became a highly regarded attorney with the firm of Thomas, Dunahoe and Gregory practicing primarily in the field of negligence, workman’s compensation and general trial practice. Thomas was selected by his peers to appear in the publication, “The Best Lawyers in America.”

As an attorney, Thomas devoted countless hours to the profession through his activities in professional organizations. He was state committeeman for the American College of Trial Lawyers and American Trial Lawyers Association and president and state committeeman of the Louisiana Trial Lawyers Association.

Thomas served as a member of the Louisiana State Bar Association House of Delegates, chairman of the State Bar Association section on negligence, worker’s compensation and admiralty and president of the LSU Law School Alumni Association. He was a member of the Judiciary Commission of Louisiana from 1983 to 1987, serving as chairman in 1987.
17 2017-04-04
Natchitoches

NSU, SLCC will sign criminal justice agreement Wednesday


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University and South Louisiana Community College will sign 2 + 2 agreement that will allow students who earn an associate degree in criminal justice at SLCC to transfer credit hours towards a bachelor’s degree at NSU. Administrators say the partnership saves students time and money as they pursue a four-year degree in criminal justice.



Northwestern State University Acting President Dr. Chris Maggio and SLCC Chancellor Dr. Natalie Harder will formalize the agreement with a signing ceremony at 1 p.m. Wednesday, April 5 in Room 102 of the Ardoin Building at the SLCC Lafayette campus, 1101 Bertrand Drive, Lafayette. Area news media and the public are invited to attend.



For more information, contact Leah Jackson, NSU’s Director of Informational Services, at jacksonl@nsula.edu or (318) 357-4553
17 2017-03-30
Natchitoches

Exchange students translate Natchitoches’ past


French exchange students Jessy Gautronneau and Yohann Yjjou used their language skills to peer into Natchitoches’ past.

The pair completed handwritten item inventories of two collections concerning Lestan Prudhomme, a Louisiana French planter and a member of one of Natchitoches’ founding families.

Gautronneau and Yjjou translated and summarized the 19th-century handwritten French letters into English to be catalogued in the Northwestern State University Cammie G. Henry Research Center in Watson Library.

The collections contain documents such as personal letters and financial statements that describe the daily life of Lestan Prudhomme and his family from the 1850s and 1860s.

“The letters are written in French and italic, and the handwriting wasn’t always very good,” said Yjjou, a senior who is working on a master’s degree in international management and a bachelor’s in business administration. “You can easily spend 15 minutes on a very short list.”




17 2017-03-27
Natchitoches

Plans for NSU residential hall unveiled


Campus Living Villages and Northwestern State University hosted a ceremony to mark the beginning of significant renovation to Varnado Hall and reveal plans for the historic building Thursday.

Varnado will be transformed into a 21st century living/learning residential college for students in the School of Creative and Performing Arts and is expected to be open for Fall 2017.

“The demand for housing is growing,” said NSU’s Acting President Dr. Chris Maggio, who noted that over the last several years, NSU has renovated and repurposed several historic buildings to meet contemporary student needs. The Varnado project is a collaboration between students, faculty, staff and Campus Living Villages that will benefit “one of our shining lights, our School of Creative and Performing Arts.”



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17 2017-03-27
Natchitoches

Milan, Pearson to perform April 4


Flutist Susan Milan and pianist Lillian Buss Pearson will perform at Northwestern State University Tuesday, April 4 at 7:30 p.m. in Magale Recital Hall. Admission is free and open to the public.

The program will feature works by Richard Rodney Bennett, Ph. Gaubert, Bohuslav Martinu, Edward German, Olivier Messiaen and Claude Debussy.

Milan has forged a career as orchestra principal, chamber musician, recitalist, soloist and recording artist and has performed in festivals, music clubs and as soloist and principal flute with all the major orchestras in the United Kingdom She continues to perform in Europe, the U.S., South Africa, Russia, Australia and East Asia. She has given numerous world and UK premieres and has inspired contemporary composers to write for her, among them Richard Rodney Bennett, Antal Dorati, Carl Davis, Jindrich Feld, Edwin Roxburgh, Robert Saxton, Ole Schmidt, Robert Simpson, Keith Gates, Cecilia McDowall, Brian Lock and recently Douglas Weiland. This year, Milan will record concertos by Richard Rodney Bennett, Robert Simpson and Carl Davis with the Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra to be released on the Divine Art label.

Milan is regularly heard on BBC and Classic FM radio and has recorded most of the mainstream repertoire on the Chandos, Hyperion, Upbeat, Da Capo, Omega, Denon, Cala, Divine Art and Metier labels. In the academic field, she has researched and published 19th century repertoire for Boosey & Hawkes and she is currently researching and revising “6 Sonatinas” by W. Popp for Spartan Press. She is also restoring and processing for CD her collection of historic 78 recordings of flautists 1910-1945.

Milan is a professor and fellow of the Royal College of Music, London, where she was herself a scholar at the age of 16, and she is also professor of flute at Trinitylaban Conservatory, London. She enjoys giving master classes internationally and has been a member of numerous competition juries. As director and founder of the British Isles Music Festival, she masterminds an annual international summer chamber music and master class course for outstanding young musicians exploring works with woodwind, strings, piano, harp and voice.

Pearson has appeared throughout the continental United States and England as a soloist and collaborative artist. She is associate professor of music and coordinator for keyboard studies at Western Carolina University. Pearson holds degrees from Florida State University and the University of Illinois,

Her interest in historically informed performance practice has led her to study harpsichord and fortepiano. In 199,7 she spent seven months in England performing and working intensively with Nelly Ben-Or of the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, studying piano and the Alexander Technique. During this time she also spent considerable time examining and playing historical keyboard instruments, especially nineteenth-century pianos.

Pearson has appeared as soloist, twice with the Asheville Symphony, Jacksonville Symphony, the Breckenridge Festival Orchestra, the Western Carolina Civic Orchestra, the National Chamber Players and the Brandenburg Ensemble. This past summer she was a pianist at the International Flute Festival of Costa Rica. For many years she was a regular performer in the Breckenridge Music Festival and also performed in the Cullowhee Summer Music Festival. Pearson has served as an official accompanist for the International Horn Workshop, the International Double-Reed Society, the International Trumpet Guild, the Southeastern Horn Workshop, the Southeastern Composers League Forum, and Wildacres Flute and Chamber Music Symposium, the British Isles Music Festival, as well as performing for the National Flute Association, the Florida Flute Fair, the Music Teachers National Association Collegiate Artist Competition and the Bodky Competition.
17 2017-03-27
Natchitoches

Northwestern Opera Theatre to perform "The Mikado"


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern Opera Theatre Ensemble will present Gilbert and Sullivan’s "The Mikado" April 5-8 at 7 p.m. in Theatre West. Tickets are $10. To reserve tickets in advance please call (318) 357-4522. Northwestern State, BPCC@NSU and Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts students are admitted free with a current student I.D. Stefan Gordon is the stage and music director.

This farce takes place in the mythical town of Titipu, where identities are confused, tailors and trombonists rule, flirting is forbidden by law and no one dies.

“The opera is one of the most performed works in musical theatre history, and has a little something for everyone to enjoy, both young and old,” said Gordon.

The show will be followed by a short talk back about the racial problems the show presents.

“Mikado is double cast with Jenson Wall and Joey Carroll of Denham Springs, as Nanki Poo, Amanda Charles of Shreveport and Nadya Cesario of Fort Smith, Arkansas, as Yum Yum, Sean Grady of Leesville and Rayshaughn Armant of Gretna as Ko Ko, and Hannah-Nöel Johnson of Haughton and Daniela Salas-Ricardo of Cartegena, Colombia, as Katisha.

The cast also includes Leonard Harris of Baker and Jason Smith of Deville as Pooh-bah, Benjamin Wiltz of Monticello, Arkansas, and Michael Martin of Pineville as Pish Tush, Carly Ryder of Deville and Cassidy Giddens of Shreveport as Pitty Sing and Mark Payton of West Monroe and Aaron Grant as Mikado.

Dr. Chialing Hseih is the accompanist with costumes by Michelle Lange and hair and makeup by Amanda Charles of Shreveport. Rachael Bryant is assistant chorus master. Savannah Thibodeaux of Baton Rouge is stage manager and Binta Francis of Harvey is assistant stage manager. Corey Trahan is assistant stage director.


17 2017-03-27
Natchitoches

Flavor of Louisiana moved to Prather


NATCHITOCHES – Due to overwhelming response, Flavor of Louisiana, Northwestern State University’s celebration of students, supporters, alumni and friends, will be moved to Prather Coliseum. The event was originally scheduled to be held at the Wellness, Recreation and Activities Center, but an outpouring of response from ticket buyers and patrons necessitate the change of venue, organizers said. The event will begin at 6 p.m. Friday, April 7 as planned and will showcase the talents of chefs from throughout the state with samplings of Louisiana seafood, along with cocktails and entertainment.



“This is the first time Northwestern State has hosted an event like this in collaboration with the Louisiana Seafood Board and the response from the community has been tremendous,” said Drake Owens, executive director of the NSU Foundation. “As ticket sales and sponsorships grew, it became clear that we would need to move the event to a larger space, which is wonderful for us.”



Guests at Flavor of Louisiana will be able to sample a variety of seafood dishes presented by chefs, restaurants and caterers from throughout the state and NSU’s culinary arts students. The event will include entertainment provided Ben Rushing and Friends, the popular Colombian band Larry’s Group, Peter and Paul Band, D.J. Leonard Sarpy and other NSU student groups with sound by Southern Breeze Productions.



Lt. Governor Billy Nungesser will be a featured special guest, along with 2017 inductees into the Long Purple Line, NSU’s alumni hall of distinction, who will be honored earlier in the day.



Tickets to Flavor of Louisiana are $65 per person or $125 per couple. Sponsorships are available at three levels. Pelican Sponsorship ($1,500) entitles guest to reserved seating for 8, media promotion, signage and priority parking. Magnolia Sponsorship ($1,000) entitles guest to reserved seating for 8 and sponsor signage. Fleur de Lis Sponsorship ($500) entitles guests to reserved seating for 4 and sponsor signage.
17 2017-03-24
Natchitoches

NSU Design, Marketing earn CASE Accolades


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Director of Publications Beth Mann won a Silver Accolade from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) for a graphic design project she created for University Advancement. Mann designed a full color laser-cut mailer and envelope as part of an NSU Alumni Association membership campaign that was recognized at the CASE District IV conference in Fort Worth. Case District IV Southwest includes public and private colleges, universities and schools from Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas.



Cole Gentry and Karalee Scouten of University Marketing and Branding won a Bronze Accolade for a general information video about Northwestern State, “More Than A University,” in in the category of videos under two minutes. The video can be viewed here: https://vimeo.com/155910199.



The office of University Advancement won a Bronze Accolade in specialty advertising products for NSU golf sets.



Entries were judged by a panel of experts who are not current advancement professionals in District IV. Silver represents an exceptional entry and Bronze represents an outstanding entry.



Also during the conference, Gentry and Scouten competed in an impromptu “design-off” competition against Texas Christian University in which they were given a subject and had 20 minutes to complete a billboard design while the session audience watched on monitors.



“We are very proud of our colleagues for well-deserved Accolades awarded by CASE,” said Drake Owens, executive director of the NSU Foundation. “CASE is comprised of institutions both large and small and it is encouraging that despite a small staff and limited resources, the dedicated and creative team from Northwestern State produces the high caliber of work that is on par with much larger schools.”



Vanner Erikson, associate director of Alumni Affairs, was named director of the CASE Louisiana division. In that capacity, he serves as the liaison for the Louisiana chapters to the national organization.



CASE is a professional association serving educational institutions and the advancement professionals who work on their behalf in alumni relations, communications, development, marketing and allied areas. CASE helps its members build stronger relationships with their alumni and donors, raise funds for campus projects, produce recruitment materials, market their institutions to prospective students, diversify the profession and foster public support of education.



Each year, CASE recognizes best practices in advancement and outstanding people who contribute to the growth and understanding of the advancement profession. District awards honor everything from annual reports to websites, distinguished service to new professionals, fund raising campaigns, design projects and more.



A delegation of personnel from Northwestern State annually attends the CASE IV conference representing Alumni and Development, University Advancement, Marketing and Branding and Informational Services, where they participate in professional development workshops, networking opportunities, team building and strategic planning.
17 2017-03-24
Natchitoches

Varnado renovation underway


NATCHITOCHES – Campus Living Villages and Northwestern State University hosted a ceremony to mark the beginning of significant renovation to Varnado Hall and reveal plans for the historic building Thursday. Varnado will be transformed into a 21st century living/learning residential college for students in the School of Creative and Performing Arts and is expected to be open for Fall 2017.



“The demand for housing is growing,” said NSU’s Acting President Dr. Chris Maggio, who noted that over the last several years, NSU has renovated and repurposed several historic buildings to meet contemporary student needs. The Varnado project is a collaboration between students, faculty, staff and Campus Living Villages that will benefit “one of our shining lights, our School of Creative and Performing Arts.”



Constructed in 1939, Varnado Hall is geographically close to the Creative and Performing Arts complex and in addition to 128 residential rooms will include practice rooms, a music studio and other amenities for CAPA students. The building’s historic ballroom will be transformed into a space where performances and other events will take place and faculty rectors will to oversee programming that promotes artistic engagement.



Ian Cassidy of Covington, a senior and third year music student, spoke on behalf of his peers to express appreciation that Varnado is being refurbished specifically for CAPA students who carry musical instruments across campus to and from rehearsals.



“Varnado Hall is going to be something we’ve never seen before,” he said. “It provides everything and more for the performing arts students. The importance of the amenities can not be overstated. The locale is perfect.”



Gary Clarke, CEO of Campus Living Villages, said he “holds NSU up as the exemplar of partnership.” CLV is a global student accommodation provider with services in finance, design, development, project management and operation of student housing and is one of the largest student housing providers in the world. He said the $10 million project will result in an exceptional student experience and that his personnel will be working through weekends to ensure the building is ready for students this fall.



“Everyone involved has imagined this to be an extension of what the Creative and Performing Arts already do, and an enhancement of the student experience in CAPA,” said Dr. Greg Handel, interim dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. “We hope that Varnado, much like the CAPA Complex, becomes a place where students embrace their collaborative and artistic spirits to create a community of artists.”


17 2017-03-23
Natchitoches

French exchange students using language skills to peer into Natchitoches’ past


French exchange students Jessy Gautronneau and Yohann Yjjou used their language skills to peer into Natchitoches’ past.

The pair completed handwritten item inventories of two collections concerning Lestan Prudhomme, a Louisiana French planter and a member of one of Natchitoches’ founding families.

Gautronneau and Yjjou translated and summarized the 19th-century handwritten French letters into English to be catalogued in the Northwestern State University Cammie G. Henry Research Center in Watson Library.

The collections contain documents such as personal letters and financial statements that describe the daily life of Lestan Prudhomme and his family from the 1850s and 1860s.

“The letters are written in French and italic, and the handwriting wasn’t always very good,” said Yjjou, a senior who is working on a master’s degree in international management and a bachelor’s in business administration. “You can easily spend 15 minutes on a very short list.”

Gautronneau, also a senior working on a master’s degree in international management and a bachelor’s in business administration, poured through Prudhomme’s personal letters to family members as a college student at St. Mary’s in Baltimore, Maryland, as part of his archiving duties.

“My biggest challenge was understanding who is who and which person is being talked about,” Gautronneau said. “I also learned about the way trade was conducted in 1850s by translating debt papers.

“Most people didn’t pay directly for what they purchased, they added debt papers to their name.”

The French students study at Northwestern State via an exchange program with Universite’ d’ Angers.

Mary Linn Wernet, an associate professor, university archivist and records officer, said the Lestan Prudhomme collections paint a picture of daily life on a large Natchitoches plantation and also of a “chatty” young man who provided a mostly European view of Natchitoches during the Civil War.

“The documents detail the happenings on a large agricultural farm and the role the Prudhomme family played in trade and economic development,” Wernet said. “We also get Lestan’s perspective of what’s going on in the world.

“At that time, Louisiana was part of a changing landscape that was shifting from a French colony to an American state, and Lestan provides a European mindset of what’s going on. These collections detail our history and culture of how people lived in that time.”

Gautronneau and Yjjou agreed documents relating to slavery were the most eye-opening.

“I came across a rent contract, and the contract stated that the (renters) must feed the owners’ pigs,” Gautronneau said. “But part of the contract was to make sure that slaves didn’t eat the pigs’ food.”

Gautronneau and Yjjou’s summaries will be made available online through the work of history senior Elizabeth Curcuru of New Orleans. Curcuru is creating digital copies of Gautronneau’s and Yjjou’s inventories.

The trio plans on making a presentation during NSU’s Research Day in April.

The collections were donated by Julie Hughes Callihan, who offered her Lestan Prudhomme items and encouraged her family members to give their collection of documents.
17 2017-03-22
Natchitoches

Proposals accepted for Louisiana Studies Conference


Presentation proposals are being accepted for the Ninth Annual Louisiana Studies Conference which will be held Sept. 22-23 at Northwestern State University. The theme of this year’s conference is “Louisiana Landscapes.”

Conference co-chair Dr. Shane Rasmussen, director of the Louisiana Folklife Center and associate professor of English at NSU, said conference organizers are interested in proposals that deal with the theme of Louisiana Landscapes, but all papers, creative writing, and short performances (dance, music, or theatric) that address any aspect of Louisiana studies are welcome. Proposals are being solicited for 15-minute presentations from scholars at all career stages as well as graduate students. Creative work (film, creative non-fiction, short fiction, and poetry) is welcome. Undergraduates are invited to submit, provided they are working with the guidance of a trained scholar.

Conference registration is free for all faculty, staff, and students affiliated with Bossier Parish Community College, the Louisiana Scholars’ College, the Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts, the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training, and Northwestern State University, as well as State and National Park Service personnel situated in Natchitoches Parish.

Abstracts (300 words max.) for scholarly proposals, creative writing, films, and short performances (dance, music, or theatric) should be sent as e-mail attachments to Rasmussen at rasmussens@nsula.edu. Presentations should run no longer than 15 minutes. Briefly detail the audio / visual tools (laptop, projection screen, data projector, DVD player, etc.) or space (the stage in the Magale Recital Hall will be provided for short performances) your presentation will require, if any.

Proposals should include a separate cover page with name, affiliation, mailing and e-mail address, and the title of your presentation. E-mails should be entitled: Louisiana Studies Conference Submission. An e-mail acknowledgement of having received each abstract will be sent within one week of having received it. If you do not receive an acknowledgment please resend your submission as it may not have been received. The deadline for submissions is July 1. Accepted presenters will be notified via e-mail by no later than July 15.

This interdisciplinary conference will be accepting proposals from the following disciplines: American studies, anthropology, architecture, archival studies, communications, craft, creative writing, criminal justice, cultural studies, cultural tourism, dance, design, education, English and literary studies, environmental studies, ethnic studies, fashion design, film studies, fine arts, folklore, gender studies, geography, heritage resources, history, interior design, journalism, linguistics, media studies, museum studies, musicology, music performance, philosophy, photography, political science, preservation studies, psychology, queer studies, religious studies, Romance languages, social work, sociology, theatre and vernacular architecture.

Rasmussen said Louisiana, its peoples, cultures, history, literature, places, etc. should be an intrinsic aspect of the proposed presentation.

“For example, ‘philosophical landscapes’ in itself would not be an appropriate presentation topic proposal for the Louisiana Studies Conference, while “philosophical landscapes in Louisiana” or “the philosophical landscapes of Louisianans” would be highly appropriate,” said Rasmussen.

Examples would include American Indian Landscapes, Architectural Landscapes, Archival Landscapes, Artistic Landscapes, Borders and Border Crossings, Built Environments, Climate Landscapes, Contested Landscapes, Crossroads and Convergences, Cultural Landscapes, Cultural Mapping, Emerging Landscapes,
Endangered Landscapes, Ethnic Landscapes, Folk Landscapes, Gender Landscapes, Geographies, Historical Landscapes, Interior Landscapes, Landscapes in Fashion, Linguistic Landscapes, Literary Landscapes, Media Landscapes, Mental Landscapes,
Musical Landscapes, Mythic Landscapes, Narrative Landscapes, Neglected Landscapes, Performative Landscapes, Philosophical Landscapes, Photographic Landscapes, Political Landscapes, Preserving Landscapes, Questioning Landscapes, Religious and Spiritual Landscapes, Rural Landscapes, Sacred Sites and Spaces, Syncretic Landscapes, Theatrical Landscapes, Urban Landscapes and Vernacular Landscapes.

A selection of scholarly and creative work presented at the conference will be solicited for publication in the Louisiana Folklife Journal, a peer reviewed academic journal produced by the Louisiana Folklife Center at Northwestern State. Additional information is available on the website for the Louisiana Folklife Center, louisianafolklife.nsula.edu.

Conference co-chairs along with Rasmussen are Dr. Lisa Abney, faculty facilitator for academic research and community college outreach and professor of English at Northwestern State, Jason Church, materials conservator, National Center for Preservation Technology and Training and Dr. Charles Pellegrin, associate professor of history at Northwestern State.

The Conference is co-sponsored by the Folklife Society of Louisiana, the Louisiana Folklife Center, and the NSU College of Arts, Sciences, Graduate Studies and Research.
17 2017-03-22
Natchitoches

CLCU will meet at Northwestern State


NATCHITOCHES – The Conference of Louisiana Colleges and Universities will meet on the campus of Northwestern State University Thursday, April 6. Dr. Jim Henderson, CLCU president and president of the University of Louisiana System, will make opening remarks. Other speakers will include Dr. Joseph C. Rallo, commissioner of higher education, and Kimberly Robinson, secretary of the Louisiana Department of Revenue and co-chair of the taskforce on structural changes in budget and tax policy.



The day-long event will also include panels to address state and federal legislative issues, faculty and academic affairs and emerging trends in higher education.



CLCU was established with the purpose of improving postsecondary education in Louisiana. It serves as a communications medium for all institutions of higher education in the state and other constituents. The CLCU is comprised of representatives from Louisiana’s accredited two-year and four-year colleges and universities, as well as members of the Louisiana Board of Regents and the management boards for each system.


17 2017-03-20
Natchitoches

Contemporary Music Ensemble to perform Monday


The NSU Contemporary Music Ensemble will perform Monday, March 20 at 7:30 p.m. in Magale Recital Hall. Admission is free and open to the public.

The ensemble consists of NSU faculty and students, joined by distinguished guest artists, who are committed to presenting quality performances of masterworks from the 20th and 21st centuries.

The program will feature works by Blank, Britten, Herbillion, Lee, Mellits, Tull and Yun. For more information call (318) 357-5802.




17 2017-03-17
Natchitoches

NSU Jazz Orchestra honored at Loyola Jazz Festival


NATCHITOCHES, LA. - Northwestern State University’s Jazz Orchestra was rated as an Outstanding Band at the 2017 Loyola Jazz Festival held in New Orleans.

The Jazz Orchestra, directed by Associate Professor of Music Galindo Rodriguez, received superior ratings in sound quality, technical accuracy, musicality and stage deportment.

The trombone section consisting of Wes Scholten of Temple, Texas, Michael Daley of West Monroe, Michael King of Deville and Benjamin Wiltz of Krotz Springs, was rated as an outstanding section.

Scholten, Francisco Ballestas Sayas of Cartegena, Colombia, on trumpet, Addison Pellegrino of Burleson, Texas, on drums and Jimmy Leach of Longview, Texas on vibraphone were named outstanding soloists.
17 2017-03-17
Natchitoches

LitCon, International Festival March 21


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Department of English, Foreign Languages and Cultural Studies will host LitCon on Tuesday, March 21 starting at 9 a.m. in Orville Hanchey Gallery.



LitCon will bring together members of the Natchitoches and NSU literary community to showcase their work, foster collaboration and educate the community on the importance of the humanities. LitCon will create a relaxed environment allowing students, faculty and community members to talk about their craft, educational opportunities, working across disciplines and how to make a living in the humanities.



The event will feature more than 10 artist tables for book sales and signings, booths from Natchitoches Parish Library, NSU archives, Argus, Brainy Acts Poetry Society, Current Sauce, the Department of Fine + Graphic Art, the Department of English, Foreign Languages and Cultural Studies; Pop-Up Poetry, question and answer sessions and the annual Spring Read.



Another feature of the event is literary cosplay, in which participants dress as their favorite literary figures. All cosplayers can enter to win the costume contest.



The event will culminate in the Spring Read that evening. Faculty and students will share original works or works by favorite authors on the theme of roots.



The schedule of events is as follows:

9 a.m.--Booths open



10 a.m.--Film study animation documentary discussion with Dr. Allison Rittmayer and Collier Hymes



11 a.m.--Editing, writing, and publishing seminar with Heather Salter and Dr. Julie Kane



Noon--Film criticism with Kenneth Burns



1 p.m.--Academic writing and publishing information from Dr. Erick Jarvis, Dr. Lisa Abney, and Dr. Sarah McFarland



2 p.m.—Literature and Art with John Kemp and Annabel Jones



3 p.m.—La. Folklife Journal and La. Studies Conference information by Dr. Shane Rasmussen



4 p.m.—BAPS and Argus literary magazine information from their staffs



5 p.m.—Creative Writing and CR Reading Series with Dr. Andy Briseno



6 p.m.—Literary Cosplay Contest



7 p.m.—Spring Read



LitCon will coincide with another campus event, the International Festival of Culture and Cuisines presented by the Department of Hospitality Management and Tourism. The food and culture festival will be held from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. in the Alumni Plaza just outside Hanchey Gallery.



Students will be in costume representing the culture and cuisine of Ireland, Germany, the Caribbean, France, Texas, India and Greece. Latin America will be represented with a performance by NSU’s popular Colombian band, Larry’s Group.



For more information on LitCon, contact Oona Zbitkovskis at oonaz@nsula.edu.



For more information on the International Festival of Cultures and Cuisines contact Dr. Lynn Woods at llwoods@nsula.edu.
17 2017-03-16
Natchitoches

NSU releases new mobile app


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University unveiled a new mobile app last week that provides access to several useful links and services, news and events, maps and other features. The app is available on iOS and Android platforms. Users can use the app to track registration and financial aid, listen to KNWD Radio and locate available computers in computer labs.



“There is something in the app for everyone – community members, campus guests, alumni and prospective students. Items include athletics, news and calendar events, housing information, interactive maps, access to student media and more,” said Ron Wright, NSU’s chief information officer.



The free app is compatible with iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch and iPod Touch was developed in-house on top of a framework provided by Ellucian, software for higher education management.



“This provides us with deep integration into Banner and the services that students rely on such as registration and access to key information such as financial aid status and university account balances,” Wright said. “Faculty members have access to class schedules, rosters and advisee information. All employees have access to leave balances. The primary design goal was to create an app that users could interact with daily to enhance their NSU experience.”



Two additional features are the ability to send targeted Push Notifications via the app as well as support for beacon technology.



“Push support will allow us to proactively send messages to students informing them of items such as holds on their account, the availability of grades or registration reminders,” Wright said. “Use of these notifications will be limited to items of importance to the users. Beacons allow us to trigger notifications to students based upon their proximity to a given location on campus.



“The technology behind the app allows us to push out changes and new features without requiring users to download new versions of the app. Each time a user opens the app it will check for new items and update itself if necessary,” Wright said.



There are additional features already in the works including integration with online courses so that due dates and other course related information will appear in the app. Also coming soon will be the ability for students to pay tuition, fees and other charges.



Development of NSU Mobile included staff members from across the ITS group. The two primary developers were Matthew Foshee and Jorge Rodriguez, both graduates of NSU’s Computer Information Systems program.



“Their unique insight as former students played a key part in the apps overall design and feature set,” Wright added.



“After only four days of availability we have seen close to 600 downloads without formally promoting its availability. We expect to see these numbers increase quickly over the next few weeks,” he said.
17 2017-03-16
Natchitoches

"Steel Magnolias Scrapbook" now digitized


NATCHITOCHES – “The Steel Magnolia Scrapbook: Memories of Movie Making in a Small Town” has been digitized and is available through Northwestern State University’s Tradition’s website, where the university’s digital archives can be accessed. First printed in 1989, the book was produced by the NSU Press and edited by Tom Gresham, Jerry Pierce and Tom Whitehead to document the movie’s filming in Natchitoches – and the effect the movie had on on the town -- in the summer of 1988. The film was released in 1989.



Long out of print, the book’s digitization coincides with an upcoming 30th anniversary story about the premier of the “Steel Magnolias” play in New York in Garden and Gun magazine.



“After 30 years, “Steel Magnolias” is still performed around the world, and the movie still has a large fan following,” Whitehead said. “The stories of making the movie in Natchitoches and on the Northwestern campus are still told.”



Access to NSU’s archives is accessible at traditions.nsula.edu where users can also browse archived editions of Potpourri, NSU’s yearbook; the Current Sauce student newspaper, Alumni Columns magazine, Argus literary magazine, college catalogs and “NSU 125,” a coffee table book about NSU’s history. All of the archives are searchable.



The upcoming Garden and Gun article will include photos form the book and NSU coverage at the time of the filming, according to Tom Whitehead who worked with the magazine’s photo researcher.



Whitehead credited Sonny Carter, image specialist at Watson Library, and NSU’s Director of Marketing and Branding Cole Gentry for their work on the project.


17 2017-03-16
Natchitoches

Honor society for international scholars to induct new members March 19


Dr. Ali Ahmad, head of Northwestern State University’s Department of Engineering Technology, will be the speaker at the spring induction of the Phi Beta Delta Honor Society for International Scholars Sunday, March 19 at 5 p.m. in the Natchitoches Room in Russell Hall. The public is invited to attend. Ahmad will speak on Globalization and Cultural Paradigm Shifts in the Middle East.

Members of Phi Beta Delta include faculty, staff, and students who are selected on the basis of their international orientation, scholarship accomplishment, and/or contribution to international exchange.

Thirteen new members will be inducted into this international honor society. New faculty/staff members are Director of the Louisiana Scholars’ College Dr. Kirsten Bartles, Dr. Nabin Sapkota and Dr. Jafar Alsharb of the Department of Engineering Technology and Assistant Professor of Computer Information Systems Dr. Jason Powell.

New student members include graduate student in English Kaysee Carrere of Houma, Scholars’ College students Jordan Reich of Shreveport, Megan Boyanton of Pearl River, Skylar Guidroz of Carencro, and Rachel Moran of Metairie, industrial engineering technology major Angelica Galban of Many and industrial engineering/music major Luz Arrieta-Jimenez of Cartagena, Colombia. Acting Northwestern State University President Dr. Chris Maggio and community member Dr. Nahla Beier will be inducted as honorary members.

Ahmad, a native of Jordan, received degrees from the University of Jordan and University of Central Florida. He has diverse expertise in human-computer interaction, quality engineering and simulating human-machine systems. Prior to joining the NSU faculty, Dr. Ahmad taught at King Saud University in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and was the founder and president of AXIS Technology Consulting, LLC., a business focused on human systems integration research and development. He will speak about the evolving Middle East and how globalization and advancement in communication technologies have helped to transform cultural norms in the Middle East. His talk will present a personal perspective on these cultural paradigm shifts.

Phi Beta Delta is the first honor society in the United States to recognize scholarship achievement in international education. It was established in 1987 and now has more than 200 chapters at universities in the United States and around the world. Its goals are to increase the recognition, credibility and importance of the international experience and create a catalyst for international academic-based programming on college campuses while providing support and recognition to those individuals on campuses who are involved in international endeavors.

The Northwestern State chapter of Phi Beta Delta received its charter in April 2010 with the induction of 25 faculty, staff and student members. During the current academic year, Phi Beta Delta sponsored an International Student Panel in October, a Student Study Abroad Panel in November, a presentation by Dr. Greg Granger on his recent trip to Cuba and held a no-host dinner for members and friends.

The Eta Mu Chapter at NSU is committed to supporting international students, domestic students who are interested in international travel and affairs, and faculty and staff who engage in international research and travel. Phi Beta Delta is interdisciplinary in nature and includes individuals from all content areas. For more information about Phi Beta Delta, contact Chapter Coordinator and President Sharon Joy at joys@nsula.edu or (318) 357-5754.
17 2017-03-16
Natchitoches

Music and seafood will be at NSU fundraiser


Northwestern State University’s upcoming spring fund raiser, Flavor of Louisiana, will not only feature a variety of seafood dish samplings, but a lineup of entertainment that includes a variety of performers.

Entertainers will be Ben Rushing and Friends, the popular Colombian band Larry’s Group, Peter and Paul Band, D.J. Leonard Sarpy and other NSU student groups with sound by Southern Breeze Productions.

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17 2017-03-15
Natchitoches

Flavor of Louisiana: Music, seafood and more


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s upcoming spring fund raiser, Flavor of Louisiana, will not only feature a variety of seafood dish samplings, but a lineup of entertainment that includes a variety of performers.



Entertainers will be Ben Rushing and Friends, the popular Colombian band Larry’s Group, Peter and Paul Band, D.J. Leonard Sarpy and other NSU student groups with sound by Southern Breeze Productions.



Flavor of Louisiana take place indoors at NSU’s Wellness, Recreation and Activities Center beginning at 6 p.m. Friday, April 7. Chefs, restaurants and caterers from around the state, including NSU culinary arts students, will prepare seafood dishes guests can sample while enjoying cocktails, music and a silent auction.



The event is a collaboration between the Louisiana Seafood Board and the NSU Foundation with proceeds benefitting student scholarships.



“We’re putting together an evening that is a bit different,” said Drake Owens, executive director of the NSU Foundation. “We have never hosted an event to feature Louisiana seafood and are grateful to our partners at the Louisiana Seafood Board for donating all the items that will be prepared. We hope our guests enjoy the food, the atmosphere and the music with proceeds going to an important cause.”



“This Spring, Northwestern State experienced a growth in enrollment and one important reason was because we were able to provide full funding for TOPS scholarships for our students,” said NSU’s Acting President Dr. Chris Maggio. “Scholarship dollars are crucial to helping us retain and provide resources for students and support faculty.”



Tickets to Flavor of Louisiana are $65 per person or $125 per couple. Sponsorships are available at three levels. Pelican Sponsorship ($1,500) entitles guest to reserved seating for 8, media promotion, signage and priority parking. Magnolia Sponsorship ($1,000) entitles guest to reserved seating for 8 and sponsor signage. Fleur de Lis Sponsorship ($500) entitles guests to reserved seating for 4 and sponsor signage.



For more information or to make reservations, visit northwesternalumni.com/fol.
17 2017-03-15
Natchitoches

Maggio effective as acting president


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Acting President Dr. Chris Maggio jumped into his leadership role at NSU with both feet, continuing to foster the growth and momentum the university has experienced in the last three years. Maggio is a fixture at campus activities and events, ballgames and performing arts programs, interacting with students, faculty and staff while advocating for NSU on higher education issues at the state level.



Last week, Maggio joined cadets from NSU’s ROTC program for their early morning 4-mile run through campus.



“Dr. Maggio asked to run with us,” said LTC Katherine Carlson. “He really respects the cadets and the program and wanted to show his support.”



“I had the opportunity to address them after the run and I told them how much I appreciated all that they do, and how proud I am of them for how they represent our university,” he said. “They are our nation’s future leaders and I thanked them for choosing NSU and NSU Army ROTC. They do this every day. It was an honor for me to share their physical training run for just one day.”



Maggio has long been a supporter of the nation’s military and earlier this year initiated a program to honor veterans at all home basketball games.



Maggio has been acting president since Jan. 1, following the departure of Dr. Jim Henderson who accepted the position as head of the University of Louisiana System. Maggio will continue to guide the university during a presidential search that should conclude in May with leadership in place by July 1.



Maggio has been actively engaged in recruiting, traveling to schools and events all over the state, and his approachability resonates with current and prospective students.



“What Dr. Maggio has done for recruiting is difficult to put in words,” said Jana Lucky, director of University Recruiting. “He works very hard to try to meet and visit with every prospective student that he can. He gets daily updates to see which prospective students are visiting the university each day so that he can greet them by name if he has the opportunity. Dr. Maggio takes personal attention to a whole new level. He loves NSU and it shows in everything that he does.”



Maggio is a Natchitoches native and 1985 summa cum laude graduate of NSU. He earned his master’s of education at NSU and received a doctorate in developmental education at Grambling State University. He has been on staff at NSU since 1988 and has served in a variety of administrative roles, including Dean of Students, director of Alumni Affairs and executive director of the NSU Foundation.



While acting as president, Maggio maintains his role as vice president for the Student Experience, in which he leads the Dean of Students and the Offices of Admissions, Recruiting, Financial Aid, Student Activities and Organizations, First Year Experience and Leadership Development, Judicial Services, Counseling and Career Services, Student Life, the Student Activities Board, Student Government Association and Greek Life. He is actively involved with many aspects of student life, from participating in the Lady of the Bracelet pageant where he played a role in a musical piece by the Student Theatre Organization, and judging debate competitions.



“The first time a student meets him he remembers their name, where they are from, what high school they went to, exactly where it is and something about their family,” said Student Government Association President John Pearce of Livonia. “Besides being deeply involved with Student Government in obvious ways, he was instrumental in allowing the foundation of my fraternity, Pi Kappa Alpha. I have seen him involved with every aspect of this university since he stepped in, and if he isn't present, his wonderful wife Jennifer usually is.”



Maggio is also overseeing growth with the campus itself, with a new driving range in the works and irrigation improvement underway at the Robert Wilson Recreation Complex, clean up initiatives and seawall repair on Chaplin’s Lake and improvements at the tennis courts. There have also been upgrades in Kyser Hall and in facilities at the Health and Human Performance Building.



The search committee for Northwestern State’s next president will receive nominations/applications and a list of candidates by the end of March. On April 3, the committee will meet to review applicant materials and select semifinalists. On-campus interviews will take place April 24-26 with finalists presented to the full board and interviews conducted on May 4, at which time the board may make a selection.
17 2017-03-14
Natchitoches

Music Morning to be held Saturday


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s School of Creative and Performing Arts will present Music Morning, a program of music activities for Natchitoches children on Saturday, March 18 at the A.A. Fredericks Fine Arts Center. Registration begins at 8 a.m. Activities will be from 8:30 a.m. until noon. The event is free.

Children ages 4-11 are invited to participate in a variety of music experiences that include singing, music games, instrument demonstrations and a music craft. This event is presented by NSU music education majors, who will conduct the activities.

Former NSU music education major and elementary music specialist Jeralyn Wilhite, the originator of the event, believes that every child has the right to music.

“Music changes how we see the world, even at a young age,” said Wilhite. “It opens the door to imagination. Music Morning is an opportunity for the children of the community to come and receive keys to unlocking that door - to see that music is out there and it is within their grasp.”

Music education major and NAfME president Lauren Schexnayder of Kaplan is coordinating the event, with more than 20 music education majors providing activities and leadership.

Music Morning will conclude with a large group singalong and presentation of what the children learned throughout the morning. Associate Professor of Music Education Sharon Joy is assisting with the coordination of the event.

“This event has been planned by music education students who are committed to bringing music to Natchitoches children,” said Joy. “It’s exciting to see this passion among our students.”

For additional information contact Joy at joys@nsula.edu.
17 2017-03-14
Natchitoches

NSU reviews, renews misconduct protocols


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s coalition to end sexual assault reviewed and renewed its memorandum of understanding with several local agencies Friday, meeting required mandates in awareness, prevention, referring and reporting sexual misconduct. NSU has an agreement with parish law enforcement, healthcare providers and advocacy groups that delineates procedures for reporting, investigating and adjudicating cases quickly and fairly.



“This is a proactive collaboration that is important not just for Northwestern but for the community as a whole,” said NSU’s Acting President Dr. Chris Maggio during a breakfast sponsored by Campus Living Villages, the company that manages NSU’s residential facilities.



NSU’s Dean of Students and Title XI Coordinator Frances Conine, Deputy Title IX Coordinator Lori LeBlanc and an NSU student advocacy group, Demons Support Demons, developed the agreement three years ago in cooperation with NSU Police, the Natchitoches Parish Sheriff’s Department, Natchitoches Police Department, Natchitoches Parish District Attorney’s Office, Natchitoches Regional Medical Center and Natchitoches Coroner’s Office. NSU also works closely with Project Celebration and STAR sexual assault advocates.



“This brings back into focus the reason for the coalition: to end sexual assault,” Conine said. In compliance with federal mandates, NSU offers an annual climate survey and developed the memorandum of understanding with local stakeholders. The goal is to educate students by raising awareness of sexual assault and its prevention.



“Awareness, education and prevention programs at NSU have been very strong,” LeBlanc said. “We have created pathways for students to report sexual assault and the work we do is confidential.”



Students say the initiatives are making a difference.



“I can see such a change,” said Caleb Howell, vice president of Demons Support Demons which works in tandem with It’s On Us, a national movement to end campus sexual violence. The group has about 30 active members and more than 200 who subscribe to their email list. The group is planning their biannual Week of Action March 20-24. “It’s rejuvenating to see new faces involved and people working to raise awareness on campus.”



“Our goal is to protect and serve,” said University Police Chief Jon Caliste. “The best way we can do that is when we have engagement in the community. That goal is forming right before my eyes when we have student groups, faculty, staff, law enforcement and healthcare providers all come together to say ‘We’ve had enough.’”
17 2017-03-14
Natchitoches

Kisatchie Sound to present concert Friday


The new music ensemble Kisatchie Sound will perform at Northwestern State University Friday, March 17 at 7 p.m. in Magale Recital Hall. Admission is free and open to public.

The concert will feature original music composed by NSU Adjunct Instructor of Music Matt Petty and is a celebration of Kisatchie Sound’s third year in collaboration with NSU students, faculty members and guest artists.

Kisatchie Sound features faculty member David Steele on clarinet, and Petty on trombone and vocals, as well as NSU students Cesia Corrales of San Pedro Sula, Honduras, on viola, Jocelyn Cummons of Katy, Texas, on flute, James Leach of Longview, Texas, on percussion, and Jordan Whatley of Paris, Texas, on tuba and bass guitar. The program will include selections of original music for live ensemble, electronics, and video. Almost every member of the band will be performing on multiple instruments as well, including an arrangement of Daniel Johnston's song “Walking the Cow” which will be performed on various toy instruments.

“Each of the pieces on the concert are inspired by road trips across the country that I've taken over the past year, including one piece inspired by a local Natchitoches legend called ‘Sang Pour Sang,’’’ said Petty. “Another piece uses location recordings of nature made in Vermont against an improvised flute solo. Each piece will also include a video component to accompany the live music.”

Petty, an NSU alumnus with a degree in music education and trombone performance, is a musician/composer, video artist and educator. He uses low-fi gear to create music-based multimedia pieces involving sound, video and live performance. Petty is an alumnus of New York’s Watermill Center, where he was influenced by artists such as theater director Robert Wilson, filmmaker Jim Jarmusch and the American freak-folk band CocoRosie.

He is a collaborator and performer with composer and mentor Eve Beglarian on a number of music and multimedia projects. Petty is the founder and producer of the electro-acoustic collective Kisatchie Sound with Steele, a group that creates new music with a sense of place.

As a collaborative artist, Petty has worked with numerous visual artists and musicians across the U.S. performing shows and making video pieces. He has performed shows in Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, California, New York and Vermont and has been featured internationally at Biome Arts' AltFuture series of environmental art in Taipei, Taiwan and the first annual Bad Video Art Festival in Moscow, Russia.

Petty is the creator of the feature documentary, “Sacred as Folk” about the life of Louisiana artist, Brother Michael David Elvestrom. His current collaboration, “Lighten Up,” is a multimedia fantasia about American “outsider" artists whose lives and work re-define the American Dream in imaginative, powerful, and healing ways.

Petty is one of 25 international artists selected for the Lucas Artist Fellowship in Music at Montalvo Arts Center, in Saratoga, California where many of the pieces on the program were created.
17 2017-03-13
Natchitoches

NSU Legislative Priority Meeting: Fighting for funding, Keeping up with change


Legislators from across the state met with Louisiana University System and Northwestern State University representatives and Natchitoches officials at a Legislative Priority meeting held March 9 at NSU.

ULS President Dr. Jim Henderson called it a conversational meeting to discuss the issues the state and higher education face when it comes to the unlimited demands placed on extraordinarily limited resources.

“We’re not here to ask you for money today,” Henderson joked. “That’s not what today is about. Today is about setting priorities.”

Louisiana is entering an age where employers are requesting higher skill sets than ever before. “What a scary time this is for us,” said Henderson. “Because it’s change. But that’s good in a lot of ways.”

ULS is constantly looking at its operations. According to Henderson, 350 outdated programs were eliminated and 15 percent of salaries across the system were eliminated, totaling over $70 million.

“We are entering a season where continued disinvestment in education makes us noncompetitive,” he said. He said this relates to high amounts of deferred maintenance and faculty salaries.

ULS Board Chair Alejandro Torres said being noncompetitive is creating a “brain drain” for higher education when it becomes more financially viable for students to attend out of state colleges than the ones closest to them.

With 68 percent of all students in Louisiana attend a ULS college, Senator Gerald Long said Governor John Bel Edwards is committed to fixing the problem. Long will meet with Edwards March 13 to discuss budget issues, keeping in mind their goal of bringing back funding for higher education up to the 50 percent level as soon as possible.

Long said the key word here is patience. “This will be a slow process,” he said.

It’s a revenue stream issue. The state gives away too much money in exemptions, approximately $9 billion a year in the form of rebates and industrial credits. The legislature is challenged with dealing with these issues because a balance must be found.

Alan Seabaugh, a state representative from Shreveport, said higher education lost $1 billion in state funding to hospitals last year.

State Representative Terry Brown said TOPS recipients need to be held accountable for the money they receive if they don’t finish their degrees.

State Representative Kenny Cox said scholarships need to be offered based on occupation forecasting, however Henderson said the top 10 jobs in demand for 2025 don’t even exist today. There is a need to stay competitive to keep the best and brightest in-state so the colleges and universities can prepare them for a future where careers are constantly changing.
17 2017-03-13
Natchitoches

NSU dedicates Student Services Building in honor of Long


NATCHITOCHES – Friends, family and former colleagues of Jimmy D. Long Sr. recalled his distinguished life and career at the dedication of the Jimmy D. Long Student Services Center at Northwestern State University Thursday.

By DAVID WEST
NATCHITOCHES – Friends, family and former colleagues of Jimmy D. Long Sr. recalled his distinguished life and career at the dedication of the Jimmy D. Long Student Services Center at Northwestern State University Thursday.

Long served eight consecutive terms in the Louisiana House of Representatives from 1968 to 2000. He was appointed to Board of Supervisors of the University of Louisiana System in 2001. Long passed away in August.


Former legislators, NSU students and university leaders told a large crowd at the dedication about Long's nearly half-century of work on behalf of education.

Mr. Long had a great impact on the state, community and Northwestern State that was enormous and will be everlasting," said Northwestern State Acting President Dr. Chris Maggio. "This is one of the highest honors we can bestow upon an individual. This is not just a monument or landmark, but is a building our students and prospective students use every day."

The Jimmy D. Long Student Services Center was completed in 2012. The 34,451 square foot facility is on the former site of West Caspari Hall. The $8.5 million Student Services Center was the first state-funded new building constructed on the Northwestern State campus in more than 30 years.

"Mr. Long stood for students and this is a way to honor him," said University of Louisiana System President Dr. Jim Henderson. "It is a dedication to his spirit and legacy."

The Student Services Center is home to the Offices of University Recruiting, First Year Experience and Leadership Development, Financial Aid, Student Employment Scholarships, Admissions, Veteran's Affairs and the Vice President for the Student Experience as well as the Registrar's Office, One Card Office and Cashier's Office.

"Look past the brick, concrete and glass and look at what happened to make this building a reality," said NSU Student Government Association President John Pearce. "The foundation was being laid because of Mr. Long's dedication to students. He had a passion for education and fought for students."

Board of Supervisors member Lola Dunahoe of Natchitoches served with Long on the Presidential Search Committee that selected Dr. Jim Henderson as Northwestern State's president in 2014. She was able to see Long's concern for Northwestern and its students first-hand.


"He brought to the search a level of calm and caring. His underlying thought that nothing was too good for Northwestern," said Dunahoe. "All of us looked to him for guidance. To his family, I want to say thank you for sharing him with us."

Former Louisiana Speaker of the House Joe Salter recalled that Long was "a mentor and a friend" when they served together in the legislature.

"He had a great influence on Northwestern and higher education," said Salter, who represented Sabine and Red River parishes in the House of Representatives. "He made this institution stronger and the state stronger."

More Video: Hawk a hit

Louisiana Senate President Pro Tempore Sen. Gerald Long followed his brother into public service and is his third term in the Senate. Gerald Long recalled their mutual love of Northwestern along with his brother's unique way of giving advice.

"Over the years, he and I spent hours taking about this university," said State Senate President-Pro Tempore Gerald Long, Jimmy Long Sr.'s brother. "I would go to him for counsel and he never told me what to do, but always gave good suggestions. He was a valuable mentor."

Jimmy D. Long Sr. dealt with a variety of issues as a legislator, but none were more important to him than education.

"The Longs have always been champions of education," said Gerald Long. "He saw that one way for people to grow and prosper was through public education."


Sen. Long said his brother never sought the spotlight and was quick to credit others for accomplishments he had a role in.

"He never saw himself as more important than the next person," said Gerald Long. "He was a member of a team and wanted what was best for Louisiana. His footprints on this university will last through eternity."

Jimmy D. Long Sr. served two terms as chairman of the Board of Supervisors, which is the governing board for Northwestern State University and eight other universities across the state. It is the largest higher education system in Louisiana with more than 90,000 students.

Long's 32-year tenure in the legislature was one of the longest in the state's history, and colleagues recognized him with a resolution during his last term designating him as "Dean of the Legislature."

hairman of the House Education Committee for 16 years and a long-time member of the Southern Regional Education Board, Long was recognized as a leading authority in Louisiana and throughout the South on education-related legislation.

He introduced legislation to establish the Louisiana Scholars' College at Northwestern and was also an author of the bill to create the Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts in Natchitoches.

Cited by The Times of Shreveport as one of the "100 Most Influential People of the Century in Northwest Louisiana, Long is a member of the Louisiana Political Hall of Fame and the Northwestern Alumni Hall of Distinction, the Long Purple Line.
17 2017-03-10
Natchitoches

Search committee seeks public input on NSU's next president


NATCHITOCHES – Students, faculty and members of the community were invited to voice expectations regarding Northwestern State University’s next president during a campus forum Thursday. Those who spoke to the search committee that will select NSU’s next president expressed similar sentiments: a desire for the new president to be energetic, engaged, open to new ideas and committed to sustaining the momentum the university has experienced over the last three years.



“This is an exciting time and I appreciate your input in the search process,” said Alejandro Perkins, chair of the board of supervisors for the University of Louisiana System.



“Your input is vital in helping us select the next president of Northwestern State. We are here to listen, to learn and discuss the qualifications, characteristics, issues, challenges and priorities of your next president,” said UL System President Dr. Jim Henderson, NSU’s immediate past president who assumed his current role with the UL System in January.



During the forum, the committee reviewed the process and timeline for the search. The committee will receive nominations/applications and a list of candidates by the end of March. On April 3, the committee will meet to review applicant materials and select semifinalists. On-campus interviews will take place April 24-26 with finalists presented to the full board and interviews conducted on May 4, at which time the board may make a selection. New leadership should be in place by July 1.



“From a student perspective, we want a president that is going to be involved, not just from a social aspect but also with technology,” said student Hunter Horton of Plain Dealing. “We want someone energetic, engaged with students and who leads alongside the students.”



Jinger Sepulvado of Noble expressed the sense of home she discovered at Northwestern State and her concerns as a student who depends on TOPS to attend college.



“Northwestern is the heart and soul of this community and that relationship must be protected at all costs,” said Dr. Kathy Seymour, retired education faculty. “The role this university plays in the community cannot be overstated.”



Dr. Thomas Reynolds, Faculty Senate secretary, expressed a desire for someone open to new ideas and innovation.



“I hope the incoming president is someone committed to academics, is an academic and is committed to addressing compensation and workload issues, a person with an awareness of what faculty mean and an awareness of new ideas and innovation,” Reynolds said.



Sharon Joy, a professor of music, said she hopes the previous administration’s ability to connect with people will continue, and hopes the new president will have a sense of “team-building across all disciplines and foster an atmosphere of listening and have an open door policy.”



Public comments will be posted on youtube.com and linked to the UL System website, ulsystem.edu.



Perkins said he is listening and believes the university community wants consistency.



“I’m hearing ‘We want more of what we just had,’” he said, referring to Henderson’s short but productive tenure as NSU president. “Engagement with students and faculty and the community. Our job is to vet through the candidates.”



“This entire day is a reflection of how important NSU is,” said Lola Dunahoe, a Natchitoches native, NSU graduate and member of the search committee. “NSU is a different place than it was three years ago. We are looking for a candidate that is not interested in the status quo. We want a visionary.”



Search committee members are Henderson, chair (non-voting); Edward Crawford, Dunahoe, Pamela Egan, Jimmie Martin, Shawn Murphy, Perkins, Robert Shreve, Winfred Sibille and Antonio Torres and NSU Faculty Senate President Dr. Marcia Hardy. Non-voting members are Scott Andrews, NSU Foundation; Monty Chicola, NSU Alumni Association; Gail Jones, community representative, and John Pearce, NSU Student Government Association President.



The University of Louisiana System is the largest higher education system in Louisiana enrolling more than 90,000 students at Grambling State University, Louisiana Tech University, McNeese State University, Nicholls State University, Northwestern State University, Southeastern Louisiana University, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, the University of Louisiana at Monroe and the University of New Orleans.



Information about the search for Northwestern State University’s next president is available through the University of Louisiana System’s website at www.ulsystem.edu/northwesternsearch.
17 2017-03-09
Natchitoches

Current, future NSU students asked to begin financial aid process


Northwestern State University’s Office of Student Financial Aid is encouraging current and future students to begin the process of applying for financial aid for the 2017-18 academic year.

According to Lauren P. Jackson, director of financial aid at Northwestern State, the first step toward obtaining financial aid is to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), the primary form the federal government states and colleges use to award grants, scholarships, work study and student loans. The form also determines eligibility for TOPS and the PLUS Loan for Parents.

Northwestern State’s financial aid priority deadline is May 1.

“Those who have all financial aid paperwork completed and in the Office of Student Financial Aid by the priority deadline receive priority consideration for financial aid,” said Jackson. “Funding for some programs is limited, so those who meet the deadline have a better opportunity to benefit from all available programs.”

For more information, e-mail nsufinaid@nsula.edu or go to nsula.edu/financialaid.

17 2017-03-09
Natchitoches

Rosalie Piano Trio to perform March 16


The Rosalie Piano Trio will perform in the Thursday, March 16 at 7:30 p.m. in the Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free and open to the public.

The trio includes Roman Carranza on violin, Paul Christopher on cello and Chialing Hsieh on piano. They will perform works by Franz Joseph Haydn, Greg Robin and Darius Milhaud.

Carranza is a native of San Pedro Sula, Honduras and started his music training at the age of seven at the Victoriano Lopez Music School located in San Pedro Sula. He has participated in many well-known music festivals in Central America, Brazil and the United States.

Carranza has gained experience by performing with the San Pedro Sula Chamber Orchestra, Honduras Philharmonic, The Youth Orchestra of Central America, Shreveport Symphony, Texarkana Symphony, Longview Symphony, Rapides Symphony, South Arkansas Symphony, Acadiana Symphony and Baton Rouge Symphony.

Carranza holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree in music performance from Northwestern State University. He works as a freelance violinist and as string teacher in Shreveport.

Christopher received his Bachelor of Music Education from the New England Conservatory of Music and his Master of Music in Cello Performance from the University of Memphis.

From 1989 to 2004 he was principal cello of the Shreveport Symphony Orchestra, Shreveport Opera, and a member of the Premier String Quartet. Simultaneously, from 1993 to 1999 he also served as adjunct lecturer of low strings at Stephen F. Austin State University. In 2005, Christopher joined the string faculty at Northwestern State where he serves as associate professor of cello and music theory. He performed as assistant principal cello with the Peter Britt Festival Orchestra in Jacksonville, Oregon in the summer from 1993 to 2014.

Christopher has appeared as clinician and guest artist throughout Louisiana, as well as, in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Indiana, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Costa Rica, Honduras, Panamá and South Korea. His original articles have been published in American String Teacher, Bass World, The Jacques Offenbach Society Newsletter and Strings.

As a member of the Nashville String Machine, Christopher has recorded with artists such as Faith Hill, Ricky Skaggs, Bruce Springsteen and George Strait. He is currently recording the cello duos of Jacques Offenbach, with seven CD's available on the Human Metronome label. For more information visit paulchristophercello.com.

An avid performer of contemporary music, Hsieh is devoted to promoting new piano solo and chamber works. She has premiered approximately 40 compositions and has performed on the premiere recordings of 10 works by contemporary composers. Hsieh has been a featured pianist on seven CD’s for the Centaur, Innova, Enharmonic, and Ballpark record labels. Hsieh has received several grants to promote new American music, including an Artist Enrichment Grant from the Kentucky Foundation for Women.

A sought after collaborative pianist, Hsieh has performed with members of the New York Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony Orchestra and Lyric Opera Orchestra, Los Angeles Philharmonic, National Symphony Orchestra of Taiwan and the symphony orchestras of Detroit, Cleveland, St. Louis, Minnesota and Memphis. She has performed with the faculty of Julliard, Northwestern University, New England Conservatory, University of Cincinnati and Arizona State University.

Hsieh has performed recitals in Europe, Asia and throughout the United States. She performs regularly at universities and conferences for CMS, MTNA, NATS, SCI, North American Saxophone Alliance, National Flute Society, International Clarinet Association, International Viola Congress, World Association for Symphonic Bands and Ensembles and the Southeastern Composers’ League. Hsieh has given master classes throughout the United States and abroad and served as a judge and adjudicator for competitions and events.

Hsieh joined NSU’s faculty last fall as assistant professor of collaborative piano. Prior to this appointment, she was the instructor of music/faculty accompanist at Morehead State University from 2004 to 2016. In the summer, she is the piano instructor at the Lutheran Summer Music Festival and Academy and the Sounds of Summer Institute. She earned her bachelor’s degree from the National Taipei University of the Arts, and M.M. and D.M.A. in piano performance at the University of Cincinnati, College-Conservatory of Music.
17 2017-03-09
Natchitoches

NSU student Jessica Love to take part in national radiologic sciences program


Northwestern State University student Jessica Love has been selected to participate in the American Society of Radiologic Technologists 2017 Student Leadership Development Program.

The program will be held in Orlando, Florida June 21-25. Love will take part in educational conferences taught by national leaders in the field of radiologic science. She will also be able to attend the ASRT Annual Governance and House of Delegates meeting. The votes that are cast in the meeting shape the field of radiologic technology in the United States.

“Jessica is an outstanding student who actively serves her class and the University,” said Assistant Professor of Radiologic Sciences and Clinical Coordinator Joel Hicks. “By attending this program, Jessica will be able to see many of the things that are on the horizon within our field, and bring these items back to share with fellow students.”

Love, a junior radiologic sciences major from Harvey, is active in the Shreveport campus Student Government Association, serving as Radiologic Sciences senator and recording secretary. She participates in the Radiologic Science Honors Program, which involves additional research and other scholarly activity above and beyond the normal classroom requirements.

“This is an incredible honor,” said Love. “The program will allow me to watch educational sessions that can help prepare me for the Registry, the national examination that certifies students after they graduate. I will be able to network with professionals such as educators, technologists, employers and more from across the country.”

Love learned about the program at the 2016 Louisiana Society of Radiologic Technologists’ Annual Conference.

“I was able to watch two students who had gone to the program give a presentation about their time there,” said Love. “They had pictures of them meeting professionals from across the country and discussed how much fun the event was. They also talked about how much they learned about the professional nature of the radiologic sciences field. I knew instantly that I wanted to go, and I actually found one of the previous students that had attended to ask her questions.”

Love was interested in majoring in radiologic sciences because graduates in the field are in high demand. After taking classes, she developed a deep interest in the field.

“I did not realize how much I would love this program until my very first day in radiation physics, with one of my professors, Kelli Haynes,” said Love. “I loved the physics class, and that kept me motivated until we began clinical rotations in the hospitals. After my first semester in clinical, I knew I had found the career for me and that I wanted to continue pursuing opportunities within the radiologic sciences field.”

Love has high praise for Northwestern State’s radiologic sciences faculty.

“Northwestern's radiologic sciences professors are amongst the best in the country,” said Love. “The faculty work hard to ensure that the students understand the material and are ready to begin taking x-rays as soon as we walk into clinic on our first day. They continue pushing us to get better with each day so that when we graduate, Northwestern radiologic sciences graduates are the ones chosen by employers first in the Shreveport area.”

Love says NSU’s faculty are demanding and constantly push students to grow and improve.

“They keep the curriculum rigorous, and a student has to want to be an x-ray technologist in order to keep going through the courses,” said Love. “Despite being tough on us, the faculty are compassionate and caring. They understand that this career is difficult, and they work with the students to help us finish everything we need in order to graduate. Each faculty member pursues opportunities to improve themselves, and they motivate us to do the same. I chose Northwestern's radiologic sciences program because I knew that the faculty would motivate me to always try to be better.”

For more information on Northwestern State’s radiologic sciences program, go to nsula.edu/academics/nursing-allied-health/allied-health-2.
17 2017-03-08
Natchitoches

Dallas-area alum supporting NSU


NATCHITOCHES – A Texas real estate agent is contributing to fund raising efforts at his alma mater by offering rebates on home sales for other alumni, in addition to making a donation of the portion of the rebated price to the Northwestern State University Foundation.



Gregg Manning, who serves Prosper, Texas, in the Dallas/Fort Worth metro area, proposed to offer other Northwestern Alumni a rebate of 1 percent of the sales price whether they are buying or selling a home. Manning will donate 10 percent of the rebated amount to the NSU Foundation and 5 percent of the rebated amount will be paid to the alumni who referred or marketed his services, all of which would occur after closing and funding the transaction.



“My proposal is simply to help raise funds for NSU,” Manning said. “Ultimately all parties involved with feel like they have contributed to NSU,” Manning said.



Examples include the following.



SP $150,000 = $1,500 rebate; $150 to NSU; $75 to R/M partner

SP $200,000 = $2,000 rebate; $200 to NSU; $100 to R/M partner

SP $500,000 = $5,000 rebate; $500 to NSU; $250 to R/M partner

SP $1,000,000 = $10,000 rebate; $1000 to NSU; $500 to R/M partner



Manning attended NSU from 1974-78. He earned a degree in political science with a minor in business and was a member of Phi Eta Sigma freshman honor service fraternity and Blue Key. He served as a senator-at-large, held office in Fellowship of Christian Athletes and was named Mr. NSU 1978. He was an All-Conference and All-American tennis player as a freshman and voted MVP of the tennis team as a sophomore. He was inducted into the N Club Hall of Fame in 1985 and recognized as an NSU Legend in 2016.



“I have known Gregg for many years and am deeply appreciative of his devotion to Northwestern State University,” said NSU Acting President Dr. Chris Maggio.



Manning has been a member of the U.S. Professional Tennis Association since 1981, having directed tennis operations at clubs around the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex. The U.S. Tennis Association chose Manning as one of America’s best coaches in 1997 and he continues to train a select few today. He acquired his Texas real estate license in 1986 and began a second career. He was recently recognized in Texas Monthly magazine for the sixth year in a row as a Five Star Realtor for "Best in Customer Satisfaction.”



In 2007, Manning was diagnosed with leukemia. In 2014 he wrote “Manning Up in the Face of Death” to encourage other cancer patients with proceeds benefitting the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.



Manning can be reached at (469) 556 9288 or through his website, greggmanning.com. Information about his book is available at manningupforcancer.com.
17 2017-03-07
Natchitoches

NSU will host Spanish Language Film Festival


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Department of English, Foreign Languages and Cultural Studies will host a Spanish Language Film Festival March 15-19 featuring six films of a variety of countries and genres that will be screened with English subtitles. All screenings will be held in the Cane River Room of NSU’s Sylvan Friedman Student Union and are free and open to the public.



The Film Festival is made possible by a Spanish Film Club grant from Pragda film distributors, the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports of Spain, and SPAIN arts & culture.



“It is a long-running, competitive grant program that specifically funds screenings of new films from Spain, Latin America and South America at high schools and universities in the U.S.,” said Dr. Allison Rittmayer, assistant professor of English and film who authored the grant. “I decided to pursue this grant because it was a unique opportunity to bring films to NSU that our students probably haven't seen before. It's also a chance for students currently taking film classes and Spanish classes to enrich their learning experiences since we will be holding Skype Q&As with two of the directors, Carlos Caridad Montero and Niccolò Bruna, which is really exciting.”



Films and screening times are as follows.



“3 Bellezas” (3 Beauties) - 5 p.m. Friday, March 17, followed by Director Q & A, and at 5 p.m. Sunday, March 19



“Chico & Rita” - 5 p.m. Wednesday, March 15 and 7 p.m. Sunday, March 18



“El Club” (The Club) – 7 p.m. Thursday, March 16, President’s Room, and 1 p.m. Sunday, March 18



“Operación E” (Operation E) – 8 p.m. Friday, March 17 and 4 p.m. Saturday, March 18



“Pequeñas mentiras piadosas” (The Travel Agent) – 5 p.m. Thursday, March 16, President’s Room, and noon Sunday, March 19, Director Q & A, TBA



“Arrugas” (Wrinkles) – 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 15 and 3 p.m. Sunday, March 19



The Spanish Language Film Festival will be presented in collaboration with the Foreign Language Resource Center and the Student Film Society.
17 2017-03-06
Natchitoches

Angels and Demons: Clothed in righteousness


For two-and-a-half hours on a recent Saturday, Mike McConathy was the worst dressed man in college basketball. The men’s head coach of Northwestern State University had arrived at Moody Coliseum decked out smartly in a gray sport coat with crossing purple stripes, black slacks and a dark mock turtleneck. But just before his team tipped off against Abilene Christian University, McConathy slipped on a bright orange, long-sleeve, moisture-wicking athletic shirt.


Boone is the radio-TV voice of the Wildcats
He never looked better.

The front of the shirt bore three prominent characters that convinced McConathy, quite the character himself in his 18th year leading the Demons, to commit such a fashion faux pas: P4X, the name of the foundation benefiting from funds raised during that doubleheader between ACU and Northwestern State.

P4X originated as the rallying cry for Rex Fleming: Pray 4 Rex. The son of ACU associate director of athletics for media relations Lance Fleming (’92) and his wife, Jill, Rex was diagnosed with a cancerous brain tumor in November 2010. His two-year battle engaged innumerable supporters from among the extended ACU community, the city of Abilene, various corners of college athletics and the worldwide web via social media.


Jill, Rex and Lance Fleming
When Rex passed in November 2012, the Flemings wanted to find a way to assist and comfort families fighting pediatric cancer in the same way they had been blessed. So in 2013, they established the P4X Foundation, tweaking the acronym from pray for Rex to play for Rex. Through a series of promotional events over the last four years, the P4X Foundation has raised more than $200,000 and partnered with healthcare organizations where Rex was treated, such as Hendrick Hospice Care and West Texas Rehabilitation Center, to create spaces where families can congregate, regroup and find strength. The foundation also has made numerous gifts to individual families at places like Cook Children’s Medical Center in Fort Worth.

The idea to designate that aforementioned Saturday, Feb. 11, as P4X Day at Moody was hatched in January and came together quickly. It began with a conversation between Lance Fleming and ACU associate men’s basketball coach Brette Tanner, who volunteered to reach out to the Northwestern State coaching staff, many of whom he has known from his years as an assistant at Stephen F. Austin State University. Even though ACU’s athletics department moved forward with plans to recognize the P4X Foundation that day, NSU as the visiting institution had no obligation to participate.

Not only did both McConathy and his women’s basketball counterpart Jordan Dupuy verbally agree to be part of the program, they each put their money where their mouths were. Each NSU team enthusiastically accepting the invitation to wear specially made warm-up shirts with their team colors (orange with purple lettering) similar to the purple and white versions ACU players would wear. And despite the fact that neither coach has a personal connection to ACU – in fact, Dupuy is in his first season with the Lady Demons and was making his first trip here – both sought out Fleming courtside and wrote a personal check to the foundation.

McConathy, his eyes glistening while listening to Fleming speak of Rex and living to tell his story, even told NSU sports information director Doug Ireland and the Demons’ radio announcer Patrick Netherton they need to get a team together for the P4X Foundation golf tournament in Abilene on May 15. Don’t bet against it. This is the same coach who drove to Huntsville, Texas, to attend the visitation services of a woman he’d never met: the wife of Kooter Roberson, veteran play-by-play man for NSU rival Sam Houston State University.

In his explanation that faith and good deeds go hand in hand, James, the brother of Jesus, wrote, “Even the demons believe.” It’s true. I watched it happen.


Rex was a familiar face at ACU sporting events his whole life, here standing behind (from left) his dad, Lance, Chris Macaluso and Grant Boone.
17 2017-03-06
Natchitoches

Northwestern State to offer concealed carry course


Northwestern State University’s Office of Electronic and Continuing Education will offer a conceal carry class Saturday, March 18 from 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. in South Hall on NSU’s Campus and at the Natchitoches Shooting Range for the qualifying stage.

Space is limited to the first 20 students and a minimum of 10 students. The 9-hour course is for Louisiana residents 21 or older who want to obtain a concealed handgun permit. The course will be taught by Kevin Billiot, a certified instructor.


17 2017-03-03
Natchitoches

Conine scholarship will assist students with disabilities


NATCHITOCHES – A Northwestern State University graduate established a scholarship to benefit students with disabilities who may need financial assistance to pay for aids and technologies that help them succeed academically. The C.A. Conine Scholarship will be awarded to a student registered with NSU’s Office of Disability Support and must be in financial need. The student must maintain a 2.5 grade point average.



Connie Conine of Natchitoches was led to establish the scholarship because she herself copes with epilepsy, an ADA-recognized condition.



“My mother did not hover,” she said. “She let me live my life.”



Conine said her intent is to help students who may need special technology or additional assistance to complete their studies. She pointed out that the Civil Rights Act of 1964 did not include protection for individuals with disabilities. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was not signed into law until 1990 by President George H. W. Bush.



“This scholarship will help students pay for technology and additional fees they couldn’t get through financial aid,” said Catherine Faucheaux, director of Disability Support. “They may need braille textbooks, assistive technologies or they may have a laptop and need specific computer programs, such as zoom text, digital transcribers and text-to-speech components. Student have different learning styles, whether they learn material by hearing it, seeing it or speaking it. The technology available now is impressive.”



“This is a special scholarship,” said Drake Owens, executive director of the NSU Foundation. “Northwestern State is committed to supporting and seeking resources for our students who face extra challenges. We appreciate Ms. Conine’s compassion and her generous gift.”



“Connie Conine is a remarkable, compassionate lady who has overcome challenges in her own life,” said NSU Development Officer Jill Bankston, CFRE. “Connie remembers what it’s like to battle those challenges, and has generously given back so that an NSU student has one less thing to fight through when they are earning their education.”



Conine previously established the L.C. and Trudy Conine Endowed Scholarship to benefit a student who intends to pursue a career in the medical field. Conine was a chemistry/zoology major at Northwestern State and enjoyed a 40-year career as a medical technician in a hospital lab in Dallas.



“When you see handicapped stickers on cars, you don’t know why they are there. It makes you reflect. Not all disabilities are visible,” Conine said. She described the ideal recipient for the scholarship as “someone who might be discouraged from trying to get to school to study, but if there was a way to get that extra help, they would go for it.”



For more information on scholarships available through the NSU Foundation, call (318)-357-4414 or visit northwesternalumni.com.


17 2017-03-02
Natchitoches

NSU honors veteran Joseph Maggio


NATCHITOCHES, La. (NSU) - Northwestern State University recognized Air Force veteran Joseph Maggio during the Feb. 25 double header basketball game against the University of New Orleans. The university is recognizing veterans throughout the academic year for their service to the country.

Maggio served in the U.S. Air Force from 1950 to 1954. He trained at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, and Wichita Falls, Texas, before receiving advanced training at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida. In January 1952, he traveled aboard the USS Randolph to Japan where he transferred for duty in Korea.

From strategic air bases at Kusan and Teague, Korea, then Staff Sergeant Maggio served as an administrative and head clerk and processed personnel files and records including orders, transfers, and shipments supporting the war effort. For his service, he was awarded the Air Force Good Conduct Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean War Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal and Presidential Korean Service Medal.


After a year tour in Korea, he returned to the United States via the USS Salem to settle back in Natchitoches with his honorable discharge. Maggio retired from Gulf Oil Corporation after 35 years with the company. He is a member of St. Charles Catholic Church, Knights of Columbus 4th Degree and the American Legion.

Maggio and his wife, Betty, have been married 62 years. They have four adult children and one deceased.
17 2017-03-02
Natchitoches

NSU Theatre and Dance to perform ‘Hedda Gabler’


Northwestern State University Theatre and Dance will present Ibsen’s “Hedda Gabler” March 8-12 and 15-18 on the A.A. Fredericks Auditorium stage. Performance time is 7:30 p.m. March 8-11 and 15-18 and March 12 at 2 p.m.

“Hedda Gabler” was written by Henrik Ibsen and revolves around the beautiful and willful Gabler. She is a very ambitious and controlling woman married to the solid and respectable academic George Tesman. The dreamer Eilert Lovborg, an old flame of Hedda’s, reappears and a series of events leads to tragic results. Former Artistic Director Dr. Jack Wann is returning to NSU to direct “Hedda Gabler.”



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17 2017-03-02
Natchitoches

NSU violin faculty to be featured in recital March 6


Sofiko Tchetchelashvili, left and Andrej Kurti

Northwestern State University violin faculty Andrej Kurti and Sofiko Tchetchelashvili will present a recital Monday, March 6 at 7:30 p.m. in Magale Recital Hall. Admission is free and open to the public.

Kurti is an associate professor of violin/viola. Tchetchelashvili is an adjunct faculty member in violin/viola.

The program includes works by Mozart, Despic, Gliere, Halvorsen and Azarashvili.

Kurti is a native of Belgrade, Serbia. He studied at the Moscow State Tchaikovsky Conservatory and finished his graduate studies in the University of Georgia, where he received doctorate degree in violin performance.

He was a recipient of five first prizes in competitions in Yugoslavia, four first prizes in competitions in Georgia and Florida and a finalist in the MTNA (Music Teacher National Association) Competition in 1998.

In 2000, Kurti became a recording artist for classical label Blue Griffin Recording, for which he later recorded Six Sonatas for Violin Solo by Eugene Ysaye, op.27.

In 2004, Kurti became a professor of violin at Northwestern State He appeared as a soloist with many symphony orchestras in the United States, Serbia, Montenegro, Italy, Greece, Russia and France. He also appeared as a chamber performer in Spain, France, Latvia, Canada and South Korea.

In non-classical music world, Kurti performed and arranged on more than 40 albums of popular and modern music, which he recorded for many different music labels in the United States.

Kurti has been invited to several international music festivals where he most often performed music written for solo violin. Most recently, Kurti performed Ysaye's “Six Sonatas for Violin Solo, op.27” in his Road to Carnegie nation-wide recital series, culminating with his Carnegie Hall debut.

Tchetchelashvili is a native of Tbilisi, Georgia and studied at Tbilisi State Conservatory.

In 2014, Tchetchelashvili accepted a graduate assistantship at Baylor University, and two years later she completed another graduate degree in violin performance. She
was a winner of four Georgian national violin competitions, as well as a recipient of two consecutive President’s Awards.

In addition to her teaching duties at NSU, Tchetchelashvili is an active concert violinist and violist.
17 2017-03-01
Natchitoches

NSU to dedicate Jimmy D. Long Sr. Student Services Center March 9


Northwestern State University will dedicate the Jimmy D. Long Sr. Student Services Center Thursday, March 9. The ceremony will begin at 11 a.m. outside the Student Services Center. The public is invited to attend.

The Jimmy D. Long Student Services Center was completed in 2012. The 34,451 square foot facility is on the former site of West Caspari Hall. The $8.5 million Student Services Center was the first state-funded new building constructed on the Northwestern State campus in more than 30 years.

“Jimmy Long was a giant in education in Louisiana,” said Northwestern State Acting President Dr. Chris Maggio. “Countless thousands of students benefitted from his leadership on educational issues in the Legislature and on the Board of Supervisors of the University of Louisiana System. He had a deep passion for helping students and especially those at Northwestern. It is appropriate that this building which was designed to provide services to students is being named in Jimmy Long’s honor.”

The Student Services Center is home to the Offices of University Recruiting, First Year Experience and Leadership Development, Financial Aid, Student Employment Scholarships, Admissions, Veteran’s Affairs and the Vice President for the Student Experience as well as the Registrar’s Office, One Card Office and Cashier’s Office.

Long served eight consecutive terms in the Louisiana House of Representatives from 1968 to 2000. He was appointed to Board of Supervisors of the University of Louisiana System in 2001. Long passed away in August.

He served two terms as chairman of the Board of Supervisors, which is the governing board for Northwestern State University and eight other universities across the state. It is the largest higher education system in Louisiana with more than 90,000 students.

Long’s 32-year tenure in the legislature was one of the longest in the state’s history, and colleagues recognized him with a resolution during his last term designating him as “Dean of the Legislature.”

Chairman of the House Education Committee for 16 years and a long-time member of the Southern Regional Education Board, Long was recognized as a leading authority in Louisiana and throughout the South on education-related legislation.

He introduced legislation to establish the Louisiana Scholars’ College at Northwestern and was also an author of the bill to create the Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts in Natchitoches.

Long, who attended Northwestern State, helped obtain millions of dollars over the years for construction and renovation projects at the school and for highways, bridges and other major improvements in his legislative district.

Cited by The Times of Shreveport as one of the “100 Most Influential People of the Century in Northwest Louisiana, Long is a member of the Louisiana Political Hall of Fame and the Northwestern Alumni Hall of Distinction, the Long Purple Line.

He was a lifelong business leader and cattleman in Natchitoches who received numerous other honors for his leadership in civic, professional and church activities.
17 2017-02-24
Natchitoches

Demon Battalion will host Military Ball


Through a collaborative effort, the Northwestern State University Demon Regiment and NSU’s Department of Military Science will host the 67th Demon Battalion Military Ball in March on the campus of Northwestern State University. The event will be held in the Friedman Student Union Ballroom and feature prestigious guests, cadets and cadre.



The ball will open with the battalion honoring cadets who will commission this May with the Arch of Steel. Later, Lieutenant Colonel (Retired) Charles “Sandy” McNeely and Lieutenant Colonel (Retired) Truman Maynard, who will serve as the guest speaker, will be inducted in the Demon Regiment Hall of Fame. Other honored guests include Acting President of Northwestern State Dr. Chris Maggio and Interim Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Vickie Gentry.



The purpose of the military ball is to instill Army traditions while teaching organizational and leadership skills. It allows for essential interaction between cadets and university and community leadership. The ball enables cadets to exchange ideas and build relationships that are vital to ROTC’s recruiting efforts. Lieutenant Colonel Katherine Carlson, the professor of Military Science, also holds the honor of serving as the 22nd Colonel of the Demon Regiment. The Senior Military Instructor is Master Sergeant Randy Angel.



Honorary Colonel of the Demon Regiment Lieutenant General (Retired) Joseph Cosumano, Jr., invites the community to join enjoy the evening with the battalion. The ball will begin with social hour followed by dinner and dancing. The cost is $40 per person, and menu selections include Prime Rib, Chicken Opelousas or Eggplant Parmigiana. For additional information or reservations, please contact Ed Kelly at kellye@nsula.edu or (318) 357-5157. The dress is formal.
17 2017-02-23
Natchitoches

Flavor of Louisiana at NSU will draw alumni, prospective students and others


The Flavor of Louisiana event that the Northwestern State University Foundation will present on April 7 will offer an alluring mixture of good food, entertainment, recognition of some prominent alumni and opportunities to help NSU retain and attract students.

Lt. Gov. Billy Nungesser, who will be a special guest for the 6 p.m. program at the Wellness, Recreation and Activities Center, helped assure the success of the event by arranging for donations of a variety of foods from the Louisiana Seafood Board.

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17 2017-02-23
Natchitoches

NSU launches Quality Enhancement Plan


Northwestern State University held a launch party for its Quality Enhancement Plan Wednesday. Students browsed through booths set up by academic departments to learn how to get involved with internships, conduct research and coordinate performances to fulfill future academic requirements. The plan, “Learning for Life: Experience Your Future,” focuses on enhancing and expanding experiential learning opportunities for undergraduate students. Video of the launch is available at youtube.com/watch?v=kuS3bskqDgI
17 2017-02-23
Natchitoches

City Bank is Magnolia sponsor of Flavor of Louisiana


City Bank and Trust is a Magnolia sponsor of Northwestern State University’s spring fund raiser, Flavor of Louisiana, set for Friday, April 7. The event will be a celebration of the state’s culinary seafood heritage with tastings, music and more. From left are Senior Vice President Loan Officer Shanna Baker, Assistant Vice President Kim Howell, Banking/HR Officer Rachel Stephens, City Bank President and CEO John Ackel, and NSU Development Officers Tiffany Chasteen and Kimberly Gallow. Sponsorships to Flavor of Louisiana are available at the $1,500, $1,000 and $500 levels. For more information, call (318) 357-4414 or visit northwesternalumni.com/fol.


17 2017-02-22
Natchitoches

Five added to NSU's Long Purple Line


Northwestern State University will honor five graduates by inducting them into the University’s alumni hall of distinction, the Long Purple Line. The 2017 inductees are Dr. Julian Bailes of Chicago, the late Joe Delaney, Dr. James Henderson and Gerard F. Thomas Jr. of Natchitoches and Lenn Dohmann Prince of Ruston.

Honorees will be honored at a luncheon on April 7 at 11:30 a.m. in the Friedman Student Union Ballroom. Tickets are $20. For more information, call (318) 357-4414 or go to northwesternalumni.com/lpl17.

Since 1990, 120 NSU alumni have been named to the Long Purple Line.

Bailes has become a leading figure in the field of sports-related concussion research.

A world-renowned neurosurgeon, Bailes is an advisor to the NFL Players Association, the NCAA’s Competitive Safeguards and Medical Safety Committee, the Southeastern Conference and Pop Warner football. In the recent movie “Concussion” starring Will Smith as Bailes’ colleague Dr. Bennet Omalu, award-winning actor Alec Baldwin portrayed Bailes in a film that brought sports concussion issues to a mainstream audience spurring discussions of the safety and future of American sports.

Bailes has testified in front of Congress regarding safety aspects of sports, particularly football from the Pop Warner level up to the NFL, and has taken bold positions related to safety of competitors. He has been instrumental in implementing return-to-play protocols in all 50 states and internationally.
Bailes is chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery and co-director of the Northshore Neurological Institute in Chicago. Bailes is a founding member and director of the Brain Injury Research Institute, which focuses on the study of traumatic brain injuries and their prevention. His research has been instrumental in the understanding of the clinical evidence of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), a progressive, degenerative disease found in individuals who have been subjected to multiple concussions or sub-concussive blows.

He is a 2016 recipient of the Dave Dixon Louisiana Sports Leadership Award presented by the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame.

Delaney, a Haughton native, was a two-time All-America running back in 1979-80 for the Demons, and joined Mark Duper, Victor Oatis and Mario Johnson on the Demons' 1981 NCAA championship 4x100 meter relay team, earning All-America honors.

Delaney was selected in the second round of the 1981 NFL draft and was the 1981 AFC Rookie of the Year for the Chiefs and played in the Pro Bowl.

Delaney died June 29, 1983, trying to save three children from drowning in a pond at an amusement park in Monroe. One of the three survived.


His No. 44 Demon football jersey was retired at halftime of his final game at NSU. Since his death, no Kansas City player has worn his No. 37. He is immortalized in several ways at Northwestern State, including plaques at Turpin Stadium and the Ledet Track Complex, and with the permanent football team captains receiving Joe Delaney Memorial Leadership Awards annually. The Demons' spring football game has been known as the Joe Delaney Bowl since 1989 and the Joe Delaney Distinguished Supporter Award goes each year to a leading backer of NSU Athletics.
 
 Delaney was posthumously awarded the Presidential Citizen's Medal from President Ronald Reagan, presented at his funeral by then Vice President George H.W. Bush to the Delaney family. Delaney is enshrined in the N Club Hall of Fame, the Ark-La-Tex Museum of Champions, the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame, the College Football Hall of Fame and the Chiefs' Ring of Honor at Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City.

His story was told in the 2015 ESPN film “Delaney.”

Henderson became president of the University of Louisiana System on Jan. 1. He oversees one of the largest university systems in the United States with more than 90,000 students on nine campuses.

Henderson was president of Northwestern State for two years. In that period, NSU increased overall enrollment and improved its retention rate. Enrollment in the fall 2016 semester increased by seven percent to 9,819, the highest total since selective admissions were implemented in 2005. Northwestern State worked to strategically develop new programs that give students access to high demand skills and give employers in the region a competitive advantage.

As NSU’s president, Henderson worked closely with students, faculty, staff, alumni and stakeholders to strengthen the university. He was honored at the spring 2016 commencement ceremony with a resolution from Northwestern State’s Faculty Senate for his “multiple creative and innovative efforts to revitalize the life of the university.”

Henderson was chancellor of Bossier Parish Community College from 2009 - 2014. In that time, BPCC grew its enrollment by more than 84 percent and increased annual certificate and degree completions by 90 percent. He was senior vice president, workforce and economic development/career & technical education for the Louisiana Community & Technical College System from 2005 to 2009.

From 2001 to 2005, he was director of administration and director of workforce development for the Louisiana Department of Labor.

Henderson was in the private sector for 10 years in hotel management.

Prince is a native of Opelousas who began studies at Northwestern State in 1972, where she was a member of the NSU Chorale and played French horn in the NSU Orchestra. She was a member of Delta Zeta Sorority and represented NSU in the 1974 Miss Louisiana Pageant as Miss Northwestern-Lady of the Bracelet. She graduated in 1975 with a bachelor’s degree in vocal performance education and later earned a master’s degree in vocal performance form the University of Louisiana at Monroe.

While living in Albuquerque, New Mexico, Prince continued her vocal studies with teacher and pedagogue Jane Snow, performing in many vocal ensembles in Albuquerque and Santa Fe and with the Southwest Opera Chorus in Albuquerque. While working towards her master’s degree, Prince was awarded a scholarship from the University of Miami to study in Salzburg, Austria, during the Salzburg Opera Festival where she studied and was coached by numerous world-renowned opera performers and teachers.

After moving to Ruston in 1992, Prince was host for many years to Northwestern State’s north-central Louisiana recruiting reception in her home. She was also a member of the Ruston Masterworks Chorus and the soprano soloist for many performances.

Prince and her husband Danny own and operate several businesses in several states, including nursing and rehabilitation centers, pharmacies and therapy companies, as well as Port au Prince restaurant on Lake Claiborne and Port au Prince Cross Lake.

She was inducted into the Mrs. H.D. Dear Sr. and Alice Estelle Dear School of Creative and Performing Arts Hall of Fame in 2016.

Thomas earned a bachelor’s degree from Northwestern State in 1943. He was on active duty in the United States Marine Corps from 1943 to 1946. Thomas received a degree from LSU Law School in 1948.

He became a highly regarded attorney with the firm of Thomas, Dunahoe and Gregory practicing primarily in the field of negligence, workman’s compensation and general trial practice. Thomas was selected by his peers to appear in the publication, “The Best Lawyers in America.”

As an attorney, Thomas devoted countless hours to the profession through his activities in professional organizations. He was state committeeman for the American College of Trial Lawyers and American Trial Lawyers Association and president and state committeeman of the Louisiana Trial Lawyers Association.

Thomas served as a member of the Louisiana State Bar Association House of Delegates, chairman of the State Bar Association section on negligence, worker’s compensation and admiralty and president of the LSU Law School Alumni Association. He was a member of the Judiciary Commission of Louisiana from 1983 to 1987, serving as chairman in 1987.
17 2017-02-22
Natchitoches

NSU to host 59th Annual Caddo Conference


Northwestern State University will host the 59th annual Caddo Conference Feb. 24-25 in the ballroom of the Sylvan Friedman Student Union. Meetings are open to the public.

Archaeologists, ethnologists, geographers, Caddo Nation leaders and artists will present talks on the Caddo Nation it’s past and present developments, according to NSU Professor of Anthropology Dr. Pete Gregory. Participants from Louisiana, Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas are expected, Gregory said.

A traditional Caddo dance featuring the Caddo Culture Club will be held in the ballroom Friday at 6 p.m.

Several current and former Northwestern State faculty will be making presentations at the conference.

Gregory and former faculty member Dr. Dayna Lee will discuss trade silver with the Caddo and their neighboring tribes in a presentation “Silver Looking Good : Silver Ornaments, the Caddo and Their Neighbors.” Professor of Geography Dr. Dean Sinclair will deliver “Edge of Empire: The Origin and Settlement of Louisiana’s Neutral Strip.” Faculty member Jeff Girard will present “Colonoware and European Pottery from late 18th, early 19th century sites in Northwest Louisiana.”

For more information, contact Gregory at (318) 357-4364 or e-mail gregoryh@nsula.edu.
17 2017-02-22
Natchitoches

NSU will host Law Day March 9


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s pre-law and paralegal program in the Department of Criminal Justice, History and Social Sciences will sponsor Law Day from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Thursday, March 9 in the 107 Kyser Hall Conference Room.



The event would be of interest to students as well as other individuals interested in:

* Pursuing a career in law

* Attending a law school, and/or

* Working in a support position in the law

* Entertaining the possibilities in law



Those who attend can meet with representatives from the legal field and Southern University Law School and Financial Aid regarding, but not limited to:



* Questions about the Field of Law and Employment Opportunities

* Information on How to Apply for Law School

* Queries on How to Pay for Law School

* How to Best Prepare for the LSAT



Students and individuals from the community are invited and can set appointments with representatives to meet and discuss their interest and questions. Walk-ins are welcome.



For more information or to make an appointment, contact Southern University Law School Queries, LSAT & Financial Aid coordinator Michael Garrard at (225) 771-4900, Ext. 203 or MGarrard@sulc.edu.



Information is also available by contacting Shirley Snyder, coordinator of NSU's pre-law and paralegal studies programs, at (318) 357-6963 or snyders@nsula.edu.
17 2017-02-22
Natchitoches

NSU will present International Festival March 21


NATCHITOCHES – Buenas Dias. Bonjour. Willkommen. Benvenuto. Northwestern State University’s Department of Hospitality Management and Tourism will present the popular International Festival of Culture and Cuisines from 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 21 at the Alumni Plaza in the Fine Arts Complex.



Students will be in costume representing the culture and cuisine of Ireland, Germany, the Caribbean, France, Texas, India and Greece. Latin America will be represented with a performance by NSU’s popular Colombian band, Larry’s Group.



“This event will have wonderful food provided Northwestern’s very own culinary arts students and the travel/tourism students in costume providing music, fun and games,” said Dr. Lynn Woods, HMT professor.



Parking will be available in the lots across the street from the plaza and near the WRAC. To sample the international faire, guests will purchase tickets from the Japan booth to exchange for small servings of dishes from each “country.”



For more information, contact Woods at llwoods@nsula.edu.


17 2017-02-20
Natchitoches

NSU honors WWII veteran Bill Bacle


NSU- Northwestern State University recognized Urson S. “Bill” Bacle of Coushatta, who served in both the U.S. Army Corps during World War II and later with the U.S. Air Force, during the Feb. 16 basketball game, the university’s on-going effort to honor veterans. Bacle served in the U.S. Army Air Corps from June 26, 1943, to April 7, 1946. The Air Force recalled him to service on September 1, 1951, where he was a flight line mechanic and part-time engineer. He retired from the Air Force in April 1970 with the rank of Major.

The first-person account of his story, as told to Sid Hall, NSU’s Military Affairs Coordinator and ROTC Program Manager, is as follows.
17 2017-02-20
Natchitoches

inaugural NSU Science Showcase draws students from throughout Louisiana


Winnfield Senior High School students Bridget Berry, Victoria Primm and Cameron Weaver made silly putty during a polymer synthesis demonstration in a chemistry laboratory at Northwestern State University Friday. NSU’s School of Biological and Physical sciences hosted more than 300 students from around the state in the first Science Showcase, an opportunity for high school students to explore degree programs and career opportunities. For more information on NSU’s School of Biological and Physical Sciences, visit sciences.nsula.edu.


Northwestern State University student volunteer Shannon Jones presented a liquid magnet demonstration for Natchitoches Central High School students Jolie Williams, Tayla Rachal, Courtney Edmonson and Leah DeFord during the NSU Science Showcase, an event hosted by the School of Biological and Physical Sciences Friday. Students from throughout Louisiana participated in workshops in chemistry, biology, physiology, environmental sciences, veterinary technology and physics. For more information on NSU’s School of Biological and Physical Sciences, visit sciences.nsula.edu.


Dr. James Woodard, instructor of veterinary technology, demonstrated canine CPR for Skylar Morgan, a Natchitoches Central High School student, during Northwestern State University’s Science Showcase, presented by the School of Biological and Physical Sciences. High schoolers learned about career opportunities available through different degree programs and were able to talk with faculty and NSU students about scholarship opportunities and their experiences as science majors. For more information on NSU’s School of Biological and Physical Sciences, visit sciences.nsula.edu.


Abigail Trahan, a senior at South Terrebonne High School, examined nerve endings under a microscope during a physiology presentation in one of Northwestern State University’s biology laboratories. Trahan and more than 300 other high school juniors and seniors from around the state participated in NSU’s Science Showcase, hosted by the School of Biological and Physical Sciences. For more information on NSU’s School of Biological and Physical Sciences, visit sciences.nsula.edu.


17 2017-02-17
Natchitoches

Versatile musician Warren Wolf to perform with NSU Jazz Orchestra


Versatile musician Warren Wolf will perform with the Northwestern State University Jazz Orchestra on Wednesday, Feb. 22 at 7:30 p.m. in Magale Recital Hall. Admission is free and open to the public. Galindo Rodriguez directs the Jazz Orchestra.

The program will include “The Blues Machine” by Sammy Nestico featuring James Armstrong of Natchitoches on piano, Ian Cassidy of Madisonville on alto saxophone and Michael Daily of West Monroe on trombone; “A Time for Love” by Johnny Mandel and P. F. Webster and arranged by Hank Levy featuring the trombone section and “Garaje Gato” by Gordon Goodwin featuring Addison Pellegrino of Burleson, Texas, on drums, Jose Miguel Aguero of San Pedro Sula, Honduras, on Latin percussion, Jack Salyer of Duncanville, Texas and Kenyon Johnson of DeRidder on saxophone and Ronald Rodriguez of Cartegena, Colombia on piano.

Wolf will perform two of his original compositions, “Soul Sister” and “Gang, Gang” along with “Invitation” by Bronislau Kaper and P.F. Webster and arranged by Eric Richards and “On Purple Porpoise Parkway” by Tom Kubis.

Wolf is a multi-instrumentalist from Baltimore. From the age of three, he has been trained on the vibraphone/marimba, drums and piano. Under the guidance of his father Warren Wolf Sr., Warren has a deep background in all genres of music.

After graduating from Berklee College of Music in May of 2001, Warren became an active musician on the Boston local scene. Wolf was hired in 2003 to become an instructor in the percussion department at Berklee. He taught private lessons on the vibraphone and drums, as well as a beginner’s keyboard class for entering freshman drum set majors.

After two years of teaching at Berklee, Wolf headed back to Baltimore to start his main goal of becoming a full-time performing musician. He landed the piano duties with the Rachael Price Group.

Wolf is the drummer of choice for alto saxophonist Tia Fuller, who tours with Beyonce. He is a member of the Donal Fox Group, which includes bassist John Lockwood and drummers Dafnis Preito and Terri Lyne Carrington. Wolf tours with Bobby Watson's Live and Learn sextet, Karriem Riggins Virtuoso Experience and Christian McBride & Inside Straight. With these three groups Warren has traveled the world, perforing throughout the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia.
17 2017-02-17
Natchitoches

Pianist Sonia Wheaton Dudley to perform Tuesday, Feb. 21


Pianist Sonia Wheaton Dudley will perform at Northwestern State University Tuesday, Feb. 21 at 7:30 p.m. in Magale Recital Hall. The concert is part of the Louisiana Piano Series International. Tickets are $15. Students are admitted free. Dr. Francis Yang and Dr. Christine Burczyk Allen are the organizers of the Louisiana Piano Series International.

Dudley will perform works by Benjamin Britten, Samuel Barber, Allan Gordon Bell, Nikolai Medtner and Sergei Rachmaninov.

A talented musician and enterprising professional, Dudley is an accomplished solo and chamber music performer active in Montreal, Canada. She presented Olivier Messiaen’s song cycle “Harawi” with mezzo-soprano Kristin Hoff at the Chapelle historique du Bon-Pasteur in March 2015. Dudley is a founding member of Ensemble QAT, a quartet dedicated to new music. Ensemble QAT successfully won the support of the Montreal Arts Council in 2011, winning the prestigious Montreal Arts Council Tour. QAT was also invited to Montpellier, France in 2012 to perform prize-winning show “Birds,” a multi-media event featuring both improvised and written music. The Canada Council and the Quebec Arts Council both also funded QAT for several projects including a tribute to Messiaen and the concert tour in France.

Dudley has performed across Canada including concerts in Victoria, Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal. In addition to performing, she teaches classical piano at Université du Québec à Montréal. She also taught piano, chamber music and piano literature at the State University of New York at Potsdam from 2011-2014. A classically trained pianist, Dudley completed a Doctorate of Music in performance at the Université de Montréal.
17 2017-02-16
Natchitoches

NSU faculty recital will feature period instruments


NSU– A recital featuring period instruments will be performed by Dennette McDermott, Douglas Bakenhus and Francis Yang on Friday, Feb. 17 at 6 p.m. in the Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts Recital Hall.

Admission is free and open to the public. McDermott, Bakenhus and Yang are members of the Creative and Performing Arts faculty at Northwestern State University.

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17 2017-02-16
Natchitoches

Student attend DC auto exhibit to see their design work on display



Rachael Gaude of Ventress and Jessica Cross of Natchitoches snapped a selfie in front of a 2017 Mazda Miata wrapped in a design Cross created in a Northwestern State University art class. Cross’s design, “Kisatchie Forest,” was selected for the wrapped car, which was featured at the Washington, D.C., Auto Show. Gaude’s design, “Honey Bubbles,” was represented in a poster display. The two NSU art students attended the show with their professor, Collier Hyams, who assigned the project, based on a reflection-based surfacing them.


A wrap design by Jessica Cross of Natchitoches was featured on a 2017 Mazda Miata placed on exhibit at the Washington, D.C., Auto Show, one of the nation’s top five auto shows presented by the International Organization of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Jan. 27-Feb. 5. Cross placed first in a Mazda design competition for her “Kisatchie Forest” design and Rachael Gaude of Ventress placed second for “Honey Bubbles.” Gaude’s concept was featured as a poster print at the exhibit booth. Both are art students at Northwestern State University. The designs were created in Visual Communications 3220, taught by Collier Hyams, a professor of art who developed a relationship with Mazda several years ago as an opportunity for students to apply their ideas to a product. Standing in front of the “Kisatchie Forest” car are, from left are Eric Chrisinske of Mazda North American Operations; Cross, Gaude and Hyams.


17 2017-02-16
Natchitoches

Opera Theater to present "Amore senza fine"


Northwestern Opera Theater will present "Amore senza fine" Monday, Feb. 20 at 5:30 p.m. in the Friedman Student Union Ballroom. Tickets are $10. Admission is free for Northwestern State, BPCC@NSU and Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts students with a current student I.D.

"Amore senza fine" is an operatic journey exploring love, fidelity, betrayal and all the wonders and horrors opera brings when it comes to romance. Featured performers are Northwestern State faculty Dr. Stefan Gordon and Dr. Chialing Hsieh along with special guest Michelle Lange.

Gordon has performed in operas, theaters, churches, and in concert in productions in Germany, Austria, Italy and across America. He has created two leading roles in American opera premieres, participating in both Arizona Opera workshops of Craig Bohmler’s “New Opera Riders of the Purple Sage” as the villainous Elder Tull. With Ohio Light Opera he premiered the role of romantic lead James Paradene in the first complete performance of Jerome Kern’s “The Cabaret Girl” in the United States, a role he recorded with Albany Records.

As an administrator and director, Gordon led casting and helped in the creation of a new opera production of Mozart’s “Le nozze di Figaro” with more than 200 performances in Vienna, Austria. He directed Rapides Symphony’s production of “Die Zauberfloete” and will serve as Assistant Director for Natchez Music Festival’s productions of “Il barbiere di Siviglia” and “Camelot” and Vienna Summer Institute’s production of “Don Giovanni.” Gordon received his Doctor of Musical Arts at Arizona State, holds a master in music from Florida State, and a bachelor in music from the University of Utah.

Hsieh is an active solo and collaborative pianist with a large repertoire of both standard and lesser-known works from the Baroque to the present. She was a winner in the First Youth Piano Competition in Taiwan and has performed solo recitals in Europe, North America and Asia. As a collaborative pianist, Hsieh has performed recitals with renowned musicians including Joseph Alessi, Catharine Carroll, Steven Cohen, Massimo La Rosa, Timothy McAllister, Nathan Nabb and the Oasis Saxophone Quartet. Hsieh has been a featured pianist on six CD’s for the Centaur, Innova and Ballpark record labels.

Hsieh performs at a variety of regional and national conferences and accompanies at several competitions in the United States—including the Yamaha Young Performing Artists Competition and the District Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions.

She earned her bachelor’s degree from the National Taipei University of the Arts, and M.M. and D.M.A. in piano performance at the University of Cincinnati, College-Conservatory of Music.

Video of Gordon discussing the performance is available at youtube.com/watch?v=pzKrTOT5pbU.
17 2017-02-15
Natchitoches

Colombian faculty visit former students at NSU


NATCHITOCHES – Colombian performing arts students from Comfenalco Cartagena have enriched Northwestern State University’s School of Creative and Performing Arts since an exchange agreement was reached in 2011.

The nearly 50 Colombian students received a visit from a handful of their old mentors recently as Colombian professors made an 11-day visit to the campus.

Colombian bassoon and oboe professors attended NSU’s Double Reed Day workshop, which included interpretation of a Colombian quintet arrangement, among various activities on their tour.

“We wanted them to participate and observe classes, and they engaged in playing and conversation with our faculty and students,” said Dr. Greg Handel, interim dean of Northwestern State’s College of Arts and Sciences and director of the School of Creative and Performing Arts. “We hope that they can take the experiences back and advance the mission of (Comfenalco Cartagena).

“The director of their Philharmonia guest conducted the NSU Symphony, and this was a wonderful indication of how music transcends language and provides everyone a deeper understanding of the emotion in music.”

Comfenalco professor Alvaro Hernandez said he enjoyed seeing the progress of his students in a collegiate setting.


“I’ll have great memories of seeing the artistic evolution that our students have had, both on musical and personal levels,” Hernandez said. “I’m proud of them because they have opened possibilities for other fellow students of our institution to follow the same positive path they have taken.

“We had a very enriching visit academically and personally, and Northwestern State University is supremely organized with a high academic and humanistic focus. They have high quality professors who demonstrate professional ethics not only in their methodologies but also because they treat their students as if they were their own children.”

The Colombian students, who participate in NSU’s early start program, have excelled in the music program.

Most recently, three Colombian students were featured in the six-student McCutcheon Honors Recital, which selects the best performers from the fall.

While music may be universal, methods for producing the sound can differ around the world.

Professor Rosana Salgado Cruz said she learned about the construction of American reeds, which differed from European reeds used in Colombia.


“It’s necessary for my students to know and learn about it, so those that receive these scholarships to Northwestern State can be ready,” Salgado Cruz said. “Dr. Handel and (Executive Vice President for University and Business Affairs) Marcus Jones as well as all the administrators and teachers were very attentive and made us feel like we were a part of the community and institution during our visit.

“We are grateful for this enriching experience as well as for the exemplary education and protection they have given our Colombian students.”


Comfenalco professor Rosana Salgado Cruz plays bassoon as part of Northwestern State University's Double Reed Day. Colombian professors toured the campus recently to visit the nearly 50 Comfenalco students enrolled at NSU.
17 2017-02-15
Natchitoches

NSU's vet tech program is a good fit for those who love animals


NATCHITOCHES – Growing up in Shreveport, Tyler Cummings had a passion for animals and knew she wanted to pursue a career in veterinary medicine. She also knew that attending a large university was not for her, so she explored the opportunities Northwestern State University offers in veterinary technology.



“It was a very easy decision for me to make,” Cummings said. “I loved the curriculum for the vet tech program at NSU and I knew that I would receive more one on one attention and hands on experience here.”



Veterinary technicians could be described as the nurses of the animal world. When animals get sick or injured, vet techs examine them, administer first aid, collect laboratory samples and perform certain tests under the direction of licensed veterinarians. Providing this type of hands-on animal care requires formal training and, in most cases, professional licensure. Candidates must graduate from veterinary technician schools accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) and pass the Veterinary Technician National Exam to be licensed.



Northwestern State offers both the associate degree in veterinary technology and a bachelor's degree in biology with veterinary technology concentration. While there are over 200 schools that offer the associate degree, only 22 others in the U.S. offer the bachelor of science option in schools accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association. NSU is the only Louisiana school that offers the bachelor’s degree option.



According to Dr. Brenda Woodard, director of the program, NSU is finalizing an articulation agreement with Delgado Community College so that graduates of two-year program can complete the bachelor’s degree option at NSU.



“NSU is the only state school providing on-campus opportunities for completing clinical skills labs in radiology, anesthesia, dental prophylaxis, surgical technology and animal nursing in an educational setting,” Woodard said. “Students work with cattle and horses on the campus farm. Dogs and cats are housed on campus, along with rabbits, birds, reptiles and rodents. Students learn how to care for all of these animals as a veterinary technician.”



“The biggest advantages to the Vet Tech program here at NSU are the professors, the small classroom environment and the hands on experience that we receive,” Cummings said. “Dr. James Woodard and Dr. Brenda Woodard are phenomenal teachers. They push you to be the best that you can be. They make sure that every student receives that one-on-one attention that we need in order to excel.”

Cummings said the hands-on experience with animals is a big factor in student success. During their first two semesters, students partner to care for the animals housed in the program’s facilities



“It is a lot of pressure but everyone enjoys the experience,” said Cummings, who plans to practice as a registered veterinary technician in Texas after graduation and hopes to eventually operate a no-kill animal shelter. “In each vet tech class the professors make it a point to give you hands on experience with the different animals.”



NSU’s vet tech program was recently ranked 16th in the nation in four-year schools by accreditedschoolsonline.org. Woodard said the program is emotionally rewarding for students interested in learning to care for sick and injured animals. Cummings agreed.



“The person that usually pursues this field of work is one that has a passion for helping animals,” Cummings said. “It is not a career that you do for money. It is a career that you do out of love for animals.”



For information on NSU’s vet tech program and other degree programs offered through NSU’s School of Biological and Physical Sciences, visit sciences.nsula.edu.



The School will host its first Science Showcase from 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17. The program is aimed at high school juniors and seniors interested in experiencing a day in the life of a science major at NSU. Science Showcase participants will perform hands-on experiments, participate in student-led questions and answer panels and learn about scholarships and career opportunities. To register for the event, visit sciences.nsula.edu/nsu-sciences-showcase. Participants can also like the NSU Science Showcase event on Facebook. For more information, contact J. Colby Lasyone at (318) 357-5375 or email lasyonej@nsula.edu.
17 2017-02-14
Alexandria

Colleges see higher spring enrollment


Enrollment at both Northwestern State University in Natchitoches and Louisiana State University of Alexandria is up by about 6 percent year over year for the spring semester.

"The spring enrollment numbers are a wonderful testament to the hard work of the Department of Admissions as well as the entire faculty and staff," LSUA Chancellor Guiyou Huang said in a school release. "We are very excited about the direction of the university and will continue to look for ways to grow enrollment."

"Everything that is accomplished at Northwestern can be attributed to the combined efforts of students, faculty, alumni, friends and stakeholders," NSU Acting President Chris Maggio said in a statement. "When these groups with a common interest in advancing our university work together, we can do great things."

University officials reported spring enrollment figures on Feb. 6 and 7.

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Maggio said a factor in the enrollment gain was Northwestern's decision "to provide full funding for TOPS scholarships this spring to assist students in making the difficult transition to reductions in the program enacted by the state."

TOPS recipients at universities statewide received total funding for the scholarships during the fall semester, but the scholarship allocations were reduced by nearly 60 percent for the spring.

Northwestern currently has 9,191 students, which is 540 more than last spring. Officials said NSU's enrollment numbers are the highest for a spring term at the university since 2006, the first year of selective admissions, and the largest gain in spring semester enrollment since 2003.

This is LSU of Alexandria's largest spring enrollment since 2004. The school has 2,982 students enrolled, including 132 incoming freshmen, 248 students enrolled in online courses only and 611 students taking dual enrollment classes.

Louisiana College in Pineville saw little fluctuation in enrollment, according to figures reported by officials. The school has 899 students enrolled compared to 894 last spring.


17 2017-02-14
Natchitoches

Student art show on exhibit through Feb. 24


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Department of Fine + Graphic Art is hosting a spring exhibition of student work in the Orville Hanchey Gallery. The show opened with a reception Feb. 8 and will be up through Feb. 24.



Gallery hours are 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 8 a.m.-noon Friday.



Participating students and their hometown are as follows.



Alexandria – Jaliyah Jasper, Elizabeth Walke, Lessie Walters,



Amite – Marcie Jenkins,



Anacoco – Patrick Ramke,



Bossier City – Bonny Bacoccini, Whitney Guidry,



Boyce – Sarah Hill



Brusly – Emma Wallace,



Cartagena Bolivar, Colombia -- Natalia Zapata Yonoff



Coushatta – Jeremy Lawson



Covington – Rachael Coyne,



Gretna – Rachel Neathamer,



Hineston – Madison Morrison



Hornbeck – Richelle Dorris,



Jonesville – Brandon Cagle, Coleen Cagle,



Lafayette – Haley Hackett, Jacklyn Marr, Thomas Middleton,



Leesville – Alex Benson, Heather Hickman, Brittany Paris;



Mamou – X Skahl,



Marrero – Ajeahnell Dempsey,



Minden – Michael Dick,



Monroe – Trinity Butcher,



Natchitoches – Ariel Bailey, Cherilynne Cottles, Jessica Cross, Joshua Davis, Michelle Dupree, Layne Elkins, Raven Hailey, Heather Lockwood, Ethan Stelly



Parkville, Maryland -- George Flaviano,



Pineville – Savannah Andries, Kayla McKern,



Quitman – Cheyenne Berg, Abbie Lawson,



Rogers, Arkansas – Taylor Zane Bush,



Saline – Isabella Jones,



Shreveport – Mary Breithaupt



Ventress – Racheal Gaude,



Zachary - Darryl Anderson;
17 2017-02-13
Natchitoches

NSU honors top brass students


Brass faculty in the Mrs. H.D. Dear Sr. and Alice E. Dear School of Creative and Performing Arts at Northwestern State University recently recognized the outstanding students in their individual studios for the fall semester. Those selected and the work they performed at fall juries were: Bryce Hernandez, music business major from Lafayette, trumpet, “Legende” by Eugene Enesco; Blayne Fugere from Duncanville, Texas, horn, “Alpha” by Jean Michael Defaye and Fernando Zuniga, Duncanville, Texas, euphonium, “Concerto de Flicorno Basso” by Amilcare Ponchielli.
17 2017-02-13
Natchitoches

NSU HMT hosts ProStart workshop for teachers from throughout Louisiana


NATCHITOCHES – More than a dozen high school teachers from throughout Louisiana participated in a ProStart training workshop at Northwestern State University Friday, hosted the Department of Hospitality Management and Tourism.

The workshop, presented by HMT faculty Valerie Salter, Connie Jones and Landon Amberg, addressed quantity cooking, catering, fund raising ideas and the connection between tourism and the culinary arts.

ProStart is a two-year elective program for high school students that teaches culinary techniques, management skills and facets of the restaurant and food service industry. ProStart is supported and operated by the Louisiana Restaurant Association Education Foundation in partnership with the National Restaurant Association Education Foundation.

More than 2,000 students from 60 high schools in Louisiana participate in ProStart, a talent pipeline for careers in Louisiana’s world-renowned foodservice industry. Students who complete the ProStart program are eligible for scholarships and other benefits.

For information on ProStart, visit www.lraef.org/prostart. For information on NSU’s Department of Hospitality Management and Tourism, visit hmt.nsula.edu.
17 2017-02-13
Natchitoches

NSU honors Navy veteran, former administrator Tom Paul Southerland


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University recognized Navy veteran, educator and former NSU administrator Dr. Tom Paul Southerland during Thursday’s home basketball game.

A video of Southerland’s presentation is available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=krKp7fJs8DA

Serving in the Navy in both theaters, then Lieutenant Southerland served in World War II from 1943 to 1946. He was one of three young men selected by NSU to attend the "Ninety Day Wonder," officer training school in New York City.

Southerland first served in the Atlantic Theater as the commanding officer of a Rescue and Salvage Ship, then aboard a Submarine Chaser. In the Pacific Theater, he was the commanding officer of YP-239 and was commended for his service during the Battle of Iwo Jima.

Following his military service, Southerland became a career educator working as a teacher and administrator before joining the Northwestern State faculty. He was an administrator at Northwestern from 1966 until his retirement in 1986 and came to NSU after serving four years as assistant superintendent for instruction for the Rapides Parish School Board.

Southerland was the university’s dean of the College of Education from 1966 until 1975 and dean of the School of Graduate Studies and Research from 1975 until 1978. In 1978, Southerland was appointed vice president for academic affairs and was named executive vice president in 1982. He was named vice president emeritus in 1987. He is a 2001 inductee in the NSU Hall of Distinguished Educators, received the President’s Distinguished Service Award in 2003 and, along with his wife Maxine Aycock Southerland, a home economics professor at NSU, was inducted into NSU’s Long Purple Line in 2008.

During his tenure as Dean of Education, he designed and oversaw construction of the Teacher Education Center. He was instrumental in establishing admissions standards for teacher education and developing 14 new programs for the College of Education, as well as securing a specialist and doctorate program.

In addition to being named Louisiana’s Educator of the Year, Southerland was Natchitoches’ Man of the Year and President of the Natchitoches Rotary Club.

Joining him for Thursday’s presentation were his daughters, Lisa Southerland Allen and Jude Southerland Kessler, her husband, Rande Kessler (U.S. Naval Academy Class of 1977), and Southerland’s caregiver, Debra Cooper.

To nominate a Veteran for recognition at an upcoming NSU event, please contact Sid Hall, NSU’s Military Affairs Coordinator, at halls@nsula.edu or (318) 357-6951.
17 2017-02-13
Natchitoches

NSU musician earns post-grad spot at top London music conservatory


NATCHITOCHES – Carlos Gomez Garcia, a Colombian exchange student pursuing a degree in music performance with a minor in business at Northwestern State University, has been accepted to pursue an advanced degree at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, one of the top 10 music conservatories in the world. Located in London, England, the school is a global leader of creative and professional practice and promotes innovation, experiment and research for musicians, actors, stage managers and theatre technicians as they develop as artists and professionals.

Garcia, a double-bass player, will pursue a Guildhall Artist Master in Performance degree, a two-year program in which students gain technical facility and musical flexibility while providing professional exposure. Students study with world-class professors, work with internationally renowned conductors and artists and perform in some of the finest venues.

Guildhall has more than 900 students in higher education drawn from nearly 60 countries around the world.

Garcia will graduate from NSU in May. Meanwhile, he is preparing for his senior recital as well as an important competition sponsored by the Music Teachers National Association (MTNA) in which he advanced from the state and regional competitions to qualify as one of seven musicians competing at the national level in the String Young Artist category. The competition will take place in Baltimore, Maryland in March.

Garcia, 21, has been playing the double bass since age 13. He began preparing for the Guildhall audition, held last November, two semesters in advance.

“I knew it was something that required a considerable amount of time to get ready, so I started recording the music needed for the audition,” he said. “Normally auditions are held in different parts of the world such as New York, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Seoul or Tokyo. But I asked for a special permit to submit a DVD audition instead, since I could not afford traveling to New York with a bass, to play the live audition.”

Going to London will be a new experience for Garcia, who will be travelling to Europe for the first time. He auditioned in 2011 to join NSU’s School of Creative and Performing Arts, so when he came to the United States in 2013, he already knew some of the students and staff at Northwestern State, such as Dr. Marcus Jones, who has worked to facilitate recruitment of international students and smooth their transition into NSU.

“This time it is going to be different because I do not know anybody there,” he said. “It’s going to be a new place, a new school, a different education system, new country, new continent and I am honestly very excited about it. The only thing I know for sure is that I have very high expectations for the future to come.”

One of Garcia’s inspirations, Rinat Ibragimov, is a professor at Guildhall and Garcia is hopeful to have him as a teacher.

“He is one of the best and finest double bass players alive, his music is very passionate yet so focused, that allows him to play with so many sonorities achieving his desired sound,” Garcia said. He is also a fan of Dominik Wagner, a young and accomplished rising star in double bass.

As for his future as a professional musician, Garcia would like to perform with the London Symphony Orchestra and have a career as a teacher, soloist and global performer.

“I think of music like wings,” he said. “It allows you to do many things and go to so many places, as long as you are willing to fly.”

He credited Paul Christopher, associate professor of cello and music theory, a well as Peter Haas for guidance as mentors at Northwestern State.

“NSU was crucial element for my developing as musician and more importantly as a person,” Garcia said. “It really opened my eyes for the possibilities beyond my education. The environment is really suitable for people who want to improve on their instruments, people who like to push themselves to be better everyday, who like to go beyond what is expected and do the unexpected.”
17 2017-02-13
Natchitoches

Flavor of Louisiana will feature Louisiana seafood cuisine


NATCHITOCHES – The Northwestern State University Foundation will host Flavor of Louisiana, an event to showcase the talents of chefs from throughout the state with samplings of Louisiana seafood dishes, along with cocktails and entertainment.

Flavor of Louisiana, which will begin at 6 p.m. Friday, April 7 inside NSU’s Wellness, Recreation and Activities Center, is a collaboration between NSU and the Louisiana Seafood Board in which guests can savor eclectic samplings of Louisiana’s rich culinary tradition.

“Louisiana is known for its unique cuisine and flavorful seafood traditions,” said Jill Bankston, CFRE, associate director of Development. “The Louisiana Seafood Board is donating the seafood for the chefs to prepare for Flavor of Louisiana. Participating chefs and restaurants will offer a variety of seafood dishes for our guests and we are planning entertainment with some of our popular student ensembles for the evening. We are looking forward to hosting this spring event to celebrate Louisiana’s culinary arts.”

Lt. Governor Billy Nungesser will be a featured special guest, along with 2017 inductees into the Long Purple Line, NSU’s alumni hall of distinction, who will be honored earlier in the day.

Tickets to Flavor of Louisiana are $65 per person or $125 per couple. Sponsorships are available at three levels. Pelican Sponsorship ($1,500) entitles guest to reserved seating for 8, media promotion, signage and priority parking. Magnolia Sponsorship ($1,000) entitles guest to reserved seating for 8 and sponsor signage. Fleur de Lis Sponsorship ($500) entitles guests to reserved seating for 4 and sponsor signage.

For more information or to make reservations, visit northwesternalumni.com/fol.



17 2017-02-10
Natchitoches

LSBCD will host free geauxBIZ workshops


NATCHITOCHES – The Louisiana Small Business Development Center and the Louisiana Secretary of State’s Office have partnered to provide small businesses with hands-on geauxBIZ training and registration workshops. The workshops will take place Wednesday, March 8 at 9 a.m. in Alexandria and 2 p.m. in Natchitoches and at 9 a.m. Thursday, March 9 in Shreveport. There is no cost to attend.

The workshop is for new business owners, start-up companies and those thinking about starting a business. Instructor for the workshop is Carla Bonaventure, commercial administrator with the Louisiana Secretary of State’s Office Commercial Division. The GeauxBIZ workshops will be about two hours and will address common issues and challenges. GeauxBIZ allows entrepreneurs the ability to complete the necessary legal documents to start a business, register for a tax revenue number and apply for an unemployment insurance tax account number.

The workshop will cover how to reserve a business name, how to create a checklist of federal, state and local licenses and permits, how to file with the Secretary of State, Department of Revenue and Louisiana Workforce Commission, how to apply for unemployment insurance and how to find helpful resources.

The Alexandria workshop will be held at the Cenla Chamber of Commerce, 1118 Third St. The Natchitoches session will take place on the third floor of Caspari Hall, 310 Sam Sibley Dr. The Shreveport workshop will be at Hamilton South Caddo Library, 2111 Bert Kouns Industrial Loop.

The Louisiana Small Business Development Center is the state’s largest and most accessible source of assistance for entrepreneurs and the only statewide nationally accredited program that provides business consulting to entrepreneurs at no cost. The LSBDC network, hosted by Northwestern State University, is an accredited member of the National Association of Small Business Development Centers and funded in part through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration, Louisiana Economic Development and participating universities.
17 2017-02-10
Natchitoches

NSU offers nursing class in DeRidder


DERIDDER – Northwestern State University is using technology to bring nursing classes to DeRidder. Classes began two weeks ago at the former DeRidder Elementary School where a classroom has been set up for distance education, according to Linda Nichols, nursing coordinator on the Leesville-Fort Polk campus.

Nichols said the class originates on the Leesville-Fort Polk campus and is delivered by compressed video. Students in the class are from DeRidder and Beauregard Parish and chose to take the class in DeRidder instead of driving to the Leesville-Fort Polk campus.

“The class is going well so far. The students are glad they don’t have to spend as much time on the road,” said Nichols. NSU hopes to expand offerings in DeRidder to include additional nursing classes and other subjects depending on demand.

Students in DeRidder are taking fourth level nursing which focuses on cardiac, respiratory and pediatric nursing. Nichols said NSU hopes to expand offerings in DeRidder to include additional nursing classes and other subjects depending on demand.

The effort to add classes in DeRidder began when DeRidder Mayor Ron Roberts expressed a desire to Northwestern State officials to make college courses available in the community. Dr. Darlene Williams, vice president for technology, innovation and economic development, and Dr. Dana Clawson, dean of the College of Nursing and Allied Health, worked with DeRidder officials on the project.
17 2017-02-10
Natchitoches

Spring/Summer Job Fair to be held Tuesday


The Office of Counseling and Career Services at Northwestern State University will sponsor a Spring/Summer Job Fair Tuesday, Feb. 14 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Friedman Student Union Ballroom. The event is open to all Northwestern State students.

Local, national and multinational companies, governmental agencies and universities will be on hand to accept resumes, conduct job interviews and provide information.

Participating companies will be Alliance Compressors, AMERISAFE, Benee Irwin State Farm, Crest Industries, LLC, CSRA, the Dallas Police Department, Fastenal Company, Firebond Inc., the Gallaspy College of Education at Northwestern State, Harding University College of Pharmacy, J. Bennett Recruiting, LLC, Louisiana Methodist Children’s Home, Louisiana Workforce Commission, LSU Ag Center- Grant Walker 4-H Educational Center and LSU and LSU-S Online Graduate Degree Programs.

Others planning to take part in the Job Fair are Med Camps of Louisiana, Mississippi College School of Law, Modern Woodmen of America, National Nurses of America, NSU Graduate School, PhysAssist Scribes, PioneerRx Pharmacy Software, Rehabilitation Services of Louisiana, Reiser Group (dba Sonic Drive-in), Southern University Law Center, Target, Tyson Foods, Inc. U.S. Navy Officer Programs and United Rentals.

For further information on the Spring/Summer Job Fair, go to ccs.nsula.edu/career-fairs-and-special-events.
17 2017-02-10
Natchitoches

Cane River Reading Series will continue Feb. 23


NATCHITOCHES – The Cane River Reading Series will host a reading of poetry and prose at 6 p.m. Thursday, February 23, on the campus of Northwestern State University. The event will be in the Natchitoches Room in Russell Hall featuring Selena Anderson, Novuyo Rosa Tshuma, and Henk Rossouw.

Anderson is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Houston and finished her MFA at Columbia University, where she won the Transatlantic/Henfield Prize. She has held fellowships at the MacDowell Colony, the Bread Loaf Writer’s Conference and Kimbilio. Her stories have appeared in Georgia Review, AGNI, The Best of Gigantic, Kenyon Review and Glimmer Train. She is working on a collection and a novel.

Tshuma is from Zimbabwe and has lived in South Africa and the U.S. Her collection, “Shadows,” was published to critical acclaim in 2013 by Kwela in South Africa and awarded the 2014 Herman Charles Bosman Prize. She is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop (2015) and is pursuing a Ph.D. in creative writing and literature at the University of Houston. Her novel, “The House of Stone,” is forthcoming with W.W. Norton (U.S.) and Atlantic Books (U.K.).

Originally from Cape Town, South Africa, Rossouw has poems in The Paris Review, The Massachusetts Review, The Common and The Boston Review. Blackbird and Tupelo Quarterly will publish excerpts from his book-length poem “Camissa.” In 2009, he gave a reading in Times Square as one of the winners of the Poetry Society of America's Bright Lights Big Verse contest. He’s also published nonfiction in The Threepenny Review and The Chronicle Review, an interview with Nadine Gordimer in The Virginia Quarterly Review and short fiction in Tin House. With an MFA from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Henk is about to complete a Ph.D. in literature and creative writing at the University of Houston, where he serves as a poetry editor for Gulf Coast.

The Cane River Reading Series is sponsored by NSU and the Department of English, Foreign Languages and Cultural Studies. Professor Andy Briseño is event coordinator. For more information, contact Briseño at brisenoj@nsula.edu.
17 2017-02-09
Natchitoches

NSU Alum part of team that discovers shipwreck off Florida coast


Northwestern State Leadership Achievement. University alumnus Dillon Roy was part of a team of student/ staff field archaeologists from the University of West Florida that discovered a shipwreck near Pensacola, Florida, last year.

Roy, a graduate student, was among the divers who discovered the ship, referred to as Emanuel Point III, covered with sand in seven feet of water. The ship was part of a fleet that in 1559 brought Conquistador Don Tristan de Luna and his army to what is now suburban Pensacola, site of the first European settlement in the United States. Most of that fleet sank during a hurricane that struck the coast shortly after Luna’s arrival.

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17 2017-02-09
Natchitoches

High schoolers get a glimpse at healthcare careers at Health Career Exploration Day


NATCHITOCHES – Students from 20 high schools in north and central Louisiana participated in Healthcare Career Exploration Day Wednesday, an event co-sponsored by Northwestern State University and Central Louisiana Area Health Education Center (CLAHEC)

High school students from throughout central Louisiana divided into small groups to attend faculty-led workshops to about skills and qualities that make a good health care professional. Students explored programs in psychology, addiction studies, biological and physical sciences, nursing and allied health and health and human performance and how degree programs in those fields translate to careers in healthcare, medicine, pharmacy, physical therapy, cardiopulmonary science, optometry, clinical laboratory science, forensic science, pharmaceutical and biotechnology research, bioinformatics, natural resource science, veterinary medicine and more.

A panel of NSU students majoring in biology and/or health sciences spoke to the students about their programs, scholarship opportunities and tips on successfully transitioning from high school to college.

Ashley Jones, a junior from Mansfield, said she learned a lot during the program.

“We learned how to take vital signs and about different kinds of burns and things about psychology like the difference between a functional family and a dysfunctional family,” Jones said. “It’s been a good experience.”

CLAHEC also shared information about volunteer healthcare programs offered in the area each summer.

Next week, NSU’s School of Biological and Physical Sciences will host the Science Showcase for high schoolers. The program will be from 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17 and will include hands-on experiments, panel discussions and information on career opportunities. For more information on the Science Showcase, visit https://sciences.nsula.edu/nsu-science-showcase/. Participants can also like the NSU Science Showcase event on Facebook. For more information, contact J. Colby Lasyone at (318) 357-5375 or email lasyonej@nsula.edu.
17 2017-02-09
Shreveport

NSU's Thompson earns national community service honor


NATCHITOCHES – Sabri Thompson has stepped up his game immensely in his senior season, just when his Northwestern State basketball team needed it most.

Though impactful, Thompson’s on-court exploits won’t be enough to earn him All-America honors, but his off-court community service over his four years at NSU has earned him one of college basketball’s most prestigious honors.

Tuesday morning, the Academic All-America candidate was announced as one of only five NCAA Division I men’s basketball players on the 2017 Allstate NABC Good Works Team spotlighting elite seniors who have set the curve for student-athletes around the country with remarkable records of service and leadership.

The National Association of Basketball Coaches administers the Good Works Team recognition. Thompson, a senior guard, is joined by Steven Cook of Princeton, Billy Garrett Jr. of DePaul, Iowa State’s Monte Morris and Rand Rowland of Georgia Tech. They were chosen from 181 nominees across the almost 350 Division I basketball programs.

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NSU's Thompson earns academic honor
It’s the second time an NSU student-athlete has won Good Works Team honors. Linebacker Yaser Elqutub was chosen to the 2011 Allstate Good Works Team in his sport, and was selected as team captain.

“Sabri has been a high achiever for our program in every conceivable way, whether it be in the area of athletics, academics, Christianity or volunteering his time and talents with his peers, youth and elders,” said NSU basketball coach Mike McConathy. “His body of work and consistent desire to make this game, and world, a better place, is simply remarkable.

“This is truly an elite honor, and Sabri is a very worthy recipient,” he said. “Everybody in our program is absolutely thrilled about this recognition for him.”

Thompson owns a 3.73 grade point average with a double major, business administration and accounting. His 17.5 scoring average in 10 Southland Conference games this season is the sixth-best in the league, and his 42.1 percent aim overall in 21 games on 3-pointers ranks 28th nationally.

His extensive service work has been a constant since he arrived at NSU from his hometown of Newark, Del. He has been a keynote speaker to groups and individuals at seven Natchitoches area schools as part of NSU’s participation in the NABC’s Stay In to Win program addressing alarming dropout rates nationally, impacting nearly 3,000 students locally.

“He has a unique story to share and cites examples where he could have fallen victim to tough circumstances,” said McConathy. “He has an uncanny ability to reach kids.”

Late basket dooms Northwestern State in overtime loss
Thompson has been a youth leader at his Natchitoches church, has mentored at-risk middle school and high school students before and after their enrollment at NSU, and has been a Spanish tutor for teammates and other NSU student-athletes. Thompson took a mission trip to China as part of the Sports Reach USA Basketball Team, and helped with flood recovery around Natchitoches and Coushatta last spring.

Among the causes he’s been involved with are Special Olympics, National Night Out, Natchitoches Parish Kids Health Festival, Community Clean-up, and the local Boys & Girls Club. He’s made dozens of school appearances, visited nursing homes, helped local schools and NSU move furniture, fed the homeless, and provided underprivileged youth with school supplies.

“The citizens of Natchitoches really know Sabri by face and name and not just because he is a high-profile player on our basketball team, but because he has a constant presence in and around town making a positive difference serving our campus, this community and anywhere he can contribute,” said NSU director of athletics Greg Burke.

Thompson has been treasurer of NSU’s Student-Athlete Advisory Committee for two of the four years he has served as a basketball team representative.

Academic All-Southland Conference last season, he took part in a resource management workshop on the U.S. Army’s Communications-Electronics Command Center at Aberdeen Proving Ground last summer.

“Using a basketball analogy, Sabri’s actions have resulted in him achieving his own unique triple-double by demonstrating a commitment to excellence and making charitable contributions off the court. He has excelled as an athlete, within the community and in the classroom,” said Albert Foderaro, the NABC Stay In to Win Coordinator.

Thompson and the Demons play at home Thursday night in Prather Coliseum against Houston Baptist.
17 2017-02-08
Natchitoches

"Music for 18 Musicians" to be performed Feb. 13


NATCHITOCHES – Faculty and students in the Mrs. H.D. Dear Sr. and Alice E. Dear School of Creative and Performing Arts at Northwestern State University will perform Steve Reich’s “Music for 18 Musicians” Monday, Feb. 13 at 7:30 p.m. in Magale Recital Hall. Admission is free and open to the public.

The performance is to commemorate Reich’s 80th birthday. The ensemble is being coordinated by NSU Assistant Professor Of Percussion and Assistant Director of Bands Oliver Molina.

"Music for 18 Instruments" was composed in 1974-1976 and received its premiere in the Town Hall in New York City. Scored for an ensemble of violin, cello, four female voices, two clarinets/bass clarinets, four pianos and a battery of percussion, it is recognized as one of the defining masterworks of minimalism, and continues to exert a strong influence on concert and popular music. Based on a cycle of 11 chords, this hour- long work was Reich's first attempt at writing for a large ensemble. While presenting a variety of challenges, the colorful sonorities and infectious rhythms make any opportunity to hear "Music for 18 Musicians" live a memorable and hopefully life changing experience.

For more information call (318) 357-5802.


17 2017-02-08
Natchitoches

LitCon literary event March 21


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Department of English, Foreign Languages and Cultural Studies will host LitCon on Tuesday, March 21 starting at 9 a.m. in Orville Hanchey Gallery.

LitCon seeks to bring together members of the Natchitoches and NSU literary community to showcase their work, foster collaboration and educate the community on the importance of the humanities. LitCon will create a relaxed environment allowing students, faculty and community members to talk about their craft, educational opportunities, working across disciplines and how to make a living in the humanities.

The event will feature tables for book sales and signings, Q&A sessions and the annual Spring Read.

Published authors who would like a table to sell copies of their work can contact Oona Zbitkovskis at oonaz@nsula.edu. Tables are free.

Authors will participate in 30-minute Q&A sessions throughout the day highlighting their expertise.

Another feature of the event is literary cosplay, in which participants dress as their favorite literary figures. All cosplayers can enter to win the costume contest.

The event will culminate in the Spring Read that evening. Faculty and students will share original works or works by favorite authors on the theme of roots. Winners of the costume contest will also be revealed.

A complete program of events will be released soon.


17 2017-02-08
Shreveport

NSU spring enrollment increases by 540


NATCHITOCHES, La. - Northwestern State University’s current spring semester enrollment of 9,191 is an increase of 540 students, or 6.1 percent, over last spring’s registration count of 8,651.

This spring’s enrollment numbers are the highest for a spring term at the university since 2006, the first year of selective admissions, and the largest gain in spring semester enrollment since 2003.

NSU Acting President Dr. Chris Maggio attributed the substantial enrollment increase to “the university’s continuing focus on academic excellence, expanded efforts to attract and retain outstanding students and an increased emphasis on meaningful and effective student services.”

Maggio said another major factor in the enrollment gain was Northwestern’s decision “to provide full funding for TOPS scholarships this spring to assist students in making the difficult transition to reductions in the program enacted by the state.”

TOPS recipients at universities statewide received total funding for the scholarships during the fall semester, but TOPS allocations were reduced by nearly 60 percent for the spring.

Maggio noted that former NSU president Dr. Jim Henderson, now head of the University of Louisiana System, “made the decision to use funds from reserves, increased fall enrollment revenues, private funding and other sources to honor the university’s commitment to TOPS student for the spring, and that was obviously a good investment.”

The NSU acting president said student services were enhanced last year with the opening of an Academic Success Center in Watson Library to improve campus wide tutoring and academic support for students. A gift from State Sen. Gerald Long and his wife Rose helped fund the establishment of the center.

Maggio said, “Everything that is accomplished at Northwestern can be attributed to the combined efforts of students, faculty, alumni, friends and stakeholders.” When these groups with a common interest in advancing our university work together, we can do great things.”

Northwestern has also focused increased attention on realigning and developing academic programs that give students expanded skills and training for high demand jobs in this region and across the state.

NSU has developed a cooperative endeavor agreement with the Louisiana Department of Economic Development to develop a trained workforce for CRSA, a global leader of next-generation technology services and solutions at the Cyber Research Park in Bossier City. Through this partnership, NSU will triple the size of the renowned computer information systems program.

The university has also signed several new agreements with community and technical colleges throughout Louisiana to make it easier for students with an associate degree to obtain a bachelor’s degree.

Last fall, Northwestern State created the first competency based degree program in the state. The program in computer information systems allows students to learn and advance at their own pace as they demonstrate mastery of specific skills.

A new Bachelor of Applied Science in Resource Management has been created, and the university has also developed post associate and post baccalaureate certificates in quality control and project management along with a post baccalaureate certificate in business analytics.

Northwestern State was ranked as most affordable online college in the United States by College Choice, a leading authority in college and university rankings and resources.

Northwestern State is also implementing a new Doctor of Education degree that will prepare individuals for leadership positions that focus on adult learning and development, particularly in the community college setting.

Maggio said, “These innovative academic advancements will make the university even more attractive to prospective students in the years ahead.”




17 2017-02-07
Natchitoches

NSU honors Navy veteran Ray Ponthieux


NATCHITOCHES – In continuing to honor individuals who served in the United States armed forces, Northwestern State University recognized Senior Chief Petty Officer Ray Ponthieux during the Feb. 4 double header basketball game. Ponthieux served in the U.S. Navy from 1956 until his retirement in 1975.



Ponthieux served with I Corps in the Northern Providences of South Vietnam, as the psychological operations advisor to Vietnamese and U.S. Navy forces conducting operations on rivers of South Vietnam. As part of the Naval Advisor Group, he performed waterborne and aerial broadcasting and leaflet drops to encourage enemy defectors.



Among his other assignments, he was assigned to the Joint Command and Operations Center, Izmir, Turkey, and for three years, was the only Navy enlisted person at this large NATO command. He also served three years as the administrative assistant for the Naval ROTC Unit at Oregon State University. From there, he took an early rotation to establish the NROTC Student Personnel Office at the Naval Training and Education Command in Pensacola, Florida.



Ponthieux’s military education includes one year of Vietnamese language instruction at Defense Language Institute, Washington, D.C. He also completed the U.S. Army Psychological Operations School at the John F. Kennedy Special Warfare and School, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, and is a graduate of the Navy’s Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape (SERE) School at Little Creek, Virginia.



His military honors include the Joint Service Commendation Medal, Navy Commendation Medal, Navy Achievement Medal, Combat Action Ribbon, Good Conduct Medal, and various medals from the South Vietnamese government including the Cross of Gallantry with Bronze Star.



After retirement from the Navy, for 22 years, Ponthieux worked as a claims representative at the Natchitoches Social Security Office. He also enrolled and graduated from Northwestern State University in 2011 at the age of 72.



Ponthieux devotes much of his free time to volunteering in the community. He is the manager of Natchitoches Knights of Columbus weekly bingo which supports various charities. He is an usher at the Minor Basilica of the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in Natchitoches and serves on the team that prepares bank deposits for the church’s weekly donations. Many also know Ponthieux as a member of three-person team that provides statistics at all St. Mary’s School football games. He also holds membership with the American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars.



Ponthieux is married to Gwen Ponthieux, who is retired after 42 years of civilian service for the US Army at Fort Polk.
17 2017-02-06
Alexandria

NSU student wins Rapides Symphony competition


The month of March will be memorable for Northwestern State University student Jonathan Andino.

Northwestern State University student Jonathan Andino.
Northwestern State University student Jonathan Andino. (Photo: Courtesy)
The violinist will perform with two regional symphony orchestras that month, the Natchitoches-Northwestern Symphony March 13 and the Rapides Symphony on March 18.

Andino, a sophomore, will be performing with the Rapides Symphony after winning the Young Adult/Collegiate division of the orchestra's Concerto Competition last weekend against students from throughout Louisiana. Andino, a student of NSU Associate Professor of Applied Violin and Viola Dr. Andrej Kurti, previously was a winner of the NSU Concerto Competition. He won both competitions playing "Introduction And Rondo Capriccioso" by Camille Saint-Saëns.

"I cannot wait to perform with a professional orchestra such as Rapides Symphony Orchestra,” said Andino, who is from San Pedro Sula, Honduras. "I worked really hard with Dr. Kurti to do my best in that competition, and even when I felt really stressed because of it Dr. Kurti always told me to stay calm and focus, and told me 'You can do this Jonathan.'"


17 2017-02-06
Natchitoches

NSU grad students get La-CEC grants for special ed classroom projects


NATCHITOCHES – Several Northwestern State University graduate students completing Master of Education or Master of Arts in Teaching degrees in special education were awarded $500 mini-grants for their classrooms from the Louisiana Council for Exceptional Children (LA-CEC). Awards were presented at La-CEC awards program in Lafayette Jan. 30.



Those who received grants, their schools and projects are Mary Andermann, APPLe Digital Academy, Ascension Parish, “Practical Career Planning;” Connie Bowen, Grant Prairie Elementary, St. Landry Parish, “Learning Science While Growing;” Sally-Rose Cragin, Hazel Park Hilda Knoff Elementary, Jefferson Parish, “Comprehensive Reading Tools for Students who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing;” Tonda Collett, Bogalusa High, Bogalusa Parish, “Transitions Pathways: Parents + Students = Success;” Michelle Frederick, Benton Middle School, Bossier Parish,”Inspiring Comprehension through Technology;” Rebecca Lee-Poklemba, Aiken Virtual Program, Rapides Parish, “Improving Reading Comprehension with Text-to-Speech NaturalReader;” Ted Turlock, New Iberia Senior High, Iberia Parish, “Growing Together and Across the Curriculum.”



The assignment for the students was to follow the LA-CEC mini grant guidelines to apply for funding for a class project. Students learned the grant writing process including project description, statement of need, description of population, objectives, activities and timeline, evaluation procedures, project benefits, budget and letter of endorsement. LA-CEC awards the grants for projects that educate children with exceptionalities, improve relationships within families of children with exceptionalities, developing independent living or employment skills for students with exceptionalities or use technology to enhance education for children/youth with exceptionalities.



“I am thrilled that our students have an opportunity to learn grant-writing skills and are rewarded for their efforts by receiving $500 to spend in their classrooms,” said Dr. Barb Duchardt, professor in NSU’s Department of Teaching, Leadership and Counseling.



Donna Edwards, first lady of Louisiana presented awards to all winners along with Bambi Polotzola, executive director of the Governor’s Office of Disabilities Affairs.



Kelly Phillips, NSU graduate student pursuing add-on educational diagnostician special education certification, received the LA-CEC $1,000 Scholarship.



For information on NSU’s graduate programs in education offered through the university’s Gallaspy College of Education and Human Development, visit tlc.nsula.edu.




17 2017-02-06
Natchitoches

Maggio issues statement in support of international students, faculty


NSU Northwestern State University Acting President Dr. Chris Maggio expressed support Tuesday for the university’s international students and faculty in response to President Donald Trump’s executive order banning travel from seven countries. Maggio said, “Northwestern has historically maintained a culture of diversity that focuses on respect for all of its students and faculty regardless of race, gender, creed or national origin. We will maintain that spirit of diversity by providing assistance and support in every way possible for those in the NSU family that are affected by the immigration policy.”


17 2017-02-03
Shreveport

NSU grad student nominated for Most Courageous award


NATCHITOCHES, LA (KSLA) -
A legally blind Northwestern State University student has been selected for a special award for his role in managing the Natchitoches school's men's basketball team for more than a decade.

Trey McCrory is one of 10 finalists for the U.S. Basketball Writers Association's Most Courageous award.

Born legally blind, the team cited Trey's dedication to the team as just one of the many reasons they nominated him.

"We'll attribute some of our success to Trey because he's been an inspiration. Because every day he has hardships, but he doesn't complain about his hardships," coach Mike McConathy said.

Trey is the graduate manager for the team, and he's been part of the staff for 4 years.

He takes care of the team's travel, keeps track of equipment during games and works the clock during practice.

"During my first two years of college, I came to all the games. But it was a dream," Trey said. "I was like, 'Man it would be awesome to be able to work for the men's basketball program'."

Now he is in his last semester of graduate school at NSU.

"I don't even have to look at it now, I just push buttons and I know it's already done. Memorization, that's the key for me. Memorize stuff - I'm good."

Trey says it takes him a little longer than most people to do a task.

When his mother was 4 1/2 months pregnant with him, her appendix ruptured. Doctors didn't think he would survive through birth.

"I can see about 5 feet. But since the past couple of years, my vision's got progressively worse because I've got glaucoma in both eyes."

He uses a monocular to see the games and at farther distances.

"There are some days that it's tough because the emotional battles you have with not being able to do things everybody else can do. But at the end of the day, my faith drives me to do everything I can and fight as hard as I can."

It's his persistence that team members say motivates them.

"He inspires me to do more and go beyond," said Devonte Hall, his roommate and the point guard for the basketball team.

Trey says his dream is to work at a Division I program.

"I had somebody tell me once, 'It would be funny to see a blind guy on ESPN as a coach.' And I told him, 'Well, you'll see me in 10 years on ESPN, I'll prove you wrong'."

This year's winner of the Most Courageous award will be recognized during a ceremony at the NCAA Final Four in Phoenix.


17 2017-02-01
Natchitoches

2nd annual Dragon Boat races March 4


NATCHITOCHES – The Northwestern State University Foundation will present the second annual Natchitoches Dragon Boat Races Saturday, March 4 on Chaplin’s Lake on the NSU campus.



Races will begin at 8 a.m. and continue throughout the day with vendors, music and activities for families and spectators. Spectator admission is free.



Dragon Boat teams consist of 20 paddlers (a minimum of eight must be female) and one drummer. The helmsman will be provided. There will be a practice session for each team during the week preceding the event. To register as a competing team, visit northwesternalumni.com and find Dragon Boat Races under the Events listings. Downloadable reservation forms are available. Registration will close Feb. 26.



“Last year’s inaugural event was a phenomenal success with support from the university and the community. We expect this year’s event to be even more exciting,” said Vanner Erikson, event coordinator.


17 2017-02-01
Natchitoches

Carey Scholarship will benefit criminal justice majors


NATCHITOCHES – A couple engaged in ministry, mentoring and literacy programs established a scholarship to benefit a student seeking a degree in criminal justice at Northwestern State University. The Don and LaKeisha Carey Scholarship will be awarded to a freshman or sophomore pursuing a degree in criminal justice. The recipient must maintain a grade point average of 2.75 or better. LaKeisha Gray Carey is a 2008 graduate of NSU’s Department of Criminal Justice, History and Social Science and described the ideal recipient as “someone who needs financial assistance to pursue their dream and career in the Criminal Justice Department. I know that person will touch many lives in our justice system and I would like to help assist with that.”



“We love to give back because we believe that success not only defined by the number of milestones we obtained for ourselves, but also by the number of people we reach back and pull along the way. It's just our heart to help others,” Mrs. Carey said. She is a practicing attorney who represents children and recently published her first children’s book entitled “Cankeyo, You Can Keep Your Dreams Alive!”



LaKeisha Carey graduated as valedictorian of Bernice High School in 2004 and attended NSU on a scholarship where she majored in pre-law and criminal justice. During her college career, she was very active in community service projects and organizations. She is a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated. She graduated Magna Cum Laude with a 3.8 grade point average in 2007. She began law school at Southern University Law Center in 2008, graduated in the top 5 percent of her law school class in May 2011 and was sworn into the Louisiana State Bar in October of that year. Last year, she and her sorority sisters created the L.I.F.E. (Ladies Investing in Future Education) to benefit an African American female student at NSU. Mrs. Carey specifically named Department Head Joe Morris and Associate Professor Shirley Snyder as mentors who cared for her and her classmates.



She and Don met through a mutual friend.



Don Carey is a professional football player with the Detroit Lions. He grew up in Norfolk, Virginia, and attended Norfolk State University where he earned a degree in building construction technology before entering the National Football League draft. In addition to his athletic career, he pursued a master’s degree in theology and established the Don Carey International Ministry. Mrs. Carey serves as president of the organization. DCIM is based in Chesapeake, Virginia, where the couple lives with their toddler son Victor during the off-season.



“This ministry was created to help educate and make leaders for Christ who can adequately defend their faith,” Mrs. Carey said. “Don is also the co-founder and ambassador of the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Youth and Literacy programs which operates in several underprivileged school in Detroit. It's a literacy program geared toward STEM designed for kids grades level K through 12. Don and several of his teammates go to the schools every month to read with and do different activities with the students.”



Mrs. Carey said she would encourage students to pursue careers in the justice system to make positive change and be difference makers.



“If a student feels they are passionate about criminal justice they should pursue it because they are the answers and have the answers to a lot of the issues, injustices and problems in the justice system,” she said.



NSU’s Department of Criminal Justice, History and Social Science prepares students for careers in law enforcement, public safety, intelligence agencies, customs and more. History graduates are prepared for advanced study to pursue careers as teachers, docents and more.



“We are so grateful for active donors like Mr. and Mrs. Carey who have demonstrated their desire to help and mentor young people,” said NSU Development Officer Tiffany Chasteen. “This scholarship will have a direct impact on students and their ability to pursue their educational goals.”



For more information on Don Carey International Ministries, visit dcimin.org. For more information on NSU’s Department of Criminal Justice, History and Social Science, visit criminaljustice.nsula.edu. For information on supporting student scholarships, contact the NSU Foundation at (318) 357-4414 or visit northwesternalumni.com.




17 2017-02-01
Shreveport

Maggio issues statement in support of international students, faculty


NATCHITOCHES, La. - Northwestern State University Acting President Dr. Chris Maggio expressed support Tuesday for the university’s international students and faculty in response to President Donald Trump’s executive order banning travel from seven countries.

Maggio said, “Northwestern has historically maintained a culture of diversity that focuses on respect for all of its students and faculty regardless of race, gender, creed or national origin. We will maintain that spirit of diversity by providing assistance and support in every way possible for those in the NSU family that are affected by the immigration policy.”

Enrollment of international students has increased significantly in the past decade at Northwestern, and Maggio said, “These individuals enhance and expand the culture of the university through their participation in student activities, creative and performing arts programs, intercollegiate athletics and their respective academic pursuits.”

Maggio said Northwestern embraces and supports the position of its governing body, the University of Louisiana System, on the executive order on immigration.

The UL System, which is headed by former Northwestern president Dr. Jim Henderson, has issued the following statement on the travel ban:

“The Universities of Louisiana provide campus cultures of inclusion that offer students the opportunity to develop their natural talents. We welcome students and faculty from around the globe who contribute to the diverse learning culture only available on a college campus. Our universities are working closely with students, faculty and staff who may be impacted by the executive order.

“We value immensely the work of our faculty and staff from the U.S. as well as those from other countries including employees from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. Our international students and faculty are a vital part of our campus communities who contribute greatly to the missions of our universities.”

Maggio said Northwestern, which has more than 100 international students from 21 countries and several international faculty members, has personnel and resources available to assist individuals that may be affected by the executive order on immigration.

Students with questions or concerns may contact the International Student Resource Center in Room 230 of Russell Hall. Center director Telba Espinoza-Contreras may be reached at contrerast@nsula.edu. or by calling 318-357-5939. Vivian Pedroza, graduate assistant at the center, can be reached at Vpedrozaoo6310@nsula.edu or 318-357-5937.

Faculty with questions or concerns should contact Chief Academic Officer Dr. Vickie Gentry at 318-357-5361 or by email at gentry@nsula.edu.

“We want to reassure our students who may be uneasy about the repercussions of the new immigration policy that we are here to assist them,” Espinoza-Contreras said. “Our university is better because of its international students, and we offer support to them and the international community here.”

17 2017-01-31
Natchitoches

NSU will host Science Showcase for high schoolers Feb. 17


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s School of Biological and Physical Sciences will host its first Science Showcase from 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17.



“Science Showcase is an event primarily aimed at providing area junior and senior high school students with the opportunity to experience a day in the life of a science major at NSU,” said J. Colby Lasyone, an instructor in the department. “We have personally invited over 300 students and a host of teachers, principals and counselors from area high schools.”



Science Showcase participants will perform hands-on experiments, participate in student-led questions and answer panels and learn about scholarships and career opportunities. A portion of the day will include an afternoon mixer where the department will showcase its efforts and accomplishments to area businesses and community leaders.



“NSU Science Showcase is free to students with an interest in learning more about studying the sciences, specifically, the areas of biomedical science and microbiology, natural science and ecology, veterinary science and chemistry and physics,” Lasyone said.



To register for the event, visit sciences.nsula.edu/nsu-sciences-showcase. Participants can also like the NSU Science Showcase event on Facebook. For more information, contact Lasyone at (318) 357-5375 or email lasyonej@nsula.edu.
17 2017-01-30
Natchitoches

Theatre students learn to build their own brand


Theatre and Dance students at Northwestern State University are learning some of the best methods to help them stand out when they begin looking for professional jobs.

A group of students are taking a class, “Branding the Artist,” taught by actor and director Joe M. Hernandez. The three-week class runs until Feb. 2.

“The course is designed to provide students the opportunity to have the tools to market themselves in the theatre industry,” said Hernandez. “Throughout the course, students are learning the proper way to structure a resume for both the theater industry and for jobs outside of our industry.”

Students in the class are being asked to build a website, create business cards and a cover letter and establish a social media presence. They are also researching prospective companies that they are interested in applying for and discussing taxes for an artist.

“The most important elements of the course they're writing an artistic statement and manifesto,” said Hernandez. “These two assignments that I just mentioned are the foundation for what they will build their entire brand.”

Hernandez earned a bachelor’s degree at the University of Mobile and an MFA at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Hernandez has taught master classes at a number of colleges and universities on some of the material in “Branding the Artist,” but this is the first time has developed a full course.

“My hope is that this course is allowing the students to ask themselves the hard questions that many artists are afraid to ask,” he said. “For instance, when they look at themselves in the mirror they ask the question ‘What do they see?’ They ask, ‘Who am I?’ Self reflection as an artist is vital to the development of success in our industry in my opinion. Most importantly, we have to know who we are, what we stand for and what sacrifices are we willing to make to be successful in this industry.”

Hernandez said hopes the students walk away prepared to embark on the next chapter of their lives and equipped to go into an interview or audition with the materials needed to be successful.

“I hope that they walk out of the course a little stronger, a little wiser and a little more confident in who they are as artist than they were when they walked into the course for the first time,” he said.




17 2017-01-27
Natchitoches

Theatre students learn to build their own brand


Theatre and Dance students at Northwestern State University are learning some of the best methods to help them stand out when they begin looking for professional jobs.

A group of students are taking a class, “Branding the Artist,” taught by actor and director Joe M. Hernandez. The three-week class runs until Feb. 2.

“The course is designed to provide students the opportunity to have the tools to market themselves in the theatre industry,” said Hernandez. “Throughout the course, students are learning the proper way to structure a resume for both the theater industry and for jobs outside of our industry.”

Students in the class are being asked to build a website, create business cards and a cover letter and establish a social media presence. They are also researching prospective companies that they are interested in applying for and discussing taxes for an artist.

“The most important elements of the course they're writing an artistic statement and manifesto,” said Hernandez. “These two assignments that I just mentioned are the foundation for what they will build their entire brand.”

Hernandez earned a bachelor’s degree at the University of Mobile and an MFA at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Hernandez has taught master classes at a number of colleges and universities on some of the material in “Branding the Artist,” but this is the first time has developed a full course.

“My hope is that this course is allowing the students to ask themselves the hard questions that many artists are afraid to ask,” he said. “For instance, when they look at themselves in the mirror they ask the question ‘What do they see?’ They ask, ‘Who am I?’ Self reflection as an artist is vital to the development of success in our industry in my opinion. Most importantly, we have to know who we are, what we stand for and what sacrifices are we willing to make to be successful in this industry.”

Hernandez said hopes the students walk away prepared to embark on the next chapter of their lives and equipped to go into an interview or audition with the materials needed to be successful.

“I hope that they walk out of the course a little stronger, a little wiser and a little more confident in who they are as artist than they were when they walked into the course for the first time,” he said.




17 2017-01-27
Natchitoches

NSU alum research seeks to inhibit the spread of HIV


NATCHITOCHES – Blake Schouest, a 2016 Northwestern State University graduate, co-authored a paper published in the international peer-reviewed Journal of Undergraduate Chemistry Research that explores the way specific compounds may have the potential to inhibit the spread of HIV within infected individuals.

The title of the paper is “Investigation of Stilbenes as Potential Inhibitors of Human Immunodeficiency Virus by Computational Docking.” The research was conducted under the direction of Dr. Massimo D. Bezoari, Richard Lounsbery professor of chemistry in NSU’s Louisiana Scholar’s College, who was also an author of the paper.

Schouest studied how small excreted vesicles are released from HIV-infected cells and travel through the body to promote infection and how other small organic molecules inhibit their interaction with target cells.

“This is an extension of my senior thesis project that I completed as part of the core curriculum of the Louisiana Scholars' College,” Schouest said. “Dr Bezoari was my primary mentor for the project, and Dr. Curt Phifer, professor of biology, also made corrections to the manuscript.”

“In the following project I used computation chemistry in the form of docking studies for drug discovery,” Schouest said. “I received honorable mention for the Barry Goldwater Scholarship in the spring of 2015 for a similar approach, but applied to herpes simplex virus. The current paper focuses on HIV. Dr Bezoari has been my mentor since I began in this line of research.”

Schouest is currently a Ph. D. graduate student in biomedical sciences at Tulane University School of Medicine. A native of Des Allemands, he is the son of Brent and Rebecca Schouest. Last May he earned two degrees from the Louisiana Scholars’ College at NSU, a bachelor of arts in liberal arts with a concentration in scientific inquiry and a minor in microbiology, and a bachelor of science in biology with a concentration in biomedical sciences. He graduated first in his class with a 4.0 grade point average.

“Blake’s project was beyond the level of work normally encountered with undergraduates and was a significant contribution to his acceptances from institutions with renowned Ph.D. programs in biomedical sciences,” Bezoari said. “Computational chemistry is used in medicine-related research as a first step in the development of new drugs and vaccines. Its importance in science was formally acknowledged in 2016 by the American Chemical Society.”

The research was supported by the Richard Lounsbery Foundation in the form of a Research Professorship to Bezoari.


17 2017-01-26
Natchitoches

NSU to host Louisiana Thespian Festival


NATCHITOCHES –Northwestern State University will host the 2017 Louisiana Thespian Festival Jan. 27-28 in the A.A. Fredericks Center for Creative and Performing Arts. Junior high and high school students from throughout Louisiana will participate in classes, workshops and performances, audition for college scholarships and network with students and directors from across the state.

Northwestern State Theatre and Dance faculty, staff and students will be involved in the festival, conducting workshops and auditions and overseeing logistics for the event.

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17 2017-01-26
Natchitoches

NSU student Jonathan Andino wins Rapides Symphony competition


he month of March will be memorable for Northwestern State University student Jonathan Andino.

The violinist will perform with two regional symphony orchestras that month, the Natchitoches-Northwestern Symphony March 13 and the Rapides Symphony on March 18.

Andino, a sophomore, will be performing with the Rapides Symphony after winning the Young Adult/Collegiate division of the orchestra’s Concerto Competition last weekend against students from throughout Louisiana. Andino, a student of NSU Associate Professor of Applied Violin and Viola Dr. Andrej Kurti, previously was a winner of the NSU Concerto Competition. He won both competitions playing "Introduction And Rondo Capriccioso" by Camille Saint-Saëns.

“I've never performed as a soloist with an orchestra, and I really hope this turns out well,” said Andino, who is from San Pedro Sula, Honduras. “I'm really excited about it. I'll do my best and with Dr. Kurti’s help, I'll try to play even better than at the competition.”

Andino said he is honored to perform with his peers in the Natchitoches-Northwestern Symphony Orchestra and with the Rapides Symphony, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary this season.

“I cannot wait to perform with a professional orchestra such as Rapides Symphony Orchestra,” said Andino. “I worked really hard with Dr. Kurti to do my best in that competition, and even when I felt really stressed because of it Dr. Kurti always told me to stay calm and focus, and told me ‘You can do this Jonathan.’”

The music performance major said waiting for the results of the Rapides Symphony competition was nerve-wracking for him.

“I was in the hallway along with my friends waiting for the results and whenever the judges came out to give the results, my heart started beating really hard, and even though it was cold inside the building, I started sweating,” said Andino. “When he said my name, I felt so excited and I could only think about thanking God for that achievement and also my family, and what would they say when I tell them.”

Andino gives Kurti a great deal of credit for his success.

“When I won, the first thing I did was call Dr. Kurti to tell him the great news and he was also very excited about it because we worked really hard for it,” said Andino. “I'm really thankful to Dr. Kurti. He is a great teacher.”


17 2017-01-26
Natchitoches

NSU, NPSB will get BESE grant for teacher residencies


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University and Natchitoches Parish Schools will receive grant dollars from the Louisiana Board of Elementary and Secondary Education to advance the state-wide shift to full-year residencies for all aspiring teachers.

Although final numbers are not available, NSU requested $85,000 of the $1 million allocated to universities and Natchitoches Parish Schools should receive $10,000 of the over $500,000 allocated to school districts, said Dr. Kimberly McAlister, head of NSU’s Department of Teaching, Leadership and Counseling.

“NSU is completing its third pilot of having undergraduate early childhood and elementary education teacher candidates teach for an entire year in a single placement,” McAlister said. “Currently, we have teacher candidates completing a full year of residency at Weaver Elementary and Fairview Elementary. We are working to transition all undergraduate teacher education programs (secondary and K-12 programs) to this full year of residency.”

Like many states across the nation, Louisiana's schools have experienced staffing shortages and difficulty retaining excellent teachers. Last October, BESE adopted regulations to address these challenges, providing teacher candidates with a full-year classroom residency alongside an experienced mentor teacher, coupled with a competency-based curriculum that will provide them with the knowledge and skills needed for their first day of teaching. Teacher candidates admitted into programs in the 2018-19 year will be the first cohort to experience the required year-long residency and new competency-based models.

"The residency program is a key component to ensuring that new teachers enter the classroom ready on day one," said BESE Vice President Dr. Holly Boffy. "This is an important initiative to further strengthen teaching in Louisiana. Great teachers pave the way for our students to excel academically and achieve their goals."

The funding package, which draws from existing state and federal funds, is based on an approved funding formula that includes grant allocations for Louisiana universities with approved undergraduate teacher preparation programs, as well as 18 partnering school systems.

More than $1 million was awarded to universities to support staff costs related to the transition of preparation programs, and nearly $600,000 was awarded to school systems to provide 233 teacher candidates, or residents, completing year-long residencies and 228 mentor teachers hosting year-long residencies with $2,000 and $1,000 stipends, respectively.

Educators and preparation leaders alike cite clear benefits to the shift.

"We view the year-long residency as a positive move toward assuring our candidates are better prepared for the realities of today's classrooms and the diverse student populations that occupy them," McAlister said. "This extension to a year-long residency better connects theory with practice, making the experience more meaningful for candidates, and may improve both their preparation and retention in a Louisiana classroom."


17 2017-01-25
Natchitoches

Rome reflects on being named Miss Northwestern-Lady of the Bracelet


Senior Maria Rome hadn’t participated in a beauty pageant before winning Saturday’s 59th Annual Miss Northwestern-Lady of the Bracelet Pageant, but she’s no stranger to the stage.

The Baton Rouge native was a theater and dance veteran at St. Joseph’s Academy, and her previous stage presence along with encouragement from her fraternity sisters helped Phi Mu continue their success as Northwestern State University pageant winners.

“(My experience) definitely made it easier, and I was more comfortable on stage than if I would have never participated in theater and dance,” Rome said. “But pageants are so different than theater or dance recitals -- you’re on stage all alone with all eyes on you.

“But after all the rehearsals, I told myself it’s basically a performance now. The only thing different about this is that somebody is going to win the performance.”

Rome is the fourth Phi Mu member to be named Miss Northwestern in the last five years, and she said advice from past winners Tori Thompson (2012) and Marissa McMickens (2016) aided in her pursuit of the crown and a shot at Miss Louisiana.

“Marissa is my big (sister), and Tori is my grand big (sister),” said Rome, who will receive more than $8,000 in scholarships and prizes. “I just saw how they conduct themselves with such poise now, and I saw how much pageants did for them and positively impacted their lives.

“I had the desire to participate, and when they would talk about Lady of the Bracelet, it sparked something in me. I would mention it, and they would encourage me. They were fueling a fire that had already been burning within me.”

In addition to the crown, Rome also took home the Liz Carroll People’s Choice Award selected by the pageant audience and the Children’s Miracle Network Miracle Maker Award.

Rome’s personality was on display in her singing performance of “How Do You Solve a Problem Like Maria?” from the classic musical “The Sound of Music” that was adapted into a hit movie.

“I thought the song was a little ironic and fun,” Maria said. “If I had a dime for every time I introduce myself and someone started singing that song, I swear I could retire.”

Rome chose NSU because of its stellar music and performing arts programs, but a past community service experience shaped her career pursuit as well as her platform as Miss Northwestern.

She and her mother volunteered with Miracle League, an organization that provides opportunities for special needs children to play baseball.

The psychology major aspires to be an occupational therapist and work closely with special needs and disabled children.

“My mom and I are part of a charity organization that works with a new philanthropy every year, and in my junior year of high school, we worked on a service project with Miracle League,” Rome said. “You’re at a baseball game, and you work 1-on-1 with a disabled child as their personal protector during the game.

“You play with them, throw the ball to them and explain what’s happening in the game. It’s so rewarding because you give these kids their one moment to shine and have a night where they are just like any other kid. Miracle League helps break barriers because you realize these kids aren’t as different as you’d think. They like the same things and want to laugh and have fun. They just want to live life and do the best with what they are given.”

Rome’s family suggested she look into occupational therapy, and when she realized psychology classes were a significant portion of prerequisites, the two fields seemed “to fit.”

Upon graduation either this coming fall or next spring, Rome plans on enrolling into an occupational therapy program.

“I just want to get my platform out there a little bit more (as a Lady of the Bracelet),” Rome said. “I want to do a few fundraisers and bring it home to Baton Rouge to help give them what they gave me -- Miracle League is how I decided that I wanted to be an occupational therapist.

“I also want to return to my high school and encourage and empower the young women there. I want to speak to them about healthy living.”

Natchitoches and NSU are also close to Rome’s heart, and she plans on serving those communities often during her year of service.

“I want to do a lot of different things here like work with the Boys and Girls Club to give back to this town and university that gave me so much,” Rome said. “The feeling I had when I got here was phenomenal.

“The family environment is great, and the faculty and staff want you to be successful. I am proud to be an NSU Demon, and I can’t wait to represent this school.”

Video of Maria Rome discussing her journey to the title of Miss Northwestern-Lady of the Bracelet is available at youtube.com/watch?v=vmXFHIle2cI&feature=em-upload_owner


17 2017-01-24
Natchitoches

Mazda picks NSU student design for 2017 art car


NATCHITOCHES – Design work by Northwestern State University students Jessica Cross of Natchitoches and Rachael Gaude of Ventress will be featured at the Washington, D.C., Auto Show, one of the nation’s top five auto shows presented by the International Organization of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Jan. 27-Feb. 5. Cross placed first for her “Kisatchie Forest” design and Guade placed second for “Honey Bubbles.” Their work will be applied, or “wrapped,” on a 2017 Mazda Miata and displayed at the Mazda booth at the show. Julien Montousse, director of design at Mazda Motor of America, selected the top design choices.

In addition to the wrapped vehicles, Automotive Rhythms Magazine is presenting an accompanying “Art In Motion” exhibit of poster prints showcasing Northwestern State student work that was also submitted for the competition.

The designs were created by students in Visual Communications 3220, taught by Collier Hyams, a professor of art who developed a relationship with Mazda several years ago as an opportunity for students to apply their ideas to a product.

“I like cars and package design projects and I wanted to find something wide-reaching and multi-disciplinary that would mean a great deal on a resume,” Hyams said. He encouraged his students to adopt a design firm mentality to develop their ideas. This year’s them revolved around reflection-based surfacing, in which the car reflects its surroundings, either literally or figuratively. It was the first time either Cross or Gaude had attempted an industrial design project.

Cross is pursuing a degree in fine and graphic art with a concentration in graphic communication and a minor in photography. Because she grew up in central Louisiana where pine trees dominate the landscape, she based her design on Kisatchie National Forest.

“Considering this year’s theme was reflection-based surfacing, I thought it would be interesting to reflect the environment surrounding the car,” Cross said. “After coming up with a theme, I decided to go with an abstract-minimalist style. I built a gradient effect from top to bottom, giving a sense of perspective and depth to the design. This combination allows the viewer to grasp the design with only a glance.”

Cross plans to graduate this May and hopes to find an internship at an ad agency and eventually do freelance work or work for a publishing company creating book covers.

Gaude is majoring in fine and graphic art with a concentration in studio art and a minor in communications. When given the assignment, her first inclination was to create something obviously reflective such as mirrors, water or personal introspection, but decided to stretch the theme by incorporating an uncommon reflective surface to make her design stand out. Her point of departure was her experience in beekeeping with her father.

“This car design’s purpose is to raise awareness for the declining honey bee population,” she explained. “The environment surrounding the car plays a huge role in the design of the car itself. Just as I have gazed at my reflection in a bucket of golden honey after a harvest from one of my own hives, a viewer would be able to see themselves and the outdoor environment reflected within the honey design. It subtly reminds the viewers of the crucial impact bees have on the environment and how the natural world would change for the worse without honey bees’ work as the leading pollinators.”

Gaude plans to continue to expand my art skills, earn a graduate degree in art and eventually teach at a university.

Hyams’ relationship with Mazda began when the company opened a new factory in Mexico and issued a call for design concepts that reflected the theme of Mexican art and culture. One of his former students from Georgetown University won the competition and his students have participated in the competition ever since.

“I enjoy brand identity projects,” he said. “I’m always looking for projects in applied arts. It’s practical rather than theory.”

The Mazda RX-Vision series concept car will be one feature of the Washington Auto Show, which annually showcases cutting-edge exhibits, latest model cars and displays of historic vehicles at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center. For information on the Washington Auto show, visit http://www.washingtonautoshow.com.

For information on NSU’s Department of Fine + Graphic Art, a department within the School of Creative and Performing Arts, visit capa.nsula.edu/art.


17 2017-01-23
Lafayette

PARISH RESIDENTS EARN DEGREES FROM NSU


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State awarded 852 degrees during Fall Commencement ceremonies to students who completed coursework in the Summer 2016 and Fall 2016 semesters. Commencement speaker was NSU alumnus David Morgan.
The university also awarded an honorary degree in elementary education to Noella Lyons Black of New Orleans, who left school during World War II just a few credits shy of graduation.
A trio of students from Evangeline Parish were among those hundreds that were awarded degrees. Those two are Melissa Forestier of Basile (Post Baccalaureate Certificate) and Shelbi LaFleur and Darius Poullard (Bachelor of Science).

17 2017-01-23
Natchitoches

NSU to host Double Reed Day Sunday


Oboe and bassoon players of all levels can learn more about their instrument at Northwestern State University’s Double Reed Day Sunday, Jan. 22 in the A.A. Fredericks Center for Creative and Performing Arts. Registration begins at noon and the program starts at 12:30 p.m. with a group double reed ensemble reading session followed by separate oboe and bassoon groups. Sessions will continue until 6:30 p.m.


17 2017-01-23
Natchitoches

Coreil, Molina to present recital Monday


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University faculty Kristine Coreil and Oliver Molina will present a recital Monday, Jan. 23 at 7:30 p.m. in Magale Recital Hall. Admission is free and open to the public.

Coreil, a professor of horn, and Molina, an assistant professor of music, will present genres ranging from atonal music to a baroque vocal transcription. The recital will feature pieces written for horn and percussion combinations including horn and chimes, horn and timpani, horn and marimba and horn and vibraphone, along with horn and drum set. The combinations provide some variety from the standard chamber groupings for horn. Director of Bands Jeff Mathews will be featured on a drum set in a piece for jazz horn.


17 2017-01-20
Baton Rouge

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17 2017-01-20
Natchitoches

Art professors' work chosen for juried competition


NATCHITOCHES – Work by Northwestern State University Associate Professor of Art Leslie Gruesbeck and Professor of Art Michael Yankowski have been accepted into the fourth Louisiana Biennial-National Competition, a juried competition in which 60 pieces were selected from more than 800 entries.

Of 175 artists entering the competition only 50 were accepted, 17 from Louisiana and 22 from throughout the United States.

Gruesbeck’s “Double Breasted Hat” is a crochet wearable sculpture of mohair, cotton and Mylar.

Yankowski’s wood and mixed media work is entitled “The Other Side of Time” is constructed of oak and other exotic woods, housing enamel paint on glass and containing an antique metronome to mark the passage of time. A second piece entitled “Celestial Realms” is constructed of oak, brass and enamel on glass.

All artwork was on exhibit in September at the 2016 NSU Art Faculty Exhibition in the Orville Hanchey Gallery.

The Biennial Competition will be on display January 26-February 16 at the F. J. Taylor Arts Center on the campus of Louisiana Tech University in Ruston. A juror’s lecture will begin at 5 p.m. Thursday, January 26 followed by a reception and awards presentation at 6 p.m.

The juror for the exhibition, a multi-media show for 2D and 3D work, was Rachel Cook, curator of DiverseWorks in Houston was juror for the exhibition.


17 2017-01-19
Natchitoches

Debate team competes at Arkansas invitational


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Speech and Debate Team completed at the Golden Eagle Invitational at John Brown University in Siloam Springs, Arkansas, last weekend. Team members are Jett Hayes of Lake Charles, Kelsey Jordan of Winnfield, Drew Chesher of Anacoco and Alice Wilson of Ball. The team earned 3rd place in terms of winning percentage. Results are as follows.

Hayes and Jordan were semifinalists in Team Debate, losing to last year’s national champions. This was the first time Hayes and Jordan debated as a team and the first for Hayes to debate at all.

Hayes went 2-4 in his first time debating individually.

Jordan was a semifinalist in Individual Debate and 5th Best Speaker in Novice, bringing home a total of three trophies.

Chesher was a semifinalist in JV and first place speaker in JV.

Wilson judged 15 different rounds and helped with prep. her first tournament.

Dr. Davina McClain, team sponsor, accompanied the team to the competition and arranged meals.


17 2017-01-19
Natchitoches

NSU alum part of team to discover Pensacola shipwreck site


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University alumnus Dillon Roy was part of a team of student/staff field archaeologists from the University of West Florida that discovered a shipwreck near Pensacola, Florida, last year.

Roy, a graduate student, was among the divers who discovered the ship, referred to as Emanuel Point III, covered with sand in seven feet of water. The ship was part of a fleet that in 1559 brought Conquistador Don Tristan de Luna and his army to what is now suburban Pensacola, site of the first European settlement in the United States. Most of that fleet sank during a hurricane that struck the coast shortly after Luna’s arrival.

The Emanuel Point Shipwreck Site, Florida’s oldest, was first discovered in 1992 when the Florida Bureau of Archaeological Research conducted an underwater inventory of Pensacola Bay and searchers located the remains of a Spanish galleon. Experts suspected that other vessels from the Luna fleet were submerged in the bay and located EP II in 2006. EP III was discovered about 200 meters from shore, which could indicate it was a small vessel and possibly one of the earliest ships built in the New World.

Roy was one of the divers who returned to the surface with artifacts in their hands. The team from the UWF archaeology program discovered ballast stones, iron concretions, an articulated hull of the ship with frames and hull planking and remnants of ceramics carried on the ship.

“I'm currently working on my master’s degree in historical archaeology focusing on maritime archaeology at UWF,” Roy said. “I've been diving since January 2013. When I got out to the maritime portion of field school as a supervisor last summer I had heard that we had a substantial hit from a previous magnetometer survey and that some of the target dives that followed had yielded a few possible pieces of ballast stone. No excavations had been conducted on the possible new site however though.”

When the team investigated the area, the first dive team installed a 1 x 1-meter square grid for a test unit. Dive two’s team, consisting of Roy, UWF maritime archaeology professor Dr. Greg Cook and field school student Rick Ramos, went down with a dredge to begin excavating the test unit.

“Shortly into dredging we uncovered ship structure, confirming that we did indeed have a new wreck,” Roy said. “I think the most thrilling thing about the discovery for me was realizing just how big of a deal this was and that I got to be a part of it. I never imagined that as a grad student that I would be involved with something this incredible.”

Roy, a native of Baton Rouge, graduated from NSU in 2014 with a degree in general studies with a concentration in social sciences and a double minor in anthropology and English.

“I would in no way be where I am today in my studies had it not been for the instruction and mentoring of NSU anthropology and archaeology professors Dr. Pete Gregory and Dr. Tommy Hailey,” he said.

Luna, the conquistador, and about 1,500 soldiers, colonists, slaves and Aztec Indians traveled in 11 ships from Veracruz, Mexico, to Pensacola. Three shipwrecks still remain undiscovered in the bay, but the UWF team possibly found another one, or even all three, based on a few of the magnetic anomalies detected last year. UWF students divided into two groups and excavated the bay for 11 weeks.

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers approved a permit for the UWF team to conduct test excavations through March 2017 to determine the extent of the shipwreck and the type of wood used to build the ship.

A Florida Division of Historical Resources’ special category grant for $290,000 funded part of the excavation. The matching grant awarded to UWF in 2014 provided funding for faculty, staff and students to conduct fieldwork, laboratory analysis, artifact conservation and curation, archival research in Spain and public outreach for two years. UWF will apply for similar grants in the future to fund further excavations.


17 2017-01-18
Natchitoches

Kelly family creates nursing scholarship in thanks for compassionate care


NATCHITOCHES – One family’s story of loss, recovery and healing is a testament to the compassionate care many receive from dedicated nurses. In this case, gratitude was transformed into support for students who are seeking a career in nursing.

Jennifer and Keenan Kelly of Natchitoches established the Carolyn Annette Kelly Endowed Scholarship in Nursing that will be presented to a junior-level Northwestern State University nursing student in clinicals. The scholarship is for one year and recipients can reapply. Recipients must maintain a grade point average of 3.0 or better. The scholarship honors the memory of the Kellys’ infant daughter.

“On October 3, 2006, I was admitted to the hospital with complications from a twin pregnancy,” Jennifer Kelly said, describing the weeks she spent on complete bedrest in a Shreveport hospital, an hour away from home. “We had known that it was a possibility that I would be hospitalized early but considering I was only 23 weeks, I was not ready. Those three weeks would have been miserable without the kind and caring nurses who took wonderful care of me.”

During her hospitalization, while Keenan was in Natchitoches finalizing the purchase of their new home and moving, Jennifer said “I became one of them.”

“If they ordered out, so did I. We each had our ‘money’ bag which was a biohazard bag,” she said. “I will never forget these wonderful women and the care they showed.”

On the night of Oct. 26, at 27 weeks, it was determined that Jennifer had lost one daughter, Carolyn Annette Kelly, and was at risk of losing her identical twin, Anderson Paige Kelly and was scheduled for emergency surgery. Anderson was born weighing 1 pound 14 ounces and although Keenan could not reach the hospital in time, two of Jennifer’s sisters were able to be with her for delivery. Anderson was taken immediate to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit where she spent the next three months. Jennifer was impressed by the professionalism and caring of the nurses during her emergency situation and during the three months that Anderson was in NICU.

“There was never a moment that we felt that Anderson was not getting what she needed. We could not have asked for better care from each of these departments,” Jennifer said.

When Andi was considered out of the woods and just needed time to grow, Kelly returned to her job as director of Auxiliary Services at NSU so that when Andi was allowed to come home, she could spend her maternity leave with her at home.

“Being over an hour away was very hard and the most comforting thing was we could call 24 hours and talk to the nurses to get the latest,” she said. “We called numerous times a day to find out how much Andi had eaten, how much weight she had gained and to get any other updates. I left my digital camera with the nurses and they would always snap photos for me.”

Today, Andi is a healthy 10-year-old in fourth grade at St. Mary’s School in Natchitoches. She is involved in piano, dance, softball and basketball.

Keenan Kelly graduated from NSU in 1990 with a degree in business in administration and graduated from Loyola University School of Law in New Orleans in 1993. Jennifer earned a bachelor’s degree in business and office education in 1991, master’s in educational technology in 1999 and completed 30+ in educational leadership in 2004. Her current title at NSU is assistant to the provost for academic support and auxiliary services.

“Northwestern has always been a very special place for Keenan and I. As alumni we are always looking for ways to support the University and to help others,” Jennifer said. “We hope to continue to grow this scholarship as a legacy in Carolyn’s name. We know firsthand what a well educated nursing staff can do.”

Established in 1954, Northwestern State’s has the oldest baccalaureate program in nursing in Louisiana. Healthcare agencies in Caddo and Bossier parishes estimate that 75-80 percent of the RN workforce are graduates of one or more of NSU’s nursing programs.

For information on supporting student scholarships, visit northwesternalumni.com or call (318) 357-4414.


17 2017-01-17
Natchitoches

NSU recognizes Maj. (Ret.) Richard Hooter


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University is continuing its tradition of honoring those who served in the nation’s Armed Forces by recognizing a veteran during each home basketball game this season. Maj. (Ret.) Richard G. Hooter of Natchitoches was recognized during the Jan. 12 game.

Hooter was drafted in 1970 for service in Vietnam. There, he served with C Company, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry, 198th Infantry Brigade, 23rd Infantry Division (Americal). He was released from active duty in 1972 with the rank of Sergeant, E-5. He then enrolled at NSU and joined the NSU ROTC program. In 1974, he graduated from NSU with a bachelor’s degree and was commissioned an Infantry officer.

Hooter served twice as a Reconnaissance Platoon Leader, first, with B Company, 1st Battalion, 10th Infantry, then with Delta Troop, 1st Squadron, 10th US Cavalry, 4th Infantry Division (Mechanized). He also served as Combat Company Commander for the 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division.

His other assignments include Post Commander of Fort DeRussy Military Reservation, Honolulu, Hawaii; Director of Tactics, Missile and Munitions School, Redstone Arsenal, Huntsville, Alabama; Executive Officer for the 5th Recruiting Brigade, Little Rock, Arkansas; Executive Officer, 2nd Battalion, 10th Infantry, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri; and Director of Tactics, US Army Engineer School, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri.

Hooter’s military schooling includes Officer Basic Course, Fort Benning, Georgia; Officer Advanced Course, Fort Benning, Georgia; Personnel Management Course, Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indianapolis, Indiana; Command and General Staff College; and Strategic Studies, US Army War College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania. He also completed US Army Ranger, Airborne, and Pathfinder Schools, all located at Fort Benning, Georgia.

In addition to the Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross, Hooter’s awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal, Meritorious Service Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters, Army Commendation Medal for Valor, Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal, and the Army Service Ribbon. His tabs and badges include the Expert Infantry Badge, Combat Infantry Badge, Ranger Tab, Airborne Badge, and the Pathfinder Badge.

Hooter retired from the Army in 1992 and spends much of his spare time fishing in various Fishing League Worldwide tournaments. He has qualified for four All-Americans. He also mentors NSU’s ROTC Cadets and Cadre, is their devoted grill master and serves as the Operations Officer for NSU’s Demon Regiment, the alumni arm of the NSU ROTC program.

Hooter and his wife, the former JoAnn Aamons, have been married 49 years and have lived in Natchitoches since 1993. Mrs. Hooter is a Natchitoches native. They have two sons, John and Philip, and five grandchildren, Braden, Mollee, Mason, Avery and Harrison.

In gratitude of their service to the nation, Dr. Chris Maggio, acting university president, requested that Northwestern State University increase its public recognition of veterans. To nominate a veteran for recognition at an upcoming NSU event, please contact Sid Hall, NSU’s Military Affairs Coordinator and ROTC program manager, at halls@nsula.edu or (318) 357-6951.
17 2017-01-13
Natchitoches

PHS student organizing debate tournament for comm disorder awareness


NATCHITOCHES – “We take our ability to speak to one another for granted and very rarely think about those who cannot do the same thing,” said Megan Guilbeau, a Pineville High School student who is leading an initiative to raise awareness about individuals with communication disorders. Guilbeau, 17, is organizing a state-wide speech and debate tournament to help educate the public about challenges faced by those with hearing problems, speech deficiencies and other issues.

The “Speak Up” speech and debate tournament is set for Saturday, Jan. 28 at PHS where a speech-language pathologist (SLP) will be on hand to offer informational materials and talk about communication disorders. Topics during student debaters impromptu round also will be related to communication and childhood education.

“Communication disorders and raising awareness are incredibly important to me. I realized that it is a common problem in children, but also that it is very rarely diagnosed because it is often hidden behind other disorders or behavioral issues,” Guilbeau said. “It is estimated that around 10 percent of children have communication disorders, which includes disorders of speech, language, hearing and voice. However, only about 2 percent are ever diagnosed or treated. The others are left to grow up without any help and this causes problems with education through the years, participating in medical appointments, getting a job, etc.”

Guilbeau has been involved with debate since her freshman year and is president of Pineville High School’s debate team. She is classified as a junior, but is taking senior-level classes. She considered graduating early but decided not to because of speech and debate and other extra curricular activities. The tournament began as a project associated with her English IV curriculum.

“Before I started my senior project, I hadn't met anyone who had a communication disorder, but I had a lot of empathy for the people who could not do something I loved so dearly and actively did for speech and debate,” Guilbeau said. “However, over the last few weeks, I have grown to know several people with communication disorders and several other people who work with children that have them.”

After high school, Guilbeau plans to pursue a master’s degree and eventually work in pharmaceutical research and development, specifically in the cancer field.

“I love chemistry and biology just as much as I love public speaking and trying to spread empathy and information,” Guilbeau said.


Northwestern State University will be a sponsor of the “Step Up” speech and debate tournament, providing judges and assistance with the tournament. Any business or individual interested in sponsorship can contact Guilbeau at megan.guilbeau@gmail.com. Volunteer judges should be over age 18.


17 2017-01-12
Natchitoches

Registration continues at NSU


Registration for the spring 2017 semester at Northwestern State University is being held through Monday, Jan. 16.

Eligible students can sign up for spring classes through NSU Connect which is available at my.nsula.edu. Spring classes start on Jan. 17. Late registration will be held Jan. 17-25 For more information on spring registration at Northwestern State, go to nsula.edu/registrar.



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17 2017-01-11
Shreveport

Spring semester registration underway at NSU


NATCHITOCHES, La. - Registration for the spring 2017 semester at Northwestern State University is being held through Monday, Jan. 16.

Eligible students can sign up for spring classes through NSU Connect which is available at my.nsula.edu.

Spring classes start on Jan. 17. Late registration will be held Jan. 17-25.

For more information on spring registration at Northwestern State, go to nsula.edu/registrar.

17 2017-01-09
Lake Charles

SW La. students among NSU grads


NATCHITOCHES — Northwestern State University awarded 852 degrees during recent fall commencement ceremonies to students who completed coursework in the summer 2016 and fall 2016 semesters.
Diplomas were awarded to 250 graduates who completed coursework during the summer. Those graduates and their degrees, listed by hometown:
Fort Polk — Jade Mitchell, Associate of General Studies.
Lake Arthur — Tuesdi Thibodeaux, Associate of General Studies.
Lake Charles — Crystal Ortego, Bachelor of Science.
Leesville — Shelby Ellerson, Bachelor of Arts; Andrea Garrett, Bachelor of Science in Nursing; Charlotte Hooks, Post Masters Certificate.
New Llano — Kimberly Froisy, Bachelor of Science in Nursing; Cody Crews, Bachelor of General Studies.
Oakdale — Jayme Gormanous, Bachelor of General Studies.
Sulphur — Julianna Pugh, Associate of General Studies.
Westlake — Ebony Price, Associate of General Studies.
Fall graduates by hometown:
Anacoco — Elaina Cooley, Associate of General Studies; Tryon-Stephen Williams, Bachelor of Science; Rachel Reischling, Master of Arts; Sharon Austin, Master of Arts in Teaching.
DeRidder — Sean Austin, Bachelor of General Studies; Casey Harris, Nora Lersch, John McDaniel, Stephanie Rabb, Bachelor of Science; Marie Alexander, Whitney Hendrix, Bachelor of Social Work; Magalindia White, Associate of General Studies; Matthew Stevenson, Bachelor of Fine Arts; Amanda Krygowski, Bachelor of Science in Nursing; Kayla York, Master of Education.
Lake Charles — Julia Lee, Associate of General Studies; Sarena Pundt, Bachelor of Applied of Science; Paula DeJean, Isaiah Wheeler, Bachelor of Arts; Capricia Ryan Botley, Melissa Walls, Bachelor of Science; Jamila Daniel, Bachelor of Science in Nursing; Jennifer Elbert, Master of Education.
Leesville — Jacob Contreras, Bachelor of Fine Arts; LaKieah Brown, Bachelor of General Studies; Teresa Contreras, Zachary Crowder, Katarina Haymon, Jenna Jeane, Cole Parker, Michael Snell, Jessica Williamson, Bachelor of Science; Katlynn Dillon, Bachelor of Social Work.
Oakdale — Shawn Pelt, Associate of Science in Nursing.
Oberlin — Amber Artis, Bachelor of General Studies.
Pitkin — Luke Rasberry, Bachelor of Science.
Sulphur — John Bergstedt, Bachelor of Science; Jessica Tarver, Bachelor of Science in Nursing; Taylor Morris, Bachelor of Social Work; Ashbrooke Hogan, Master of Education; Kelsey Kibbe, Master of Science.
Vinton — Ashley Gragg, Bachelor of Social Work.
Westlake — Brandi Roessler, Bachelor of Science.

17 2017-01-05
Natchitoches

BOM is a $250 sponsor of the Dreams Scholarshi


BOM is a $250 sponsor of the Dreams Scholarship Fund. This Foundation provides educational opportunities to disadvantaged high school students in the Natchitoches area. From left are Wanda Wynder (Dreams Scholarship Fund Board Member), Sylvia Madison, (DSF Board Member), Cloyd Benjamin Jr. (DSF President), Katrice Below (DSF Board Member & BOM assistant vice president and Felicia Murphy.


17 2017-01-03
Alexandria

2017 to bring milestone events for local higher ed


The wheels already are set in motion for some 2017 milestones in local higher education. New leadership and campus projects are set to shape the year for Central Louisiana institutions and impact students for years to come. Here's what to expect. (Click on the highlighted text for more background.)

The most tangible milestone event will be the beginning of construction on a $21 million, 60,000-square foot-campus downtown, which is expected to happen in the fall. Officials are predicting Central Louisiana Technical Community College's eventual relocation and new facility will attract a substantial number of new students. CLTCC's Alexandria campus is currently located on South MacArthur Drive and will move to a site between Murray and Jackson streets across from the U.S. District Courthouse.
Louisiana State University of Alexandria is one of two schools in the region with incoming leaders. Guiyou Huang steps into his new role as chancellor on Jan. 1. He has pledged to make growth a top priority at a school and enhance international recruitment efforts, which could set the stage for more change. LSUA leaders have said the school's growing student body will soon create needs on campus. In terms of enrollment, LSUA has seen unprecedented growth since 2013. Overall enrollment in the fall was 3,277, up 47 percent from three years earlier.
Guiyou Huang has been named the next chancellor ofBuy Photo
Guiyou Huang has been named the next chancellor of LSU of Alexandria. He visited the campus and addressed stakeholders in early November. (Photo: Miranda Klein/The Town Talk)
Northwestern State University in Natchitoches plans to wrap up its presidential search by July 1. Former President Jim Henderson will lead the University of Louisiana System starting Jan. 1 with longtime staff member and administrator Chris Maggio stepping in as acting president of NSU through June 30. The university also experienced growth under Henderson's leadership and will no doubt look for a president to continue the trend.
Louisiana College in Pineville has been undergoing $14 million-worth of renovations with some major projects set to wrap up in 2017. The most notable will be a floor-to-ceiling transformation of the private Baptist school's Guinn Auditorium, where weekly chapel services, commencement exercises and other community events regularly are held. Administration has indicated plans to fundraise for more campus improvement projects as the school seeks to continue growing enrollment.
Guinn Auditorium on the Louisiana College campus isBuy Photo
(Photo: Melinda Martinez/The Town Talk)
Decisions made by lawmakers and higher education leaders, especially in regards to TOPS also will be felt by local students in the coming year. About 51,000 students saw reductions in their TOPS award going into the spring semester, and there's now discussion about requiring TOPS students to take more credit hours. Current policy requires TOPS students to take 24 credit hours over an academic year. The new minimum would be 30 credit hours.

17 2016-12-27
Natchitoches

Acting NSU president full of hope and optimism about future of university and his role there


“What I see right now is excitement…passion…an affinity for NSU, which is something that has waned for several years,” Northwestern State University Acting President Chris Maggio told the Walter Ledet Coffee Club Wednesday. “We have just been going through the motions, but now I see a rejuvenation. Students are starting to gravitate towards the university throughout the state again.” Maggio said that when Dr. Jim Henderson became president of NSU two years ago, he brought some validation to the university from the outside. He felt NSU, as a university, did not realize how good it was and felt the school had been beaten down a little bit and was feeling sorry for itself because of state budget cuts.


17 2016-12-22
Natchitoches

Northwestern State presents diplomas to graduates


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State awarded 852 degrees during Fall Commencement ceremonies Friday to students who completed coursework in the Summer 2016 and Fall 2016 semesters.

The commencement speaker was NSU alumnus David Morgan. The university also awarded an honorary degree in elementary education to Noella Lyons Black of New Orleans, who left school during World War II just a few credits shy of graduation.

Diplomas were awarded to 250 graduates who completed coursework during the summer. Natchitoches Parish graduates who completed coursework during the summer and their degrees listed by hometown are as follows.


17 2016-12-19
Natchitoches

NSU recognizes top grads, first DNP grads


Northwestern State University honored the top graduates from the Gallaspy College of Education and Human Development, the Louisiana Scholars’ College and the College of Arts and Sciences prior to morning commencement Dec. 16. Seated from left are Melissa Bailey of Prairieville, Sarah Gandy of Monroe and Gabrielle Gonzales of New Orleans. Standing from left are David Morgan, commencement speaker; Kaitlin Lewing of Ebarb, Jacob Bryant of Bossier City, Emory Rachal of Moreauville, Kayla Ashford of Baton Rouge, Rebekah Broussard of Morse, Tanner Hernandez of Robeline, Lauren Yepson of Ruston and NSU President Dr. Jim Henderson.


Northwestern State University recognized top graduates from the College of Nursing and School of Allied Health, the College of Business and Technology and those receiving general studies degrees prior to afternoon commencement Friday. Seated from left are Jamila Daniels of Lake Charles and Amanda Skaggs of Bossier City. Standing are State Rep. Kenny Cox, Kazue Seo of Kuroda, Japan; Austin McCurry of Haynesville, Logan Webb of Shreveport, Tyler Cox of Sarepta and NSU President Dr. Jim Henderson.


The first class of graduates of Northwestern State University’s Doctor of Nursing practice degree were hooded during NSU commencement Friday. Provided through NSU’s College of Nursing and School of Allied Health, the program provides a clinical doctorate for master’s prepared registered nurses. On the front row from left are Susan Brown, Detries Morris, Allison Turner, Aimee Sandifer, Jennifer Cameron, Tammy Harris and LaToya Gipson. On the back row are Dr. Dana Clawson, dean of the College of Nursing and School of Allied Health, Alice Fanning, Beatrice Launius, Cheryl Adair, Julie Gayle, Billy Morales and Dr. Connie Hale, faculty.
17 2016-12-19
Natchitoches

NSU closes for Christmas and New Year’s break


Northwestern State University will be closed Dec. 19 – Jan. 2 for the Christmas/New Year’s break. Administrative offices will reopen Tuesday, Jan. 3. Spring 2017 classes begin Tuesday, Jan. 17.

The Wellness Recreation and Activity Center will be closed Dec. 23-25 and Dec. 30 – Jan. 1. Hours of operation through Jan. 14 will be 5:30 a.m. – 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 5:30 a.m. – 7 p.m. on Friday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. on Saturday and 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. on Sunday. Regular hours resume on Sunday, Jan. 15.

17 2016-12-15
Natchitoches

Folk Festival gets NEA Challenge America grant


Northwestern State University’s Louisiana Folklife Center will receive a $10,000 Challenge America grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to support the 38th annual event. The NEA approved more than $30 million in grants as part of the group’s first major funding announcement for fiscal year 2017. The Challenge America category supports primarily small and mid-sized organizations for projects that extend the reach of the arts to underserved populations—those whose opportunities to experience the arts are limited by geography, ethnicity, economics or disability.



“We are deeply honored that the Festival has received a Challenge America award from the National Endowment for the Arts,” said Dr. Shane Rasmussen, director of the Natchitoches-NSU Folk Festival. “This year’s Festival will be a fun filled, educational event that will highlight some of the finest folk music, food, crafts and cultural traditions in Louisiana.”



“The arts are for all of us, and by supporting organizations such as Northwestern State University’s Louisiana Folklife Center, the National Endowment for the Arts is providing more opportunities for the public to engage with the arts,” said NEA Chairman Jane Chu. “Whether in a theater, a town square, a museum or a hospital, the arts are everywhere and make our lives richer.”



The 38th annual Natchitoches-NSU Folk Festival will be held on July 14-15, 2017 in air-conditioned Prather Coliseum on the Northwestern State University campus in Natchitoches, Louisiana. The 2017 Festival theme is “Keeping Tradition Alive!” In addition to the annual Louisiana State Fiddle Championship which will be held in the Magale Recital Hall on the afternoon of July 15, performers will present a variety of styles of music ranging from country, Cajun, zydeco, gospel, bluegrass and blues.



Artists will include Cajun music with Steve Riley and the Mamou Playboys and Ray Abshire and Friends, Zydeco with Geno Delafose and French Rockin’ Boogie and Gerard Delafose and the Zydeco Gators, Texas Swing with the Caddo Creek Band, traditional mariachi music with Mariachi Jalisco US, blues with Hezekiah Early and the Houserockers and the Wayne “Blue” Burns Band, a traditional Easter Rock celebration, country with Gal Holiday and the Honky Tonk Revue, Natchitoches favorite Ed Huey, bluegrass with the Clancey Ferguson Band, French Creole la la music with Goldman Thibodeaux and the Lawtell Playboys and many more.



The 2017 Festival will also include a Cajun accordion workshop led by Ray Abshire and Steve Riley. With three music stages, Cajun dance lessons, narrative sessions, folk foods, traditional crafts persons and exhibits and Kidfest, the Festival audience will be greatly edified, enlightened and entertained at the 38th annual Natchitoches-NSU Folk Festival, Rasmussen said.



The Louisiana Folklife Center was established at Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, Louisiana to identify, document, and present Louisiana’s cultural and folk traditions and to provide public access to this material via the Natchitoches-NSU Folk Festival.



For more information on projects included in the NEA grant announcement, visit arts.gov/news. For more information contact folklife@nsula.edu, call (318) 357-4332, or check out the Louisiana Folklife Center on Facebook.




17 2016-12-14
Alexandria

Students can graduate from high school with an associate degree


PINEVILLE — An agreement between Pineville High School and Northwestern State University in Natchitoches will allow qualified students to graduate high school with two diplomas. School administrators met Tuesday to ink the deal and officially announce the news.

Pineville High Principal Karl Carpenter said the high school will become the second in Louisiana to offer students the opportunity to earn an associate degree. It will be awarded by NSU at no cost to students and families.

"How great this is for our region, how great it is for the state," said Chris Maggio, vice president for the student experience at NSU. And ultimately, Carpenter, Maggio and Pineville's Lead Teacher Bonnie White pointed out the agreement is a win-win for students and families — many of whom worry about the cost of an undergraduate education.

White said this gives students "a chance to take everything they've learned here with them."

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Next year, Pineville High will begin offering an expanded selection of dual-enrollment courses, which allow students to earn college credit while in high school. All public Rapides Parish high schools offer dual-enrollment courses taught by certified high school teachers.

White said normally students are eligible to enroll as junior and seniors, but now Pineville students will need to enroll their sophomore year and start the path toward earning 60 credit hours and the general studies degree.

The goal is for members of the class of 2020 to be able to don red robes for a traditional Pineville High graduation and days later "walk that (Northwestern) stage in purple," White said.

About a dozen Pineville students who met NSU's GPA and ACT score criteria were selected to be the first to start on the path this spring, but going forward, there will be an application process.

Because high school students in Rapides and surrounding parishes can open enroll their freshman year, there is potential for the agreement to benefit more than just the students already planning to attend Pineville High.

"We do want to make sure that students know we have a solid opportunity for them here," White said.

Interested parents of junior high students and high school freshmen can attend an upcoming Parent Night to learn more. The informational meeting hosted by Pineville High is set for 6 p.m. Dec. 19 in the school library.


17 2016-12-14
Natchitoches

NSU to hold Fall Commencement Friday


Northwestern State University will hold its Fall Commencement exercises Friday, Dec. 16 in Prather Coliseum. More than 870 graduates from the summer and fall semesters are expected to receive degrees.

At 10 a.m., graduates from the Gallaspy Family College of Education and Human Development, the Louisiana Scholars’ College and the College of Arts and Sciences except for general studies will receive diplomas. At 3 p.m., graduates from the College of Nursing and School of Allied Health, the College of Business and Technology will be recognized.

During the morning ceremony, NSU will bestow an honorary bachelor’s degree in elementary education to Noella Lyons Black of New Orleans.

Alumnus David Morgan will be the commencement speaker. Morgan graduated from Bolton High School in Alexandria and received a degree in business from NSU.

After graduation, he started his career in the insurance field selling insurance to active teachers in Louisiana. In 1981, he began United Teacher Associates Inc., an insurance agency specializing in insurance benefits to members of large state retired teacher associations. Morgan purchased an insurance company three years later and started writing the association member insurance policies through the company. The renamed United Teacher Associates Insurance Company grew annual revenue to more than $200 million with 250 full-time employees and more than 3,000 agents across the company. In 1999, he sold United Teacher Associates to a Fortune 500 company.

After a brief retirement, Morgan and his brother co-founded Association Member Benefits Advisors in 2001. AMBA provides a broad range of member benefits in 30 states to over 4 million association members with over 300 full time agents. AMBA is home to many NSU graduates with successful careers.

At Northwestern State, Morgan was president of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, inducted into “Who’s Who Among College Students” and was the school mascot, Vic the Demon.

He is a member of the NSU Alumni Hall of Distinction, the Long Purple Line, and Pi Kappa Phi Hall of Fame. Morgan has been a member of the NSU President’s Council and the Board of Directors of the NSU Alumni Association and is very involved in the NSU alumni chapter of Pi Kappa Phi. He created an endowed professorship in the Northwestern State School of Business to further the study of salesmanship and insurance.

He is married to Sherry Fargerson Morgan who also graduated from NSU and was a member of Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority. The Morgans split their time between Austin and St Thomas, V.I., and have three children and seven grandchildren. Their oldest son, David Morgan Jr. and his wife, Leslie, are also graduates of NSU.

17 2016-12-14
Shreveport

NSU signs dual enrollment agreement with Spanish university


NATCHITOCHES, La.

Northwestern State University and the University of Alicante (Universidad de Alicante) in Spain signed an exchange agreement Monday that will facilitate student and faculty exchanges, research collaboration and dual enrollment opportunities for students majoring in business and business administration.

Faculty in Northwestern State’s School of Business worked with their counterparts at Alicante to establish the agreement for academic cooperation for students interested in a dual degree program in which the host university can award a bachelor’s degree based on specified course requirements.

Students in the dual degree program must follow the study program set in the agreement to be awarded with both degrees.

Administrators say international study allows students to participate in research programs, cultural activities and language immersion that contribute to personal enrichment and studying business abroad provides a more global perspective on business and economics.

Dr. Begona Perez-Mira said, “This agreement is a wonderful opportunity for students, faculty and staff at both institutions."

Perez-Mira added, "In a job market where internationalization is essential, this agreement provides enhanced cultural experiences, key global competencies and collaborations that will increase the already well-rounded education that our students receive.”

The exchange opportunity is open to junior level students with a 2.5 cumulative grade point average and a conversational level of Spanish language skills based on personal interview.

Perez-Mira is a professor of Computer Information Systems in NSU’s School of Business and native to a small town near Alicante, Spain.

Located on Spain’s southeastern Mediterranean coast, the University of Alicante has an enrollment of over 25,000 students. Almost all classes are taught in Spanish although some are in English, in particular, in computer science and business degrees.

The number of international students at Northwestern State had grown significantly in recent years as the university pursued agreements with institutions outside the U.S., coordinated international study projects abroad and earlier this year opened the International Student Resource Center.

Beginning in the Spring 2017, the first cohort of students from the Universidad Veracruzana, Mexico, will arrive in Natchitoches to study under a dual enrollment agreement similar to the one signed with Alicante.

Dr. Chris Maggio will assume office as acting president of NSU in January. Dr. Maggio said, “Support of our international students will continue to grow at NSU. Our goal is to offer more students the opportunity to study abroad and provide the best possible experience for international students for enhanced global awareness, academics, leadership and personal growth.”

17 2016-12-13
Natchitoches

Marcus Jones named executive vice president at NSU


Marcus Jones has been named executive vice president for university and business affairs at Northwestern State University. His appointment has been approved by the Board of Supervisors for the University of Louisiana System.

He has been vice president for university affairs since 2007. Jones will be responsible for the oversight of the areas of student accounting and cashiering, accounting and budgeting, purchasing, University Police, construction projects, maintenance, custodial and general upkeep of all university facilities and grounds. He will be responsible for reviewing and executing University leases and cooperative agreements, overseeing the environmental health and safety officer. Jones leads the university’s international recruitment effort, which has substantially increased the number of students at NSU from outside the United States in recent years.

“Marcus Jones is the consummate leader. As executive vice president, he will create a business culture founded on responsiveness and efficiency in our back office operations and the other areas under his purview,” said Northwestern State President Dr. Jim Henderson.

Jones brings an extensive academic, business and legal background to the position. Jones is a graduate of Northwestern with a bachelor’s degree in business administration and finance, a master’s in international trade and finance from Grambling State University and a law degree from Southern University Law Center where he was managing editor of the Southern Law Review. He also studied international business and finance at the University of Plymouth in Plymouth, England.

“I am looking forward to assuming my expanded role as executive vice president,” said Jones. “As part of my new role, I plan to work closely with the business affairs division to meet the University’s strategic goals, which have been set by Dr. Henderson and others.”

Jones has been a member of Northwestern’s faculty since 1994 as an instructor of business, assistant professor of business law and international business and associate professor of business law and international business. He holds the Ben D. Johnson Endowed Professorship.

He has also been treasurer and consultant of the Northwest Louisiana Athletic League and has served in several capacities including co-editor of “Callaloo,” a literary magazine based at Texas A&M.

Jones has also been treasurer and a consultant to the Ben D. Johnson Educational Foundation and finance/accounts manager and consultant for the Ben D. Johnson Construction and Finance Co. In his role with the construction and finance company, Jones supervised subcontractors at construction sites, managed the company’s operating budget, provided financial oversight and worked in economic development.

He is a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc.


17 2016-12-13
Natchitoches

Rotary Club supports NSU scholarships



The Natchitoches Rotary Club presented the Northwestern State University Foundation with a donation of $18,500 to create an endowment for student scholarships. The Club's goal is to endow $25,000. Natchitoches Rotary invests in NSU students by awarding $1,000 to a local student, based on need. Ultimately, the Rotary Club Endowment will allow the Club to have a greater impact over time, while it still offers assistance annually to a deserving NSU student. From left are Associate Director of Alumni Affairs Vanner Erikson, Rotary Past President Jimmy Berry, President Fred Terasa, Past President Dr. Margaret Wheat-Carter and Drake Owens, executive director of the NSU Foundation.
17 2016-12-13
Natchitoches

Northwestern State University’s School


Northwestern State University’s School of Business hosted an induction ceremony for new members of Beta Gamma Sigma Honor Society. Beta Gamma Sigma is the honor society recognizing business excellence. On the front row from left are Dr. Margaret Kilcoyne, interim dean of the College of Business and Technology
17 2016-12-13
Natchitoches

Alliance continues support of scholarships, programming


NATCHITOCHES – Alliance Compressors continued their support of Northwestern State University with a donation of $5,000 to the NSU Foundation that will be divided between programming at L.P. Vaughn Elementary School in Natchitoches, a scholarship at Northwestern State University for students pursuing a degree in engineering technology and support for Project Lead the Way, an elementary through high school curriculum that introduces students to concepts in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.



The donation was made through the Emerson Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Alliance’s parent company, Emerson, who is headquartered in St. Louis, Missouri.



“I can’t think of a better allocation of funds in which students will benefit from the beginning of their academic journey at the elementary level, through middle and high school and as college students,” said Drake Owens, director of the NSU Foundation. “Alliance has been an important industry partner to NSU by coordinating internships, mentoring students, funding scholarships, hiring graduates and providing input on industry needs.”



The PLTW portion of the donation will be disbursed through the Natchitoches Parish Chamber of Commerce Education Fund. In the past, the funds have been used to implement PLTW curriculum into area schools. NSU is the Louisiana affiliate university for PLTW. The L.P. Vaughn funds will be used to support the school’s music program.



Alliance Compressors is a manufacturer of air conditioning compressors for the HVAC industry. The company is a joint venture between Emerson, Lennox International and Trane, a subsidiary of Ingersol Rand. Alliance Compressors operates a 400,000 square foot production facility in Natchitoches that has been in operation since 1998.



“I feel honored to be able to direct these funds to such worthy causes through my alma mater. I also feel fortunate to have been involved with NSU and the chamber at the front end of Project Lead the Way and to see how it has thrived and grown. What great and positive things are going on at NSU,” said Ken Gardner, plant manager. “We are blessed to be able to provide these funds through the Emerson trust to the NSU Foundation.”


17 2016-12-12
Alexandria

NSU pays tribute to education icon Jimmy Long Sr.


Northwestern State University will name its Student Services Center in honor of former state representative Jimmy D. Long Sr.

Long, who passed away in August, also was a member of the Board of Supervisors for the University of Louisiana System, which approved the designation Thursday, a school release said.

"Jimmy Long's contributions to Northwestern State are immeasurable," NSU president Jim Henderson said. "His support of the university during his tenure in the state legislature and his service on the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors benefited nearly a quarter of a million students who attended the university during that time. It is fitting that all future students will enter a building dedicated to serving them that is named for Jimmy Long."

The Jimmy D. Long Student Services Center was completed in 2012. The $8.5 million facilitiy was the first state-funded new building constructed on the Northwestern State campus in more than 30 years.

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The building is home to the Offices of University Recruiting, First Year Experience and Leadership Development, Financial Aid, Student Employment Scholarships, Admissions, Veteran’s Affairs and the Vice President for the Student Experience as well as the Registrar’s Office and Cashier’s Office.

Long was named by The Times of Shreveport one of the "100 Most Influential People of the Century in Northwest Louisiana" and is a member of the Louisiana Political Hall of Fame and the Northwestern Alumni Hall of Distinction, the Long Purple Line.

A few of his contributions to the state and to education include:

Serving eight consecutive terms in the Louisiana House of Representatives from 1968 to 2000. His 32-year tenure in the legislature was one of the longest in state history, and colleagues recognized him with a resolution during his last term designating him as "Dean of the Legislature."
Chairing the House Education Committee for 16 years.
Serving two terms as chairman of the Board of Supervisors, which is the governing board for Northwestern State University and eight other universities.
Introducing legislation to establish the Louisiana Scholars' College at Northwestern and authoring the bill to create the Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts

17 2016-12-12
Houma/Thibodaux

Nicholls State University to graduate 650 HIDE CAPTION Kit Parker


Nicholls State University will award more than 650 degrees during its fall commencement Dec. 17.

It's scheduled for 10 a.m. Saturday in John L. Guidry Stadium.
Harvard professor Kevin Kit Parker will serve as the keynote speaker. A decorated lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army Reserve, Parker is the Tarr Family Professor of Bioengineering and Applied Physics in the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard.
Parker joined the U.S. Army as a paratrooper in 1992 and, following the Sept. 11 attacks, served two tours in Afghanistan. He also conducted additional missions as part of the Gray Team, a special inspection unit charged with treating traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder.
In the event of bad weather, commencement will be moved to Stopher Gym and split into three ceremonies: the College of Education and College of Business Administration at 9 a.m., the College of Arts and Sciences at noon and the College of Nursing and Allied Health at 3 p.m. Tickets will be required only if the ceremonies are relocated to the gym.

17 2016-12-09
Natchitoches

Multicultural Christmas concert draws community together


NATCHITOCHES – The 8th annual Natchitoches-Northwestern State University Multicultural Christmas Concert was held Dec. 6 at Treen Auditorium at the Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts. The event was a benefit concert for the local nonprofit organization Cane River Children’s Services and was sponsored by the Department of Student Life, the Louisiana Folklife Center, the Office of Cultural Diversity and the Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts.



The concert featured an array of both sacred and secular Christmas performances. Performers included Addy Daddy and the Boys, a jazz group made up of NSU students James Armstrong, Fabian Güette, Nestor Mercado-Garcia, Addison Pellegrino and Jack Salyer; the Anointed to Praise Dance Team directed by Shereka Jefferson, Justin Cruse, Hardrick Rivers and Friends, Ed Huey, the members of La Table Française aux Natchitoches, including Natchitoches Central High School French teacher Nathalie Malti, LSMSA faculty Lisa Benner and Pablo Molino, NSU student Beau Voinche and NSU faculty Christine Ferrell and Allison Rittmayer; the LSMSA Chorale directed by Lisa Benner; the LSMSA Dance Ensemble directed by Audra Allen; the Natchitoches Detention Center Choir directed by Faye Smith, Audrey, Gidget and Shane Rasmussen, and a reading of “A Louisiana State Normal Student Christmas” by Mary Linn Wernet of the Cammie G. Henry Research Center.



The evening’s festivities concluded with a group singing of “Silent Night,” led by Addison Pellegrino with Faye Smith on piano. Highlights from the concert can be viewed on the Louisiana Folklife Center Facebook or website at https://louisianafolklife.nsula.edu/.



Many people contributed to making the event a success. The Louisiana Folklife Center staff, comprised of students Cheryl Garrett, Angel Lewis, Kirsten Sanders and Jeffrey Watley, as well as administrative coordinator Shelia Thompson, planned and promoted the event. The Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts hosted the event, which was coordinated by Jonathan Carruth, event technology support coordinator for LSMSA, and Shirley Dobson, administrative assistant to LSMSA executive director Dr. Steve Horton. LSMSA students served as stage managers and crew for the concert.



“We are so grateful to have had so many talented people perform in this year’s concert. That they volunteer to perform, freely donating their time and talents to the benefit of others, is what the season is all about,” said Rasmussen, associate professor of English and director of the Louisiana Folklife Center. “This concert is about the ways in which people from a wide variety of backgrounds come together to form community. This year’s concert was our best yet. The talent and dedication of these performers is simply off the charts, and the spirit of the season was palpable as the concert closed with everyone singing ‘Silent Night.’ The concert is a wonderful way to celebrate the joy and hope of the season. We are honored to be able to support such a worthy cause as Cane River Children’s Services.”



Those who wish to make a donation to Cane River Children’s Services may do so by contacting CEO Jennifer Karle at (318) 352-9349, or by mailing a check to P.O. Box 2453, Natchitoches, LA 71457.



In addition to spreading holiday hope and cheer, the concert also serves as both a retention and a recruitment event for NSU, with performances by community members of all ages as well as by current NSU students.



17 2016-12-09
Natchitoches

ROTC honors cadets for military, academic accomplishments


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Department of Military Science recognized cadets in the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) for outstanding achievements during the Fall 2016 semester.



To open, branch assignments for the spring graduates were announced. Cadet Teamara Judkins will be branched Ordnance and will serve on active duty. Cadet Mark Ordoyne will be branched military intelligence and will served in the National Guard. Cadet Sonia Ortiz will be branched chemical and will serve on active duty. Cadet Joshua Perkins will be branched armor and serve in the National Guard. Cadet Autumn Mitchell is a Cadet Command Distinguished Military Graduate who placed in the Top 20 percent nationwide. SHE will be branched engineers and serve on active duty.



Cadets listed on the President’s List who earned a 4.0 grade point average are Cadet Bryan Lee, Cadet Karl Marzahl and Cadet Emily Sparks.



Cadets listed on the Dean’s List, those with 3.50-3.99 grade point averages were Cadet Teamara Judkins, Cadet Shaffer Kimball, Cadet Autumn Mitchell, Cadet Sonia Ortiz, Cadet Scott Stearns, Cadet Taylor Andrews, Cadet Savannah Carter, Cadet Albert Tuiel, Cadet Adam Barnes, Cadet John Ham and Cadet Ramon Stetson.



MS IV Cadets and their awards are as follows.



Cadet Teamara Judkins currently serves as the S2 Military Intelligence Officer and will maintain that position in the spring. Judkins earned ROTC Honors for a 4.0 grade point in military science and the Recruiting Award.



Cadet Shaffer Kimball currently serves as the Battalion Command Sergeant Major. He has been selected to served as the Battalion S-1 in the spring. He earned ROTC Honors, Intramural Sports Recognition Award, the Commendation Medal Award for extraordinary efforts to the ROTC program and the Recruiting Award.



Cadet Autumn Mitchell is the Battalion’s Executive Office and will served as the Battalion in the spring. She earned the ROTC Honors, the Leadership Excellence Award for leadership in campus and/or civic activities and the Recruiting Award.



Cadet Captain Joshua Perkins serves as the S4 logistics officer and will serve as S-6 communications and audio/visual officer in the spring. He earned the Cadet Honors Award for a grade point average of 3.2-3.49 and the ROTC Honors Award.



Cadet SarahJane Sablay serves as the S6 communications and audio/visual officer. She will serve as the S-4 logistics officer in the spring. She received the Recruiting Award.



Cadet Lieutenant Scott Stearns serves as Battalion Commander. He will serve as the S-3 operations/training officer in the spring. He received ROTC Honors and the Leadership Excellence Award.



Cadet Mark Ordoyne, who served as the assistant S6 this semester, completed his military science studies and is considered a complete cadet. He will complete his degree and graduate next semester.



Cadet Sonia Ortiz is the S3 operations and training officer and will serve as the battalion’s executive officer in the spring. She received ROTC Honors, Commendation Medal Award, the Leadership Excellence Award, the Recruiting Award and the Field Training Exercise Award.



MS III cadets and their awards are as follows.



Cadet Taylor Andrews received the ROTC Honors, Recruiting Award and Field Training Exercise Award.



Cadet Gavin Bazer will graduate Dec. 16 and commission in the Military Police Corps in the U.S. Army Reserve. This spring he will attend the Basic Officer Leader Course at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri and return to his unit as a platoon leader. Bazer received ROTC Honors and the Recruiting Award.



Cadet Steven Bryant received ROTC Honors and the Recruiting Award.



Cadet Savannah Carter received ROTC Honors, Intramural Sports Recognition Award, the Commendation Medal Award, the Recruiting Award and the Field Training Exercise Award.



Cadet Jaelon Davis received the Leadership Excellence Award and the Recruiting Award.



Cadet Tucker Ellis received the Cadet Scholar Award for a grade point average of 2.9-3.19, ROTC Honors, Silver Medal Athlete for a scot of 270-279 on the Army Physical Fitness Test, Intramural Sports Recognition Award, the Cadet Achievement Medal for outstanding efforts to the ROTC program, the Recruiting Award and the Field Training Exercise Award.



Cadet Mary-Kathryn Fuller received the Cadet Scholar, ROTC Honors, Leadership Excellende Award and the Recruiting Award.



Cadet Brandon Homan received the Recruiting Award.



Cadet Ronicia Howze received ROTC Honors.



Cadet Michael Kingsley received the Cadet Honors Award, ROTC Honors, Commendation Medal Award and the Field Training Exercise Award.



Cadet Taimata Luafalemana received the Cadet Honors Award, ROTC Honors, Cadet Achievement Medal, Recruiting Award and the Field Training Exercise Award.



Cadet Thomas Marlbrough received the Cadet Honors Award and ROTC Honors.



Cadet Aliona Salter received the ROTC Honors and Bronze Medal Athlete.



Cadet Taylor Saucier received the Leadership Excellence Award.



Cadet Alexander Stewart received ROTC Honors.



Cadet Albert Tuiel received ROTC Honors and the Field Training Exercise Award.



Cadet Brittanie M. Williams received the Intramural Sports Recognition Award and the Recruiting Award.



Cadet Joey Willis received Cadet Honors Award, ROTC Honors, Cadet Achievement Medal, the Recruiting Award and the Field Training Exercise Award.



MS II cadets who received honors were as follows.



Cadet Adam Barnes received the ROTC Honors, Perfect Attendance Award, the Cadet Achievement Medal and the Leadership Excellence Award.



Cadet Joe Brown received the Intramural Sports Recognition Award.



Cadet Dominitra Charles received ROTC Honors, Platinum Medal Athlete for a perfect score on the Army Physical Fitness Test and the Recruiting Award.



Cadet Cameron Coleman received ROTC Honors, the Leadership Excellence Award and the Recruiting Award.



Cadet Logan DeOre received the Cadet Scholar, ROTC Honros and the Field Training Exercise Award.



Cadet Shaniece Fields received ROTC Honors.



Cadet Dale Granier received Cadet Honors Award, ROTC Honors and the Cadet Achievement Medal.



Cadet John Ham received ROTC Honors, Bronze Medal Athlete, the Intramural Sports Recognition Award, the Cadet Achievement Medal and the Field Training Exercise Award.



Cadet Everett Johnson received ROTC Honors.



Cadet Bryan Lee received ROTC Honors.



Cadet Karl Marzahl received ROTC Honors, the Intramural Sports Recognition Award, team captain; Perfect Attendance Award, Leadership Excellence award and the Field Training Exesrcise Award.



Cadet Alonzo Zachary received the Recruiting Award.



MS I cadets and their honors are as follows.



Cadet Brandon Bullock received the Perfect Attendance Award and the Recruiting Award.



Cadet Briyonna Collins received the Intramural Sports Recognition Award, Perfect Attendance Award, the Leadership Excellence Award and the Recruiting Award.



Cadet Phoenix Gibson received the Recruiting Award.



Cadet Danny Hatcher received the Cadet Achievement Medal and the Recruiting Award.



Cadet Jessica Hooten received the Leadership Excellence Award.



Cadet Larancion Magee received the Cadet Scholar Award, Bronze Medal Athlete and the Cadet Achievement Medal.



Cadet Angel Rodgers received the Leadership Excellence Award and the Recruiting Award.



Cadet Kendrick Shavers received the Bronze Medal Athlete, the Intramural Sports Recognition Award and the Cadet Achievement Medal.



Last summer, four NSU cadets attended Cadet Initial Entry Training with 100 percent success completion rate. They were Mary-Kathryn Fuller, Jaelon Davis, Brandon Homan and Aliona Salter. Salter was chosen Most Outstanding Cadet.



Bazer, Judkins, Mitchell, Ortiz, Perkins and Ordoyne completed the Leader Develop,ent and Assessment Course. Bazer was chose Most Outstanding Cadet.



Cadet Joey Wills served on a CULP (Cultural Understanding Leadership Program) mission to Gabon, Africa.



The Department of Military Science awarded cadet scholarships established by alumni. Brandon Bullock received the Malcolm Daisy Scholarship and the Teresa Cazales Scholarship. Recipients of the James A Noe Memorial Scholarship are Brandon Bullock, Shaffer Kimball and Scott Searns. Kimball also received the Andrea Rene Cespedes “Above the Best” Scholarship.



For more information on Northwestern State University’s Department of Military Science and ROTC program, visit rotc.nsula.edu.
17 2016-12-09
Natchitoches

NSU Middle Lab students inspired to trust their instincts at creativity workshops


A local author and illustrator have collaborated on a new collection of poems, “Peculiar Poems for Pint Size Provocateurs, Vol. Two: The Mysterious Circus.”

Author Oona Zbitkovskis is an English instructor for both Northwestern State University and Bossier Parish Community College. She also said that she enjoys photography and acting. Illustrator Annabel Jones is a children’s librarian at the Natchitoches Parish Library.

The two visited NSU Middle Lab School Nov. 28 to present writing and illustrating workshops to all students. The series of 45- minute workshops for each class focused on encouraging students to use their creativity without their critical voice getting in the way.


17 2016-12-09
Shreveport

Dr. Chris Maggio named acting NSU president


NATCHITOCHES, La. -
Dr. Chris Maggio was appointed as acting president of Northwestern State University Thursday by the Board of Supervisors of the University of Louisiana System.

Maggio was recommended for the position by Dr. Jim Henderson, who will leave his position as president of Northwestern on Dec. 31 to become president of the University of Louisiana System, which governs NSU and eight other universities.

The appointment of Maggio, a lifelong resident of Natchitoches and long-time faculty and staff member at Northwestern, will be for the period of Jan. 1 through June 31 as the board conducts a national search for Henderson’s permanent replacement.

"Dr. Maggio has been a valuable member of the Leadership Team, contributing significantly to our progress over the past two years,” said Henderson. “He is well-suited to ensure our university continues to progress. His relationships with our alumni and other external stakeholders will help maintain the unprecedented level of energy and support from the friends of Northwestern."

Maggio was named vice president for the student experience at Northwestern State in September after serving as interim vice president for just over a year. He will maintain his role as vice president for the student experience while serving as acting president.

“I am deeply honored and humbled by Dr. Henderson’s recommendation for me to serve as acting president of Northwestern State University and by the overwhelming support that many have expressed for that decision,” said Maggio. “It would be my hope as acting president to maintain and strengthen the spirit of teamwork and unity among students, faculty, staff and alumni that has been so prevalent at Northwestern under Dr. Henderson’s leadership. We would also continue to embrace and attempt to expand the many valuable partnerships and relationships that the university has established in recent years with business and industry, government agencies, educational institutions and other entities that share our goal for the advancement and excellence of Northwestern and higher education in Louisiana and across the nation.”

As vice president, Maggio has led the Dean of Students and the Offices of Admissions, Recruiting, Financial Aid, Student Activities and Organizations, First Year Experience and Leadership Development, Judicial Services, Counseling and Career Services, Student Life, the Student Activities Board, Student Government Association and Greek Life.

Northwestern State has recorded enrollment increases for the past two years. Enrollment for the Fall 2016 semester was 9,819 students, a seven percent increase over the previous fall, the highest growth rate of any University of Louisiana System institution.

Maggio served as assistant vice president of external affairs for university advancement from 2013 until 2015. He has been a staff member at Northwestern State since 1988. He was named Dean of Students and assistant provost for student success in 2007. Maggio was selected as director of alumni affairs in 1999, director of alumni and development in 2003 and executive director of the NSU Foundation in 2005.

Under Maggio’s leadership, the NSU Foundation completed its first capital campaign in Northwestern’s history, exceeding a campaign goal of $18.84 million and raising $31 million to support the university. He has also been a faculty member in the Department of Health and Human Performance for more than 20 years as an instructor, assistant professor and associate professor.

During his career at NSU, Maggio also served as director of admissions and recruiting and director of enrollment services. He joined the staff at Northwestern State as women’s track and field coach.

Maggio is a 1985 summa cum laude graduate of Northwestern State. As a senior, he was elected Mr. NSU by his fellow students. Maggio earned his master’s of education at NSU. He received a doctorate in developmental education from Grambling State University.


17 2016-12-08
Baton Rouge

LSMSA students win awards at NSU Journalism Day


Four members of the student newspaper staff at the Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts placed in competitions at the 43rd Journalism Day hosted by Northwestern State University on Nov. 4.

The school newspaper, the Renaissance, and yearbook, the Rubicon, also received honors.

Will Heitman, a sophomore from Baton Rouge, won first place in the radio competition. In the TV news category, Olivia Gotte, a junior from Iota, placed first.

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Winning in the media writing competition was Rosemarie Skillman, a sophomore from Denham Springs. Kaitlyn Randall, a junior from Vidalia, placed second in the media writing competition. In the newspaper competition, LSMSA won first place. The school’s yearbook placed second.

First-place winners of each individual competition were awarded $500 scholarships to attend Northwestern State University and major in communication.

Also competing were Caroline Jin, a junior from Shreveport, and Alena Noakes, a junior from Dry Prong.


17 2016-12-08
Monroe

LSMSA to name residence hall after late Rep. Long


Members of the Board of Directors at the Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts unanimously approved a motion to name the new residence hall after Jimmy Long Sr. during a meeting held Monday, Dec. 5.

“Jimmy Long had a vision for excellence in education and believed in the future of our state,” said Sharon Gahagan, chair of the Board of Directors. “Since the signing of the legislation to establish the Louisiana School, Rep. Long’s commitment and dedication have enabled the school to attain national prominence.

“It is certainly appropriate that we honor Mr. Long posthumously by naming the proposed residence hall the Jimmy D. Long Center for Living and Learning. Mr. Long was a wonderful personal friend and supporter of the Louisiana School. He will certainly be missed.”

Dr. Steve Horton, executive director, believes that LSMSA is fortunate to have a cadre of founding fathers, Dr. Robert Alost, Sen. Donald Kelly, Gov. David Treen and especially the late Rep. Jimmy Long, who saw the opportunity to create a residential learning environment for the academically talented that would eventually be the model for nearly a dozen other residential schools across the nation.

“Had it not been for Rep. Long’s dedication to the school’s vision as a model for experiential learning, LSMSA would have faded years ago,” said Horton. “Today, nearly 5,000 students, now spanning two generations, proudly display their LSMSA credentials and hold leading positions across the world.

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“How better an opportunity to recognize Rep. Long for what he did than to dedicate to his memory one of the most significant structures of the school than its living learning community building?”

Horton reported to the board that a full project team will be put together to focus on the project starting Jan. 2. It is estimated that it will take three months to complete the CDs and submit a 100 percent complete CD submittal to both the Office of Facility Planning and Control and LSMSA.

It is estimated that construction documents will be submitted April 1; FP&C and LSMSA review will begin May 1; design team revises CDs per review and issues CDs for bidding June 1; bid date July 1; and start of construction set to begin Aug. 1.

A 24-month construction period is projected for the new residence hall.This schedule will allow LSMSA to occupy and move in furniture/equipment and students in time for the fall 2019 academic year.

Jamie G. Smith, president of the LSMSA Alumni Association, agrees that the residence hall should honor Long.

“Jimmy Long Sr. was a founding father of our school,” said Smith. “It is very fitting that the dorm that will house our students and future alumni should bear his name.”


17 2016-12-08
Natchitoches

NSU Middle Lab students inspired to trust their instincts at creativity workshops


A local author and illustrator have collaborated on a new collection of poems, “Peculiar Poems for Pint Size Provocateurs, Vol. Two: The Mysterious Circus.”

Author Oona Zbitkovskis is an English instructor for both Northwestern State University and Bossier Parish Community College. She also said that she enjoys photography and acting. Illustrator Annabel Jones is a children’s librarian at the Natchitoches Parish Library.

The two visited NSU Middle Lab School Nov. 28 to present writing and illustrating workshops to all students. The series of 45- minute workshops for each class focused on encouraging students to use their creativity without their critical voice getting in the way.



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17 2016-12-08
Natchitoches

Regents approve doctorate in education at Northwestern


The Board of Regents has approved a Doctor of Education in Adult Learning and Development at Northwestern State University. The program will begin enrolling students next year.

The Doctor of Education in Adult Learning and Development is Northwestern State’s second doctoral program. A Doctor of Nursing Practice was approved in 2013 and its initial class of graduates will receive degrees next week.

The new Doctor of Education degree (Ed.D.) is a practitioner degree program that will prepare individuals for leadership positions that focus on the adult learning and development, particularly in the community college setting. Specifically, the program will prepare reflective practitioners with a comprehensive understanding of adult learning and development across the following domains: teaching and learning, curriculum and instructional design, workforce development, program management and planning, organizational change and community college leadership.

“While the employment outlook for Louisiana is very positive, there is a large gap between the demand of the job market and the number of annual completers from workforce development programs, community and technical colleges, and adult education services,” said Bill Morrison, Associate Professor of Adult Learning and Human Development. “Additionally, The Board of Regents (2011) recognizes that, “with less than 30% of Louisiana’s adults holding a postsecondary credential, the existing workforce in Louisiana is ill prepared to work in a knowledge economy.”

Morrison believes the program will be highly successful and will play an important role in Louisiana’s economic development efforts.

“The additional emphasis on expanding postsecondary completion and workforce development opportunities to meet the demands of the job market in Louisiana has created a need for additional faculty and administrative resources to educate these additional students,” said Morrison. “The Northwestern State University Doctor of Education program specifically targets providing additional terminal degreed faculty and administrators functioning at the highest levels of their practice who can help Louisiana meet these goals.”

The Doctor of Education in Adult Learning and Development at Northwestern State is the only advanced degree program in Louisiana focusing on the need of developing community college leaders and preparing practitioners to work with adult learners and in workforce development. Graduates will be qualified to assume advanced leadership roles in areas of workforce development, organizational leadership, community college administration and management and scholarship.

According to the Louisiana Workforce Commission, an additional 12,000 postsecondary completers are needed over the next ten years to meet the demand of new Tier One jobs, which are critical economic driver industries and which require community or technical college education. The emphasis on expanding postsecondary completion and workforce development opportunities will create the associated need for additional faculty and administrative resources, particularly at the community college level. Institutions are challenged to expand nontraditional learning opportunities and offer increased flexibility to accommodate the life and education needs of adult learners.

The Louisiana Community and Technical College System has developed a plan, “Our Louisiana 2020; Building the Workforce of Tomorrow.” The plan calls for doubling the number of graduates from the LCTCS, doubling the earning of graduates to $1.5 billion, quadrupling student transfers to four-year universities to 10,000 annually and doubling the number of students served to 325,000.

Morrison said the Doctor Of Education In Adult Learning and Development is the only advanced degree program in Louisiana “that focuses on developing community college administrators and preparing leaders and faculty to work with adult learners and workforce development.”

The program is a comprehensive 63 semester hour program providing foundation courses in adult education and organizational leadership, along with coursework targeting two concentration areas: community college leadership and adult learning and workforce development. The foundation coursework is designed to provide the student with an integrated knowledge base of theory and current best practice within the fields of adult learning, organizational leadership and instructional design.

Cross-disciplinary coursework common to each area has been incorporated whenever possible to maximize the use of resources. Within each concentration area, students may pursue specialized areas of interest and study through elective courses and gain practical experience within their own organization or area of interest through an individualized practicum experience.

For more information on the Doctor Of Education In Adult Learning and Development, contact Morrison at morrisonb@nsula.edu.
17 2016-12-07
Natchitoches

NOLA matriarch will get honorary degree during NSU commencement


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University will award an honorary bachelor of science degree in elementary education to Noella Lyons Black of New Orleans, a former student

who attended Louisiana State Normal College, as NSU was then known, in the 1940s and will celebrate her 94th birthday on Christmas Day. More than 25 members of the Black family will join her for the university’s Dec. 16 fall commencement ceremonies, fulfilling a lifelong goal for the matriarch who left college just a few credits shy of graduation.



“I always intended someday to go back to Natchitoches and walk across the stage,” she said.



When given the news, “it literally brought tears to her eyes,” said her grandson Bill Brigman. “She’s not often speechless, but this time she was. Her first comment was ‘How did you know I always wanted this?’ She is excited to drive back up to Natchitoches and see the campus again and receive this capstone recognition in her life.”



Black grew up in Home Place in Plaquemines Parish in a hard-working family of six children and made the journey to Natchitoches by train following in the footsteps of her older sisters who attended Normal in pursuit of being an educator. She attended Normal for three years and was joined by another sister the last year.



“We had to walk downtown and I was in the movie downtown when they shut the movie down and announced Pearl Harbor had been bombed by the Japanese,” she remembered. “I knew then our lives would be changed and they were. That stayed in my mind a long time. We were in awe. It changed our world.”



Most of the men from her hometown, including many teachers, quickly enlisted in the military. She was called home by the Plaquemine Parish School Board who asked her to teach fifth grade in Port Sulphur.



“I decided I needed to do my duty because all the boys were doing their duty and going off to war,” she said. She had previously taught lower grades at that same small school during her last year of high school when there was a shortage of teachers. The following year, after attending summer school at Normal, she taught second grade in Port Sulphur until a permanent teacher could be found.



It was during the summer session in Natchitoches that she met the man who would become her husband of 54 years, H. Geyman Black, a Naval officer attending the Navy Flight Preparatory School at NSU. Upon their marriage, she left college with little more than a semester left to graduate to support her husband as he served during World War II. Later, they travelled the country with his job as an engineer for Dupont before settling in New Orleans to raise their family.



“Grandma was always a teacher,” Brigman said. “Formally as a frequent substitute in the local schools in the Algiers area of New Orleans, and always to her children, grandchildren, nieces and nephews. She raised us all with a determination to achieve academically with as much formal education as possible in order to serve in some way.”



Black’s oldest daughter graduated from Tulane Law School and became Chief Counsel for the United States Customs Service. Her son is a physician who opened an obstetrics and gynecological practice in the Hammond area where he has served the population for over 40 years. As the eldest of the grandchildren, Brigman remembered sitting with her diagramming sentences and doing multiplication tables while Black prepared a meal for the family. He recently retired as a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Air Force.



“With her help, guidance and assistance, her other grandchildren have also gone on to complete their college studies and to serve in professional endeavors, including senior U.S. customs agents, law partners, medical professionals and artists,” Brigman said. “None of this could have happened if not for the determination, love and support of our matriarch.”



As a student at Normal, Black was a member of Pi Kappa Sigma Sorority and a maid on the State Fair Court with Ralph Prather as her escort. She lived in Varnado Hall and remembered Mrs. Dean Varnado, Dr. Joe Farrah, who was president from 1941-47, and Dr. John Kyser, who president from 1954-1966.



After settling in New Orleans, Black took some courses at Holy Cross College in new math, children’s literature and other subjects but never completed a degree. Her teaching days were a rewarding experience.



“A former student who now lives in Mississippi called me recently. He wanted to tell me how interesting I had made fifth grade,” she said. “I wondered if I’d made a difference and when that man called me, I thought I had.”



Black has returned to Natchitoches a few times over the years, to see the Christmas lights and watch a granddaughter graduate from the Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts. These days, she visits her daughter in California, plays bridge and checks Facebook so she can keep up with her children and grandchildren. Her husband died 16 years ago.



Black has waited a long time for formal recognition from the school she loves and her family will be in Prather Coliseum to see her on the stage in cap and gown on Dec. 16.



“I’ve had a great life,” she said. “I’m thrilled to be getting a diploma. Now my dream will be a reality.”


17 2016-12-07
Natchitoches

S.W.A.T. supports University Police


Northwestern State University’s chapter of Students With A Target (S.W.A.T.) hosted “Christmas for Campus Cops” to show appreciation for University Police. The group collected donations throughout the month of November and delivered wrapped goodies to University Police Monday. From left are Capt. Wesley Harrell, S.W.A.T. President Damian Glover, Chief Craig Vercher, Ryan DeGruy, Chief Jon Caliste, S.W.A.T. Vice President Taylor Aucoin and S.W.A.T. facilitator Maggie Welch.


17 2016-12-07
Shreveport

Outgoing Northwestern State president Jim Henderson named honorary coach for Dec. 17 game in Shreveport-Bossier Holiday Classic


NATCHITOCHES — Northwestern State University president Jim Henderson, a staunch supporter of athletics, can usually be heard from anywhere in NSU’s venues voicing his delight for the Demons or his opinions on officiating.

For NSU men’s basketball’s Dec. 17 tilt with ULM in the Shreveport-Bossier Holiday Classic in Bossier City’s CenturyLink Center, the outgoing NSU president will be much closer to the action.

Henderson will be an honorary coach, invited to sit on the bench with NSU coach Mike McConathy and the Demons for the 4:30 game.

Tickets can be purchased through NSU until Monday. Fans can sit courtside for $50, in the reserved section for $25 or in general admission for $15. One ticket admits a fan for all three games of the basketball classic, which begins with Centenary-Millsaps at 2 p.m. and ends with Grambling-Louisiana Tech at 7 p.m.

Tickets can be purchased at nsutickets.com or by calling the NSU ticket office at 318-357-4268. All tickets bought through NSU will directly benefit Demon athletics.

“Dr. Henderson has been such a great supporter of the men’s basketball program and all of NSU athletics,” McConathy said. “The passion he displays at our games comes from his heart, and it sets a great tone for everybody in our fan base.

“What he’s done for our university is just remarkable so making him honorary coach seems a perfect way for our program, on behalf of everybody in the NSU family, to show our admiration and appreciation. I might even pick up some tips about how to work the officials.”

Henderson was selected to be the University of Louisiana System President in early October, and he will officially begin that post Jan. 1.

In his two years as president of his alma mater, Henderson has injected energy into the Natchitoches campus.

NSU’s fall enrollment of 9,819 is its highest since 2005. Enrollment increase has been a key part of Henderson’s strategy as NSU strives to become “the nation’s premiere regional institution of higher education.”

Among the many milestones reached in Henderson’s tenure include a cooperative endeavor agreement with the Louisiana Department of Economic Development to develop a trained workforce for CSC, a global leader of next-generation technology services located in Bossier City.

Henderson has deep ties to the Shreveport-Bossier area. His late father Clem was a revered high school coach and principal at Fair Park, winning a state basketball championship in 1964.

As Bossier Parish Community College’s chancellor from 2009-14, Dr. Henderson oversaw an enrollment increase of more than 84 percent while annual certificate and degree completions increase by 90 percent.

Henderson’s middle child Nicholas helped Shreveport’s Loyola Prep to one of its best football seasons in recent history this fall as the Flyers went 9-2 and were the No. 2 seed in Division II.

— Matt Vines, Northwestern State Sports Information


17 2016-12-06
Natchitoches

Hendersons honored during Gala Week


Submitted by Northwestern1 on Mon, 12/05/2016 - 4:55pm

The Natchitoches community and Northwestern State University family bestowed several surprise honors upon the out-going first couple Dr. Jim and Tonia Henderson last week. In addition to dedicating Friday’s performance of the NSU Christmas Gala to the Hendersons, Mayor Lee Posey presented the couple with a key to the city. The university will name the third floor conference room of Caspari Hall the Dr. Jim Henderson Conference Room and will place an iron bench bearing the names of Dr. and Mrs. Henderson in the Alumni Plaza. Earlier in the week, the Student Government Association unveiled plans to place a bust of the Italian poet Dante in front of the Student Union dedicated to Dr. Henderson. Henderson, who served as NSU’s president for the last two years, will assume duties as president of the University of Louisiana System on Jan. 1, 2017.


17 2016-12-06
Natchitoches

Student Support Services holds recognition program


NATCHITOCHES – Student Support Services at Northwestern State University hosted a Nov. 29 recognition ceremony to honor SSS students with high and improved grade point averages. Keynote speaker was Samantha Ford, a 2000 graduate of NSU who said she benefitted academically and personally from her involvement in SSS.



“You are special and you have a purpose,” she said. “To know who you are and why you’re called is the first step of purpose. And its never too late. Know your purpose and continue to achieve. The sky is the limit.”



SSS is funded by a Federal TRIO grant and exists to eliminate barriers to graduation for 360 low income, first generation and disabled students by providing intensive and effective academic and student services. SSS offers peer tutoring, academic advising, study skills training, career counseling, financial aid counseling and other strategies to help students achieve their goals.



SSS advisors/instructors Danielle Conde, Jamie Flanagan and Terri Marshall presented awards for students achieving the Honor List, Dean’s List and President’s List, as well as students whose grade point averages were most improved over the semester, with congratulations from SSS Director Frances Welch.



Alexandria -- Roderick Henry, Brittany Jackson, Nolan Lowe, Sadae Polk, Precious Pridgeon



Baldwin -- Kenisha Lewis



Baton Rouge -- Tremia Lockett



Boyce -- Ashley Smith



Center, Texas -- Jozlyn Moore



Coushatta -- Treasure Wilson



Cypress, Texas -- Mercedes Wiles



DeRidder -- Savanna White



DeSoto, Texas - Joseph Blazio



Forest Hill -- Halle Lawson, Celina Thrasher



Franklin -- Ajaysia Moton



Frierson -- Marvaeya Edwards



Greenwell Springs -- Jamie Brooks



Gretna -- Siera Sutton



Houston – Jaisley Barnes



Jonesboro -- Chelsea Love



Keithville -- Shevonté Lewis



Kenner -- Kiristen Byrd



Lafayette – Christian Andrus, Taylor Aucoin



Lake Arthur – Nicole Andrews



Leesville -- Ashley French, Brittany French, Luki Gil, Samantha Richard



Luling – Macie Barrios



Marshall, Texas -- Matayzsha Dorsey



Metairie -- Ariel Landry



Mesquite, Texas -- Jaylen Mumphrey



Monroe -- Brooke Howard, Sidney Jackson



Natchitoches - Cameron Brooks, William Cromartie, Angel Greer, Shayla Johnson, Joshua Randolph, Kayla Roquemore, Maria Rushing, Alexis Turner



Natchez -- Alexis Moses



Opelousas -- Kierra Doucet



Pineville -- Kristan Valdez



Pioneer -- Kayla Rockett, Moesha Smith



Plain Dealing -- Jacquelyn Jones



Pleasant Hill -- Stephane Pulzone



Port Allen -- Shawn Christophe



Ringgold -- Miracle Mays



New Orleans -- Larionne Clark, Teia Jones



Scott -- Joy Trahan



Shreveport – Ashlee Arkansas, Sha’Destiny Blackshire, Rakeisha Brown, Mighty Warrior Buckles, Tiffany Calhoun, Jamie French, Jade Gaines, Taylor Henderson, Korynthia Johnson, Kiera Jones, Jaylon Lewis, Jalesia Peair, Aaliyah Watkins



St. Francisville -- Kathleen Morse



Thibodaux -- Nia Walker



Ville Platte -- Hannah Gallow, Regis Tezeno



Waskom, Texas -- Kourtni Griffith



Winnfield -- Alexis Jackson, Daeshawn Lyles, Ieishlia Lynch, Tashari Stringer



Zwolle -- Alliyah Perry


17 2016-12-05
Natchitoches

Wilson completes program to learn techniques for treating Parkinson's patients


Northwestern State University Assistant Professor of Nursing Sheri Wilson recently participated in the Edmond J. Safra Visiting Nurse Faculty Program at the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation.

This 40-hour accredited “train the trainer” program is designed to improve nursing care in Parkinson’s disease by training nurse faculty leaders who in turn, prepare their students to fight the disease on the front lines. Wilson underwent the program at The Marlene and Paolo Fresco Institute for Parkinson’s and Movement Disorders at NYU Langone, one of eight training locations offered this year.

Wilson was joined by fellow faculty from undergraduate nursing programs across the U.S. who were immersed in academic instruction, hands-on experience with people with Parkinson’s, and mentorship from nurse specialists at nationally recognized movement disorder centers.

By bringing this knowledge back to their students, she and her fellow Scholars will help the Parkinson’s disease Foundation prepare the next generation of nurses to care for the growing population of people living with Parkinson’s disease.

Wilson is in her third year as a member of the faculty on NSU’s Shreveport campus. She has been a registered nurse for 10 years at health care facilities in Shreveport/Bossier City. Wilson is a graduate of Wiley College, Grambling State University and the University of Phoenix. She is a doctoral program at Grambling.

17 2016-12-02
Natchitoches

NSU and community college enter agreement


NATCHITOCHES - Northwestern State University and River Parishes Community College have agreed to enter into a memorandum of understanding for a 2+2 program between the two institutions covering criminal justice programs. The 2+2 program will allow students to complete the Associate of Arts in Criminal Justice at River Parishes Community College and transfer all credit hours applied to the associate degree in partial fulfillment of degree requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice at NSU. Northwestern State’s Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice is available over the internet. The university has a tuition exemption for students employed fulltime as public safety officers.


17 2016-12-02
Natchitoches

NSU's Mathews honored as band director who makes a difference


Jeffrey C. Mathews, director of bands at Northwestern State University, has been selected for inclusion in the 19th Annual 50 Band Directors Who Make a Difference Issue of School Band and Orchestra Magazine.

The magazine honors one band director in each state. Mathews was nominated by a current or former student, colleague, administrator or other person familiar with his work.

“I am completely humbled by being selected as one of the 50 Band Directors Who Make a Difference,” said Mathews. “I am particularly proud that this honor was bestowed upon me for the things I am able to do for students and the community away from the classroom. All faculty members are experts in their field who publish and receive recognition for teaching and research, but to be honored for serving our students is the most special part of this for me.”

Mathews has been director of bands at NSU since 2013. A member of Northwestern State’s faculty since 1998, he has served as associate director of bands/associate professor of music, director of student activities and organizations and director of athletic bands/assistant professor of music.

Mathews holds the Alford Memorial Endowed Professorship in Music. He has recently served as a guest conductor for high school honor bands in Louisiana, Texas, and Tennessee and is a regular guest conductor for the Royal Northern College of Music Wind Orchestra in Manchester, England.

He is part of a recruiting team that brings in 85 to 100 new band students annually.

Mathews serves part-time as Chief of Air National Guard Bands. He is the functional manager of the Air National Guard band program nationwide and principal advisor to the Secretary of the Air Force Public Affairs Division and National Guard Bureau Public Affairs on matters pertaining to Air National Guard Bands.

Mathews earned a Bachelor of Music Education at Northwestern State, a Master of Music Education at the University of North Texas and a Doctor of Musical Arts in conducting pedagogy at the University of Southern Mississippi.


17 2016-12-02
Natchitoches

Lessons and Carols program to be performed Tuesday


The Northwestern State University Chamber Choir will present a candlelight service of “Lessons and Carols” Tuesday, Dec. 6 at 7:30 p.m. at the Minor Basilica of the Immaculate Conception at 145 Church St. in Natchitoches. Admission is free and open to the public. Dr. Nicholaus B. Cummins will conduct the chamber choir and several faculty from the School of Creative and Performing Arts will be lectors during the service. Professor Michael Rorex, Associate Professor of Voice, will be the organist, and featured soloists will be Sean Grady of Leesville, Hannah Noëlle Johnson of Haughton, and Destinee Roberson of Natchitoches. This is the 26th consecutive year the NSU Chamber Choir has presented this service.

The “Lessons and Carols” is a service based upon a century-old tradition established at Kings College, Cambridge, in England, where it is performed every Christmas Eve to standing room only crowds and broadcast worldwide on the BBC. “Lessons and Carols” consists of nine lessons, readings for both the Old and New Testament of the Bible, all related to the Advent and birth of Christ. Following each lesson, the choir singing a text that relates to each of the readings. During the carols, altar servers light a variety of candles, which remain lit throughout the service. Gradually, the church is transformed from darkness into light as the Service concludes in a festive recessional.

The Northwestern State University Chamber Choir is the premiere choral ensemble at Northwestern State University. Many of the singers are music majors, but some are majors in other fields at the university. The Chamber Choir has established an outstanding reputation for choral performance in the region. They have been invited to sing for several professional conferences sponsored by the Louisiana Music Educators and the Louisiana Choral Directors Association. For more information on the Northwestern State choral program, go to nsuchoirs.org or facebook.com/nsuchoirs.

17 2016-12-02
Natchitoches

Community responds to #GivingTuesday


NATCHITOCHES – The Northwestern State University family responded to #GivingTuesday by donating over $23,000 to the NSU Foundation and the Demons Unlimited Athletic Foundation, the university’s nonprofit fund raising arm and the organization that supports the university’s athletic programs. The funds will support scholarships for student-athletes and students who depend on TOPS funding for tuition.



#GivingTuesday, which took place Nov. 29, is a global day of giving that harnesses the collective power of individuals, communities and organizations to encourage philanthropy and to celebrate generosity worldwide.



“Northwestern State promised students they would be able to cover the gaps for students who have TOPS scholarships,” said Jill Bankston, CFRE, associate director of development for the NSU Foundation. “We see students every day who struggle financially but are committed to bettering their lives and families through education. We reached out to alumni, supporters, businesses and our university community and they responded with generosity and compassion. Together, our supporters make a big impact.”



“Giving Tuesday provided us with a great opportunity to engage our alumni and fans and generate more support for Northwestern State Athletics through the Demons Unlimited Foundation,” said Dr. Haley Blount Taitano, associate athletic director for external affairs. “The financial support we receive from private donors is paramount to our growth and success, and allows us to better recruit, compete and expand our brand. The growing partnership between the Demons Unlimited Foundation and the NSU Foundation has proven to be beneficial for the university, and I look forward to expanding our reach together.”



Carly Clark, who will graduate in December with a Master of Arts in Student Affairs in Higher Education, also made a contribution. She currently works at Nicholls State as the student activities coordinator and SPA advisor.



"I am giving to NSU because it has given me so much! I wouldn't be where I am today without the education I earned at Northwestern State."



As part of #GivingTuesday at NSU, donors who contributed $100 or more were entered into a drawing for trip donated by alumni Dr. and Mrs. John Bolin of Lafayette. The winner was Henry Jochum, who graduated in May and was a first-time donor. Jochum earned a graduate degree in English with a concentration in Teaching English as a Second Language and is employed internationally as an education consultant.



“I have been reading in the news about what’s been going on in Louisiana with the budget and cutbacks in higher education and I wanted to repay NSU for the great education I received there,” Jochum said.



“We want our donors to know how appreciate our students are for the scholarships they receive that help with buying books, lab fees and other expenses,” Bankston said. “NSU will deliver on its promise to help students reach their goals in academics and in life.”


17 2016-12-01
Natchitoches

NSU and community college enter agreement


NATCHITOCHES - Northwestern State University and River Parishes Community College have agreed to enter into a memorandum of understanding for a 2+2 program between the two institutions covering criminal justice programs. The 2+2 program will allow students to complete the Associate of Arts in Criminal Justice at River Parishes Community College and transfer all credit hours applied to the associate degree in partial fulfillment of degree requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice at NSU. Northwestern State’s Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice is available over the internet. The university has a tuition exemption for students employed fulltime as public safety officers.


17 2016-12-01
Natchitoches

Jazz for Pups concert to be held Monday at NSU


The Northwestern State University Jazz Combos will perform a “Jazz for Pups” concert Monday, Dec. 5 at 7:30 p.m. in Magale Recital Hall.

The concert is a benefit to support local rescue dogs and Natchitoches Hope for Paws. Admission is free, but audience members are asked to donate to Natchitoches Hope for Paws. Members of the organization will be present to accept donations. A wish list of donation items is available at natchitocheshopeforpaws.org.

For more information, contact Associate Professor of Saxophone Paul Forsyth at forsythp@nsula.edu.

17 2016-12-01
Natchitoches

Phi Delta Kappa inducts new members


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University hosted an induction ceremony on Nov. 29 for new members of Phi Delta Kappa, the professional organization for educators. The mission of Phi Delta Kappa International is to promote high-quality education, in particular publicly supported education, as essential to the development and maintenance of a democratic way of life. The mission of the organization is accomplished through leadership, research and service in education.



New inductees are SueZanna M. Albritton of Pioneer, Frances L. Attenhofer of Lafayette, Jaisley M. Barnes of Houston, Bridgette W. Bell of Noble, Gabrielle E. D’Antoni of Thibodaux, Alli R. Douet of St. Martinville, Alicia J. Foy of Grayson, Edie R. Gowen of Many, Michelle H. Hardin of Shreveport, Megan Jenkins of Belle Chasse, Mercedes L. Morgan of Anacoco, Christina M. NesSmith of Colfax, Nicole D. Patterson of Denham Springs, Jessica L. Rousset of Harvey, Savanna N. Whitten of Monroe and Mercedes Wiles of Cypress



NSU’s chapter of Phi Delta Kappa was chartered in 1965. New inductees received membership certificates and seniors received honor cords to wear at commencement.


17 2016-12-01
Natchitoches

Phlebotmists complete certification


Northwestern State University and Stick It Phlebotomy held a Nov. 16 commencement ceremony for graduates of a phlebotomy technician course offered through NSU’s Office of Electronic and Continuing Education. The class, which had a 100 percent pass rate, required students to complete 100 clinical hours and 100 venipunctures and complete the National Board Certification Exam on site. The course also included Basic Life Support Certification through the American Heart Association. From left are Alexis VanZant, LaJuan Taylor, Heather Moore, Jakieva Lilly, Olivia Grappe, Sherry Hinton, instructor with Stick It Phlebotomy, LLC; Brenda Gentry, McKell Epperson, Jessalin Edwards and Sarah Below. Not shown is Jennifer Freeman.




17 2016-11-30
Natchitoches

Phi Beta Lambda conference winners recognized


Three members of Northwestern State University’s chapter of Phi Beta Lambda received letters of commendation from Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards for their accomplishments at the organization’s national conference in Atlanta. Chapter Advisor Dr. Julie McDonald, left, presented the letters to Maggie Harris of Monroe, Katelyn Marchand of Gonzales and Michelle McIntyre of Bossier City, who were recognized for placing in the Top 10 in leadership competition. Phi Beta Lambda, the college-level arm of Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) is the largest student organization in the world for individuals preparing for careers in business. At the convention, students and advisers participate in motivational general sessions, professional development and career planning workshops.


17 2016-11-29
Natchitoches

NSU hosting La. Crafts Guild exhibition


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Department of Fine + Graphic Art is partnering with the Louisiana Crafts Guild for an exhibition of fine crafts that will be on exhibit at the Orville Hanchey Gallery through Dec. 9. A reception will take place at 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 1. The public is invited.



The Louisiana Crafts Guild is a juried organization of fine crafts artisans from throughout the state of Louisiana and the southern region of the United States. Because of the organization’s stringent jury requirements and dedication to excellence in fine craft, only three out of every 10 applicants is approved for membership. Members of the Guild are active in their community and give back by providing demonstrations to schools, churches, libraries and other organizations. Members’ generosity support community events, non-profit organizations and fundraisers.



The exhibition features scarves, carved chairs, jewelry, ceramics, woodwork and more featuring the best in Louisiana artisanship. All items are available for purchase.



Orville Hanchey Gallery is located at 140 Central Avenue on the NSU campus. Hours are 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 8 a.m.-noon on Friday. For more information, contact Leslie Gruesbeck at gruesbeckl@nsula.edu.


17 2016-11-29
Natchitoches

ROTC will hold Dec. 1 awards program, Dec. 16 commissioning ceremony


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Department of Military Science will wrap up the Fall 2016 semester with a Dec. 1 awards program to recognize cadet accomplishments and a Dec. 16 commissioning ceremony for Cadet Gavin Bazer.



“NSU’s Army ROTC cadets are wrapping a very busy fall semester,” said Sid Hall, Military Affairs coordinator and ROTC program manager. “From field training exercises, to a commemoration ceremony honoring Vietnam veterans, to supporting student organizations and athletic events, they have certainly made a mark on campus.”



The awards program will begin at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 1 in the ballroom of the Sylvan Friedman Student Union. A reception will follow the ceremony.



Cadet Bazer will take the Oath of Commissioned Officers at 1:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 16, also in the Student Union Ballroom. Guest speaker will be Colonel Nelson G. Kraft, commander, 6th Brigade, U.S. Army Cadet Command. The commissioning will take place in conjunction with Fall Commencement. A reception will follow the ceremony.



For more information or to RSVP for the ceremonies, contact Ed Kelly at (318) 357-5157 or kellye@nsula.edu.


17 2016-11-28
Natchitoches

School of Business at NSU offering CLE class


Northwestern State University’s School of Business will host a Continuing Legal Education (CLE) event on Thursday, Dec. 1 on the main campus. “The School of Business will host another CLE event on Natchitoches campus,” said Dr. Carmella Parker, event organizer. “This outreach effort is to help attorneys in the local and regional areas to obtain their CLE hours without having to travel so far to get them. Additionally, this event also serves as a fundraiser for Northwestern State University’s School of Business Director’s Fund.”


17 2016-11-28
Natchitoches

#GivingDay to celebrate giving back to the community


The Northwestern State University Foundation, the university’s nonprofit fund raising arm, and Demons Unlimited Athletic Foundation, the organization that supports the university’s athletic programs, have joined #GivingTuesday, a global day of giving that harnesses the collective power of individuals, communities and organizations to encourage philanthropy and to celebrate generosity worldwide.

“#GivingTuesday is held annually on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving in the U.S., this year Nov. 29, and the widely recognized shopping events Black Friday and Cyber Monday to kick-off the holiday giving season and inspire people to collaborate in improving their local communities and to give back in impactful ways to the charities and causes they support,” said Kimberly Gallow, NSU Development officer. “Join us as we participate in #GivingTuesday and support Northwestern State University by pledging your donation to raise money for our students and our university. Funds from both foundations will help support student scholarships, alumni engagement and outreach, all 14 Division 1 sports at NSU and the overall student experience.”




17 2016-11-28
Natchitoches

Campbell announces Valley/SWEPCO assistance to NSU


NATCHITOCHES –Valley Electric Membership Corporation and its 70 years of service to 30,000 Northwest Louisiana families will be recognized with the establishment of nearly $300,000 in endowments and grants to Northwestern State University.

Public Service Commissioner Foster Campbell, an NSU alumnus, has worked with the university and Valley’s successor, SWEPCO, to commit $200,000 in remaining Valley capital credits to NSU for student scholarships, faculty support and campus improvements.

The Valley/SWEPCO commitment will be matched with $80,000 in State Board of Regents funding, bringing the total donation to $280,000.

“SWEPCO has worked diligently since purchasing Valley Electric in 2010 to refund $25 million in capital credits owed to the families and businesses that were members of the co-op during its 70 years of operation,” Campbell said.

“More than 99 percent of that money has been returned to its rightful owners, and at my request the PSC has now approved the transfer of the remaining $200,000 to NSU.”

Shreveport-based SWEPCO completed the purchase of Natchitoches-based Valley Electric in October 2010. As part of the $100-million transaction, Valley’s board of directors pledged to honor Valley’s $25 million in “patronage capital credits” owed to its members.

Patronage capital credits are accumulated by electric co-op members as their share of co-op earnings.

SWEPCO President Venita McCellon-Allen said the Shreveport-based utility conducted two rounds of payments to return the credits to Valley members and their heirs.

“We exhausted all efforts to return this money to its owners,” McCellon-Allen said. “We are happy to close the books on these credits now by working with Commissioner Campbell and NSU to provide this important support for the university.”

“It will keep alive for many years the legacy of Valley’s service to this region,” McCellon-Allen said.

According to Northwestern State administrators, the Valley/SWEPCO contribution will be dispersed in three ways to maximize its impact:

$120,000 will be used to establish two endowment funds, the “Valley Electric/SWEPCO First Generation Endowed Scholarship” and the “Valley Electric/SWEPCO Endowed Professorship” in the NSU College of Business and Technology; and
$80,000 will be allocated to the NSU Columns Fund for student scholarships, support for faculty and staff, and capital improvements.
The first-generation scholarship will support students who are the first in their family to attend college. The endowed professorship will enable the university to recruit and retain faculty whose research, teaching and/or public service contribute to their department and the institution.

State matching contributions from the Board of Regents Support Fund will provide an additional $40,000 for each of the two endowment funds, bringing the total impact of the Valley/SWEPCO contribution to $280,000.

"These funds will enable Northwestern State to continue our mission of putting students first and will impact students in the Valley/SWEPCO service area,” said NSU President Dr. Jim Henderson. “Scholarships and professorships help us give our graduates competitive advantages over their peers in their pursuit of education and career success.

“We are grateful to SWEPCO President McCellon-Allen and Commissioner Campbell for making this investment in our students.”

Campbell initiated talks between Valley Electric and SWEPCO early in 2009 after Valley changed wholesale electricity suppliers and its rates increased dramatically. With Campbell’s backing and that of both companies, Valley members voted overwhelmingly in January 2010 to merge operations with SWEPCO.

“They made the right decision to sell,” Campbell said. “The first month after the sale took effect rates were down almost 30 percent.”

Last year, on the fifth anniversary of the transaction, Campbell said the former Valley members had saved a total of $64 million on their electric bills since SWEPCO purchased the co-op in 2010.

"SWEPCO kept its promise to lower rates by at least 20 percent for Valley's 30,000 families and business customers," Campbell said.

Besides lowering rates, SWEPCO pledged to improve service in the eight-parish Valley territory. McCellon-Allen said SWEPCO has invested $10 million to improve Valley facilities, including development of an electronic map of the former co-op service territory to help crews restore power during outages.

"By the end of this year we will have spent an additional $17 million on tree-trimming throughout the Valley territory," McCellon-Allen said. "More than 50 percent of the outages we experience at SWEPCO are caused by trees."

The territory of the former Valley Electric, now known as the Valley District of SWEPCO, includes approximately 30,000 households and 41,000 meters in eight parishes – Caddo, DeSoto, Natchitoches, Red River, Sabine, Vernon, Grant and Winn.



Valley Scholarship cutline:

Public Service Commissioner Foster Campbell, an NSU alumnus, has worked with the university and Valley’s successor, SWEPCO, to commit $200,000 in remaining Valley capital credits to NSU for student scholarships, faculty support and campus improvements. The announcement was made during a press conference Wednesday. From left are Campbell, SWEPCO President Venita McCellon-Allen and NSU President Dr. Jim Henderson.
17 2016-11-23
Gannett

New program lets college students set the pace


A lesser known education model is making its way to Louisiana with a new degree program that lets college students advance at their own pace.

Competency-based degree programs surged in popularity in the U.S. over the last few years as universities started implementing them and the U.S. House of Representatives unanimously passed the Advancing Competency-Based Education Demonstration Project Act in July 2014.

The competency-based program is a flexible education model that builds upon students' prior knowledge and experience rather than spending a set number of hours in a classroom. Students advance as they demonstrate mastery of specific skills or knowledge called competencies.

If students can show mastery over material and pass a pre-assessment, they move to the next unit or competency. The opposite also is true. Those needing more time to master an area can take that time.

In most cases, students have a set amount of time overall, like six months to complete all competencies, but they can spend as much time as needed on individual units.

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Such is the case for Northwestern State University's new competency-based program for students seeking a computer information systems (CIS) degree or certification. School officials say using this model allows students to complete the program at a fraction of the time and cost.

Students can go through the program at NSU on a credit or non-credit basis. Those who may need to gain an industry certification or gain a specific skill can take classes on a non-credit basis.

Courses start on most Mondays and can be completed in one day or in up to six months. They are completed through the school's learning management system, which currently is Moodle. Tuition for each course is $250 in addition to required textbooks, which is about 40 percent less than a typical class, according to the school.

"This is the first of its kind in our System, said Cami Geisman, communication director for the University of Louisiana System.

It appears to be the first of its kind in the state. While this model is brand-new in the area, there are other ways UL System and other Louisiana schools take prior knowledge into account — like testing out of courses, prior learning assessment and ACE for military personnel. This program goes a step further.

"Now there seems to be a national trend to streamline these avenues of credit to a defined path to degree completion," Geisman said. "Simultaneously institutions have to ensure the degree programs are not diluted. It’s a delicate balance, but this is a positive trend, especially for adult learners."

It's a relatively new trend — most programs younger than five years old — but it is catching on. The Atlantic reported at least 200 institutions had competency-based education programs in 2014. New Hampshire, Michigan and Ohio are among some state efforts listed by the U.S. Department of Education in 2016.

Why try this new model?

Advocates say this education model is more student-centered, letting them complete programs at their own pace and based around their lifestyle. Add to that benefits like quicker completion times and less costs for motivated students.

And employers benefit in that they can judge prospective employees, the students, on demonstrated competencies that translate better to the work than traditional grades might.

“For Louisiana to move from the bottom ranks in educational attainment, our universities must create innovative pathways to marketable degrees, especially for adult students,” Northwestern State President Jim Henderson said in a release. “Northwestern State’s groundbreaking approach to delivering a world-class CIS degree will dramatically expand access, developing talent at a stunningly low cost. Employers win, taxpayers win and most importantly, students win."

The U.S. Department of Education called such programs a way to "help to save both time and money" and "an opportunity to achieve greater efficiency and increase productivity.

It also could be a way to reach more students, especially those considered non-traditional, and make higher education more accessible.

"Depending on the strategy pursued, competency-based systems also create multiple pathways to graduation, make better use of technology, support new staffing patterns that utilize teacher skills and interests differently, take advantage of learning opportunities outside of school hours and walls, and help identify opportunities to target interventions to meet the specific learning needs of students," according to the U.S. Department of Education.

But not everyone is behind competency-based programs. They are not one-size-fits-all and require more self-motivation and time management skills than a traditional on-campus education.

Northwestern State not only admits this, but advertises it on the program's online description under the heading "Is It Right for Me?"

"NSU’s Competency-Based Program is ideal for adult learners or busy professionals who are balancing full-time job or family commitments," the site reads. "If you are self-motivated, eager to learn and capable of working online, a competency-based education may be right for you."

Because the model isn't right for everyone it's no surprise that retention rates of such programs are lower than traditional on-campus courses, according to The Atlantic. And it could end up costing students more should they not complete their courses in the allotted time and they choose to repeat the process.

There also could be additional costs to the university, like specific training for faculty, the need for more technical support personnel or software upgrades. Such issues also apply to implementing online learning programs. If these already are in place at a school, the environment likely is ripe to try competency-based education.


17 2016-11-22
Alexandria

What's happening in Cenla education


Alexandria student named 'Mr. NSU'

Terrell Gorham of Alexandria was recently named Mr. Northwestern State University 2016.

"Receiving the honor of being Mr. NSU is truly a dream come true," said Gorham, a senior social work major. "It is something that I always wanted since I first arrived here at Northwestern State University. I feel extremely humbled and honored to earn the respect and admiration of faculty, staff and the students here on this campus. I will definitely not take this for granted and continue to represent this University in a positive manner."

Gorham is the son of Terrell Gorham and Jennifer Gorham. He is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., Order of Omega, the National Panhellenic Caucus, Helping Hands and the African-American Caucus. A Dean’s List student, Gorham is a former member of the Student Government Association and Student Activities Board. He was a member of the 2016 Homecoming Honor Court.

"To leave my mark on this campus in some form or fashion, I knew that could only be possible if I got involved as much as possible," Gorham said. "I knew that I wanted to hone my leadership skills, and gain other skills as well. I’m a firm believer in making the most out of your college experience. You can develop life long friendships along the way as well."

Gorham is supporting the Wade Smith Foundation, an organization founded by Smith, a former NFL Pro Bowl player. The organization supports community youth programs in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex and Greater Houston area focusing on literacy and education.

"As a social work major, I believe in helping and advocating for others," he said. "I feel this foundation is awesome. I believe that this program is remarkable due to the fact that it gives back to youth. With education and literacy programs, and scholarship programs, I feel that this foundation is blessing to those that are involved."


17 2016-11-21
Natchitoches

NSU revitalizing astronomy observatory


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University is restoring the university’s astronomical observatory and hopes to offer programs not only for students, but also the public interested in studying the stars. NSU’s School of Biological and Physical Sciences is acquiring new equipment for the observatory, a large dome structure located on the roof of Fournet Hall, and working towards making the facility functional for study and astrophotography.



Dr. Chad Thibodeaux, assistant professor of chemistry, who is spearheading the initiative, installed a new 10-inch telescope that will be ready for students in the spring semester.



“We hope to use it for our astronomy class, which is required for all science ed majors, but we want to open it up to other majors as well,” said Thibodeaux, who would like to install a CCD camera on the scope that is capable of astrophotography and photometry, measuring the brightness of stars. By itself the CCD only takes black and white photos and Thibodeaux would like to add a filter wheel and filters for photography and photometry. Right now, the camera on the scope has a webcam imager that can image solar system objects like the moon and planets. Thibodeaux also acquired a Coronado PST solar telescope made especially for viewing the sun. The solar scope has special filters that allow only a certain type of light through to see features on the sun like filaments, sun spots and prominences.



“We could have stargazing nights that are open to the public and summer camps for kids,” he said.



Natchitoches has little light pollution, so viewers can peer into the sky and clearly see galaxy clusters and other celestial bodies. The November super moon was particularly brilliant, Thibodeaux said.



“Astronomy is one of the few areas of science where amateurs contribute information that is used by professionals in the field,” he said. He will encourage his students to become involved with the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO), to which students can submit data on various stars to databases for others to create models that tell observers how the stars function. Variable stars are those that vary in brightness over time.



“The stars I think most people find interesting are double stars,” Thibodeaux said. “These are stars that tend to orbit each other. The students seem to be interested nebulas and galaxies. I think because they tend to have these amazing structures and colors that we can image with our new telescope.”



According to Dr. Francene Lemoine, director of the School of Biological and Physical Sciences, the observatory was last used about 10 years ago and she is hopeful that former students and/or faculty may come forward with information, stories or pictures of when it was in use.



“We don’t know a lot about the history of the observatory,” she said. “We have the blueprints for Fournet and we know there were plans for an observatory but we don’t know if it was built when the building was constructed or installed during a renovation that took place from 1983-85.”



Thibodeaux said his spring classes are filling up and he is exploring grants that could be utilized towards refurbishing the observatory. Donations to support the observatory, including naming opportunities, can be made through the NSU Foundation.



For more information on the observatory, contact Thibodeaux at cthibodeaux@nsula.edu or Lemoine at lemoinef@nsula.edu.




17 2016-11-21
Natchitoches

Business students at NSU earn Hennigan Scholarship


Marcie Malmay of Many, Derek Toro of Provencal and Maggie Harris of West Monroe were named this year’s recipients of the Brook and Clay Hennigan Endowed Scholarships, which are awarded to Northwestern State University business and business education majors at the junior and senior level. The scholarship is named for the children of Dr. Margaret Kilcoyne, interim dean of NSU’s College of Business and Technology, and her husband, Jim Kilcoyne. Clay Hennigan was a 2004 Northwestern State business graduate. Brooke Hennigan had enrolled at Northwestern State, but did not attend college.


17 2016-11-18
Natchitoches

NSU to close for Thanksgiving


Northwestern State University will be closed Nov. 21 - 25 for the Thanksgiving break. Administrative offices will reopen and classes will resume Monday, Nov. 28.

The Wellness, Recreation and Activities Center will be open through Saturday, Nov. 19 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday Nov. 20 from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. On Nov. 21-22, hours are 5:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. and 5:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Nov. 23. The WRAC will be closed Nov. 24-25. The WRAC will reopen Saturday, Nov. 26 with operating hours of 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Normal hours resume on Sunday, Nov. 27.

Watson Library will close at noon on Friday, Nov. 18 and will be closed Nov. 19 – 27. Watson Library will reopen Monday, Nov. 28 at 7:30 a.m.




17 2016-11-18
Natchitoches

NSU ROTC honors Vietnam veterans


By Cadet Taylor Andrews

Photos courtesy of Kevin Shanahan





NATCHITOCHES – Serving as a commemorative partner, cadets of the 67th Demon Battalion of Northwestern State University’s Army ROTC Program recently hosted a commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of the Vietnam War at James A. Noe Armory. Veterans were recognized for their service and sacrifice in speeches given by Lt. Col. Katherine Carlson, professor of military science, and Dr. James Henderson, president of Northwestern State.



Carlson provided details of the commemorative program, while Henderson honored the nine million Americans who served in the conflict, those whose names are etched on walls of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, and those still missing.



Following the program, guests were ushered into the conference room where Cadets presented Vietnam Veterans with commemorative pins and thanked them individually for their service. Cadets and Veterans were given the opportunity to socialize at a reception following the presentation of the pins.



Vietnam Veterans receiving recognition were:

Army Specialist Five Larry Amberg

Marine Sergeant Charlie Davis, Jr.

Army Major (Retired) Leonard Fowler

Army Sergeant Major (Retired) Vade Gordon

Army Major (Retired) Richard Hooter

Army Lieutenant Colonel (Retired) Charles McNeely

Army Specialist Four John Masson

Army Lieutenant Colonel (Retired) Truman Maynard

Army Specialist Five Foy Melder

Marine Sergeant Dave Riggs

Army Specialist Four Mike Wilburn

Navy Lieutenant Commander (Retired) Roger Williams


17 2016-11-17
Natchitoches

David Morgan to speak at NSU Fall Commencement


Northwestern State alumnus David Morgan will be the speaker at Northwestern State University’s Fall Commencement exercises Friday, Dec. 16.

At 10 a.m., Morgan will speak to graduates from the Gallaspy Family College of Education and Human Development, the Louisiana Scholars’ College and the College of Arts and Sciences except for general studies.

Morgan will address graduates from the College of Nursing and School of Allied Health, the College of Business and Technology and those receiving degrees in general studies at 3 p.m.

Morgan graduated from Bolton High School in Alexandria and received a degree in business from NSU.

After graduation, he started his career in the insurance field selling insurance to active teachers in Louisiana. In 1981, he began United Teacher Associates Inc., an insurance agency specializing in insurance benefits to members of large state retired teacher associations. Morgan purchased an insurance company three years later and started writing the association member insurance policies through the company. The renamed United Teacher Associates Insurance Company grew annual revenue to more than $200 million with 250 full-time employees and more than 3,000 agents across the company. In 1999, he sold United Teacher Associates to a Fortune 500 company.

After a brief retirement, Morgan and his brother co-founded Association Member Benefits Advisors in 2001. AMBA provides a broad range of member benefits in 30 states to over 4 million association members with over 300 full time agents. AMBA is home to many NSU graduates with successful careers.

At Northwestern State, Morgan was president of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, inducted into “Who’s Who Among College Students” and was the school mascot, Vic the Demon.

He is a member of of the NSU Alumni Hall of Distinction, the Long Purple Line, and Pi Kappa Phi Hall of Fame. Morgan has been a member of the NSU President’s Council and the Board of Directors of the NSU Alumni Association and is very involved in the NSU alumni chapter of Pi Kappa Phi. He created an endowed professorship in the Northwestern State School of Business to further the study of salesmanship and insurance.

He is married to Sherry Fargerson Morgan who also graduated from NSU and was a member of Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority. The Morgans split their time between Austin and St Thomas, V.I., and have three children and seven grandchildren. Their oldest son, David Morgan Jr. and his wife, Leslie, are also graduates of NSU.
17 2016-11-16
Natchitoches

NSU nurse practitioner program ranked seventh in the nation


Northwestern State University’s nurse practitioner program has been ranked as the seventh best program in the United States, according to guidetoonlineschools.com.

The full rankings are available at guidetoonlineschools.com/degrees/nurse-practitioner/top-online-colleges.

Ranked institutions must offer at least 10 fully online degrees at the master’s level. Colleges and universities meeting the criteria were judged based on tuition rates, program coursework and accreditation. Data from the National Center for Education Statistics are utilized.

“Gaining a high national ranking increases the visibility of the program and lets prospective students know Northwestern State offers an excellent education at an affordable price,” said Dr. Connie Hale, associate professor of nursing and head of graduate programs in the College of Nursing. “It gives faculty a boost to know their work is recognized. Our students know a national ranking adds value to their degree. Ultimately, this allows us to positively impact healthcare by producing more and more quality providers.”

Nurse practitioner is one of three options in the Master of Science in Nursing program. Students can specialize in one of five areas: adult gerontology acute care, adult gerontology primary care, family nurse practitioner, primary care pediatric and women’s health.

Northwestern State also offers a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program which provides a clinical doctorate for master’s prepared registered nurses who desire to practice at the highest level and significantly impact health care outcomes for vulnerable populations. Graduates of this DNP program have the potential to transform health care by utilizing advanced clinical skills, translating evidence into practice, implementing systems changes, establishing standards and policies and acting as organizational leaders.

For more information on Northwestern State’s nurse practitioner program, go to nsula.edu/academics/nursing-allied-health/nursing-program.
17 2016-11-16
Natchitoches

Phi Beta Lambda prepares shoeboxes for Operation Christmas Child


NATCHITOCHES – “A small shoebox can have a big impact. What goes into the box is fun, but what comes out of it is eternal,” said Dr. Margaret Kilcoyne. “We try to pack a ‘wow’ item like a doll, truck, or ball and then a wash cloth with a bar of soap and a tooth brush with toothpaste. Then we fill the shoebox with pencils, pens, small notebooks, socks and other items.”



Kilcoyne, interim dean of Northwestern State University’s College of Business and Technology, was referring to Operation Christmas Child, a holiday philanthropy in which shoeboxes are packed with gifts such as toys, school supplies, hygiene products and the like and are distributed to children around the world who are living in areas with poverty, war, disease or natural disaster. National collection week runs from Nov. 14-21.



Kilcoyne and students in NSU’s chapter of Phi Beta Lambda packed more than 75 boxes for the philanthropy. Phi Beta Lambda is the national college career organization for business students.



“We started years ago with a goal of 20 boxes,” said Dr. Julie McDonald, associate professor of business and Phi Beta Lambda sponsor. “We have increased our goal each year. Since this is the 75th anniversary of our national organization, we wanted to pack 75 boxes. We achieved that goal plus five. Our club currently has only 10 members so that’s quite an achievement. The faculty of the College of Business also donate items and money for us to purchase items. The Department of Hospitality Management and Tourism also joined in this year with some donations and had two students come over to help pack, so we were happy to see them.”



The boxes are distributed by pastors or through relief organizations like Samaritan’s Purse.



“It is truly a blessing for the packer and a blessing for the child. It amazes me every year how a small shoebox can have such a big impact on the life of a child; but it is true,” Kilcoyne said. “The small things we take for granted like a hot meal, the ability to take a bath are luxuries in some countries.”

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17 2016-11-15
Natchitoches

J-Day draws prospective students to explore New Media, Journalism, Comm Arts


NATCHITOCHES – Ten area high school students won competitions at the recent 43rd Journalism Day at Northwestern State University. Three area schools received honors for their school newspaper or yearbook. First place winners of each individual competition were awarded $500 scholarships to attend Northwestern State University and major in communication.


Will Heitman of Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts won first place in the Radio Competition. Annabelle Ellis of Elysian Fields High School won second place in Radio Competition and Logan Bullock of Bossier Parish School for Technology & Innovative Learning was third.


In the TV News category, Olivia Gotte of the Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts won first place. Madison McLaren of Lakeview High School won second place and Alana Lewis of Lakeview High School finished third.


Winning the Media Writing competition was Rose Marie Skillman of the Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts. Kaitlyn Randall of Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts was second, and Haley Horton of Elysian Fields High School was third.


For the Impromptu Speech competition, Emily Windham of Lakeview took home first place. Anna Beth Simmons of Elysian Fields High School won second, and Stephen Husband of Many High School won third.


In the newspaper competition, the Louisiana School of the Math, Sciences, and Arts won first place. Airline High School placed second and Elysian Fields High School third.



In the short film competition Bossier Parish School for Technology & Innovative Learning swept the field winning first, second, and third places.



Natchitoches Central High School placed first in the yearbook competition. Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts won second, and Lakeview High School won third.



J-Day coordinators Daniel Thiels and Elaine Eaton noted 100 participants from 10 schools attended the event. Students attended career sessions featuring professionals in the fields of news-editorial, photojournalism, public relations, social media and sports information. John Lieberman, vice president and co-founder of the Shreveport Journalism Foundation, was the opening speaker.



Paula Furr, head of the Department of New Media, Journalism, and Communication Arts said the department looks forward to this event and working with area high school programs. Schools interested in having NSU conduct journalism and publications workshops should contact the department at (318) 357-5360 or newmedia@nsula.edu.


17 2016-11-15
Natchitoches

Business students earn Hennigan Scholarship


NATCHITOCHES – Marcie Malmay of Many, Derek Toro of Provencal and Maggie Harris of West Monroe were named this year’s recipients of the Brook and Clay Hennigan Endowed Scholarships, which are awarded to Northwestern State University business and business education majors at the junior and senior level.





The scholarship is named for the children of Dr. Margaret Kilcoyne, interim dean of NSU’s College of Business and Technology, and her husband, Jim Kilcoyne. Clay Hennigan was a 2004 Northwestern State business graduate. Brooke Hennigan had enrolled at Northwestern State, but did not attend college.



“For me, it helped buy books and ultimately helped my family,” said Malmay, who is majoring in business and minoring in accounting. “It is an honor and a privilege to receive this scholarship. Dr. Kilcoyne has been an amazing mentor, teacher and dean who had been very encouraging to me.”



“This scholarship has blessed me to be able to afford housing and a meal plan,” said Harris, who lives on campus. “It was a sizable scholarship and it helped tremendously.”



“I am a single parents and this has gone a long way to help me be a good example to my daughter,” said Toro, who is a single parent who enrolled at NSU as a non-traditional student majoring in business administration. “I graduated from high school in 1999 and going back to school was a challenge. This scholarship is helping me continue that dream.”



Those who would like to contribute to the Brooke and Clay Hennigan Scholarship can contact the NSU Foundation at (318) 357-4414 or visit northwesternalumni.com.


17 2016-11-08
Natchitoches

Gorham, Westfall named Mr., Miss NSU


Terrell Gorham and Leighann Westfall each wanted to leave their mark on Northwestern State University and according to their fellow students, they have done that. Gorham was named Mr. Northwestern State University for 2016 and Westfall was named Miss NSU for 2016.

“Receiving the honor of being Mr. NSU is truly a dream come true,” said Gorham, a senior social work major from Alexandria. “It is something that I always wanted since I first arrived here at Northwestern State University. I feel extremely humbled and honored to earn the respect and admiration of faculty, staff and the students here on this campus. I will definitely not take this for granted and continue to represent this University in a positive manner.”

This is Westfall’s second major honor awarded to her by Northwestern State students. Last month, she was the 2016 Homecoming Honor Court queen.

“This honor means the world to me,” said Westfall, who is from Houston. “I was completely humbled and honored. It is really amazing to know that my peers recognize my hard work and love for our university and have the confidence in myself to represent the student body and Northwestern State.

Gorham is the son of Terrell Gorham and Jennifer Gorham. He is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., Order of Omega, the National Panhellenic Caucus, Helping Hands and the African-American Caucus. A Dean’s List student, Gorham is a former member of the Student Government Association and Student Activities Board. He was a member of the 2016 Homecoming Honor Court.

Gorham initially joined Alpha Phi Alpha and branched out.

“To leave my mark on this campus in some form or fashion, I knew that could only be possible if I got involved as much as possible,” said Gorham. “I knew that I wanted to hone my leadership skills, and gain other skills as well. I’m a firm believer in making the most out of your college experience. You can develop life long friendships along the way as well.”

Westfall is a hospitality management and tourism major in the Louisiana Scholars’ College. She is the daughter of Tim and Carrieann Westfall. A member of Phi Mu Fraternity, Westfall has been a freshman orientation leader and member of the Demon Days Welcome Week Committee. She is a President’s Leadership Program mentor and member of Order of Omega, Purple Jackets and Phi Kappa Phi. Westfall is a President’s List student.

Westfall was selected to the Purple Pizazz Pom Pon Line before enrolling at NSU, then was selected to be an ambassador in the Office of University Recruiting where she worked with prospective students, their parents and university officials.

“It is important to be involved on campus to fully immerse yourself in Northwestern State and I think it is the way students make NSU their home,” said Westfall. “To be a successful student I feel as though you need to be well rounded both academically and socially. The experience students get from joining campus organizations is where they ultimately will gain experience for future jobs.”

Gorham and Westfall are supporting the Wade Smith Foundation, an organization founded by Smith, a former NFL Pro Bowl player. The organization supports community youth programs in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex and Greater Houston area focusing on literacy and education.

“As a social work major, I believe in helping and advocating for others,” said Gorham. “I feel this foundation is awesome. I believe that this program is remarkable due to the fact that it gives back to youth. With education and literacy programs, and scholarship programs, I feel that this foundation is blessing to those that are involved.”

Westfall was inspired by hearing Smith speak about his work.

“I am supporting the Wade Smith Foundation because I want to help children grow and develop themselves through education so hopefully they will have the same opportunities I was fortunate enough to have such as going to college to earn a degree,” said Westfall. “It is amazing that I will get to be a part of something bigger than myself and help build libraries for children across my hometown.”


17 2016-11-07
Alexandria

Pineville grad a finalist for Oxford scholarship


NSU students to study abroad

Several Northwestern State University students will be spending the Spring 2017 semester overseas, according to the school.

Northwestern State students Natalie Borowski of New Orleans and Kyle Bryant of Georgetown, Texas, will be studying abroad through the International Student Exchange Program. Borowski will study in Japan and Bryant in Estonia.

Tyler Henry of Robeline, Demmi O’Donnell of Lake Charles, Claire Ellen Nelson of Shreveport, Selene Allains-Kovacs of Jeanerette and Kristy Nunn of Bossier City will be studying at the University of Angers in Angers, France through a bilateral exchange.

Borowski said the International Student Exchange Program was one of the factors that made her choose to study at NSU.

"My primary goal is to learn as much Japanese as I possibly can," she said. "The Study in Kyoto Program I'll be attending at Ritsumeikan University offers an Intensive Japanese Language Track, and I plan on using the least amount of English as I can in my day-to-day activities. Additionally, I hope my semester abroad will allow me to improve my communication and interpersonal skills, and make me a more independent and well-rounded individual."

ISEP was founded in 1979 and has grown into one of the largest study abroad membership networks in the world. The organization helps students overcome the financial and academic barriers to study abroad.

In partnership with member institutions, ISEP is able to connect students to academic programs at more than 300 universities in 56 countries. ISEP has helped more than 51,000 students study abroad.


17 2016-11-07
Natchitoches

College Choice ranks Northwestern State asmost affordable online university in the country


Northwestern State University has been ranked as most affordable online college in the United States by College Choice, a leading authority in college and university rankings and resources. College Choice researchers examined accredited colleges and universities on factors including academic quality, degree options, teaching and technical support, flexibility and total cost. Online undergraduate students play a flat rate of $375 per credit hour up to 12 hours and $100 per credit hour after that. Online graduate students play a flat rate of $475 per credit hour up to nine hours and $100 per credit hour after that.


17 2016-11-04
Natchitoches

Students pen notes on Thank A Donor Day 2016


Northwestern State University’s third annual Thank A Donor Day drew over 500 students, student-athletes, coaches, faculty and staff to pen notes of thanks to individuals who support scholarships at the university. The event, a partnership between the NSU Foundation and the Demons Unlimited Foundation, encourages students to acknowledge the generosity of those who contribute to student and student-athlete scholarships and connect donors to the students who are benefitting from their contributions. “It's a chance for us to really remind our students of the impact that donors make in their experience here at Northwestern State," said NSU Development Officer Tiffany Chasteen. For information on contributing to student scholarships, contact Chasteen at (318) 357-5213 or email chasteent@nsula.edu.


17 2016-11-04
Natchitoches

Northwestern State named most affordable online college in the nation


Northwestern State University has been ranked as most affordable online college in the United States by College Choice, a leading authority in college and university rankings and resources.

College Choice researchers examined accredited colleges and universities on factors including academic quality, degree options, teaching and technical support, flexibility and total cost. Online undergraduate students play a flat rate of $375 per credit hour up to 12 hours and $100 per credit hour after that. Online graduate students play a flat rate of $475 per credit hour up to nine hours and $100 per credit hour after that.

“Affordability is so important when it comes to college. As a student you want to go to a good school, but don't want to burden yourself with a high debt at such a young age,” said Haley Jones, a freshman biology/pre-vet major from Dodson. “To be able to find a school that meets your academic needs and not breaking your bank is a top priority.”

Jones works full-time at Family Dollar as an assistant manager and online classes fit into her schedule.

“I chose to start college online because it's the most cost efficient way for me to be in college and still be able to work full time,” she said. “Being able to earn my own money and pay for college without burdening my family is very important to me, and was the deciding factor in attending on campus versus online. I think I'm getting an amazing education through NSU online.”

Northwestern State has Louisiana’s first and largest electronic campus at nsula.edu/ensu. The university offers 39 online degree programs. Internet-only students do not pay out of state fees. Northwestern State is currently developing several competency-based programs specifically for online students, all of which can be applied to a full baccalaureate degree.

Several online degree programs at Northwestern State have been ranked among the best in the nation. Northwestern State’s online RN to BSN program, along with bachelor’s programs in computer information systems, criminal justice and psychology were ranked first in the country by Nonprofit Colleges Online. The bachelor’s in accounting was ranked second and the master’s in education was seventh. The bachelor’s in addiction studies was chosen as the fifth best in the country by bestcolleges.com.

NSU has been designated a 2016 Military Friendly School, a designation is awarded to colleges, universities, community colleges and trade schools in the country that are doing the most to embrace military students and dedicate resources to ensure their success both in the classroom and after graduation.
The university recently began a competency-based program that will allow students seeking a computer information systems degree or certification to complete the program at a fraction of the time and cost. The competency-based program is a flexible education model that allows students to learn and advance at their own pace. Students advance as they demonstrate mastery of specific skills or knowledge called competencies. The structure builds upon prior knowledge and experience. A student that may already know the material can pass a pre-assessment and move to the next unit. Should a student need more time to master an area, they can slow down and focus on what they need to learn.

For more information on online degree programs, visit nsula.edu/ensu.

17 2016-11-03
Natchitoches

Spring registration to begin Monday at NSU


Registration for the spring 2016 semester will begin Monday, Nov. 7 at Northwestern State University and students are encouraged to begin the process of signing up for classes as soon as possible.

Northwestern State students can begin the registration procedure by meeting with their advisor. They can begin signing up for spring classes through NSU Connect which is available at my.nsula.edu.

Graduate students, seniors, authorized ADA students with a permit, honor students with a cumulative 3.5 grade point average and 12 or more hours, active military veterans and ROTC cadets and student-athletes can begin registering on Nov. 7.

Juniors can start signing up on Nov. 8 and sophomores can begin registering on Nov. 9. On Nov. 10, freshmen and non-traditional students (adults 25 and over) with less than 30 hours can start registering.

Registration for the spring semester is available through Jan. 16, 2017. Spring classes start on Jan. 17. Late registration will be held Jan. 17-25.

For more information on spring registration at Northwestern State, go to nsula.edu/registrar.

17 2016-11-03
Natchitoches

NSU Jazz Orchestra to perform Monday


The Northwestern State University Jazz Orchestra will perform Monday, Nov. 7 at 7:30 p.m. in Magale Recital Hall. Admission is free and open to the public. Associate Professor of Trumpet Galindo Rodriguez conducts the Jazz Orchestra.

The concert will feature Northwestern State alumnus and faculty member David Steele on clarinet.

Steele has been part of the music faculty at Northwestern State University since 2012, teaching clarinet, woodwind methods, chamber music and fine arts. He is a founding member of the contemporary chamber ensemble Kisatchie Sound. While clarinet is his primary instrument, Steele plays various woodwind instruments and several folk instruments. He plays an active role as an instructor, choreographer and visual technician throughout the Louisiana/Mississippi color guard and percussion circuit. He has studied music at Northwestern State, the University of New Mexico and the University of North Texas. He has worked for Popejoy Hall, New Mexico's premiere performing arts venue, in the education and outreach department. His teachers include Dr. Malena McLaren, Mr. Keith Lemmons and Dr. Kimberly Cole Luevano.

While at Northwestern State, Steele performed with the university's Wind Symphony, Symphony Orchestra and Jazz Orchestra. He has played principal clarinet with the University of New Mexico's Wind Symphony and Symphony Orchestra. While attending the University of North Texas, Steele performed and recorded with the U.N.T. Wind Symphony as principal clarinet. He has performed with the New Mexico Symphony Orchestra, Rosewell Symphony Orchestra, Shreveport Symphony Orchestra, Texarkana Symphony Orchestra, South Arkansas Symphony Orchestra, the Many Chamber Orchestra and the Northwestern Faculty Quintet. Steele has performed as a musician and artist at the Alley Theater in Houston and as a woodwind specialist and technician in the pit-orchestras at Long Lake Camp of the Arts in New York. He is a recipient of the McCutchen Award for Musical Excellence, the Magale Award for Musical Excellence and the Bess McNeely Award for Outstanding Musical Performance.

Steele has recorded with renowned brass players Joe Alessi, Sam Pilafian, Marshall Gilkes, and J.D. Shaw along with the contemporary composer Eve Beglarian and the chamber ensemble, Kisatchie Sound. His playing and is featured in the sound track of the documentary film, “Sacred as Folk” and the multimedia production of “Lighten Up.”

The Jazz Orchestra will perform “My Man Bill” by Rob McConnell featuring Ronald Rodriguez on piano, Jimmy Leach on vibraphone and Kenyon Johnson on tenor saxophone, “Concerto for Clarinet” by Artie Shaw and transcribed by Miles Collins featuring Steele, “Blue Cellophane” by Duke Ellington and transcribed by David Berger featuring John Floyd on trombone and “One Bass Hit” by Dizzy Gillespie, Walter Fuller and Ray Brown and arranged by Walter “Gil” Fuller and edited by Rob Duboff and Jeffrey Sultande and featuring Jose Colon on bass and Kazue Seo on trumpet.

Also on the program are “Samba Dees Gotta Do It” by Tom Kubis featuring Seo, Ian Cassidy on tenor saxophone, Wes Scholten on trombone and Jack Dyre on baritone saxophone, “Misty” by Erroll Garner and arranged by Dave Wolpe and featuring Scholten, “Snakes” by Bob Berg and arranged by Mike Crotty featuring Seo, Johnson, Leach, Dyre, Rodriguez and Jack Salyer on alto saxophone and “Nica’s Dream” by Horace Silver and arranged by Michael P. Mossman featuring Salyer and Nathan Roth on trumpet.

17 2016-11-03
Natchitoches

Fall Robotics Competition for middle schoolers Dec. 14


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Department of Engineering Technology will host the second annual Fall Robotics Competition Wednesday, Dec. 14. NSU-RC2 will take place from 8 a.m.-1 p.m. on the Student Union Ballroom.



All middle schools within a 100-mile radius of Natchitoches are invited to participate. There is no registration fee but teams interested must respond by submitting a letter of intent and a press/photo release form for each team member no later than Dec. 1. All forms, including rules of the competition, are available by emailing Kim Gibson, ET administrative assistant, at gibsonk@nsula.edu.



Competitions include speed challenge, strength challenge, accuracy challenge and maze challenge. Competitors will test their computer programming skills and compete with other students for prizes. A fun day of activities is planned that will include educational experiences, social activities and snacks. Competitors should bring their own lunches. Parents are welcome. An awards ceremony will be held at the conclusion of the event.



For more information, contact Dr. Jafar Al- Sharab at jafar@nsula.edu or (318) 357-4359.




17 2016-11-03
Natchitoches

35 bands to participate in Classic on the Cane Marching contest


NATCHITOCHES –The Spirit of Northwestern Marching Band will host the Classic on the Cane Marching Contest Saturday, Nov. 5 in Turpin Stadium. The contest begins at 9:15 a.m. and concludes with a performance by Spirit of Northwestern Marching Band at 7:15 p.m. Admission is $5 for entire day. The contest will be simulcast live on the website banddirector.com.

Thirty-five bands from throughout Louisiana and Texas will be showcased. The bands will compete in five classes based on the grade level of the school and size of the band. An overall Grand Champion will be selected along with second through fifth place overall. Other awards include first, second and third place in each class, best percussion section in each class and best auxiliary units in each class.

Bands in Class IA are Grant and Franklin Parish. Class 1B schools are Buckeye, Rosepine, Pickering, Merryville, Many, Logansport, DeQuincy and Winnfield. Those in Class II are Ruston, Jennings, Iowa, Tioga, Pineville, Byrd and Sterlington.

Bands in Class III are Benton, E.D. White, Zachary, Kerens (Texas), South Beauregard, Erath, Mabank (Texas), Acadiana, West Ouachita, North Vermilion and Central. Class IV participants are Sam Houston, Airline, Haughton, Marshall (Texas), Deer Park (Texas), West Monroe and Parkway.

17 2016-11-01
Natchitoches

Cooley presented with Monk Award


Professor Carl “Glen” Cooley, right, was recognized as recipient of the Larry Monk Award at Northwestern State University, an honor that recognizes a faculty member for exceptional and outstanding service and contributions to the Northwestern State University’s Leesville/Fort Polk campus. Dr. Cooley, who holds the Poindexter Foundation Endowed Professorship in Accounting, has served on the university faculty for more than 35 years. NSU President Dr. Jim Henderson presented the award during the Oct. 29 football game.


17 2016-11-01
Natchitoches

LSBCD will host government contract seminars


NATCHITOCHES – The Northwest Central Louisiana Small Business Development Center (LSBDC) and the Northwest Louisiana Government Procurement Technical Assistance Center (PTAC) are co-sponsoring two seminars to educate Louisiana business owners and those wishing to start a business with valuable government contracting information. “Government Contracting 101” will be presented on Wednesday, November 2 in Shreveport and Thursday, November 3 in Natchitoches from 8:30- 11 a.m.



The Shreveport-Bossier seminar will be held at the NSU School of Nursing, 1800 Line Avenue, Building A, Classroom 202. The Natchitoches seminar will be held on the campus of Northwestern State University, 310 Sam Sibley Drive in Caspari Hall, Executive Conference Room, third floor. Attendees may register online at lsbdc.org/nwcr or call (318) 357-5611. There is no charge for this seminar presented as a business service by the SBDC and PTAC. Seating is limited so early registration is encouraged.



Jeff Ulrich, procurement counselor at PTAC is the lead presenter at this informative seminar which will cover government contracting topics including government lingo, basic regulations, overview of registrations and certifications and procurement websites. Dana Cawthon, SBDC Regional Director will provide an overview of no-charge services offered to Louisiana businesses and how government contracting can significantly improve a small business’ profits.



The LSBDC is Louisiana’s largest and most accessible source of assistance for Louisiana entrepreneurs and the only statewide nationally accredited program that provides business consulting and training to Louisiana businesses at no cost. LSBDC services are funded in part through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration, Louisiana Economic Development and participating Louisiana universities. Through a statewide network of 10 centers, the LSBDC provides quality one-on-one consulting, training and capital funding resources helping Louisiana small businesses start, grow and succeed.



The LSBDC Northwest and Central Region hosts three service centers in Alexandria, Natchitoches and Shreveport Louisiana and is an economic development partner with Northwestern State University, the U.S. Small Business Administration and Louisiana Economic Development. For more information or an appointment with a LSBDC business consultant, visit the Center’s website at www.lsbdc.org or call (318) 357-5611.


17 2016-10-28
Natchitoches

Board of Supervisors approves new doctorate at NSU


The Board of Supervisors for the University of Louisiana System has approved a Doctor of Education in Adult Learning and Leadership at Northwestern State University. The proposed program will be submitted to the State Board of Regents for final approval.

The Doctor of Education degree (Ed.D.) is for students who intend to pursue or advance their careers at the highest level of professional practice in the program concentration areas of community college leadership and adult learning and workforce development.

The Doctor of Education in Adult Learning and Leadership at Northwestern State will be the only advanced degree program in Louisiana focusing on the need of developing community college leaders and preparing practitioners to work with adult learners and in workforce development. Graduates will be qualified to assume advanced leadership roles in areas of workforce development, organizational leadership, community college administration and management and scholarship.

According to the Louisiana Workforce Commission, job growth forecasts for Louisiana are strong in the short term and long term. The forecast anticipates 103,000 new jobs over the next year and a need for 76,000 workers per year through 2022. Of the state’s top 10 occupations requiring post-secondary vocational training, all are 5-star jobs with an average salary of $40,000.

The Louisiana Community and Technical College System has developed a plan, “Our Louisiana 2020; Building the Workforce of Tomorrow.” The plan calls for doubling the number of graduates from the LCTCS, doubling the earning of graduates to $1.5 billion, quadrupling student transfers to four-year universities to 10,000 annually and doubling the number of students served to 325,000.


The emphasis on expanding postsecondary completion and workforce development opportunities will create the need for additional faculty and administrative resources to meet the needs of the additional students indicated in the forecasts.

“Meeting Louisiana’s post-secondary challenges requires additional advanced degreed faculty and administration with the capacity for creating innovative institutional change and developing new learning models and instructional strategies that can address these challenges,” said Associate Professor of Adult Learning Dr. Bill Morrison. “The doctoral program is centered on professional practice and is designed to help graduates have a real-world impact in their professions to benefit education and economic development across Louisiana. “

Morrison said the Doctor Of Education In Adult Learning and Leadership will be the only advanced degree program in Louisiana “that focuses on developing community college administrators and preparing leaders and faculty to work with adult learners and workforce development.”

The program is a comprehensive 63 semester hour program providing foundation courses in adult education and organizational leadership, along with coursework targeting two concentration areas: community college leadership and adult learning and workforce development. The foundation coursework is designed to provide the student with an integrated knowledge base of theory and current best practice within the fields of adult learning, organizational leadership and instructional design.

Cross-disciplinary coursework common to each area has been incorporated whenever possible to maximize the use of resources. Within each concentration area, students may pursue specialized areas of interest and study through elective courses and gain practical experience within their own organization or area of interest through an individualized practicum experience.

For more information on the Doctor Of Education In Adult Learning and Leadership, contact Morrison at morrisonb@nsula.edu.
17 2016-10-28
Natchitoches

Grad student creates scholarship for minority males


NATCHITOCHES – A 2015 graduate of Northwestern State University created a scholarship to benefit young minority males seeking a degree, while honoring his mother, a single parent. Trevor McCray of Baton Rouge created the Davis-McCray Minority Male Scholarship with eligibility open to undergraduate students in any major to be awarded in the amount of $500 for two semesters. Applicants must submit an essay, three letters of recommendation and maintain a grade point average of 2.5 or better for both semesters. The first scholarship will be awarded for the Fall 2017 semester.



“I’m hoping to give someone a better opportunity than I had going through my undergraduate journey with a financial struggle. I also hope to give someone the opportunity to excel at their studies without the burden of financial crisis bearing down on them,” McCray said. “My ultimate aspiration with this scholarship is to encourage minority males that regardless of their situation, through ambition, strength and leadership, there is nothing they cannot conquer. The greatest gift to me is to bless others, after I’ve been blessed.”



McCray is a graduate of Scotlandville Magnet High School in Baton Rouge and earned a degree in criminal justice with a minor in pre-law and paralegal studies at Northwestern last December. He is currently pursuing a master’s degree in Student Affairs in Higher Education at Louisiana State University. He noticed that minority student resources at predominantly white institutions were underfunded and he wanted to create a gift to ease the financial burden for minority males.



“When I started college, I had the hardest time applying for and receiving scholarships that focus solely on minority males. I told myself, ‘You will make this process easier for someone else,’” McCray said. “My main reason for starting this scholarship was to make the process easier for minority males and to let minority males know that there are resources out there to help them along the way as they further their academic excellence.”



McCray said that his experiences at NSU helped him gain a sense of awareness and growth in leadership skills.



“Northwestern State not only developed me as a leader, it also developed me as a person,” he said. “Walking into NSU I definitely experience a culture shock, but it molded me to become a diversified individual, which ultimately help me understand a plethora of cultures and not just my own culture. Once I became involved and experienced the family-like atmosphere that NSU produces, I truly became a demon a heart. I struggled, I prevailed, but most of all I remained a leader throughout my journey at NSU.”







At NSU, McCray was a member of Helping Hands community service organization, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, where he served as vice president and treasurer, and the Student Government Association where he was Senator of the Year, Commissioner of the Year and treasurer. He was also a member of the Criminal Justice Club, NAACP, Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity and Order of Omega, where he served on disciplinary, traffic and appeals committees. He was a member of the Homecoming Honor Court, served as election board chairman and was an on-campus resident assistant.



“It forced me to take risks and step out of my comfort zone and it even allowed me to not be afraid to challenge the status quo,” he said. “Two things that I want people to gain from NSU: one is to always stay true to yourself and two is to utilize every resource on campus because it’s truly a place that loves helping others and seeing people succeed.”



“Trevor was a hardworking, involved student at NSU,” said Jamie Flanagan, director of Student Support Services, an office that provides support and assistance to first generation students. “He was active within several organizations on campus and participated in many service activities which included giving back to the community on and off Northwestern’s campus. He has always promoted academics and the need for more black males to educate themselves and become productive citizens.”



McCray included his mother’s maiden name, Davis, in the scholarship as a way to honor her. He described his mother, Casandra M. Davis, as “a powerful, intelligent and caring lady that never asked for much and has gone without to make sure everyone else had what they need.”



“To give my mother this honor may not be much to others, but to me this is my way of expressing to my mother that everything that she has done for me has definitely been appreciated and noticed,” McCray said.



“My reason for naming my scholarship Davis-McCray Minority Male Scholarship was because I took my father’s last name, who left my mom and I at an early age. I told my mother before she leaves this world I wanted to do something in honor of her, so I decided to put her maiden name before mine,” he explained. “She always told me she wanted me to bless others who were raised by a strong single parent and experienced financial hardship such as I did during my undergrad journey.



He was encouraged to give back by friends Matthew Miles and Assistant Director of Development Kimberly Gallow, who he believes was God speaking through to him through them. He decided that giving back sooner was better than later.



“I told myself I was going to give back to NSU once I became financially stable in a career, but my experiences and opportunity to work with young males such as myself influenced me to get the ball rolling early and with Kim and Matt pushing me to start, I knew it was time for me to invest in the future,” McCray said.



For information on creating a scholarship through the NSU Foundation, visit northwesternalumni.com or contact Gallow at (318) 357-4414 or Gallowk@nsula.edu.
17 2016-10-27
Natchitoches

Nursing students raise funds for Down Syndrome awareness


NATCHITOCHES – Level 1 nursing students from Northwestern State University participated in Shreveport’s annual Up with Downs Buddy Walk, raising $500 for local and national efforts to promote Down Syndrome Awareness month. Up with Downs is a non-profit support group for families and individuals with Down Syndrome.



“Our students had the opportunity to allocate service learning hours and volunteer for the annual Buddy Walk on October 8,” said Jolene Mateo, a nursing major from Shreveport. “My favorite part of the event was the interaction with such bright, happy, loving souls. I was carrying kids up ladders, sending them down slides and jumping hand-in-hand in bounce houses. It was a blast.”



Jennifer Goff, president of Up with Downs, presented a recognition medal to the group. The students found the experience rewarding.



“It was required this year, but next year I hope to be more involved without requirement and hope to raise more for such a wonderful organization,” said Alexis Leslie of Shreveport.



“The event was truly a wonderful highlight for a worthy cause,” said Wesley Caston of Mansfield.



“The smiles on so many wonderful children’s faces is something I will cherish and look back on fondly,” said Tricia Malone of Princeton. “I’m looking forward to many more years of ear-to-ear grins.”


17 2016-10-27
Natchitoches

NSU presents Business Awards




Northwestern State University’s College of Business and Technology honored two businesses, Crest Industries and Alliance Compressors, with Outstanding Business Awards in thanks for their partnership and support of NSU students and academic programs. From left are Dr. Margaret Kilcoyne, interim dean of the College; Kenny Robison, Crest Industries CEO; Robert Brinkerhoff, Crest Industries CFO; Scott Robison, Crest vice president; Alliance Compressors Human Resource Manager Michelle Brundidge and Alliance Plant Manager Ken Gardner with NSU President Dr. Jim Henderson. Businesses were nominated by faculty based on their efforts in coordinating internships, mentoring students, funding scholarships, hiring graduates and providing input on industry needs.


17 2016-10-27
Natchitoches

Delta Sigma Theta alumnae create L.I.F.E. scholarship


NATCHITOCHES – Members of the Iota Mu chapter of Delta Sigma Theta established a scholarship to benefit an African American female attending Northwestern State University. The scholarship was announced during Saturday’s Homecoming celebration at NSU where sorority representatives met with administrators and the scholarship’s first recipient, Azhani Bennett, a nursing major from Shreveport.



The L.I.F.E. (Ladies Investing in Future Education) award is a minority scholarship established this year through the NSU Foundation by Delta Sigma Theta alumnae commemorating their 10-year Line anniversary.



“A group of ladies decided that in commemoration of our 10-year anniversary we wanted to give back to the university with a scholarship for an African American female who demonstrated a financial need,” said Nikki Ceasar-Small. The idea came to the group this past summer during a beach reunion when the group in Line 39 discussed doing something distinctive to celebrate their 10th year as members of the Iota Mu chapter of Delta Sigma Theta.



“We wanted to make an impact in a positive way,” Ceasar-Small said. As each of the 25 members of Line 39 contributed at least $100, they also sought a partnership with the Bank of Montgomery to secure matching funds to support the scholarship.



Applicants to the L.I.F.E. Scholarship must maintain a grade point average of 2.5 or better and preference is given to a student from the Ark-La-Tex.



“Azhani’s story was compelling,” Ceasar-Small said. “We hope to attract other fraternities and sororities in giving back.”



“I am extremely grateful to have been chosen to receive this scholarship, being that I am from a middle class family and I do not receive much financial aid,” Bennett said. “This scholarship has also helped me realize that all my hard work isn't going unrecognized. When I was able to call my mother and share the great news, it was simply one of the best feelings I have ever experienced. I am tremendously honored and excited just to be considered for the scholarship, let alone receive it. I thank my family, friends and most importantly Northwestern for this opportunity.”



“We are grateful to this group of women for choosing to commemorate an important milestone in their sisterhood by supporting students,” said Assistant Director of Development Tiffany Chasteen. “Many of our students face financial uncertainties and through this gift Azhani has been given a tremendous opportunity to continue her studies.”



For information on creating a scholarship through the NSU Foundation, visit northwesternalumni.com or contact Chasteen at (318) 357-5213 or chasteent@nsula.edu.


17 2016-10-26
Natchitoches

Fall N Side View Day to be held Saturday


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University will hold its Fall N Side View Day Saturday, Oct. 29.

More than 1,000 high school juniors, seniors and parents are expected to attend the program, which is sponsored by the Office of University Recruiting. There is no cost to attend Fall N-Side View, but advance reservations should be made by calling (800) 327-1903, or (318) 357-4503 or e-mailing recruiting@nsula.edu.
Registration begins at 9 a.m. in Magale Recital Hall in the Fine Arts Annex. The program will begin at 10 a.m. in the A.A. Fredericks Auditorium. The day’s events will include a guest speaker, a student panel, a panel for parents covering scholarships, financial aid and housing options, tours of the campus and housing and the city of Natchitoches. Prospective students and parents can learn about Northwestern State’s academic programs and campus student organizations. Lunch will be available in Vic’s Café from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Lunch prices will vary.

Prospective students can get free tickets to the NSU – Nicholls football game that kicks off at 6 p.m. in Turpin Stadium. Reduced price tickets will be available at just $5 for parents and guests. A game ticket will allow free admission to pregame tailgating near Turpin Stadium.

17 2016-10-26
Natchitoches

Copyright workshop Oct. 29


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University will host a copyright workshop for creative professionals in Natchitoches this Saturday, Oct. 29. Mark J. David, entertainment/copyright attorney and author of “The Teacher’s Guide to Copyright” and “Legal Issues in the Music Industry,” will present the third in a series of ongoing legal workshops for creative professionals through Words in Progress Louisiana.



This workshop is designed specifically for musicians, songwriters, performers, writers, artists and other creative professionals who want to protect their intellectual property and creative work from theft and illegal duplication.



The workshop will be from 1-3 p.m. in the art history lecture room, Room 206 of the Fine Arts Annex.



The workshop agenda includes the following:



Introduction
Why copyright?
What is copyright?
The 6 Exclusive Rights
Trademarks, Patents & Trade Secrets
Copyrightable works
Not copyrightable
Joint Authorship
Work-for-hire
Duration of protection
-BREAK-
Public Domain
Registration
Poor Man's Copyright
Infringement
Damages
Fair Use (It ain't what you think it is)
Questions


Admission is free for creative professionals who live and/or work in north Louisiana.


17 2016-10-26
Natchitoches

Northwestern State to offer competency-based program


Northwestern State University is starting a competency-based program that will allow students seeking a computer information systems degree or certification to complete the program at a fraction of the time and cost.

The competency-based program is a flexible education model that allows students to learn and advance at their own pace. Students advance as they demonstrate mastery of specific skills or knowledge called competencies. The structure builds upon prior knowledge and experience. A student that may already know the material can pass a pre-assessment and move to the next unit. Should a student need more time to master an area, they can slow down and focus on what they need to learn.

“For Louisiana to move from the bottom ranks in educational attainment, our universities must create innovative pathways to marketable degrees, especially for adult students,” said Northwestern State President Dr. Jim Henderson. “Northwestern State’s groundbreaking approach to delivering a world class CIS degree will dramatically expand access, developing talent at a stunningly low cost. Employers win, taxpayers win, and most importantly, students win.

Students can go through the program on a credit or non-credit basis. Those who may need to gain an industry certification or gain a specific skill can take classes on a non-credit basis. Courses start on most Mondays and can be completed in one day or in up to six months.

“The Computer Information Systems area already attracts a large number of students who are working in the information technology field. These students often already have pre-existing knowledge in an array of areas,” said Curtis Penrod, coordinator of the computer information systems program at Northwestern State. “This new mode of delivery will allow us to serve this population as well as serve a new population of students who cannot pursue the CIS degree through the traditional face-to-face or even the online environments for whatever reason. For students who are truly competent and able to learn independently, they can enter this program and quickly earn credit for knowledge they already have. This new mode of delivery will hopefully allow us to expand the number of students pursuing and obtaining the CIS degree which will allow us to better meet the tremendous demand for CIS graduates and their skills.”

To earn a bachelor’s in computer information systems through the competency-based program, prospective students must be admitted to NSU. Any prior college credits can be evaluated for transfer credit that can be applied to a degree.

“The competency-based degree program will provide flexibility in a whole new way by creating opportunities for students to demonstrate their prior knowledge and mastery of learning outcomes through a personalized learning experience,” said NSU Vice President for Technology, Innovation and Economic Development Darlene Williams. “Transitioning to an online model that allows students to progress at their pace while demonstrating competencies creates a unique opportunity for students that can potentially decrease the amount of time it takes to complete a degree.”

Tuition for each course is $250 in addition to required textbooks, which is about 40 percent less than a typical class.

The computer information systems (CIS) program at NSU is nationally recognized for its excellence in systems analysis and design, database design and development, Internet web design and development and object-oriented programming. The CIS program has been recognized as an Area of Excellence by the University of Louisiana System. Since 1999, students in the program have won 15 national titles against many of the nation’s leading universities. NSU offers four concentrations in computer information systems: application development, networking and systems management, web development and core programming.

Last fall, Northwestern State and the Louisiana Department of Economic Development signed a ten-year, $2.5 million dollar cooperative endeavor agreement to enhance the computer information systems program at NSU. The purpose of this agreement is to increase the number of CIS enrollments and graduates for the workforce, specifically CSRA which has a location in Bossier City. This grant allows for the partnering of the CIS program and CSRA to ensure a qualified workforce which meets their needs. The funding is expanding the number of faculty (thus expanding course offerings), improving the technology on campus, promoting faculty development, marketing the program, and providing scholarships to students.

For more information on the competency-based program, go to nsula.edu/cb.

17 2016-10-26
Natchitoches

Cane River Reading Series continues Nov. 4


NATCHITOCHES – The Cane River Reading Series at Northwestern State University will continue with readings by Laurie Ann Cedilnik and Glenn Shaheen from 6-7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 4 in the Cane River Room of the Sylvan Friedman Student Union. The series is free and open to the public.



Cedilnik received her Ph.D. in English literature and creative writing from Western Michigan University and an MFA in fiction from the University of Houston. Her stories have been published in Epoch, Colorado Review, West Branch, Cimarron Review, Hobart and Black Warrior Review, among other venues, and was selected for the 2013 Masters Review by guest editor A.M. Homes. A native of Queens, New York, Cedilnik lives in New Orleans and teaches creative writing at Loyola University.



Shaheen is the author of the poetry collections Energy Corridor and Predatory, winner of the 2010 Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize and runner-up for the 2012 Norma Farber First book Award, and the flash fiction chapbook Unchecked Savagery. His work has appeared in Ploughshares, The New Republic, The Cincinnati Review and elsewhere.



For more information on the Cane River Reading Series, contact Stephanie Masson at massons@nsula.edu.


17 2016-10-25
Natchitoches

NSU recognized three distinguished alumni


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University recognized three outstanding alumni with distinguished service awards during the university’s Homecoming festivities Oct. 22. Honorees were Tommy Chester, Distinguished Alumnus; Dr. Cade Brumley, Outstanding Young Alumnus, and Nicole Shunte Gray, Alumni Volunteer of the Year. Each award is presented to a Northwestern graduate who has exhibited dedication and loyalty to the university’s programs and missions and has demonstrated continued interest in service to the NSU as a volunteer, donor or advocate.



The Distinguished Alumnus award is presented to an alumnus who has a demonstrated record of service to NSU and long-term interest in serving the university. The recipient must have graduated at least 10 years prior to nomination and must be 40 years of age or older at the time of nomination.



Chester earned a bachelor’s degree in 1967 and a master’s in 1969 from Northwestern State where he played baseball and was inducted into Phi Delta Kappa honor society. After graduation, he taught chemistry and biology in two parishes before working in student affairs at Louisiana College and Louisiana Tech University. He has been a State Farm agent since 1977 and has been involved with Northwestern and with his community, serving as president of the Arcadia Jaycees and as a state officer, president of the Lion’s Club, board member of Cedar Creek School and commissioner of Dixie Baseball in Arcadia.



Since moving to Natchitoches, he has been involved with the Natchitoches Parish Police and Fire Board, serving as it’s NSU delegate, and the board of the Boys and Girls Club of El Camino Real. He has been a member and is past president of the NSU Alumni Association and Demons Unlimited. He is a deacon at First Baptist Church and a member of the Association for the Preservation of Historic Natchitoches. His and his wife Cindy have been married 48 years and have three children and five grandchildren.



The Outstanding Young Alumnus Award is presented to a young alumnus has demonstrated an early record of service to Northwestern State. Recipients must have attained alumni status within 10 years and must be 40 years old or younger at the time of nomination.



Brumley has served as superintendent for the DeSoto Parish School District since 2012. During his tenure, DeSoto Parish has vaulted to the top third of Louisiana districts for academic achievement and currently ranks second in the state for rate of academic improvement. Graduation rates have increased from 79 to 96 percent, the largest gain in Louisiana and the district’s ACT gains are ranked first in Louisiana for rate of improvement.



Brumley regularly speaks on educational leadership and organizational health and is the author of “Leadership Standards in Action: A School Principal as Servant-Leader. He owns and operates Brumley Consulting, a leadership development group that supports the needs of districts, schools and non-profits seeking to improve professional practices. He is actively involved with Northwestern State University alumni engagement initiatives, with professional initiatives, with his church and his community and has been recognized with many honors in those areas.



Brumley earned a bachelor’s degree in education at Northwestern State in 2002, a master’s in education at Louisiana State University-Shreveport in 2004 and a doctor of education in leadership from Stephen F. Austin University in 2007. He is a 2010 graduate of the Harvard University Superintendent’s Academy and a fellow in the Broad Superintendent’s Academy. He and his wife, the former Toni Vail, also a graduate of Northwestern State, are the parents of two boys.



The Volunteer of the Year award is given to a member of the NSU Alumni Association who demonstrates an exemplary record of volunteering time, talents and service to the Alumni Association and demonstrates active involvement with a chapter, alumni interest group, affiliate program, NSU Alumni Board or other forums of volunteer service to the university.



Gray has been a strong advocate for NSU and its growth, having organized and established the NSU Black Alumni Alliance, which promotes the expansion of the alumni network. In 2008, she established the James Oliphant Memorial Football Scholarship, which is named for her father, a 1977 graduate of NSU. She currently serves on the executive committees for the Northwestern State University Foundation Board of Directors and the Demons Unlimited Foundation Board of Directors. She also serves on the fundraising committee and is a member of the Dallas chapter of the Northwestern State University Alumni Association. She has a strong alumni presence both on and off the campus with a primary mission of helping others achieve a quality education.



Gray graduated from Northwestern State with a degree in journalism in 1994. As a student, she was president of the student chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists, Public Relations Society of America and Northwestern’s first student chapter of the NAACP. She also competed in the 1992 Lady of the Bracelet pageant and was selected to represent Northwestern State at Texas A&M’s annual Southwestern Black Student Leadership Conference.



With more than 20 years of experience as a writer and editor, Gray began her career in journalism at the Houston Chronicle and later developed an interest in business writing. She currently works for Ernst & Young as assistant director communications and pursuit strategy and co-owns a personal training facility in Carrollton, Texas. She is also an active member of the Professional Women’s Network, which supports women’s leadership and career development within her firm.



The honorees were recognized Saturday, Oct. 22, along with other special guests, during the Homecoming football game.


17 2016-10-25
Shreveport

Shreveport native to perform fall concert with NSU Chamber Choir


Shreveport native Amanda Charles will be featured in the Northwestern State University Chamber Choir fall concert later this week.

The event will take place at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 27 in Magale Recital Hall. Admission is free and open to the public.

Director of Choral Activities Dr. Nicholaus B. Cummins will conduct the choir.

The concert, titled “Let My Love Be Heard,” will include sacred music, Southern folk hymns, and a prayer along with American and European folk songs.

Cummins said, “The work ‘Let My Love Be Heard,’ which is the title of our program, is an anthem to those who perished in recent terrorist attacks. It is a way of spreading hope of peace and love.”

All of the works on the program are unaccompanied. Some of the songs will be included on a CD the choral program plans to release next spring.

The Chamber Choir will perform “Regina Coeli” by Romuald Twardowski, “Diffusa Est Gratia” by Giovanni Nanino, “Praise to the Lord” by F. Melius Christiansen, “Saints Bound for Heaven” arranged by Robert Shaw and Alice Parker, “Wondrous Love” arranged by Paul Christiansen featuring soloists Jackie Coleman of Slidell, Nadya Cesario of Fort Smith, Arkansas, Destinee Roberson of Natchitoches and Jenson Wall of Denham Springs and “Precious Lord” arranged by Roy Ringwald featuring soloist Amanda Charles of Shreveport.

Also on the program are “Let My Love Be Heard” by Jake Runestad, “Shenandoah” arranged by James Erb, “Deep River” arranged by Norman Luboff featuring soloist soprano Rachael Bryant of Pineville, “Nelly Bly” arranged by Jack Halloran, “Jede Sedlak” arranged by Jaroslav Krcek, “Aftonen” by Hugo Alfven and “Kalejs Kala Debesis” by Selga Mence.

The Chamber Choir, founded in 1987 by Dr. Burt Allen, is a highly auditioned choral ensemble that specializes in performing music suitable for smaller choirs.

Membership is made up of students at Northwestern State, many of whom are music or music education majors, although several have majors in other fields including business, social work, social sciences and theatre.


17 2016-10-24
Natchitoches

NSU game honors breast cancer awareness, player reflects on losing mom


Natchitoches -

In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, LA dedicated today's Lady Demons' soccer match to forking cancer, but for this team, today's special game has a deeper meaning for one Lady Demons soccer player.

It is shocking but one in eight women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer sometime throughout their lifetime.

Jacqueline Manza is one of them. Her mother was diagnosed with breast cancer when Jacqueline was just in middle school, and today she had the chance to honor her mom and shine a light on this disease.

"It really was special that, not only did we win but, we won on a special event and especially for breast cancer awareness game, which meant a lot to me because I played for my mom, and I know a lot of the girls on the team were supporting my mom as well."

Jacqueline’s mom passed to breast cancer on August 9th, 2009.

Today, her teammates, the crowd, and the field were all decked out in pink to support forking cancer.

Her teammate, Esdeina Gonzales, says, "It's inspiring to watch her go on with life knowing that she lost her mom, someone that I feel like I would be crushed to lose."

Jacqueline says coping with her mother's passing has made her become the stronger person she is today.

"Definitely helped me to grow up fast and to be able to handle things, little things like doing my laundry or trying to pick something out."

She plays for a division one soccer team, and is in school for nursing. There is no doubt about how proud she has made her mom and family.

"I think it helped me just have a different outlook on life, in a way, and just to not take things for granted, and like my mom says and I say all the time-to never stop dreaming."

So she wants to carry on her mother's message for anyone going through the difficulty breast cancer brings: never stop dreaming, and keep pushing forward.

To top it all off, the Lady Demons managed to make their game dedication that much more meaningful by defeating Southeastern Louisiana with a score of four to nothing.


17 2016-10-24
Natchitoches

Tri Sigma alumna creates Extra Mile Scholarship for Alpha Zeta chapter


NATCHITOCHES – An alumna of Northwestern State University’s Alpha Zeta Chapter of Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority created a scholarship that will be presented each year to members who best exemplify the ideals of scholarship, service and character. The Sherry Fargerson Morgan “Extra Mile” Scholarship was announced during the sorority’s leadership dedication program on Oct. 22, which took place on conjunction with NSU Homecoming Festivities.



"It meant a lot to be part of a group of young women who were there for me no matter what the need - someone to listen, encourage and love me just the way I am,” Morgan said. “Several of my lifetime friends are those I met in Sigma Sigma Sigma. I have been blessed beyond measure and want to give back to a most deserving group of girls who, I know, will strive to do their best and go that ‘Extra Mile.’”



Applicants must be initiated members of Alpha Zeta Chapter of Sigma Sigma Sigma with a 2.75 cumulative and previous semester grade point average. Students must be a full-time student. Sophomore clinical students may also be eligible if they are active members of the chapter at the time of application. Recipients will receive a grant varying from $500 to $1,000.



Recipients are selected through a rigorous application process that awards points for campus and chapter leadership, grades, employment and a series of essay questions. The program seeks to recognize the effort and seriousness that a student displays in pursuit of academic excellence and their commitment to applying themselves in the classroom and in life outside the classroom by going the extra mile.



The award mirrors a similar one established at NSU in 2008 by Morgan’s husband, David Morgan, who initiated the Pi Kappa Phi Extra Mile scholarship for outstanding and high achieving members of NSU’s Beta Omicron Chapter. Morgan created the program to inspire students to pursue excellence in academics, campus and chapter leadership, service and employment.



"As someone who works with college students on a daily basis, I am thankful for donors like Sherry Fargerson Morgan, who make it possible for those students, who go above and beyond, to be rewarded for their efforts,” said Kat Gillan (1999, 2002), a Sigma Sigma Sigma alumna. Gillan is director of Fraternity and Sorority Life at the University of Alabama. “Having personally benefited from involvement specific scholarships as an undergraduate, the additional financial assistance made it possible for me to stay involved on campus while completing my degree. I see the Extra Mile scholarship as an opportunity to recognize those students who are making a difference at Northwestern State University. I hope students who are recipients of this award recognize its value and continue to give back to NSU as they pursue their degree and beyond."



“This scholarship will help deserving young women, those who excel in character, service, conduct, scholarship and work ethic,” said Chapter Advisor Reatha Cox.



Mrs. Morgan said that her life is defined by the Bible verse Ephesians 3:20: “Now to him who is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine, according to his power that is at work within us” and by the philosophy that to whom much is given much is expected.



For information on support student scholarships through the NSU Foundation, visit northwesternalumni.com or call (318) 357-4414.
17 2016-10-24
Natchitoches

NSU comes to the aid of two high schools damaged by floods


Northwestern State University along with a Louisiana and Texas high school have worked together to help a Baton Rouge-area high school damaged by recent floods. NSU worked with Alvarado (Texas) High and Parkway High in Bossier City to lend Central High School’s color guard uniforms, shoes, practice flags, performance flags, rifles, sabers and props.


17 2016-10-24
Natchitoches

Speakers address emerging technology, pathways to success at 50th annual Porter Forum


NATCHITOCHES – Speakers at Northwestern State University’s 50th annual J. Walter Porter Forum gave students a glimpse at technology of the near future and advice on how to succeed in business and in life. This year’s featured speakers were Corinne Hoisington, a professor of information systems technology at Central Virginia Community College in Lynchburg, Virginia, and David Morgan, a Northwestern State alumnus and successful insurance executive.



Hoisington’s talk addressed new and innovative ways to use technology and advances that will affect teaching and learning, communication, business, entertainment, medicine, transportation and other facets of life.



“Automation is everywhere,” Hoisington said. Driverless vehicles are already a reality and eliminate the need for parking lots, as well as reducing drunk driving and fatal accidents. Trucking will evolve to self-driving trucks and automated buses are being tested in some cities. More amazing are the advances in augmented reality and virtual reality that have great potential to blend the real world with a virtual world.



Hoisington drew students from the audience to try out VR headset devices like Viewmaster and Oculus Rift that create an immersive 3D world, devices that are becoming more affordable and could transform the way people watch and record athletic events, movies, games and other experiences. Microsoft’s Hololens may have even greater potential by allowing designers to tweak hologram images of a product in development before printing it on a 3D printer. In the medical field, doctors could examine a 3D hologram of a patient MRI to identify and treat medical conditions. In education, lectures could be delivered from an instructor thousands of miles away via holoportation and could be recorded and played back.



Most students want to major in something to help change the world, cure or help people, Hoisington said. She identified the fastest growing job opportunities in business and technology as data scientists, tax managers and solutions technology architects.



“Look forward to the next 50 years with excitement,” she said. “You are the generation who are going to become the inventors. In your lifetime you will change the world.”



In his address, Morgan discussed his career path, overcoming challenges and putting dreams into action. He is founder of Association Member Benefits Advisors (AMBA), which employs more than 300 full time agents to service members in 30 states. He and his wife, Sherry, also an NSU graduate, have maintained close ties to the university. Morgan is a member of the NSU Hall of Distinction, the Long Purple Line and the Pi Kappa Phi Hall of Fame. He has served on the NSU President’s Council and the Alumni Association Board of directors and continues to be involved with Pi Kappa Phi.



“I have a huge attitude of gratitude,” Morgan said, acknowledging the help he had along the way. The Alexandria native grew up in modest circumstances, but developed a strong work ethic and attended NSU with a desire to become something different.



“I thought growing up poor was a disadvantage but later on I realized that made me hungry,” he said. At NSU, he got involved with Pi Kappa Phi and the Student Government Association and was the university’s mascot, Vic the Demon. Those experiences helped him develop communication skills.



“I didn’t have a 4.0,” he said. “Prospective employers want to know what you did outside the classroom. Get involved. Develop people skills and be a participant.”



A born salesman, Morgan described his first job selling insurance and his climb to success as his grew his accounts and moved to the next level. He founded and later sold United Teacher Associates Insurance Company and created AMBA in 2001.



He offered some tenets to help students succeed in business: Success is your choice. A degree is not an entitlement. Attitude is key. Expect to win. Expect to start at the bottom. Don’t think you are too good for any job. You only stay at the bottom as long as you want to. Go the extra mile. Start early. Stay late. Success is a journey, not a destination. One idea, properly executed, can be the key. Keep improving your skills. Every adversity has an equal or greater benefit at a later time.



“When you go to work you have to be committed. Become a student of the business, dedicate yourself and work hard,” Morgan said. “I am the luckiest guy in the world, living the American dream.”



The Porter Forum is presented annually by the College of Business and Technology and brings business executives to the NSU campus to speak about best practices, ethics and emerging trends in business. The forum was established by family and friends of the last J. Walter Porter in recognition of his interest in improving the image of business as a career field and his concern for the moral and ethical standards of business.


17 2016-10-20
Natchitoches

Two Northwestern State students win Louisiana music competition


Two Northwestern State University students won first place in state competition at the annual Music Teachers National Association Young Artist Performance Competition held at Centenary College.

Sebastian Alfaro Fontalvo of Cartagena, Columbia, won first place in senior level brass and Carlos Garcia of Cartagena, Columbia, won first place in string bass. Fontalvo and Garcia will represent Louisiana at the MTNA regional competition in Jonesboro, Arkansas, in January.

Alonso Restrepo Cardozo of Cartagena, Colombia, was selected as an alternate in cello.

Other Northwestern State students participating in the competition were Ronald Rodriguez of Cartagena, Colombia, on piano, Nathan Roth of Luling and Francisco Ballestas Sayas of Cartagena, Colombia on trumpet.

Rodriguez is a student of Assistant Professor of Piano Francis Yang. Fontalvo, Roth and Ballestas Sayas are students of Associate Professor of Trumpet Galindo Rodriguez. Restrepo is a student of Associate Professor of Cello Paul Christopher. Garcia is a student of Christopher and Peter Haas.

Graduate students Robin Tan and Daniel Ley performed as accompanists.
17 2016-10-20
Natchitoches

Chapman Nyaho to present piano recital Oct. 25


NATCHITOCHES – Pianist William H. Chapman Nyaho will perform at Northwestern State University Tuesday, Oct. 25 at 7:30 p.m. in Magale Recital Hall. The concert is part of the Louisiana Piano Series International. Tickets are $15. Students are admitted free. Dr. Francis Yang and Dr. Christine Burczyk Allen are the organizers of the Louisiana Piano Series International.

Chapman Nyaho will perform works by Florence Price, Beethoven, Joshua Uzoigwe, Fred Onovwerosuoke, Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, Margaret Bonds and Rachmaninov.

Chapman Nyaho received his degrees from St. Peter's College, Oxford University, the Eastman School of Music and the University of Texas at Austin. He also studied at the Conservatoire de Musique de Genève, Switzerland. Nyaho is the recipient of prizes from international piano competitions.

A member of the piano faculty at Pacific Lutheran University, Chapman Nyaho was a North Carolina visiting artist for four years then taught at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette and was the recipient of the Distinguished Professor Award and held the Heymann Endowed Professorship. He was also the recipient of the Acadiana Arts Council Distinguished Artist Award. His summer teaching appointments include Interlochen Summer Arts Camp and Adamant Music School.

Chapman Nyaho's performing experience includes recitals in Asia, Africa, Europe, North America and the Caribbean. His recitals have typically included standard repertoire and piano music by composers of the African Diaspora. He has also been guest artist with orchestras in the United States. Chapman Nyaho has been featured on radio and television broadcasts in Ghana, Switzerland, and National Public Radio in the USA. He has released critically acclaimed compact discs “SENKU: Piano Music by Composers of African Descent, ASA: Piano Music by Composers of African Descent and Aaron Copland: Music For Two Pianos.”

Chapman Nyaho has also compiled and edited a five-volume graded anthology “Piano Music of Africa and the African Diaspora,” published by Oxford University Press. He is a regular guest clinician, giving presentations, lecture-recitals and workshops in elementary schools, high schools, colleges and universities and serves as adjudicator for national and international piano competitions in North America, Europe and Africa.

17 2016-10-19
Natchitoches

HMT students get "Smarty Party" to celebrate scholarships


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University students who were awarded scholarships from the American Hotel and Lodging Educational Foundation (AH&LEF) and Louisiana Restaurant Association Education Foundation (LRAEF) were recognized last week by faculty and administrators in the Hospitality Management and Tourism program. Students awarded scholarships are enrolled full-time in an undergraduate hospitality-related degree-granting program and maintain an over all grade point average of 3.0 or better.



AH&LEF student recipients are Ariel Adkins of Natchitoches, Brianna Ashley of Deville, Katarina Haymon of Leesville, Taylor Jennings of Metairie, Shelby Noustens of Destrehan and Rachel Taylor of Shreveport. Nominated by faculty, they will receive awards of $1,000-$1,500.



McKenna Opbroek of Keithville was named recipient of a scholarship awarded by the Louisiana Restaurant Association Education Foundation. She was the first recipient of the LRAEF ProStart scholarship, awarded to students that have become ProStart certified. ProStart is a two-year program for high school students to learn about culinary arts and management skills. This is her second year to receive the ProStart scholarship.



Terrian Marchand of Natchitoches earned a culinary arts scholarship from NSU, funded through the efforts of students who raise money through catering and organized holiday food fund raisers.



NSU’s HMT program is housed under the university’s School of Business in the College of Business and Technology and offers concentrations in culinary arts, hospitality services and travel and tourism. For information on programming, visit hmt.nsula.edu.
17 2016-10-19
Natchitoches

SBDC will offer Jumpstart Assistance to area businesses


NATCHITOCHES – The Louisiana Small Business Development Center is offering assistance to Louisiana businesses interesting in applying for the 2017 Startup Prize Competition.



“I am seeking Louisiana companies and/or start ups who wish to apply for the Louisiana Startup Prize for 2017,” said Dana Cawthon, regional director of the Small Business Development Center, northwest and central Louisiana region. “I am offering a Jumpstart assistance in working with alumni, business owners or students wishing to take their business projects to the next level.”



LSBDC will provide assistance to accepted candidates by developing business concepts for six plans in marketing/sales, accounting/finances, technology, human resources, operations and legal matters. The service is provided as a courtesy to help candidates get a Jumpstart for the 2017 Louisiana Startup prize competition.



Applicants must be a Louisiana company, have creative or innovative concepts and be cost-effective. The deadline to submit applications is Friday, Nov. 18.



For more information on Jumpstart assistance, call the SBDC at (318) 357-5611 or email lsbdc.nwcr@lsbdc.org. For information on the Louisiana StartUp Prize, visit lastartupprize.com.



The LSBDC is Louisiana's largest and most accessible source of assistance for entrepreneurs and the only statewide nationally accredited program that provides business consulting to entrepreneurs at no cost. The Louisiana Small Business Development Center Network, hosted by Northwestern State University, is an accredited member of
the National Association of Small Business Development Centers and funded in part through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration, Louisiana Economic Development and participating universities.




17 2016-10-18
Monroe

Northwestern State names 2016 Homecoming Honor Court


Leighann Westfall of Houston and Otha Nelson of Baton Rouge were selected as queen and king of the 2016 Homecoming Honor Court at Northwestern State University.

Westfall and Nelson are part of a 22-member honor court, which will participate in activities during Homecoming Week at Northwestern State and will be presented at halftime of the Homecoming game against McNeese State on Saturday.

The court also includes Katie Adams and Sarah Gandy of Monroe, Sha’Destiny Blackshire and Jaylon Lewis of Shreveport, Jordan Brisco of Opelousas, Anthony Cannata of Kenner, Myranda Degraw and Dedrick Lewis of Baton Rouge, Curtis Fennell of Boyce, Ashley Fortenberry and Emilie King of Natchitoches, T.J. Gorham of Alexandria, Demetri Hill of Mansfield, Abby Hinds of Many, Aly Jacobs of Houston, Bralyn James of Lake Charles, Nestor Mercado-Garcia of Cartegena, Colombia, John Pearce of Livonia, Antavious Roberson of Arcadia and Trey Roberts of Pineville.

Westfall is a hospitality management and tourism major in the Louisiana Scholars’ College. She is the daughter of Tim and Carrieann Westfall. A member of Phi Mu Fraternity, Westfall has been a freshman orientation leader and member of the Demon Days Welcome Week Committee. She is a President’s Leadership Program mentor and member of Order of Omega, Purple Jackets and Phi Kappa Phi. Westfall is a President’s List student.

Nelson is a junior liberal arts major with a concentration in politics, philosophy and economics in the Louisiana Scholars’ College. He is the son of Naomi Nelson and Curtis Nelson. A member of Sigma Nu Fraternity, he is vice president of the Student Government Association. Nelson is a member of the Interfraternity Council and Alpha Lambda Delta. He is a board member of the Fraternity and Sorority PAC and was student speaker at the 2015 New Student Convocation.

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Adams is a senior social work major. She is the daughter of Martin and Jennifer Adams. A member of Phi Mu Fraternity, Adams is a member of Order of Omega and was in the Presidential Leadership Program. She is a Dean’s List student.

Blackshire is a senior criminal justice major. She is the daughter of Carolyn Blackshire. A member of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc., Blackshire is a member of Helping Hands, the National Pan-Hellenic Council and the African American Caucus. A President’s List student, she is a recipient of the Loftin Scholarship.


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ULM celebrates homecoming with parade through campus

Brisco is a senior allied health major with a concentration in radiologic sciences. She is the daughter of Kathleen Dartez and Frank Brisco. A member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc, Brisco is a member of the Student Government Association and Blue Key Honor Society. She is a member of the National Pan-Hellenic Council and was on the Demon Dazzler Dance Line and Purple Pizazz Pom Pon Line.

Cannata is the son of Peter and Heather Cannata. He is a senior mass communication major. Cannata is a member of Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity, the Student Activities Board, Order of Omega and Demon Volunteers in Progress. He was an announcer at campus radio station KNWD and was a freshman orientation major and part of the Presidential Leadership Program. Cannata is a member of Blue Key and Alpha Lambda Delta.

Degraw is a senior psychology major. She is the daughter of Gary and Jeanne Degraw. A member of Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority, Degraw was a freshman orientation leader and was in the Presidential Leadership Program. She is a member of Demon Volunteers in Progress, Alpha Lambda Delta and Phi Kappa Phi. Degraw was on the Demon Days Welcome Week committee. She is a President’s List student and has worked in the First Year Experience Office.

Fennell is a junior electronic engineering major. He is son of Keith and Sandra Fennell. A Dean’s List student, he was on the Demon Days Welcome Committee and has worked in the First Year Experience Office. He is a member of Demon Volunteers in Progress and was in the President’s Leadership Program.

Fortenberry is the daughter of Fount and Lisa Fortenberry. She is a junior business administration major. Fortenberry is a member of Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority and Demon Volunteers in Progress. She is a Dean’s List student.

Gandy is a senior mass communication major. She is the daughter of Butch and Arlene Gandy. A President’s List student, Gandy is a member of the NSU cheerleading squad and Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority. She is a member of Purple Jackets and Alpha Lambda Delta. Gandy has been on the staff of the campus newspaper, the Current Sauce and the yearbook, Potpourri.

Gorham is a senior social work major. He is the son of Terrell Gorham and Jennifer Gorham. He is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., Order of Omega, the National Panhellenic Caucus, Helping Hands and the African-American Caucus. A Dean’s List student, Gorham is a former member of the Student Government Association and Student Activities Board.

Hill is the son of Lamesa Wyatt, Terry London and Nanette Hill. He is a senior biology major. He is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., the American Society for Microbiology, Tri Beta Honor Society, Blue Key Honor Society and Lifted Voices Gospel Choir. A Dean’s List student, he was the recipient of internships at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston and the University of Massachusetts Boston.

Hinds is a junior health and exercise science major with a concentration in occupational therapy. She is the daughter of Amy and Rodney Wyatt and Eddy and Kristin Hinds. A member of Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority, Hinds is a freshman orientation leader and a Demon Volunteer in Progress. She is a member of Purple Jackets Honor Society, Order of Omega and a Presidential Leadership Program mentor. A President’s List student, Hinds was named Greek Woman of the Year.

Jacobs is a junior accounting major. She is the daughter of Edmond and Connie Jacobs. A President’s List student, she is a member of Phi Mu Fraternity. Jacobs is the Student Government Association treasurer and was a 2016 freshman orientation leader. She was a member of the Presidential Leadership Program and Alpha Lambda Delta and was on the Demon Days Welcoming Committee.

James is a junior biology/pre-dentistry major. She is the daughter of Tracy and Joshua James. A Dean’s List student, she is president of the Student Activities Board. James is a member of Demon Volunteers in Progress and was in the Presidential Leadership Program. She was a freshman orientation leader.

King is a senior mathematics and secondary education major with a concentration in mathematics. She is the daughter of Dawn and Dustin Eubanks and David King. A member of Phi Mu Fraternity, she is the organization’s president. King is president of the Purple Jackets Club. She is a member of Order of Omega and Alpha Lambda Delta. King is a former freshman orientation leader, NSU cheerleader and Student Activities Board representative. She was named the Recognized Student Organization “Demon of the Year” and Phi Mu Active of the Year.

Dedrick Lewis is a junior business administration major with a concentration in marketing. He is the son of Trish Lewis and Nathan Lewis Sr. A Dean’s List student, Dedrick Lewis is a member of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity and the Spirit of Northwestern Marching Band. He is in the NSU Lacrosse Club and is active on the Student Activities Board. He is a member of the Northwestern State Horn Society.

Jaylon Lewis is a junior business administration major. He is the son of Tiffany Burden. Jaylon Lewis is a member of the Student Activities Board, Helping Hands, the African-American Caucus and Demon Days Welcome Week Committee. He is an Honor Roll student.

Mercado-Garcia is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc. and the NSU Soccer Club. He is involved with the International Student Resource Center. Mercado-Garcia is a music education and industrial engineering technology major and is a Dean’s List student. He is the son of Nelcyra Garcia.

Pearce is a senior communications major. He is the son of Frankie Pearce and Gina Griffon. Pearce is president of the Student Government Association and a member of Demon Volunteers in Progress. He was a freshman orientation leader and a member of Alpha Lambda Delta, Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity and the Order of Omega. Pearce is a Dean’s List student.

Roberson is the son of Suzette Cato and Anthony Roberson. He is a junior elementary education major. He is the Student Government Association student affairs commissioner. Roberson is a freshman orientation leader and was in the Capstone Leadership Program. He was on the Demon Days Welcome Week committee and served as a mentor in the President’s Leadership Program. He is an honor roll student.

Roberts is a senior psychology major with a concentration in substance abuse. He is the son of Jodie and Brenda Roberts. A Dean’s List student, he is secretary of the Student Government Association. Roberts is a member of Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity, the Interfraternity Council, Demon Volunteers in Progress and the President’s Leadership Program.


17 2016-10-18
Natchitoches

NSU students to raise money for musicians impacted by floods


Several Northwestern State University music students will be donating their time and talent to help fellow musicians who lost instruments in the recent floods at the Cenla Music Teacher Association’s Playathon on Friday, Oct. 21.

The Playathon will be held from 4 p.m. until 8 p.m. at the Alexandria Museum of Art and River Oaks Square Arts Center in downtown Alexandria in conjunction with Artwalk. For more information, contact Ellene Owens at doctorzack66@hotmail.com.

Students participating from Northwestern State are Matthew Aguilera of San Antonio, Claudia Musgrove of Forest Hill, Natalia Zapata, Valentina Perez and Ronald Rodriguez of Cartagena, Colombia, and Ramon Barralaga of San Pedro Sula, Honduras. Students of NSU Music Academy teachers Robyn Tan and Orlando Trucco will be performing as well.

Proceeds from the Playathon will be added to Louisiana Music Teachers Association’s Save Our Students Fund, which aids students and teachers in crisis situations who are in need of monetary assistance to continue musical pursuits.

Students prepare one (or several) pieces. They can be solos or duets and can be of any genre. Students then get sponsors to pledge an amount for their performance. Sponsors may pledge either per performance or a flat amount. After the performance, students will collect the donations from the sponsors and turn it in to their music teacher. Funds will be forwarded to the Louisiana Music Teachers Association.

NSU Assistant Professor of Piano Francis Yang is president of the Cenla Music Teacher’s Association.


17 2016-10-17
Natchitoches

Northwestern State Homecoming schedule filled with reunions, receptions and attractions


Northwestern State University will celebrate Homecoming 2016 with a weekend of activities, events, reunions and receptions Oct. 21-22 at the school’s main campus in Natchitoches, starting with Friday’s golf tournament, art exhibit, parade, pep rally and Rockin’ on the Riverbank Homecoming Festival featuring Louisiana rock/soul artist Marc Broussard. Saturday’s events include a full roster of activities beginning with Breakfast and Bingo at Collins Pavilion, several departmental induction ceremonies, a Vietnam War commemoration, tailgating, football and the presentation of this 2016 Honor Court. Some times and locations may be subject to change, so verifying with organizers is recommended. Guests can RSVP or register for most open events by visiting northwesternalumni.com/homecoming16.




17 2016-10-17
Natchitoches

Free Praxis seminar Nov. 3


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Gallaspy College of Education and Human Development will host a Praxis Core Writing Test Seminar that will include test-taking tips and free study materials. The seminar will be from 3:30-5 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 3 in Room C-106 of NSU’s Teacher Education Center, 150 Tarleton Dr., Natchitoches.



The seminar is free to current and prospective students. NSU’s Academic Success Center is a co-sponsor.




17 2016-10-17
Natchitoches

NSU students participate in Shreveport mass fatality disaster drill


NATCHITOCHES – Nearly 300 Northwestern State University students, faculty and staff from the university’s College of Nursing and School of Allied Health participated in the Shreveport Regional Airport mass casualty disaster drill Wednesday, an exercise coordinated by the Caddo Parish Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness in partnership with Louisiana Region 7 Hospital Preparedness Coalition, the Louisiana Poison Center and LSU Health Sciences-Shreveport with support from Barksdale Air Force personnel.



The Federal Aviation Administration requires commercial air service airports to conduct a full scale exercise once every three years in order for to maintain compliance with safety regulations. The exercise will be evaluated by FAA officials, as well as numerous emergency response providers for response times, coordination of the response and other objectives.



Tammy Curtis, a professor in the School of Allied Health, coordinated NSU’s participation in the drill and was an actor controller. CONSAH faculty said it was good experience for the students to be part of a disaster drill.



“They see how professionals work,” Curtis said. “A lot of these students will soon be professional themselves and they benefit from this experience.”



The students’ day began at 5:30 a.m. with Phase 1 moulage in which make up and fake blood were applied to simulate a variety of mock injuries, from lacerations and burns to massive head trauma. Moulage adds to the simulated reality for first responders who must triage and treat patients, according to James McManus, Flight Commander for Education and Training at Barksdale Air Force Base.



“It elicits a response,” McManus said. “The responders need to react appropriately and evaluate appropriately. Learning includes what you see and what you hear. All the information the first responders are taking needs to be congruent. The beauty of training with NSU students is they can act out their injuries.”



Each volunteer was given a card with patient information that listed their injuries and vital signs, whether they were conscious, unresponsive or confused. When examined by first-responders, the students were to portray their injuries without overacting.



Radiology student Jessica Mango’s character had burns and was missing a 3-year-old child. Nursing student Gabriella Gomez portrayed a patient with massive head trauma who was unresponsive.



“I don’t think she makes it,” Gomez said.



Organizers set forth the scenario that a Category 4 hurricane was on track to make a direct hit to New Orleans where massive evacuations were ordered and evacuation routes overwhelmed. The National Disaster Medical System was activated to assist with patient transport from New Orleans to Shreveport Regional Airport using a combination of military and civilian aircraft and the national ambulance contract.



Emergency exercise coordinators created two scenes in which NSU students played the part of those in need of emergency medical attention.



At Scene 1, an evacuation plane landed and aero-medical crew and Shreveport Fire and EMS began reporting the status of patients on the plane, many who needed immediate medical attention. Medical evacuees were to be triaged and distributed to hospitals in Shreveport, Bossier City or Louisiana Region 7. Those students were removed from the plane, triaged and evaluated in a nearby hangar.



At Scene 2, a diverted American Eagle flight lands but overshoots the runway, causing the airplane’s nose and midsection to slice off the runway, injuring crew and an unknown number of passengers onboard. The fuselage ruptured creating a fuel leak and the tower was unable to reach the crew by radio. Students at Scene 2 placed themselves around the tarmac while first responders from the airport and the Shreveport Fire Department arrived on the scene to evaluate patients and remove them from the accident site.



Meanwhile at local hospitals, student volunteers were placed in emergency rooms exhibiting traumatic injuries associated with a mass fatality incident and hazmat contamination, including pediatric issues and OB complications.



The exercises have real-world applications; during Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005, patient evacuation required triage, off-loading and staging patients from hospitals and nursing homes on ambulances. As a Federal Coordinating Center (FCC) for the National Medical System, Shreveport could receive evacuees from future hurricanes, earthquakes or other catastrophic events in the U.S.



Organizations that participated in addition to NSU included Balentine Ambulance, Barksdale Airforce Base, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms; Caddo Parish Coroner, Caddo Parish Sheriff’s Office, CHRISTUS Highland Hospital, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Knights of Columbus, Louisiana State Police, Minden Medical Center, Overton Brooks VA Medical Center, Salvation Army, Shreveport Airport Authority, Shreveport Fire Department, Shreveport Police Department, Specialist Hospital of Shreveport, Springhill Medical Center, University Health-Shreveport, VHA Office of Emergency Management and Willis Knighton (Bossier, Pierremont, South, Medical Center).



“I received positive comments concerning the student's roles as casualties,” Curtis said. “I was informed that the student's acting and the moulage made the drill better than ever.”


17 2016-10-14
Natchitoches

50th Annual Porter Forum to be held Oct. 20


The Northwestern State University School of Business will host the 50th annual J. Walter Porter Forum Thursday, Oct. 20 in Magale Recital Hall. The Form begins with a reception at 9 a.m. in the Orville Hanchey Art Gallery. The program starts at 9:40 a.m.

This year’s theme is “Celebrating the Past, Present and Future of Business and Technology.” The featured speakers are Corinne Hoisington, professor of information technology at Central Virginia Community College in Lynchburg, Virginia, and David Morgan, co-founder of Association Member Benefits Advisors. Hoisington will also speak to students in the School of Business at 2 p.m. in Room 207 of Russell Hall.

Hoisington has more than 25 years of teaching experience. She travels more than 200,000 miles a year keynoting to college and university professors and K-12 venues for such customers as the Microsoft Corporation, Microsoft’s Camp 21 International Events, Cengage Learning, Capital One International Bank and the International South by Southwest event. Hoisington is the recipient of the Microsoft Most Valuable Professional in Computer Programming. She has authored more than 20 textbooks with Cengage Learning/National Geographic such as the Android Studio Boot Camp, Dreamweaver Creative Cloud, Outlook 2016, Office 2016, Technology Now for SAM and Visual Basic 2015 with App Development.

Morgan graduated from Bolton High School in Alexandria and received a degree in Business from NSU.

After graduation, he started his career in the insurance field. He funded and later sold United Teacher Associates Insurance Company and in 2001, Association Member Benefits Advisors was created. Currently, AMBA provides a broad range of member benefits in 30 states to over 4 million association members with over 300 full time agents. AMBA is home to many NSU graduates with successful careers.

At Northwestern State, Morgan was president of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, inducted into “Who’s Who Among College Students” and was the school mascot, Vic the Demon.

He is part of the NSU Alumni Hall of Distinction, the Long Purple Line, and Pi Kappa Phi Hall of Fame. Morgan has been a member of the NSU President’s Council and the Board of Directors of the NSU Alumni Association and is very involved in the NSU alumni chapter of Pi Kappa Phi.

He is married to Sherry Fargerson Morgan who also graduated from NSU and a member of Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority. The Morgans split their time between Austin and St Thomas, V.I., and have three children and seven grandchildren. Their oldest son, David Morgan Jr. and his wife, Leslie, are also graduates of NSU.

The forum is made possible by an endowment established by the family and friends of the late J. Walter Porter in recognition of his interest in improving the image of business as a career field for college students and of his concern for moral and ethical standards as expressed in his philosophy of business. The forum is an effort to translate the textbook into practice by bringing capable, successful business executives to the campus to speak on selected topics in their area of expertise.

Porter was a native of Kaufman County, Texas. He graduated from Texas A&M and earned a master’s in civil engineering from Harvard. In 1931, he helped organize the Gifford-Hill Pipe Company at Grand Prairie, Texas. Porter saw the need to sell business to the college and to bridge the gap between the college campus and industry. He was determined to contribute to a better understanding of that system among his own employees, associates, and, where he could, on college campuses.

For more information on the Porter Forum or NSU’s School of Business and Technology, visit business.nsula.edu.

17 2016-10-14
Natchitoches

NSU alumnus making most of first season on Monday Night Football crew


Corey Taylor was working in the Mercedes-Benz Superdome on Sept. 25, 2006, when the now legendary New Orleans Saint Steve Gleason blocked a punt in the first real home game since Hurricane Katrina.

And he was working in the Superdome for the 10th anniversary of that Monday night game when the Saints hosted the Falcons on Sept. 26.

But Taylor’s roles were much different on each of those nights.

He was a server in a suite as a high schooler in 2006, and the Northwestern State University broadcast graduate returned to his native New Orleans as a production assistant in his first season with ESPN’s Monday Night Football.

Taylor said he experienced a flood of emotions when he stepped inside the Dome for a game against the Falcons 10 years later.

“It was a surreal feeling, but it feels like everything has come full circle,” Taylor said in an e-mail. “I walked back to the area where we waited outside for the Dome to reopen 10 years ago.

“I had mixed emotions at first because that night 10 years ago, it makes you remember how tough it was to get back home. That game was special to all of us. To now work on the production of this game was truly a humbling experience.”

Taylor, who grew up in New Orleans East, was pushed out of his city by Hurricane Katrina. Hurricane Rita forced his he and his family out of Lake Charles a month later, but they returned to New Orleans to rebuild.

“Losing pretty much everything in Katrina was the toughest process I’ve ever had to deal with,” said Taylor, offering condolences to those in the Baton Rouge area rebuilding after historic flooding. “There’s a lot that goes into rebuilding, but if you believe, you can make it happen.

“You have to be resilient, and it gives you a sense of pride to rebuild after taking such a loss.”

Taylor did much more than help his family rebuild -- he made his way to Northwestern State where he worked in a variety of independent student media organizations.

Davey Antilley, a NSU broadcast journalism professor and director of NSU TV, remembers Taylor as a go-getter who produced news and sports packages, was a newscast anchor, filmed as part of the camera crew and hosted his own television and radio shows.

“I can usually tell in the first few meetings if a student is going to be successful, and after just one visit with Corey, I could tell he was going to be able to do anything he put his mind to,” Antilley said. “He was one of those students that if I needed something done, he was the first to volunteer.

“He liked to joke around when not on the air … but when the lights came on, it was all professionalism.”

Taylor, a 2012 NSU graduate in broadcast journalism said his breadth of experience helped him get his foot in the door at ESPN.

“I wouldn’t take back all the hands-on experience I received at NSU for anything,” Taylor said. “The journalism department was a crash course for so many things I still work on today.

“When you’re doing everything from hosting radio shows to reporting and producing for telecasts, you’re learning things that are being used daily by many news companies. My first day at ESPN, we worked on AVID (video editing) machines. I had experience working on those for three years, and some of my co-workers had never used one before.”

Handling video is one of Taylor’s primary responsibilities with Monday Night Football. He works in the production truck logging video elements for playback during the telecast.

Before Monday Night Football, Taylor worked in remote production for college football and NFL games as well as the NBA Draft and the National Spelling Bee in his first three years at ESPN. Taylor also helped produced ESPN’s hallmark show ‘SportsCenter.’

“I grew up watching sports daily, so ESPN was always a job I’d hoped for,” Taylor said. 
“I attended a television/news convention in New Orleans, and that’s how I found out about a production assistant position at ESPN’s headquarters in Bristol, Connecticut.

“It’s a competitive business, so students should get the reps you need in school. When you’re finished, you’re confident in whatever direction you choose in what’s a really broad field. NSU prepared me for that.”

17 2016-10-14
Natchitoches

ROTC will hold Vietnam commemoration


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Department of Military Science is serving as a partner in a nationwide program to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War and over the next three years will honor Vietnam veterans with many programs and events in which the public is invited.



In conjunction with their annual Homecoming Open House, the NSU ROTC program will host a reception for Vietnam veterans and alumni on Saturday, Oct. 22. The 67th Demon Battalion and NSU Demon Regiment invite guests to an open house/tailgate from 3-5 p.m. with a Vietnam commemoration program set to take place at 3:30 p.m. Events will take place at the James A. Noe Armory, 418 Caspari St. To RSVP, contact Sid Hall at (318) 357-6951 or email halls@nsula.edu.



Saturday, Oct. 29 will be Military Appreciation Day on the NSU campus with acknowledgements for servicemen, servicewomen and their families planned for before and during the Northwestern State-Nicholls football game. The Department of Military Science will host a ribbon-cutting to formally open their new rappelling tower, which is located at the northwest corner of Turpin Stadium.




17 2016-10-13
Baton Rouge

LSMSA, Northwestern State promote Turn Teal Natchitoches program


NATCHITOCHES — Turn Teal Natchitoches organizer Leah Lentz passed out ribbons and painted nails on Sept. 28 at the Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts to help raise awareness of ovarian cancer and its impact on the community.

“Four years ago, Turn Teal collaborated with the city of Natchitoches and the Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts to bring awareness to our community about the severity of ovarian cancer,” said Lentz, a college counselor at LSMSA. “Our community is at the heart of healing the impact of ovarian cancer. Ovarian cancer ranks fifth in cancer deaths among women, accounting for more deaths than any other cancer of the female reproductive system.”

Last year, Northwestern State University joined the effort as well as LSMSA in including local high school partners in the initiative. Lentz visited with Bill Gordy, principal at Natchitoches-Central High School, and Jacque Horton, principal at St. Mary’s, about the Turn Teal effort, asking for their support.

The national campaign, Turn the Towns Teal, promotes awareness of ovarian cancer and its subtle symptoms that has volunteers tying ribbons throughout town centers and handing out symptom cards during September, National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month.


17 2016-10-13
Natchitoches

The eighth graders at NSU Middle


The eighth graders at NSU Middle Lab participated as interpreters in the Association for the Preservation of Historic Natchitoches (APHN) Third Grade Tour. These students each chose a historic role, learned lines and wore period appropriate costumes. Every third grade class in the parish was invited to the free tour of historic sites in downtown. APHN rewarded them with a pizza party.


17 2016-10-13
Natchitoches

Caroline F. Hooper Scholarship will aid in AKA travel


NATCHITOCHES – Sisters of a past president of the Eta Chi Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority at Northwestern State University are honoring her memory by initiating a travel scholarship for members to attend AKA conferences.



The Caroline Franklin Hooper Eta Chi (AKA) Travel Scholarship will be awarded to a sorority member with a 2.5 or better grade point average. Recipients will receive a one-time award to attend AKA conferences, leadership seminars and Boulé, the sorority’s biennial international summer conference.



Caroline Franklin Hooper, originally from Mansfield, was a legacy in Alpha Kappa Alpha and served as Eta Chi president. She earned her degree in business administration at Northwestern State in 1986 and worked as an accountant in Dallas. She lost her battle with breast cancer in 2013 at age 40. Her biological sister Barbara Franklin Moham of Dallas initiated the scholarship, emphasizing the importance of AKA in her family, explaining that their mother was a member and several women in the family carried on the AKA tradition of community service, sisterhood and scholarship.



Moham elected to designate the scholarship as a travel award because of an incident during her sister’s tenure as chapter president.



“She wanted everyone in the chapter to go to the 1982 South Central Regional Conference in San Antonio,” Moham said. “She used my mom's American Express card to purchase 14 plane tickets without mom knowing. This had been the family joke for years. So in her honor this scholarship is established, the Caroline Franklin Hooper Travel Scholarship.”



"The establishment of this scholarship honoring the legacy of the late former alumna and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority member Caroline Franklin Hooper will positively impact members of the sorority far beyond the present,” said Madeline Valrie, former graduate advisor to the Eta Chi Chapter.



“The scholarship was announced during an Eta Chi chapter and alumni meeting Oct. 8 and the timing is especially appropriate as October is national Breast Cancer Awareness Month,” said Kimberly Gallow, development officer with the NSU Foundation.



“It has been a pleasure working with Mrs. Moham and her sister Melinda in creating this scholarship,” Gallow said. “Because of this scholarship, many members of the Eta Chi Chapter will be touched significantly. Their gift demonstrates the dedication and devotion their family has to the Eta Chi chapter.”



Alpha Kappa Alpha was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C., in 1908. There are approximately 65,000 active members in the international organization with program targets that address education, health, family strengthening, environmental ownership and global impact.



Eta Chi Chapter was chartered at NSU on October 13, 1973, with 12 young ladies. Throughout the years Eta Chi has been enriched the NSU campus as well as the Natchitoches community. In order to learn about the program targets and to develop more impactful leadership skills the undergraduates participate in regional and national/international conferences and seminars. Most recently they traveled to Houston, Atlanta and to Little Rock, to learn effective ways to address the growing needs of our local community and society as a whole.



“With the cost of registration, travel and housing expenses the Caroline Franklin Hooper Travel Scholarship will supplement these costs and allow more members to participate,” Moham said.



For information initiating or contributing to a student scholarship, contact Northwestern State University’s Office of Alumni and Development at (318) 357-4414 or email Gallow at gallowk@nsula.edu.


17 2016-10-12
Natchitoches

PI Kappa Phi will commemorate 60th anniversary during Homecoming


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Beta Omicron chapter of Pi Kappa Phi will celebrate its 60th anniversary during this year’s Homecoming festivities Oct. 21-22. Alumni can join a weekend of events in which six decades of NSU Pi Kappa, including charter members, can reconnect, network with new alumni and make new memories with family and friends.



Activities begin Friday with university events open to all NSU alumni, including an 11 a.m. golf tournament at Northwestern Hills, the Homecoming parade that begins at 5:30, followed by the pep rally and Rockin’ on the Riverbank Homecoming Festival in downtown Natchitoches from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Pi Kappa Phi will host an alumni cocktail social at The Docks at Mariner’s on Sibley Lake beginning at 7 p.m.



Saturday’s activities surrounding the Pi Kappa Phi reunion include a Founders’ group breakfast at 8:30 a.m., breakfast for members and alumni at 9 a.m. and a memorial subritual in the NSU Alumni Plaza at 10:30 a.m. A Diamond Jubilee banquet will take place in the NSU Student Union ballroom at noon, followed by tailgating at the Pi Kappa Phi tent from 2 p.m. until game time. Pregame activities begin at 5:30 with kick-off at 6 p.m. in Turpin Stadium. A special section of tickets will be available for $12 in a reserved seating on the west side of Turpin Stadium. Seats in the reserved block can be purchased at any of the Pi Kappa Phi activities on Friday or Saturday morning.



The Beta Omicron Founders’ Generation Group will gather at Merci Beaucoup for cocktails and dinner at 6:30 p.m. Alumni and friends are invited to a 9 p.m. post-game social, location to be announced.



Sunday morning, members, alumni and guests are invited to chapter Sunday services at 10:30 a.m. at Trinity Episcopal Church, 533 Second St.



Some events or for members and/or alumni only. Others are open to families and guests.



Registration is $50 per person and includes lunch reservations at the Diamond Jubilee Banquet, full-color photo book and commemorative challenge coin.



Northwestern State’s Beta Omicron Chapter of Pi Kappa Phi began as Phi Kappa Nu Fraternity, a local fraternity organized on campus in 1929. In 1955, members of Phi Kappa Nu, seeking to become part of a national fraternity, elected to transition to Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity and were installed as the 63rd chapter of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity on Sept. 21, 1956. The chapter disbanded in 1981 and was dormant for 18 years.



In 1999, a group of young men developed an interest in bringing a new fraternity to the NSU campus and began the task of rechartering the Beta Omicron chapter. The chapter was rechartered in 2000. Since then, Beta Omicron has grown and demonstrated a commitment to engagement in the campus community, in local and national philanthropy and in leadership development.



In 2006, to commemorate the chapter’s 50th anniversary, the fraternity donated a wrought iron clock that was placed in the Alumni Plaza.



This year, on the 60th anniversary of the Beta Omicron Chapter’s chartering, Walter Ledet became the chapter’s 600th initiate. Ledet, who in the 1930s served as president of the chapter’s predecessor, Phi Kappa Nu, had expressed a desire to become an initiate of Pi Kappa Phi. Though he passed away in 2012, the fraternity’s National Council approved his posthumous initiation in 2016.



For more information or to register for the Pi Kappa Phi 60th anniversary reunion, visit pikappNSU.org/60th. Information is also available by contacting Lane Luckie at laneluckie@hotmail.com.




17 2016-10-12
Natchitoches

Kortus, Matherne willing to take on well-known roles in "Young Frankenstein"


Jesse Kortus and Luke Matherne know they have a challenge playing well known roles as Northwestern State University Theatre and Dance performs Mel Brooks’ “Young Frankenstein” Oct. 12 - 16 in the A.A. Fredericks Auditorium. Showtime is 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday through Saturday and 2 p.m. on Sunday.

Tickets to each show are $15, $12 for children and seniors and Northwestern State, BPCC@NSU and Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts students are admitted free with a current student I.D. A “Five for Fifty” package allowing patrons to see each show for $10 or buy five tickets for one show for $50 is available. For ticket information, call (318) 357-4483.

Scott Burrell is the director with musical direction by Dr. Corey Trahan and choreography by Brett Alan Garfinkel and Rebecca Morgan.

Brooks adapted his film, “Young Frankenstein” into a musical in which Frederick Frankenstein (pronounced "Fronkensteen") inherits a castle in Transylvania containing Igor, Inga and Frau Blucher. After discovering the secret entrance to his grandfather's laboratory, Frederick decides to carry on the family experiments and creates a monster of his own.

Kortus, a theatre major from Shreveport, plays the role of Igor, popularized by Marty Feldman in the film version of “Young Frankenstein” and Matherne, a theatre major from Monroe, has the part of Frankenstein played by Gene Wilder.

“Some of the lines are the same, but I have to be me,” said Kortus. “I can’t do an impression of the person who played Igor in the movie or on Broadway.”

Matherne agrees that he has to play the role his own way.

“There are things that Gene Wilder could do that no one else could, but I am looking for ways to do my own portrayal.”

Kortus said Igor is an excellent role for him because he enjoys being a character actor.

“Character actors have all the fun,” said Kortus, who is from Shreveport. “I never take myself seriously though I take my character seriously. They are often the one who gets a lot of great lines. I have done leading roles, but I like to be more goofy and physical.”

Kortus says his role is physically demanding as he has to work in a slouch yet be ready to sing or dance.

“Igor decides himself that he will be Dr. Frankenstein’s assistant and he pushes Frankenstein to create the monster,” said Kortus. “He has no concept of personal space and will appear out of anywhere.”

Matherne said the rest of the cast is responsible for making the show special.

“The remainder of the cast are the meat of the show,” said Matherne. “In a lot of cases, Frederick is the straight man who sets up the others for the punch line.”

Matherne says Frankenstein undergoes a transformation of his own during the play.

“At first, he is very scientific and logical and doesn’t think he can bring someone back to life,” he said. “But once he finds his grandfather’s book with all the details he needs to bring someone back to life, something snaps.”

Matherne thinks the play is “bigger than the movie.”

“There are a lot of similarities and differences,” said Matherne. “The songs and dance numbers are hysterical. They don’t usually advance the plot but are so funny. The play is pure comedy. If I had to sum it up in one word, it would be flashy.”

Matherne has been a mainstay of the Theatre and Dance program, appearing in “Hairspray,” “Sweeney Todd,” “Avenue Q,” “Really, Really,” “Oklahoma” and more.

“I have had the opportunity to develop my talent in a place where I could learn and grow,” said Matherne. “I have been able to try things I would never do outside school. As a dancer, I have improved by leaps and bounds so that I can go out and be a triple threat who can act, sing and dance.”

Kortus transferred to Northwestern State after completing an associate degree at Bossier Parish Community College. His transfer was made easier by the 2 + 2 agreement between the two schools. The students follow a specific curriculum during their first two years at BPCC, then transfer into their intended major at Northwestern State.

“The agreement was a big help to me. It saved me a lot of time and money,” said Kortus, who plans to graduate next fall.

Kortus appeared in productions including “Nicolas Nickleby,” “A Year with Frog and Toad” and “The Turn of the Screw” at BPCC.
17 2016-10-12
Natchitoches

ROTC honors servicemen, local sponsor




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Submitted by Northwestern1 on Tue, 10/11/2016 - 8:17am

Northwestern State University, NSU ROTC, and its alumni arm, the Demon Regiment, were honored to recognize military spouses during the coin toss and at the start of the Oct. 8 football game between NSU and Kentucky Wesleyan. Participating in festivities were soldiers and families of Fort Polk’s 3rd Brigade, 10th Mountain Division. The unit returned from Afghanistan in June. Welcomed were Specialist Cody Kouns, his wife Kasey and their son Rhys; Private First Class Dustin Friedrich, his wife Rachel and their children Madalyn and Harper; Specialist Jesse Andersen, his wife Tiffany and their son Kelly who was born two days before Specialist Andersen returned home from Afghanistan; and Staff Sergeant William Gomez and his wife, Courtney. This was Staff Sergeant Gomez’s fourth deployment. The Kouns have been married two years. The Friedrichs have been married 3 years and are expecting their third child soon. For more information about NSU’s Army ROTC Program, call (318) 357-6501 or visit https://rotc.nsula.edu/


Northwestern State University ROTC Professor of Military Science Lt. Col. Katherine Carlson thanked Jason Audirsch, general manager of Brookshire’s Food and Pharmacy, for his and Brookshire’s continued support of the ROTC Program by naming him honorary cannoneer for Saturday’s football game against Kentucky-Wesleyan. From left are Cadet Kendrick Shavers Jr., Audirsch, Carlson and Cadet Cameron Coleman. ROTC Cadets prepped and loaded the cannon and Aurdirsch fired the first shot rousting fans to cheer on the Demons. For more information about NSU’s Army ROTC Program, call (318) 357-6501 or visit https://rotc.nsula.edu/.


17 2016-10-11
Natchitoches

NSU Dance Company to present "Modern in Motion IV"


The NSU Dance Company will present “Modern in Motion IV” Oct. 18, 20, 21 and 23 at 7 p.m. at the Sweet Cane Inn at 926 Washington St. in Natchitoches.

The members of the cast are Skilynn Fontenot of Eunice, Leonard Harris of Baker, Rachel Taylor, Elaina Guerrero and Taylor Young of Shreveport, Katherine Langlois of Baton Rouge, Marissa McMickens of Pineville, Jayzen Boger of Edmond, Oklahoma, and Logan Terrell of Lake Charles. Music will be by Kisatchie Sound which consists of Matt Petty, David Steele and James Leach. Brett Alan Garfinkel is the choreographer.

Tickets for the Oct. 20 Gala performance is $45 in advance and $50 at the door which includes a reception at Maglieaux’s on the Cane after the performance. Tickets on Oct. 18, 21 and 23 are $7 in advance and $10 at the door. Student tickets are $7 each. Only 50 tickets will be sold for each performance. For ticket reservations, contact Garfinkel at (318) 357-5788 or at garfinkelb@nsula.edu.

Garfinkel said “Modern in Motion IV” is set in the 1970s and is “a story-line based performance of immersive dance in which audience members are part of the action.”

Audience members will be asked to wear masks and will be able to choose their own adventure based on how you go about the performance area.

“Your story may depend on the character you follow,” said Garfinkel.

“Modern in Motion IV” was influenced and inspired by the New York City immersive dance performances of “Sleep No More” and “The Grand Paradise.” “Sleep No More” is based on “Macbeth” and is performed in a three-story building. “The Grand Paradise” is a more interactive show in which cast members may guide audience members by hand from room to room. The audience may hold items and be part of the show.

17 2016-10-11
Natchitoches

NSU band works with two high schools to help Central High


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University along with a Louisiana and Texas high school have worked together to help a Baton Rouge-area high school damaged by recent floods.

NSU worked with Alvarado (Texas) High and Parkway High in Bossier City to lend Central High School’s color guard uniforms, shoes, practice flags, performance flags, rifles, sabers and props.

“Central High has attended summer camp at Northwestern for a number of years, so we had a strong connection,” said Estelle Murr, a Northwestern State alumna who directs the color guard at Alvarado High and is the Demon Heat color guard coordinator. “Each school went through their closets to find whatever they had they could be of use to Central.”

Murr contacted Patrick Gremillion, who works with Parkway’s color guard and NSU Director of Bands Dr. Jeff Mathews to help gather the items.

“I decided to donate to Central because I know firsthand how much this activity means to kids who participate in it and how hard they work,” said Gremillion. “To have that ripped away by a natural disaster is unimaginable. At the end of the day, I was just trying to help brighten their day and hopefully give them the means to, while on the marching field at least, escape.”

The Sprit of Northwestern Marching Band recently loaned St. Amant High School near Gonzales nine snare drums, four sets of tenor drums (six drums each) and five bass drums to replace equipment lost in the floods.
17 2016-10-06
Natchitoches

NSU ranked as fourth most affordable online college in the country


NATCHITOCHES, La.

Northwestern State University has been ranked as the fourth most affordable online college in the United States for the 2016-17 academic year by the website affordablecollegesonline.org.

The website’s researchers and higher education experts collected and analyzed data from every accredited postsecondary institution in the United States to determine which colleges offered the lowest out-of-pocket costs while still scoring high marks in academic rigor and student support.

Vice President for Technology, Innovation, and Economic Development Dr. Darlene Williams said, “Northwestern State has long been known for creating innovative educational opportunities. However, being recognized for affordability further acknowledges the University’s commitment to students by making it financially possible for a student to achieve his or her dream of earning a degree.”

To be included in the rankings, a four-year college or university must be an accredited not for profit institution that offers at least 10 online bachelor’s degree programs with annual in-state tuition and fees below $15,000.

Institutions received a numerical score based on in-state tuition and fees for undergraduate students, the count and breadth of online programs available, student to faculty ratio, six-year graduation rate and the percentage of beginning, full-time undergraduates receiving scholarship/grant aid from the college.

Northwestern State has Louisiana’s first and largest electronic campus at nsula.edu/ensu. The university offers 39 online degree programs. Internet-only students do not pay out of state fees.

Northwestern State is currently developing several competency-based programs specifically for online students, some of which can be applied to a full baccalaureate degree.

Several online degree programs at Northwestern State have been ranked among the best in the nation. Northwestern State’s online RN to BSN program, along with bachelor’s programs in computer information systems, criminal justice and psychology were ranked first in the country by Nonprofit Colleges Online.

The bachelor’s in accounting was ranked second and the master’s in education was seventh. The bachelor’s in addiction studies was chosen as the fifth best in the country by bestcolleges.com.

NSU has been designated a 2016 Military Friendly School, a designation is awarded to colleges, universities, community colleges and trade schools in the country that are doing the most to embrace military students and dedicate resources to ensure their success both in the classroom and after graduation.


17 2016-10-06
Natchitoches

Students sad with possibility of president leaving Northwestern; turn to social media to comment


Northwestern State University president Jim Henderson broke the news to his faculty and staff on Monday, Oct. 3 that he would be leaving his current position if selected to become the president of the University of Louisiana System, which governs NSU and eight other universities in the state. This news came as shock to many of the students. “Tonia and I decided this would be the right decision after lengthy conversations with numerous people,” said Henderson. “We love Northwestern State and the City of Natchitoches, but higher education in Louisiana is faced with significant challenges and virtually limitless potential. We believe we can advance the mission of Northwestern State and all of the University of Louisiana System institutions.”


17 2016-10-06
Natchitoches

Author, alum, Thomas Watson will speak at Natchitoches, Leesville campuses


NATCHITOCHES – Author Thomas Watson, a graduate of Northwestern State University, will be featured in a talk and book signing beginning at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 18 in NSU’s Sylvan Friedman Student Union Ballroom. Watson will also speak at NSU’s Leesville-Fort Polk campus at 1 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 19. All events are free and open to the public.



Watson is the author of several successful book series and novellas including a collection of six in the Blue Plague books set in Louisiana



Watson, a veteran who now lives in northwestern Montana, grew up in Doyline and Grenada, Mississippi, moved to Shreveport to start his family and began working as a nurse in Shreveport. He has continued his writing with several other series of books in different genres including vampires, a world where preppers must survive and a book about two teenage boys navigating their way through a zombie apocalypse. Eighteen books now have been published and one novella as e-books. Ten of those are available in print and Watson is quickly gaining recognition for his work.



Watson's love of reading, which was instilled in him at a young age by his parents, inspired him to begin his writing career. He creatively uses humor, honor, family and hope in his series.



A short list of Watson’s work is as follows.



“Blue Plague” - A no-holds-barred story about the end of civilization not for the faint of heart. The language and actions are harsh even by the main characters. It is a portrayal of what it would take to survive in an event of this magnitude. This series is based in and around Louisiana when a virus released in the Congo and makes its way back to the United States.



“Dark Titan” - A portrayal of what could happen in the event of an EMP. How would you survive? Join Nathan and the people he picks up along the way from Georgia to Idaho where his bug out location is.



“Vengeance in Blood” - What do you get when you have a being of legend that has roamed the land for over six hundred years, is tracked by an LA detective, a master tracker and protector of innocents in his own right? Will the existences of legends: vampires be exposed?



“Forgotten Forbidden America” - When the stock markets in Asia crash it’s only a matter of time before the U.S. feels the effects. Join Nelson and his family and friends as they travel to their safe zone and attempt to survive when civilization as we know it is in turmoil.



“Thanos” - A home of magical creatures at the beginning of time. Thanos is where magic is a part of daily life and heroes can come from anywhere.



“Forsaken World” - Join a couple of teenage boys trying to survive the zombie apocalypse with no parents to guide them. Will they survive or will they succumb to the plague of the undead?



“Bonner Incident” - When everything you have worked your entire life to build suddenly comes under fire and you and your family are threatened by those in office, how would you react? This story follows how one small business owner reacts to protecting his property and family.



Watson’s appearance will include an address to NSU’s Presidential Leadership Program students and book signings with books for sale on site. For more information, contact Anna MacDonald at macdonalda@nsula.edu.


17 2016-10-06
Natchitoches

Capt. Shreveport students visit ET labs


Students from Captain Shreve High School in Shreveport toured Engineering Technology labs and classrooms at Northwestern State University Wednesday as part of Manufacturing Month, which gives high schoolers an opportunity to visit industry and educational institutions to learn about careers available in manufacturing. Northwestern State’s Department of Engineering Technology offers degrees in electronics engineering technology and industrial engineering technology that prepare students for lucrative careers in applied engineering with an emphasis on market-responsive skills. Northwestern will host three other schools for tours this month, including Natchitoches Central and Shreveport’s Southwood and Woodlawn High Schools. For more information, visit engrtech.nsula.edu of contact Department Head Dr. Ali Ahmad at (318) 357- 6751 or email ahmada@nsula.edu.
17 2016-10-06
Natchitoches

SBDC will present tax seminars


NATCHITOCHES – The Louisiana Small Business Development Center-Northwest & Central Region, will present two seminars focusing on 2016 IRS Tax Updates for Louisiana businesses. The seminars will address the most current IRS and Louisiana Department of Revenue mandates, changes and salient information for commercial preparers and would be of interest to CPAs, tax attorneys, EAs, accountants, bookkeepers, DOFs and commercial tax preparers.



Seminars will take place from 8:30 a.m.-noon Tuesday, Oct. 18 at the Learning Center for Rapides Parish, 1410 Neel Kearby Blvd., Alexandria and Wednesday, Oct. 19 at Hilton Garden & Homewood Suites, 2015 Old Minden Road, Bossier City.



Seating is limited and early registration is encouraged. The cost is $35 per person and includes coffee and breakfast pastries. Payment must be received by Oct. 14. Walk-ins will be admitted only as space is available and payment is due at the door in the form of cash or check payable to LSBDC-NWCR. No credit cards will be accepted.



Payments can be sent to LSBDC, 175 Sam Sibley Dr., South Hall Suite 211, Natchitoches, LA 71497.



The Louisiana Department of Revenue and the U.S. Internal Revenue Service are co-sponsors of the event.



For more information or to register online call (318) 357-5611 or visit lsbdc.org/nwcr.


17 2016-10-06
Shreveport

BPCC students now have ‘world class’ transfer path October 5, 2016250 2


Sean green
sean@bossierpress.com

Bossier Parish Community College has joined forces with LSU Shreveport and Northwestern State University to create a no fuss, holistic way for students to continue their education.

The newly signed Joint Admissions agreement between the three higher education institutions has created a innovative transfer pathway that will focusing on the unique needs of the modern day college student.

What does this mean?

Basically, any BPCC student who wants to enroll in LSUS or NSU in the future can now be admitted to BPCC and LSUS or NSU simultaneously. That student can cross-enroll in courses at both institutions and students who graduate from BPCC with ann associates degree as members of Phi Theta Kappa will be guaranteed a transfer scholarship to LSUS or NSU.

“We looked at the unique experiences of students today and tried to build a system that would provide more support for students, enhance services, and improve student life opportunities so they can make the best use of their time and resources,” said BPCC Chancellor Dr. Rick Bateman.

“This streamlines the pathway and simplifies the process of moving from one university to the next and takes out the bureaucracy and hassle so the student can focus on learning,” said NSU President Dr. Jim Henderson.

“It allows us to keep students on the pathway so the credits they take will count. It also opens up other opportunities that they may not be thinking about otherwise,” said LSUS Chancellor Larry Clark. “It will allow them to be more aware of different opportunities that better match what they want to be or do.”

In addition, students will also be able to participate in student life activities at both institutions.

“That means a student who is enrolled at BPCC and has an interest in becoming a Pilot or Demon won’t have to wait until they’ve completed all their coursework at BPCC to have that Pilot or Demon experience,” Dr. Bateman explained.

For Bateman, who transferred from a two-year university, the chancellor said he understand the culture shock that awaits students.

“We have two outstanding universities where the majority of our students go and we can begin to introduce them to that university culture well before they go. I think that will do so much to enhance their experience and help them be successful.”

Lastly, a student who wants to continue their education at either of the universities will receive two advisors — one for BPCC and one for a university. Bateman said this will make the best use of the student’s time and improve time to degree.

“Higher education continues to cost more and more. The state had divested significantly in higher education and the majority of that cost has been passed on to the student in the form of higher tuition and fees,” said Dr. Bateman. “It’s incumbent on us to make sure we’re good stewards of the resources students and their families bring to the table.”

The idea for the agreement came from a year-old question posed by Dr. Henderson — “What would a world class transfer pathway look like?”

“We’ve got to come together and create a seamless pathway for students to continue to learn. It will give our employers a competitive advantage and give our citizens a higher quality of life,” said Dr. Henderson.

Dr. Henderson noted how times are changing, remarking that his smart phone and watch are 250,000 times more powerful than the desktop computer he used during his time at NSU. He said that is why he and his partners in this agreement are seeking to create learners.

“Those who are prepared for this new reality are those who can think critically, those who can solve problems, those that can communicate effectively, and those that continue to learn,” said Dr. Henderson.

It was this commitment to creating learners that Chancellor Clark pledged to uphold, saying he has found the importance of commitments between higher education institutions in his career.

“We found we could help elevate what students thought they could or might do, and get them to the goal line much quicker. There is the reality that to get to the point of being out there and showing how you’ve become a learner, you still have to do some things — courses done in sequences, pre requisite set — and by working together we get the students to where they are able to go through that more quickly and effectively,” Clark said.

Grown from a question to a done deal in 12 months time, three prominent northwest Louisiana higher ed institutions have not only bridged the gap between the state’s three systems — University of Louisiana System, LSU System, and Louisiana Community and Technical College System — but have made a commitment of “students first, no excuses.”

“We’re showing what we can do when we focus on students to really move the needle and effect change in a positive way for the students in Louisiana,” said Dr. Bateman.


17 2016-10-04
Natchitoches

Educators will be honored during Homecoming


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Gallaspy College of Education and Human Development will recognize several individuals during Homecoming festivities. The College will induct five new members into the Hall of Distinguished Educators and recognize an Outstanding Young Professional and a Friend of Education. An induction ceremony will take place beginning at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 22 in the Teacher Education Center auditorium.



Preceding the ceremony will be a reception and reunion from 1-1:30 p.m. in the Commons Area of the Teacher Education Center.



Honored as 2016 inductees into the Hall of Distinguished Educators are the late Dr. Raymond Gilbert, Mack Daniel Knotts of Bossier City, Edwina Lewis of Natchitoches, Robert Silvie of Shreveport and David Thrash of Bossier City. Micah Coleman of Natchitoches is the Outstanding Young Professional and Paula Hickman of Shreveport is this year’s Friend of Education.



Gilbert, a former Natchitoches resident, was a retired professor who served on the NSU faculty from 1970-1990 where he taught graduate courses in music and educational psychology and was sought after as a professor because of his dedication and commitment to his students.



Born in 1922, Gilbert was a native of El Dorado, Arkansas. Following service in the U.S. Army, he studied at the American Conservatory of Music in Chicago where he received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in 1949 and 1951. He began his career teaching voice and piano, both private lessons and in public schools, in El Dorado where he was also coordinator of the El Dorado High School fine arts program, a church music director and frequent vocal performer. He moved to Natchitoches, earned a doctorate in education at NSU in 1970 and for more than 40 years was involved in church, community and philanthropic endeavors. He was also highly involved with many educational organizations, serving in several offices. He received many honors during his career, including the French Legion of Honor Medal, the Outstanding Lion Award and a Natchitoches Treasure designation. He passed away June 16, 2016.



Knotts earned a bachelor’s degree at Northwestern State in health and physical education in 1961, a master’s in health and physical education/administration in 1963 and +30 at Louisiana Tech in 1973. As an undergraduate, Knotts was a member of the Demon baseball team, Phi Epsilon Kappa Fraternity and Kappa Blue Key Honor Fraternity. He is also a member of Northwestern State’s N Club Athletic Hall of Fame.



He began his career as a coach and teacher at St. Mary’s High School and Haynesville High School and served as principal at Haynesville Elementary and Jr. High from 1970-81 and principal at Haynesville High School from 1981-1992 before serving as a Bossier Parish School Board member from 1998-2010. While a School Board member, he served as chairman of the Insurance Committee and as president and helped generate support and secure funding for several schools, including Parkway High School. After retiring, he worked as an insurance agent and was a volunteer basketball and baseball coach and recreation director in Haynesville. He lives in Bossier City.



Lewis earned a bachelor’s degree in elementary education at Grambling State University in 1957 and a master’s degree in elementary teaching at Northwestern State in 1967. She also holds certification in supervision of student teachers, +30 professional development hours and additional graduate hours earned during her career. In her first years of teaching from 1950-1970, she taught home economics at Gooch School, fourth grade at Clarence Jr. High and language arts and math at North Natchitoches Elementary and spent a year as a math demonstration teacher at Northwestern State. From 1971-1992, she was at NSU Middle Lab teaching math and language arts, supervising pre-student teachers and was a substitute math instructor. From 1992-96, she worked as adjunct faculty, workshop planner and presenter for Red River, Avoyelles, DeSoto, Sabine, Winn and Natchitoches parishes.



Lewis’s post-retirement includes work with Natchitoches Parish LEAP test preparation, the Natchitoches Literacy Council, St. Anthony Catholic Church, the Natchitoches Parish Library Trustee Board and Natchitoches Parish Vocational/Technical College Board of Directors. She is also involved with the NSU Alumni Association, GSU Alumni Association, Natchitoches Parish Retired Educators Association and the Natchitoches Parish Council on Aging. She has received many honors, including being named the Middle/Junior High School Teacher of the Year for the parish and state, Iota Mu chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Dedicated Service Award, Louisiana Delta Great Retired Teacher of the Year, Natchitoches Business and Professional Woman of the Year, the Mayor’s Distinguished Service Award and a Natchitoches Treasure distinction.



Silvie is currently assistant principal at Captain Shreve High School. He earned a bachelor’s degree in business and office education in 1975 and a master’s in business and office education in 1977 at Northwestern State and completed +30 hours at NSU, Southern University, Louisiana Tech, Centenary and Louisiana State University. He began his career as a classroom teacher at North Caddo High School and Woodlawn High School from 1975-1996 before serving as assistant principal at North Caddo from 1996-2005 and interim principal from 2002-03. He served as principal at Fairpark High School from 2008-09 before his current position at Captain Shreve. He has also taught as a part-time instructor at Louisiana Technical College and served as part time bookkeeper for Project Uplift.



During his career, Silvie has served on the Caddo Parish Schools Discipline Review Committee, mentored assistant principals for the Louisiana Department of Education, evaluated and reported on the JUMP program, assessed intern teachers and served on the state curriculum guide writing team for business education subjects. He has prepared and published faculty and student handbooks, coordinated LEAP remediation plans, prepared schools for accreditation and accumulated several hundred professional development in-service hours. He has been named PTA Educator of Distinction, Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers and KMSS Teacher of the Week. He has been involved with several parent/teacher student associations and holds membership in several professional and community organizations.



Thrash has been principal at Bossier High School since 2006 and has also served as principal at Haughton Middle School, assistant principal at Haughton High School and as a teacher and coach at Benton High School and Ringgold High School. He graduated from NSU in 1983 with a degree in social studies and health and physical education, earned a master’s in health education at Louisiana Tech and +30 in education leadership at Centenary College. Thrash spent 15 years teaching middle and high school at Benton where he was head baseball and football coach and led both groups to the state semi-finals.



Thrash’s awards include being named Louisiana Principal of the Year, Bossier Parish Principal of the Year and Bossier Press Tribune Readers’ Choice School Principal finalist. He is a member of several professional, community and leadership organizations, including the Bossier City Lions Club, Bossier Association of Principals, Louisiana Association of Educations and National Association of Secondary School Principals. Since 2012, he has served on the Louisiana High School Athletic Association school relations committee and has also served as the 3A District chairperson for LSHAA. He has served on the Bossier Parish School Board since 1985.



Coleman has been a teacher and the head boys basketball coach at Natchitoches Central High School since 2006 where he led the program to two state titles in the last three years and four Top 28 appearances in the last five years. Coleman earned his undergraduate in health and physical education at Northwestern State in 1999, master’s in sports administration in 2002 and +30 in education leadership in 2012. He is certified as a secondary PE teacher, parish/city school supervisor of instruction and principal.



Coleman began his career as a science teacher at Negreet High School and was a graduate assistant and assistant men’s coach for the NSU men’s basketball team. He was also an assistant men’s basketball coach at McNeese State University, assistant boys basketball coach and teacher at Sam Houston High School and head boys basketball coach and teacher at Hamilton Christian Academy in Lake Charles where he led the team to its first-ever quarterfinal appearance before joining the NCHS staff. He is a member of several professional and athletic organizations, as well as First Baptist Church of Natchitoches and Jaycees and has been recognized as the state Basketball Coaches Association Coach of the Year, All CenLa Basketball Coach of the Year, 5-time District Coach of the Year, Shreveport Times Basketball Coach of the Year and Kiwanis Southeast U.S. Regional Teacher of the year.



Hickman is executive director of the Community Foundation of North Louisiana where she is responsible for the Foundation’s leadership, management, strategic planning and development. She helped create and incubate Step Forward, a cradle to career initiative that has engaged over 1,000 in the Shreveport-Bossier area to collectively drive excellence in education so that children of the area are prepared to compete in a 21st century global economy.



Hickman holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Alabama and juris doctorate from LSU Law Center. Although not an educator, she has always valued education as a pathway to a better life. She is a co-founder of VOA LightHouse, an educational enrichment center for children in Shreveport’s most impoverished area through which thousands of children have received support to obtain education and eventually employment. Last year 100 percent of participants stayed in school, 80 percent had a grade point average of 2.0 or better and 100 percent avoided involvement with teen pregnancy and the juvenile justice system.



Hickman has volunteered support to numerous organizations, including Providence House, Glen Retirement System, Centenary College Planning Giving Council, Volunteers of America, Shreveport Symphony, Junior League of Shreveport-Bossier and KDAQ.



NSU’s Gallaspy College of Education and Human Development annually recognizes educators whose work has made an impact on the lives of others. For more information on the College visit nsula.edu/academics/education-human-development. A full schedule of Homecoming events is available at northwesternalumni.com/homecoming16.


17 2016-10-04
Natchitoches

Three writers will be featured in Cane River Reading Series


NATCHITOCHES – Writers Erika Jo Brown, B.J. Love and Phillip Estes will be featured at the next Cane River Reading Series beginning at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 17 in the President’s Room of Northwestern State University’s Sylvan Friedman Student Union.



Brown is a New York native and is author of the poetry collection I’m Your Huckleberry (Brooklyn Arts Press, 2014). She graduated from Cornell University and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. Currently, she is a Ph.D. student in literature and creative writing at the University of Houston where she is a poetry editor and reading series co-curator for Gulf Coast.



Love is a sixth grade English teacher in Houston. A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, his poems have appeared widely, most recently in the North American Review, Barrelhouse and Hobart.



Estes is the author of “High Life” (Horse Less Press, 2016). His work as appeared in Action Yes!, Diagram, Lungfull, Prelude, Sprung Formal, West Wind Review and others. He lives in Shreveport and teaches at Louisiana Tech.



The Cane River Reading Series is coordinated by Dr. Andrew Briseño on behalf of the Department of English, Foreign Languages and Cultural Studies. The event is free and open to the public.




17 2016-10-03
Natchitoches

'Spinning Thread Into Gold' alumni exhibition opens Oct. 3


NATCHITOCHES – Creations by costume designer and Northwestern State University alumnus Joel Ebarb, a Shreveport native, will be featured in a Homecoming guest exhibition “Spinning Thread Into Gold,” which will be on display at NSU’s Orville Hanchey Gallery Oct. 3-22. Ebarb will make a presentation about his work at 10:30 a.m. Friday, Oct. 21 and will be honored with a reception at 7 p.m. that evening.



Ebarb earned a bachelor’s degree in English with a minor in theatre at NSU in 1990 and his MFA in theatre from the University of Houston. His research and creative endeavor focuses on costume design for theatre, the history of aesthetics and puppetry. As an undergraduate, he was a member of Theta Chi Fraternity.



Ebarb’s costume design credits include Jean Cocteau Repertory (Off-Broadway); Eclipse Theatre Company and Vittum Theatre (Chicago); Indiana Repertory Theatre, Phoenix Theatre and ShadowApe Theatre Company (Indianapolis); Boarshead Theatre (Lansing, Michigan); Stages Repertory Theatre (Houston) and 21 seasons with the Texas Shakespeare Festival. International credits include The Court Theatre (Christchurch, New Zealand) and the Chinese production of Avenue Q currently running in Beijing. In addition to costume design, Ebarb is an accomplished puppeteer, occasional director, sporadic playwright and novice performer.



Ebarb is a former commissioner of the USITT (United States Institute for Theatre Technology) Costume Commission and serves on the advisory board for Eclipse Theatre Company in Chicago. He is also an associate of the OISTAT (International Organization of Scenographers, Theatre Architects and Technicians: Scenography Commission) Costume Design Group and has been invited three times to the Czech Republic to attend the Prague Quadrennial as a workshop presenter and exhibitor. He has collaborated on several projects as a guest artist and visiting scholar at Peking University, Beijing.



Ebarb is a 2011 recipient of the Charles B. Murphy Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching. He was inducted into the Teaching Academy in 2011 and the Book of Great Teachers in 2013. He served as chair of the Department of Theatre from 2011–2015, and is currently the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education and International Programs in the College of Liberal Arts.



For more information on “Spinning Threat Into Gold” contact Hanchey Gallery Coordinator Leslie Gruesbeck at gruesbeckl@nsula.edu or call (318) 357-5476. To view a full schedule of NSU’s Homecoming events, visit northwesternalumni.com/homecoming16.




17 2016-10-03
Natchitoches

Terrel Delphin Scholarship honors 'Father of Creole Renaissance'


NATCHITOCHES – A new Northwestern State University scholarship honors the memory of an individual who worked tirelessly to bring awareness of the Cane River Creole culture to a national and international audience. The NSU Foundation announced the creation of the Terrel A. Delphin Jr. Scholarship, initiated through contributions to the Creole Heritage Center at NSU from the Delphin family and friends. Significant support came the Cane River National Heritage Area, Inc. (CRNHA, Inc.) to endow the scholarship at the $10,000 level.



“Today, we remember the life of Terrel Delphin and his accomplishments,” said Vanner Erikson, assistant director of Alumni Affairs and CRNHA, Inc. board member, in meeting with the family to announce the scholarship.



The scholarship will be presented to a full-time Northwestern State student classified as a sophomore or above with a 2.5 grade point average. Preference will be given to a student with a 3.0 grade point average or higher.



“We thank everyone who worked so hard to get to this point,” said Lillie Delphin, Mr. Delphin’s widow. “This is a wonderful way to remember our loved one.”



“We are fortunate in life when we meet exceptional people and he was exceptional,” said Cynthia Sutton, CEO of CRNHA, Inc.



“We were presented with an opportunity to establish the Terrel A. Delphin Jr. Scholarship Fund at NSU,” said Theresa Morgan, Delphin’s sister. “Dr. Hiram ‘Pete’ Gregory of the NSU Creole Heritage Center, suggested this would be a way of honoring Terrel’s work in establishing the Creole Heritage Center.” The Delphin family has made a commitment to continue donating annually to the scholarship fund over the coming years.



Delphin’s family has deep roots in the Cane River area. After working in law enforcement for 18 years, he joined the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry, holding a number of positions, including assistant commissioner for the Office of Animal Health Services. He retired from state service in 2005 and became the coordinator for the Office of Homeland Security and the Office of Emergency Preparedness in Natchitoches.



Delphin was active in his church, historic St. Augustine Catholic Church, and in his community for many years. His desire to protect and promote the Cane River area led to his involvement with the St. Augustine Historical Society and later serving as the president for a number of years. He advocated on behalf of his community with the Louisiana Board of Regents to establish the Creole Heritage Center at Northwestern State and served as chairman of its advisory council. He assisted in developing an ethnographic study of the Cane River Creole community for the National Park Service, served on the state committee for the National Register of Historic Places, co-chair of the Cane River National Heritage Area Commission, and was a board member of the Natchitoches Parish Tourist Commission. He was known as the “Father of the Creole Renaissance-Resurrection” as seen in the LPB documentary, “The Spirit of a Culture - Cane River Creoles.” He also worked to establish the Civil Rights Hall of Fame in Natchitoches.



As a tribute to his abilities to cross cultural lines and encourage multicultural interaction, the City of Natchitoches declared March 29, 1997, as Terrel Delphin Day. He received the Creole Center’s Historic Preservation Award in 1999 and 2003. The Natchitoches Police Jury presented him with the “People’s Involvement Award” for his work in Creole heritage preservation and he was named “Cane River Mayor.” Delphin was named a Natchitoches Treasure in 2007 and in 2011, Northwestern State awarded him an honorary doctorate of humane letters for his work in bridging cultural and racial gaps through multicultural education, harmony and cooperation.



“Terrell was a remarkable person and this scholarship is in recognition of his leadership and commitment to preserving the culture of the Cane River Creole community, with the Creole Heritage Center and the Cane River National Heritage Area,” said Dr. Kathleen Byrd, chair of CRNHA, Inc. Board of Directors. .



For information on contributing to the scholarship, contact the NSU Creole Heritage Center at 318 357-6685 or NSU Office of Alumni and Development at (318) 357- 4414 or visit northwesternalumni.com.




17 2016-10-03
Shreveport

Local colleges fight for students


Higher education institutions are enhancing their marketing, offering students additional academic and recreational opportunities and establishing more "student-centered" campuses to maintain and increase enrollment despite an uncertain future for the TOPS scholarship program.

Without the lure of the TOPS program, local schools are competing with out-of-state schoolsto keep students in Louisiana.

Despite efforts, the number of students attending NWLA colleges and universities is fluctuating across the board.

Northwestern State University of Louisiana had the highest fall 2016 enrollment growth among NWLA colleges and universities with 640 more students enrolling than last year. The largest departmental increase came from the College of Nursing and School of Allied Health, which grew by 10 percent.

"It's the largest numerical increase in the last 25 years," said NSU President Jim Henderson. "Enrollment is a reflection of how well your organization is responding to the market. We've put in a lot of effort here, from the faculty to staff and everyone involved, to create programs that are relevant in our regional economy and creating a student experience that is second to none."

Henderson added,"We're seeing the results of that and are very proud."

A year ago, the university developed a strategic framework -- a five-point plan surrounding student experience, academic excellence, market responsiveness, athletic prominence and community enrichment.

"We utilize a lot of networks including social media, traditional advertising,networking with employer to convey that purposeful plan to them and they respond," Henderson said. "Most of our growth has been in undergraduate and as we put these graduate programs into production — we expect those graduate numbers to increase as well."

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The school has also re-established the College of Business and Technology, created the Department of New Media, Journalism and Communication Arts, and strengthened the School of Biological and Physical Science by adding the state's only microbiology degree.

Louisiana Tech University also increased its student body.

LA Tech increased its freshman enrollment numbers by nearly 55 percent since 2012.

Dave Guerin, director of marketing and public relations at LA Tech, said the school has more than an 80 percent retention rate. The high retention rate reflects the staff, faculty and administration's dedication to student achievement, he said.

"La Tech is gaining a lot of national attention and being nationally ranked for value and return on investment," Guerin said. "I think the national recognition is attracting those students."

The university has enrolled approximately 12,694 students for the fall semester — a 2.3 percent increase over the last year and surpassing last year's enrollment number of 12,414. The number of out-of-state students is also growing.

TOPS was also a concern for the nationally ranked institution.

"We did suffer because of that, but it goes back to — good students want to go to good schools," Guerin said. "The uncertainty with TOPS affected us and our enrollment may have been much higher had it not been for that."

Southern University at Shreveport's enrollment has increased by 288 students since fall 2014, according to the school registrar's official headcount document.

The school is reviewing its curriculum to reflect future job security and outlook, according to Director of Marketing and University Relations Bill Strother.

“We are constantly accessing our recruitment and marketing model to ensure our messaging is maximized at reaching any potential SUSLA student. Also, we are reviewing our curriculum to reflect and support the current and future job landscape here in North Louisiana as workforce development continues to be one of our priorities," Strother said in an email.

SUSLA is constructing a new classroom building, learning center and home for SUSLA's School of Nursing. The institution is also building bridges and establishing relationships with local high schools through dual-enrollment.

While some colleges have increased in undergraduate admission, others have increased in the number of students enrolling in graduate programs.

Louisiana State University in Shreveport saw a 25 percent increase in the number of students enrolling in graduate programs, but saw a nearly 6 percent decline in undergraduate enrollment.

LSUS Provost, John Vassar, said the school's biggest challenge is undergraduate enrollment.

"The uncertainty at the state level surrounding the TOPS award has raised concerns among many students," he said. "We are continuing to increase the number of LSUS scholarships that should help recruit and retain high quality students."

The school is working with SUSLA and Bossier Parish Community College to offer programs that will allow students to easily transfer to LSUS. The school has also placed LSUS faculty in local high school classrooms to offer students dual-enrollment courses.

Vassar said the graduate programs have more out-of-state students than in previous years.

Most of the school's graduate programs are online and allow more flexibility when it comes to selecting courses. Over the summer, LSUS' online Master of Business Administration program was ranked fourth in the nation by Affordable Colleges Online.

LSUS wasn't alone in declining undergraduate numbers.

Centenary College of Louisiana has 48 fewer students than last year. A strong effort to retain continuing students helped offset a smaller incoming class, according to the Vice President for Enrollment and Marketing at Centenary College L. Calhoun Allen.

While there are fewer students, admission inquiries are increasing, according to the school.

The school is using local and out-of state outreach methods as recruitment tools.

"We are communicating more about the educational, cultural, and leisure opportunities in the city and surrounding areas," Allen said in an email. "We also continue to expand the use of technology into our outreach through email contacts and social media. Personal counselor contact is still important and our counselors visit dozens of high schools and fairs in the southeast."

Allen said out-of-state universities are using the TOPS situation to their advantage and making it harder on local institutions.

"Many students who showed interest in attending Centenary this year are now at schools in other states primarily because of the delay in announcing TOPS funding for this year and the student’s and family’s doubts about funding in future years," he said.

The Taylor Opportunity Program for Students or TOPS was created to help students with public higher education tuition. Recent budget cuts by the state legislature impacted the program's funding.

Starting last year, Higher ed institutions within the Louisiana Community & Technical College System, began counting enrollment at the end of each semester.

Bossier Parish Community College is a part of LCTCS.

The school served approximately 15,000 students in the 2015-16 academic year.

"We enroll new students every month except December and we’re working on an accelerated 3-week term that will take place in December," said BPCC Director of Public Relations Tracy McGill. "So, as a result, we count students served at the end of the semester. "

The school's English as a Second Language program was recently named the highest performance ESL program in Louisiana by WorkReady U. According to BPCC officials, the nursing program ranked number one in the state.

"Our student enrollment is ever-changing and growing," McGill said. "We continually adjust to meet the needs of the workforce, industry, and community."


17 2016-09-30
Natchitoches

MidSouth continues support of NSU Founder's Circle


MidSouth Bank renewed their commitment to the Northwestern State University Founder’s Circle by contributing $1,000 to the NSU Columns Fund, a tax-deductible giving program that supports academic endeavors, scholarships and building renovations. From left are MidSouth Business Process Manager Clay Abington, Community Outreach Officer LaCarsha Babers and City President Rhonda Jones with NSU Development Officers Tiffany Chasteen, student Adrianne Vallee of Boyce and Jill Bankston. Vallee is a junior majoring in social work who represents the many NSU students who benefit from scholarships supported by the Columns Fund. For more information on how to contribute to Northwestern State, contact the Office of University Advancement at (318) 357-4414.


17 2016-09-29
Shreveport

BPCC enters joint admissions partnership


BOSSIER--

"Students first. No excuses," says Dr. Rick Bateman, Jr., BPCC Chancellor.

Three Northwest universities decided to put students first by signing a joint admissions agreement.

"We're signing agreements with university partners that really bring 3- higher education systems together at the same time: the University of Louisiana system, the LSU system, and the Louisiana community and technical college system," says Bateman.

The joint admissions agreement between Bossier Parish Community College, Northwestern State University, and LSU Shreveport means students will be able to admit at BPCC and either university simultaneously, enabling them to cross enroll in courses at both institutions.

"You've still got to do some things like have courses done in sequence, have things done in pre-requisite. By working more closely together with that, it happens and we get the students so they can go through more quickly and effectively," says Dr. Larry Clark, LSUS Chancellor.

Students will also be able to participate in student services and student life activities.

"That means a student that is enrolled at BPCC that is interested in becoming a pilot, or an interest in becoming a demon won't have to wait until they have completed all of their coursework here at BPCC to begin to have that pilot or demon experience," says Bateman.

Receiving two advisors is another perk.

"A BPCC advisor and a university advisor. I think that is going to do more than anything else to ensure students make the very best use of their time, the very best use of their resources. We believe that we are going to improve time to degree students at the 2-year level and the 4-year level as a result of that bit of innovation," says Bateman.

University partners believe by instituting this joint admissions, it will put students on a competitive level.

"We are going to get competitive when 95% of the working age adults in this area have the knowledge skills and the ability to compete in the global society," says Dr. Jim Henderson, NSU President.

17 2016-09-29
Shreveport

Northwestern State University will hold its N Side View Day Saturday, Oct. 29


NATCHITOCHES

More than 1,000 high school juniors, seniors and parents are expected to attend the program, which is sponsored by the Office of University Recruiting.

There is no cost to attend Fall N-Side View, but advance reservations should be made by calling (800) 327-1903, or (318) 357-4503 or e-mailing recruiting@nsula.edu.

Registration begins at 9 a.m. in Magale Recital Hall in the Fine Arts Annex.

The program will begin at 10 a.m. in the A.A. Fredericks Auditorium.
The day’s events will include a guest speaker, a student panel, a panel for parents covering scholarships, financial aid and housing options, tours of the campus and housing and the city of Natchitoches.

Prospective students and parents can learn about Northwestern State’s academic programs and campus student organizations. Lunch will be available in Vic’s Café from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Lunch prices will vary.

Prospective students can get free tickets to the NSU – Nicholls football game that kicks off at 6 p.m. in Turpin Stadium. Reduced price tickets will be available at just $5 for parents and guests. A game ticket will allow free admission to pregame tailgating near Turpin Stadium.


17 2016-09-29
Shreveport

Northwestern State University will hold its N Side View Day Saturday, Oct. 29


NATCHITOCHES

More than 1,000 high school juniors, seniors and parents are expected to attend the program, which is sponsored by the Office of University Recruiting.

There is no cost to attend Fall N-Side View, but advance reservations should be made by calling (800) 327-1903, or (318) 357-4503 or e-mailing recruiting@nsula.edu.

Registration begins at 9 a.m. in Magale Recital Hall in the Fine Arts Annex.

The program will begin at 10 a.m. in the A.A. Fredericks Auditorium.
The day’s events will include a guest speaker, a student panel, a panel for parents covering scholarships, financial aid and housing options, tours of the campus and housing and the city of Natchitoches.

Prospective students and parents can learn about Northwestern State’s academic programs and campus student organizations. Lunch will be available in Vic’s Café from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Lunch prices will vary.

Prospective students can get free tickets to the NSU – Nicholls football game that kicks off at 6 p.m. in Turpin Stadium. Reduced price tickets will be available at just $5 for parents and guests. A game ticket will allow free admission to pregame tailgating near Turpin Stadium.


17 2016-09-28
Natchitoches

Learning the Ropes as an ROTC cadet


By Cadet Taylor Saucier, Slidell

NATCHITOCHES – Last week Northwestern State University ROTC cadets exercised their leadership skills on the newly revamped and recertified ropes course. The Demon Battalion had the opportunity to learn a whole new field as cadre led the first lab of the fall semester. This lab was an amazing kick-off for the Demon Battalion, as we jumped head first into a course that would not only be educational but an exciting adventure, too. The eager cadre and attentive cadets made for a smooth fun-filled experience. However, getting the swing of the ropes course wasn’t as easy as trained cadet cadre made it look.

The ropes course requires Cadets be buckled securely in a harness and climb or be pulled to great heights while putting full trust in their battle buddies. These battle buddies control the ropes that hold them aloft. This course included four nerve-racking stations, including one which required walking across a 20-foot-high, 10-foot-long log with nothing holding you up besides the trust in your fellow cadets training with the rope down below. Cadre watched new cadets closely and trained them in each individual station, safety and rules of the ropes course. Cadet leadership provided first-hand examples as they executed each station while other cadre did the verbal briefing from the ground.

While some cadets were excited to go through the stations, it was not as easy for all. The more nervous cadets went in thinking they could not complete some of the stations for fear of falling or fear of heights. Nervous though they might be, with the help of the cadre and the support from fellow cadets, they overcame their fear and completed every obstacle. Dedicated cadre stayed past lab hours to ensure each cadet successfully executed all four stations.

The ropes course was a great way to get the ball rolling for the Demon Battalion. The lab taught leadership, overcoming fear, trust in a battle buddy and support of your team, all while having the best time. This ropes course lab showed off everything NSU ROTC stands for: leadership, trust, bravery and family. Our thanks go to Ms. Reatha Cox and the Jaycees for renovating the course.

Participating in this lab was a great learning experience and an awesome way to start my first year in the Demon Battalion. ROTC is an incredible program that has molded great leaders and continues to do so. I am proud to be a part of the program and to be learning from the instructors and Cadet cadre. Needless to say, I had a great time learning the ropes of ROTC!
17 2016-09-27
Natchitoches

Richouxs happy to work outside the spotlight


Tucked away in a corner office in the bowels of the A.A. Fredericks Fine Arts Center, Robert and Karn Richoux aren’t in the spotlight.

And they wouldn’t have it any other way.

The married couple, who are each starting their first semester in the Northwestern State University theatre department this fall, specialize in technical theatre, which includes building sets, props, scene painting, stage management as well as costumes, lighting and sound.

Robert, a 2007 NSU graduate who aims to bring his experience working with the Alabama Shakespeare Festival and at the ZACH Theatre in Austin, Texas, said coming back to Natchitoches has been eye-opening.

“I’m seeing everything from a different side now after spending five years here as a student,” said Robert, an assistant professor of theatre technology who is an assistant facilities manager and assistant technical director. “It’s awesome, and it’s going to be a great opportunity to give back to the university.

“They put me in position to succeed … and this is my way of repaying that by bringing my experiences back so that we can continue to grow not only just in technical theatre but theatre as a whole.”

Sitting just a few feet behind him in their office is Karn, an assistant professor of theatre technology who doubles as the technical director for the Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts.

Karn, who taught high school theatre for the past three years, said she’s been impressed with the quality of high school and college students in her programs.

“At LSMSA, the students are much more focused than the majority of students I’ve had in the past,” Karn said. “Both the high school and college kids are smart and attentive, and I don’t see a big difference between them.

“I help (Dr. Vicki Parrish) teach the intro class, so it’s fun to see the (college) students making that transition into the college atmosphere. You can get jaded working in theatre, but it’s so refreshing to be around students who are excited and enthusiastic to learn.”

The pair met at Florida State while pursuing master’s degrees and married on Leap Day in 2011.

Although the Richouxs aren’t together every waking hour because of differing class schedules and project builds, Robert said he doesn’t get tired of being around his wife of five years.

“She’s my best friend, and we get along really well,” Robert said. “We have enough respect for one another, and we know that each other knows what they’re doing and respects each other’s choices.

“We know our strengths and weaknesses. We get along so well that we don’t mind being around each other most of the time.”

A diplomatic answer with his wife sitting beside him, but Karn shared the real reason behind their success.

“We make fun of each other all the time. Laughing is the key,” Karn said.

Added Robert, “I’ve never picked on someone as much as I pick on her, yet she still hangs around. That means something I guess.”

The Richouxs are still shaping their roles as they assist technical director Phillip Kidd and lighting designer/facilities director Paul Pharris among others.

Robert, who specializes in set building, said he hopes to incorporate more projection designs and automated scenery.

He aspired to be an athletic trainer before falling into theatre by chance.

“I was an athletic trainer in high school, and I planned to go to school for sports medicine,” Robert explained. “I had a buddy athletic trainer who also performed, and one summer, they needed someone to run a spotlight.

“The following summer, I decided to take a stagecraft class (set building). When I came to NSU, I still didn’t know what I wanted to do and was still big into sports medicine. But I got a major position (master carpenter) for a show, and I was in the shop every day. I found another love for it. I was neck-deep in it, no turning back now.”

Karn, a Minnesota native, recalls being involved in her sister’s plays as a child.

“They were church plays, and I remember at one point directing the dads to put the platforms back in a specific way in the closet because I somehow knew that information,” Karn said. “High school theatre was how I made connections in my new school, and I hadn’t stopped since my junior year.

“Robert is more of a big-picture guy, and I tend to enjoy making processes run smoother.”

The Richouxs stress that theatre isn’t just for students who want to pursue a professional theatre career.

“We do carpentry and welding among a lot of other things,” Robert said. “You can’t go work on oil rig directly after working with us, but you learn how to find different ways to solve problems.”

Added Karn, “We’re usually building fake houses for imaginary people. But the thing I love about technical theatre is you get to try so many different things, you’ll find something you’re good at. You really learn how to collaborate with a bunch of different people in a bunch of different areas.”

The department is working on its first production of the season, “Young Frankenstein,” running Oct. 12-16 in the A. A. Fredericks Auditorium.

To see a full calendar of the season’s productions, visit https://theatre.nsula.edu/calendar/.

17 2016-09-27
Natchitoches

NSU Debate Team competes in Mississippi tournament


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Speech and Debate Team competed in the Hub City Swing competition in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, this past weekend. Students are Arwa Hezzah of Cairo, Egypt; Ebony Pugh of Minden, Ryan Ware of Alexandria, Drew Chesher of Anacoco, Jessica Hooten of Fort Polk and Matthew Craig of Shreveport.



The TIPDA
Team of Ware and Chesher placed third third out of 20 teams in their first time debating as a team.



In IPDA
Novice, Hooten placed 17th out of 39 with a 3-2 record. Craig competed in his first tournament.



In JV, Chesher won second place in his second tournament at the JV level. In varsity, Ware broke to quarterfinals.



Pugh and Hezza each judged several matches.

Ware placed seventh in Extemporaneous Speaking and third (Top Novice) in Editorial Interpretation.



NSU was fifth in Swing Sweepstakes.



The NSU Speech and Debate team is coached by Dr. T. Davina McClain, professor of Classics in the Louisiana Scholars’ College and the T.H. Roberts Endowed Professor of Rhetoric and Debate in the Department of New Media, Journalism and Communication Arts.


17 2016-09-26
Natchitoches

Career Graduate Day at NSU to be held Tuesday


Northwestern State University hosts its annual Career Graduate Day Tuesday, Sept. 27 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Friedman Student Union Ballroom. The event is for juniors and seniors at Northwestern State.

17 2016-09-26
Natchitoches

Northwestern State Director of Choral Activities to be part of international exchange program


Northwestern State University Director of Choral Activities Nicholaus Cummins has been selected as a 2017 American Choral Directors Association/International Conductors Exchange Program Fellow. According to T.J. Harper of Providence College, director of the ACDA International Conductors Exchange Program, Cummins was selected based on the quality of his work at Northwestern State and the strength of his portfolio.

17 2016-09-26
Natchitoches

Young alum creates scholarship for international students


NATCHITOCHES – A recent Northwestern State University graduate interested in international study created the university’s first scholarship for international students. Chantasia Grasty, 22, was inspired by her own experiences abroad to establish the gift intended to help enrich the experience of international students studying at Northwestern State.



“This past academic year I had the opportunity to travel to Cartagena, Colombia, for a research trip and Havana, Cuba, for the agreement signing with the universities there,” Grasty said. “This sparked my interest in international student affairs and made me want to understand their culture even more to help international students who want to attend Northwestern. Interacting with this group of individuals allowed me to see their passion to learn and made me want to give back to these students and help them further their education at Northwestern."



Established through the NSU Foundation, the Grasty International Scholarship will be awarded to an undergraduate international student with a grade point average of 2.0 or higher. Application is open to any major and applicants must submit a one-page essay with at least one letter of recommendation.



A native of Leesville, Grasty is a 2012 graduate of Leesville High School. This past May she earned a bachelor’s degree at Northwestern State in family and consumer science, minoring in social sciences with a concentration in child development and family relations. As an undergraduate, she was vice president of the Student Government Association and was involved with NAACP, Circle K International and the Presidential Leadership Program. She cites as personal inspiration The Her Series, her late grandfather Esmond Grasty and Dr. Marcus Jones, vice president for University Affairs, who has been instrumental in developing international exchange opportunities.



“Before traveling to Cartagena, Colombia, in the Fall of 2015, a group of Northwestern State students and international students completed a project that allowed me to get to know and understand the various cultures better,” Grasty said. “While visiting Cartagena again this past summer, I knew I had found my passion and wanted to continue my studies in Student Affairs in Higher Education and focus on international students in higher education."



Northwestern State has nearly 100 international students currently enrolled and that number is growing due to partnerships with several universities abroad that offer exchange opportunities for short- and long-term study. The university has a long relationship with the International Student Exchange Program (ISEP) and earlier this year opened doors to a new International Student Resource Center that helps both international students as well as those interested in foreign study.

“Going to Colombia and Cuba sparked my interest in international student affairs and helped me understand their culture, economic status and their desire to learn. It made me want to give back to these students, help them further their education and help them adapt to our American culture,” Grasty said.



“Chantasia was an exceptional student leader and mentor to many students on Northwestern State’s campus,” said Kimberly Gallow, NSU assistant director of Development. To see so many young alumni investing back in their university shows that they are willing to help sustain the success of our students. It was a pleasure working with Chantasia on developing her scholarship and to see her vision in helping international students, finally come to life.”



For more information on international exchange opportunities at NSU, visit nsula.edu/international or email international@nsula.edu. For information on establishing a scholarship through the NSU Foundation or contributing to an existing scholarship, contact Gallow at (318) 357- 4435 or email gallowk@nsula.edu.


17 2016-09-23
Natchitoches

Orchestra to honor Steve Horton at concert on Tuesday


The Natchitoches-Northwestern Symphony Orchestra will perform its first concert of the 2016-17 season Tuesday, Sept. 27 at 7:30 p.m. in Magale Recital Hall.

Dr. Douglas Bakenhus is musical director of the orchestra. Tickets are $10. Northwestern State University, BPCC@NSU and Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts students are admitted free with a current student I.D.

The program is “Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg” Prelude by Richard Wagner, Mozart’s “Symphony No. 34 in C Major,” Franz Schubert’s “Symphony No. 8 in B Minor Unfinished” and “Russian Sailor’s Dance” from “The Red Poppy” by Reinhold Gliere.

The concert is dedicated to Dr. Steve Horton, executive director of the Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts. Horton, a member of Northwestern State’s faculty for 26 years served as vice provost, chief academic officer, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and the Graduate School and head of the Department of Journalism. He is a former president of the Natchitoches-Northwestern Symphony Society and a supporter of the School of Creative and Performing Arts.

The work by Wagner is a story about a singer’s guild contest.

“These contests among members of the singer’s guild were quite common and were a popular form of entertainment,” said Bakenhus. “It has several themes including a love theme where the winner of the contest wins the girl. The work ends with all of the themes at the same time which is quite majestic.”

Bakenhus said scholars have been unable to determine why Schubert did not finish his “Symphony No. 8.”

“He contracted an illness while he was composing this symphony, but he later went on to complete another symphony,” said Bakenhus. “The first movement was cloudy while the second was sunny. Perhaps he wasn’t inspired to do anything else.”

The season will include a performance by the NSU Chamber Orchestra at the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame and Northwest Louisiana History Museum on Tuesday, Oct. 18 at 6 p.m. The concert will feature Louisiana composers Kenneth Olson, Nettie Chenevert and Northwestern State faculty.

The annual Pops Concert will be on Monday, Oct. 31 at 7:30 p.m. in Magale Recital Hall. The concert will feature Mussorgsky’s “Night on Bald Mountain” and Grieg’s “In the Hall of the Mountain King” along with music from the films “Harry Potter” and “Psycho.” The orchestra will be lead by a special guest conductor recently called up from the beyond.

On Nov. 30 – Dec. 2, the symphony will be part of the annual Christmas Gala in the A.A. Fredericks Auditorium.

The first concert of 2017 on Tuesday, Feb. 7 will feature oboist Leah Forsyth, a member of NSU’s faculty, performing Mozart’s “Oboe Concerto.” The program will also include Ravel’s “Mother Goose Suite,” Beethoven’s “Fidelio Overture” and “Huapango” by Jose Pablo Moncayo.

Winners of the annual NSU Concerto Competition will be featured in a concert on Monday, March 13. The orchestra will perform Dvorak’s “Symphony No. 8.”

The final concert of the season will feature the symphony with the NSU Symphony Chorus on Tuesday, April 25.

17 2016-09-23
Natchitoches

NSU to hold Career Graduate Day Tuesday


Northwestern State University hosts its annual Career Graduate Day Tuesday, Sept. 27 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Friedman Student Union Ballroom. The event is for juniors and seniors at Northwestern State.

NSU students can get information on career opportunities, full-time jobs, internships, graduate schools, volunteer opportunities and explore career paths.

Participants will include: Arkansas Tech University Graduate School, the Baton Rouge Police Department, Centurylink, ChiroCare LLC, Crest Industries, LLC, CSRA, Enterprise Rent-A-Car, the Gallaspy College of Education and Human Development at NSU, Grambling State University, Grand Prairie Police Department, Jean Simpson Personnel Services, KSLA-TV, Louisiana Workforce Commission, Paul M. Hebert (LSU) Law School, LSU and LSU-S Online Graduate Programs-Academic Partnerships and McNeese State University.

Also participating are the Mississippi College School of Law, NSU Graduate School/ Office of University Recruiting and Graduate School, PhysAssist Scribes, Inc. Pioneer RX Pharmacy Software, RoyOMartin, Southern University Law Center, State Farm, Tower Loan, Tyson Foods, Inc., the U.S. Navy, University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences, USDA NRCS and Walmart Stores Inc.

17 2016-09-23
Natchitoches

Marc Broussard will perform at Rockin' on the Riverbank


NATCHITOCHES – Cajun “Bayou Soul” artist Marc Broussard will headline Northwestern State University’s popular Homecoming Festival, Rockin’ on the Riverbank,” set to take place on the Fleur de Lis Stage in downtown Natchitoches on Friday, Oct. 21. The fourth annual event will feature Broussard performing at 6:30 p.m. after the annual Homecoming Parade and Pep Rally. All alumni, friends and NSU supporters are invited to attend the event, which is free and open to the public.



The Homecoming Parade will begin at 5:30 p.m. on the NSU campus and proceed along Second Street, turning right onto Rue Touline and flowing to Rue Beauport and the downtown riverbank stage where members of Honor Court will be recognized and NSU spirit groups will perform. Families with children can expect throws and candy from the floats created by student organizations. The Marc Broussard concert will be from 6:30-8:30. Spirit awards for organizations that participated in Homecoming Week activities will be announced at 7:30 p.m.



“We started Rockin’ on the Riverbank because we have so many alumni arriving in town for the Friday parade and pep rally, we wanted to provide another measure of entertainment for those who are meeting up with friends, having dinner and enjoying downtown Natchitoches,” said Vanner Erikson, assistant director of Alumni Affairs. “Rockin’ on the Riverbank has grown every year and it’s always a great mix of Demon fans – alumni, current students, friends and families. It’s a great way to start Homecoming weekend.”



Broussard is a native of Carencro whose style is a mix of fun, blues, R&B, rock and pop matched with distinct Southern roots. For more information on Broussard or to sample his music, visit marcbroussard.com.



Vendor and party space is available for rent at a cost of $50 for a 10 x 10 space. For more information contact Erikson at (318) 357-4415 or email eriksonv@nsula.edu.



For more information on Rockin’ on the Riverbank or to view a full schedule of NSU Homecoming activities, visit northwesternalumni.com/homecoming16 or nsula.edu.


17 2016-09-23
Natchitoches

Cummins receives international conducting fellowship


Northwestern State University Director of Choral Activities Nicholaus Cummins has been selected as a 2017 American Choral Directors Association/International Conductors Exchange Program Fellow.

According to T.J. Harper of Providence College, director of the ACDA International Conductors Exchange Program, Cummins was selected based on the quality of his work at Northwestern State and the strength of his portfolio.

“It is a high honor to be selected for this fellowship,” said Cummins, who is in his second year at NSU. “The process was quite rigorous and I look forward to gaining international experience.”

Cummins expects the fellowship to be in South America. Additional duties of the fellowship include serving as a visiting host for an international conductor at the annual National Conference of the American Choral Directors Association. Cummins hopes the exchange can lead to a future international tour for an NSU choir.

A graduate of the University of Mississippi, Cummins earned a Master of Arts degree from the University of Alabama-Birmingham and a Doctor of Musical Arts in Choral Conducting at Louisiana State University. While completing his doctorate at LSU, Cummins was a graduate teaching fellow where he was instructor of voice and conductor of the LSU Women’s Chorale and Chamber Singers. He was an instructor of music at UAB and served as conductor of the Women’s Chorale and assistant conductor of the Concert Choir. Cummins also taught public school music for five years in Texas and Alabama, and has been involved with church music for 20 years.

Before joining Northwestern State’s faculty, Cummins was director of choral activities at Delta State University in Cleveland, Mississippi, for four years.


17 2016-09-22
Natchitoches

New Northwestern State certificate programs showing growth


NATCHITOCHES -- Northwestern State’s first-year certificate programs are picking up steam as the University seeks to align its course offerings with industry demands.

Four of NSU’s new post-graduate certificate programs, which require 18 credit hours to complete, offer current students and industry professionals additional training in a focused field of study.

These certificates include Project Management, Quality Control, Business Analytics and Writing for Business, Industry and Technology.

Dr. Ali Ahmad, head of NSU’s Department of Engineering Technology, said his department’s two certificates (Project Management and Quality Control) were requested by local industry leaders.

“The driving force behind creating these programs was in response to industry demands,” said Ahmad, who noted a total of nine students are enrolled in these programs, including undergraduates who are completing coursework while pursuing a bachelor’s degree. “Industry leaders had input in designing these programs to better prepare certificate holders for what they will experience.”

Project Management is available to a variety of students with different undergraduate degrees. Once the educational requirement is completed and that person meets the required level of professional experience to be a Project Management Professional, salaries can range from $120,000-300,000 per year, according to the Project Management Institute.

The Quality Control program offers a number of professional paths upon completion, according to Ahmad.

“Our Quality Control program follows topics from the American Society of Quality, which is nationally recognized as the standard,” Ahmad said. “This program prepares students for careers as a quality control supervisor, a quality control auditor or any number of quality control tracks.”

The other first-year programs are attempting to gain visibility within its own student body and with local and regional industry professionals.

Curtis Penrod, coordinator of NSU’s Computer Information Systems, said making data-driven decisions is key in today’s business world.

“We teach students how to make decisions based on available data,” Penrod said. “The Business Analytics certificate and this type of training will make students more marketable.

“Employers are looking for people who can solve problems and think analytically, and this program can increase one’s knowledge of computers in the area of problem-solving and analysis.”

The online-only certificate for Writing for Business, Industry and Technology is geared to train students and professionals in the area of technical writing for use in business, government and other related fields.

“This program was designed with regional employer needs in mind,” said Dr. Thomas Reynolds, associate professor and writing program administrator. “The program focuses on writing as it occurs in the workplace, including written and digital documents, in an effort to provide adequate training for those seeking to be technical writers as well as those already employed and in need of additional training in occupational writing.”

Each of these certificate programs requires a bachelor’s degree, but students completing undergraduate work can take some of the required classes simultaneously.

For more information on the Writing for Business, Industry and Technology certificate, contact Reynolds at reynoldst@nsula.edu. To learn more about the Business Analytics certificate, contact Penrod at penrodc@nsula.edu. For more information about the Project Management and Quality Control programs, contact Ahmad at ahmada@nsula.edu. Information on these and other programs is available at nsula.edu/academics.

17 2016-09-21
Natchitoches

New Northwestern State certificate programs showing growth


NATCHITOCHES -- Northwestern State’s first-year certificate programs are picking up steam as the University seeks to align its course offerings with industry demands.

Four of NSU’s new post-graduate certificate programs, which require 18 credit hours to complete, offer current students and industry professionals additional training in a focused field of study.

These certificates include Project Management, Quality Control, Business Analytics and Writing for Business, Industry and Technology.

Dr. Ali Ahmad, head of NSU’s Department of Engineering Technology, said his department’s two certificates (Project Management and Quality Control) were requested by local industry leaders.

“The driving force behind creating these programs was in response to industry demands,” said Ahmad, who noted a total of nine students are enrolled in these programs, including undergraduates who are completing coursework while pursuing a bachelor’s degree. “Industry leaders had input in designing these programs to better prepare certificate holders for what they will experience.”

Project Management is available to a variety of students with different undergraduate degrees. Once the educational requirement is completed and that person meets the required level of professional experience to be a Project Management Professional, salaries can range from $120,000-300,000 per year, according to the Project Management Institute.

The Quality Control program offers a number of professional paths upon completion, according to Ahmad.

“Our Quality Control program follows topics from the American Society of Quality, which is nationally recognized as the standard,” Ahmad said. “This program prepares students for careers as a quality control supervisor, a quality control auditor or any number of quality control tracks.”

The other first-year programs are attempting to gain visibility within its own student body and with local and regional industry professionals.

Curtis Penrod, coordinator of NSU’s Computer Information Systems, said making data-driven decisions is key in today’s business world.

“We teach students how to make decisions based on available data,” Penrod said. “The Business Analytics certificate and this type of training will make students more marketable.

“Employers are looking for people who can solve problems and think analytically, and this program can increase one’s knowledge of computers in the area of problem-solving and analysis.”

The online-only certificate for Writing for Business, Industry and Technology is geared to train students and professionals in the area of technical writing for use in business, government and other related fields.

“This program was designed with regional employer needs in mind,” said Dr. Thomas Reynolds, associate professor and writing program administrator. “The program focuses on writing as it occurs in the workplace, including written and digital documents, in an effort to provide adequate training for those seeking to be technical writers as well as those already employed and in need of additional training in occupational writing.”

Each of these certificate programs requires a bachelor’s degree, but students completing undergraduate work can take some of the required classes simultaneously.

For more information on the Writing for Business, Industry and Technology certificate, contact Reynolds at reynoldst@nsula.edu. To learn more about the Business Analytics certificate, contact Penrod at penrodc@nsula.edu. For more information about the Project Management and Quality Control programs, contact Ahmad at ahmada@nsula.edu. Information on these and other programs is available at nsula.edu/academics.
17 2016-09-19
Natchitoches

Learn shooting fundamentals and gun safety at NSU’s Continuing Education course


Northwestern State University’s Office of Electronic and Continuing Education will be offering a LA Concealed Carry course Saturday, Sept. 17. The course will be taught from 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. in the South Hall classroom, then at the Natchitoches Shooting Range from the qualifying stage of the course.


17 2016-09-19
Natchitoches

Christopher to present recital Monday


Cellist Paul Christopher will present a recital at Northwestern State University Monday, Sept. 19 at 7:30 p.m. in Magale Recital Hall. Admission is free and open to the public.

Christopher, an associate professor of music theory and low strings at NSU, will be accompanied by assistant professor of piano Dr. Francis Yang.

The program will feature music by English composers Malcolm Arnold, Nigel Clarke, John Tavener and the slow movement of an unfinished cello concerto by Ralph Vaughan Wiliams completed by David Matthews. For more information, call (318) 357-5802.

Christopher served for 15 years as principal cello of the Shreveport Symphony Orchestra and the Shreveport Opera. He received his Bachelor of Music Education from the New England Conservatory of Music and his Master of Music in Cello Performance from the University of Memphis.

Christopher continues to perform with the Rapides, Shreveport and South Arkansas symphony orchestras. In the summer, he serves as assistant principal cello with the Peter Britt Festival Orchestra in Jacksonville, Oregon. Christopher has appeared as soloist with orchestras and has performed guest artist recitals throughout the United States and in Costa Rica, Honduras and South Korea.

Articles authored by Christopher have been published in the Jacques Offenbach Society Newsletter, Strings, American String Teacher, and Bass World. He has prepared and had published scores for Offenbach’s “Cello Duos, Opus 49, Nos. 1-6” and “Opus 50, Nos. 1-3,” and for Mark Prince Lee’s “Resonance for Solo Amplified Cello.” In 2007, Christopher was recognized as a Nationally Certified Teacher of Music in Cello by the Music Teachers National Association.

Christopher has appeared on numerous recordings as a member of the Nashville String Machine with artists such as Faith Hill, Ricky Skaggs, Bruce Springsteen and George Strait. He has also recorded works by contemporary composers Dinos Constaninides, Don Freund and Mark Prince Lee as well as five CDs for the Human Metronome label devoted to the cello music of Jacques Offenb

17 2016-09-19
Regional/National

Appointments, Resignations, Deaths (9/23/2016)


Chris Maggio, interim vice president, to vice president for the student experience at Northwestern State University
17 2016-09-16
Natchitoches

NSU Theatre and Dance sets 2016-17 schedule


Northwestern State University Theatre and Dance will open its 2016-17 season with Mel Brooks’ “Young Frankenstein” Oct. 12 - 16 in the A.A. Fredericks Auditorium.

The season will feature “All in the Timing” on Nov. 2 – 6 in Theatre West, “Next to Normal” on Feb. 15-19 in Theatre West, “Hedda Gabler” on March 8 – 12 on the A.A. Fredericks Auditorium Stage and “Dance Discovery” on April 6 – 8 in the A.A. Fredericks Auditorium.

“We will have shows that entertain and those who bring up more topical issues,” said Scott Burrell, head of the Theatre Department. “Young Frankenstein is a great show to get the season started for us. It’s a show that is a lot of fun and crazy.”

Tickets to each show are $15, $12 for children and seniors and Northwestern State, BPCC@NSU and Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts students are admitted free with a current student I.D. A “Five for Fifty” package allowing patrons to see each show for $10 or buy five tickets for one show for $50 is available. For ticket information, call (318) 357-4483.

“This year’s class of students has allowed us to raise the stakes,” said Burrell. “We were able to pick shows that allows us to showcase our students. Their maturity and ability gives us the opportunities to perform difficult shows.”

Brooks adapted his film, “Young Frankenstein” into a musical in which Frederick Frankenstein (pronounced "Fronkensteen") inherits a castle in Transylvania containing Igor, Inga and Frau Blucher. After discovering the secret entrance to his grandfather's laboratory, Frederick decides to carry on the family experiments and creates a monster of his own.

Burrell is the director with musical direction by Dr. Corey Trahan and choreography by Brett Alan Garfinkel and Rebecca Morgan.

The world, according to playwright David Ives is a very odd place, and “All in the Timing” is a virtual stress test of the English language -- and of the audience's capacity for disorientation, uncertainty, randomness and delight. “All in the Timing” is fragmented into short, twisted, convoluted, and highly amusing plays as a cast of six actors play a variety of characters who plunge into the black holes of language where their simplest desires are hilariously thwarted.

Pia Wyatt is the director.

“Next to Normal” with book and lyrics by Brian Yorkey and music by Tom Kitt, takes an unflinching look how one suburban household struggles with crisis and mental illness. It is an emotional powerhouse that addresses grieving a loss, ethics in modern psychiatry and coping with suburban life. Wyatt is the director and Trahan is the musical director.

“Hedda Gabler” was written by Henrik Ibsen and revolves around the beautiful and willful Gabler. She is a very ambitious and controlling woman married to the solid and respectable academic George Tesman. The dreamer Eilert Lovborg, an old flame of Hedda’s, reappears and a series of events leads to tragic results.

Former Artistic Director Dr. Jack Wann will return to NSU to direct “Hedda Gabler.”

“Dance Discovery” will be choreographed by Garfinkel, Kirstin Riehl and Rebecca Morgan and feature NSU dance students in original works.



17 2016-09-16
Natchitoches

Military honored during NSU game


Northwestern State University’s Department of Military Science and its alumni arm, the Demon Regiment, honored two members of the U.S. Armed Forces during it’s season-opening football game Sept. 8. Specialist Brittanie Williams has served in the U.S. Army for 3-1/2 years and was stationed at Fort Polk for three of those. Looking for more opportunities, she contracted in ROTC’s Green to Gold program to move from enlisted ranks to an officer. She is now a full-time student at NSU and will commission as a second lieutenant upon graduation. John Allen Masson served in the Army from 1967-69. He was assigned to the Americal Division, 1st Battalion, 52nd Infantry, 189th Brigade. For his service in Vietnam, he was awarded the Bronze Star for Meritorious Service and was the recipient of two Purple Hearts. He and his wife Donna are supporters of NSU football and have been season ticket holders since 1971. From left are retired Maj. Ted Fowler, Williams, Masson and Lt. Col. Katherine Carlson, head of NSU’s Department of Military Science.


Cadet Brittanie Williams tossed the coin as John Masson looked on prior to the Northwestern State University Sept. 8 home game. Members of the U.S. Armed forces are honored during each NSU home football game by participating in the coin toss and with special recognition during the game.


17 2016-09-16
Natchitoches

Phlebotomists complete training


Northwestern State University and Stick It Phlebotomy held a commencement ceremony for graduates of a phlebotomy technician course offered through NSU’s Office of Electronic and Continuing Education. The class, which had a 100 percent pass rate, required students to complete 100 clinical hours and 100 venipunctures and complete the National Board Certification Exam on site. The course also included Basic Life Support Certification through the American Heart Association. From left are Dr. Darlene Williams, NSU’s vice president for Technology, Innovation and Economic Development; Lauren Garcie, Sarah Gibbs, Kourtney Hayward, Hannah Isgitt, Alyssa LaCour, Instructor Sherry Hinton, Nikita McCullar, Janice Moore, LaToya Richards, Amanda Ross, Lauren Smith, Shelly Soileau, Jessica Spaulding and Melanie Bedgood, ECE coordinator. Another 7-week phlebotomy technician class will begin Oct. 3. For more information, contact Bedgood at (318) 357-6355 or email bedgoodm@nsula.edu.


17 2016-09-16
Natchitoches

NSU counselors will offer free suicide prevention training


NATCHITOCHES – In conjunction with Suicide Prevention Awareness Month, mental health professionals at Northwestern State University are planning to offer QPR (Question-Persuade-Refer) training, an initiative that helps individuals recognize the warning signs of suicide, know how to offer hope and direct those in crisis to the resources available to get help.



“Many individuals contemplating suicide are more likely to talk to a friend rather than a professional,” said Dr. Gerra Perkins, a professor in NSU’s Department of Teaching, Leadership and Counseling. “QPR trains individuals to be Gatekeepers by recognizing the warning signs. We are teaching people to be comfortable asking the question ‘Are you thinking about suicide?’” It’s a very sensitive subject and we examine the myths around it. People learn to ask the question, then persuade the person to seek help.”



The QPR method is a positive, hopeful technique, Perkins said. QPR Gatekeeper training takes about 1-1/2 hours and is open to anyone. Perkins and Rebecca Boone, director of NSU Counseling and Career Services, can offer instruction to teachers, student organizations, community groups or in a professional development setting in central and northwest Louisiana at no charge.



Northwestern State is also participating in a nation-wide campus challenge to educate as many people as possible through June 2017. Recognition is based on campuses with the highest percentage of in-person and on-line prevention training with special honors for schools whose top administrators complete training, schools that conduct the most in-person training and those with the largest number of in-person training.



Perkins and Boone have promotional items and Lifeline information in the Counseling Center in the Student Union and plan on setting up an information table at athletic, performing arts and academic functions on campus. The first 25 people who visit the table at each event will receive a ticket they keep to exchange for an upgraded item each visit. After their third ticket, they get a t-shirt.



“NSU will participate in the challenge to educate as many people as possible,” Perkins said. “We are doing this all year long, but since September is Suicide Awareness Month, we want to announce our participation and get things kicked off.”



Last year, Perkins and Boone authored a grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration intended to promote emotional health and suicide prevention among young adults. The grant supported the creation of NSU Cares, an initiative to help students cope with the pressures of college life. Perkins and Boone are working to establish an ongoing training infrastructure and in the spring will offer a program that will qualify others to lead Gatekeeper training.



“Twelve students, three faculty in the graduate counseling program and three staff members from the Counseling Center completed the requirements necessary to facilitate the QPR Gatekeeper trainings for our campus and community,” Perkins said.



The goal, Perkins said, is upstream intervention in which individuals learn to recognize suicide warning signs and urge the person at risk to get help.



“The conversation is really key to prevention because many people’s point of contact is a friend,” she said. “Suicide affects all demographics. A lot of people are not going to take that first step to get help from a mental health professional. They need someone to get through to them. That’s why QPR training is so important.”



For more information on QPR training, contact Perkins at (318) 357-6915 or email perkinsg@nsula.edu. Information on suicide prevention and links to resources are available at nsula.edu/nsu-cares.


17 2016-09-16
Natchitoches

NSU Faculty Showcase to be held Tuesday


Northwestern State University’s School of Creative and Performing Arts will present its annual Faculty Showcase Tuesday, Sept. 20 at 7:30 p.m. in Magale Recital Hall. Admission is free and open to the public. A reception will follow at 8:30 p.m.

The showcase along with a faculty art exhibit in the adjacent Hanchey Art Gallery will showcase of the university’s music, theatre and dance and fine + graphic arts faculty. Two works, Getting to Know the Weather by Eve Beglarian, and “Sea Garden” by Matt Perry will premiere at the concert

Performing at the showcase are the Faculty Trombone Quartet on a piece arranged by William G. Rose, Paul Christopher, cello, and Christine Allen, piano, on "Andante Espressivo" by Charles Wuorinen,; Luke Brouillette, guitar will play “Tango en Skai” by Roland Dyens and Malena McLaren, clarinet, and David Steele, clarinet, will perform "Sonata for Two Clarinets and Piano" assisted by Chialing Hseih, piano, and Brett Garfinkel, dance.

Also performing are Doug Bakenhus and Dennette McDermott on a Baroque piece by Boismortier assisted by dancers Chelsey Goldsmith and Leonard Harris with choreography by Garfinkel and costumes by Jessica Parr. David Steele, bass clarinet, and Oliver Molina, percussion, will debut "Getting to Know the Weather" and Matt Petty will perform “Sea Garden.”
The showcase will also include Kristine Coreil, horn, and Jeff Mathews, drum set, on “Blues and Variations for Monk” by David Amram; Leah Forsyth, oboe, on “Oblivion” by Astor Piazzolla; Molina on “State Medley” arranged By Bob Becker, and D’nissa Hester, soprano, and Michael Rorex, piano, performing “Caro Nome” from “Rigoletto” by Giuseppe Verdi. Terrie Sanders, soprano, and Chialing Hseih, piano, will play “Light in the Piazza” from the musical of the same name by Adam Guettel and Trahan and Hseih will be featured in a collaboration on George Gershswin’s “Embraceable You” by Gershwin arranged by Bill Holcombe.

“Getting to Know the Weather” was inspired by the short story "Getting to Know the Weather" by Pamela Painter. The story centers around a middle aged woman who leaves her old life behind to seek new experiences. She begins to teach herself to wait tables by observing waitresses at a local diner. She realizes that much of her success waiting tables involves chatting with costumers about the local weather.

The weather in this case is Chromatic Lydian, which was considered by Plato to be too sensual and lax to be suitable for the education of guardians. This piece attempts to compose out the kind of non-systematized, non-superimposing experimenting one sometimes does with new material and situations.

“The last note of the piece is an Eb, which is the first time this note is played throughout the entire piece,” said Steele. “I'd like to think this moment signifies a sudden change in the weather and the adaptability one needs when faced with new experiences and situations. This is the premier performance for bass clarinet. “

Petty is performing an original composition.

"I'm premiering a piece that I made over the summer called ‘Sea Garden,’” said Petty. “It features location recordings and video that I captured in Big Sur, California. I will perform live electronics for the showcase.”

The annual Art Faculty Exhibition features the work of Corbin Covher, Brooks Defee, Matt DeFord, Clyde Downs, Mirla Gonzales, Leslie Gruesbeck, Phyllis Lear and Michael Yankowski. The works explore a variety of media and showcase each artist's personal interests.

17 2016-09-15
Natchitoches

Board of Supervisors names NSU vice president


Dr. Chris Maggio has been named vice president for the student experience at Northwestern State University. The Board of Supervisors for the University of Louisiana System approved the appointment. Maggio has been interim vice president for the past 14 months.

17 2016-09-15
Natchitoches

French Language Conference next week


NATCHITOCHES – The Creole Heritage Center at Northwestern State University will host “Unité et Diversité (Unity and Diversity): A Conference on Louisiana French.” The event will be held Friday, Sept. 23 at the Natchitoches Events Center, 720 Second St., and will conclude with La Table Française on Saturday, Sept. 24 at Fort St. Jean State Historic Site.



The conference will explore Louisiana’s French roots and aspects of the Creole language and how it evolved in different parts of Louisiana. The conference sessions are free, but donations are welcome.



“The goal of this conference is to discuss the diversity and commonalities of the Louisiana French language,” said Loletta Wynder, project coordinator at the Creole Heritage Center. “Sessions will address Louisiana Colonial, Creole and Cajun French culture and language and education and revitalization of speaking French in Louisiana.”



Friday’s events will begin with a welcome at 8 a.m. with sessions beginning at 8:30 a.m. Topics include American Indians and French in Louisiana, Creole French (Bayou Teche), Red River colonial and Creole French in Avoyelles, Natchitoches and Rapides parishes; lower Mississippi River/Atchafalaya French, CODOFIL (Council for the Development of French in Louisiana) programs and Creole French, French connections: Haiti, Martinique, Guadelupe; Creole as an endangered language, maintaining Louisiana French, Louisiana French and eco-tourism and traditional music and teaching Creole, Cajun La La and zydeco.



Saturday’s La Table Française Aux Natchitoches (LTFAN) was established in January 2013 as a means for local people to advance their use of the Louisiana French language. Involving native speakers of Louisiana French and international French speakers, the event will include activities and conversations focused on language and culture. Participants of all ages and skill levels are invited to listen, speak and learn about the Louisiana French language and the French-speaking world.



The Natchitoches Events center is located at 720 Second St. The Creole Heritage Center is co-hosting this event along with the Cane River National Heritage Area, Inc., Cane River Creole National Historical Park and CODOFIL. For more information, contact Wynder at (318) 357-6685 or visit creole.nsula.edu.
17 2016-09-15
Natchitoches

ROTC cadet shares first-hand summer leadership experience in Africa


ROTC Cadet Joey D. Wills of Central completed the Army’s CULP mission to Gabon, Africa, this past summer and shares his first-hand experience below. He is pursuing a B.S. in Computer Information Systems.



CULP: My Experiences

By: Cadet Joey D. Wills





NATCHITOCHES – Every summer, hundreds of U.S. Army ROTC cadets travel the globe, spending weeks immersed in foreign cultures, learning more about how others view the U.S. and, in the process, learning more about themselves.



As you can imagine, the selection process for CULP – the Army’s Cultural Understanding and Language Proficiency Program – is long and arduous. I am a junior at Northwestern State University and a cadet with NSU’s Army ROTC program. I was fortunate to be selected by U.S. Army Cadet Command to participate in a CULP mission to Gabon, Africa, this summer. The program gives future officers a foreign cultural experience before they commission, and it gave me one of the best experiences of my life. The knowledge gained will help me greatly in my future career as an Army officer.



My team consisted of 10 other cadets and one cadre member from all over the United States. Our mission was to teach English to the Gabonese government’s equivalent of the U.S. Supreme Court. Our trip started at Fort Knox, Kentucky, home of Cadet Command where we completed paperwork and made our final preparations before heading to Gabon. After nearly a full day of air travel, we arrived in Libreville, Gabon, where we spent the next three weeks.

By partnering with the Department of State, we completed our main mission of teaching English to the Gabonese Supreme Court. During our stay, we visited many schools in Libreville, took part in guided safaris, explored traditional markets and observed Operation Central African Accord taking place.



Most of my work in Gabon involved teaching English to Gabonese civilians with varying degrees of proficiency in English. At elementary schools, we did not usually teach but gave the children a chance to practice their English. For our main mission, we helped the Supreme Court of Gabon increase their English proficiency with an American accent. Unlike schools which we visited only once each during our trip, we spent about three hours each weekday for three weeks with the Supreme Court. The members of the Court had a basic understanding of English because the Department of State worked with them several months before our arrival. Toward the end of our mission, we held conversations with most of the group. There were even instances where the Gabonese would speak short phrases with a near prefect American accent and correct our grammar.



I found teaching English without knowing French to be a remarkable experience. Some of the team knew some French and a few spoke it fluently, but most cadets, like myself, were alarmed to find we would be teaching English without knowing the primary language. Soon other cadets begin questioning how we were to teach English when we did not know French. We were told not to worry as we had a Defense Language Institute Instructor attached to our mission. It was her job to help us teach English. Upon arriving in Gabon, the instructor taught us how to teach English without knowing the other person’s language. This mostly involves using pictures and slow transitioning into similar topics.



One of my first experiences in Gabon was one of the most impressive – visiting the Embassy of the United States. Before this trip, the only embassies I had seen were those in Washington D.C. On our first trip to the American Embassy, we passed many others. I especially noticed the Japanese Embassy with Japanese-styled architecture; seeming no larger than the average house. As we drove on, the embassies got progressively larger. The Russian Embassy was about as large as NSU’s Kyser Hall. We also passed headquarters of foreign companies such as Heineken. Eventually, we came upon a modern, contemporary-styled building, larger and unlike any other. Upon reading the U.S. Embassy’s sign, everyone in the van became quiet as we thought we were approaching our embassy. Noticing our silence, the Commander chuckled that we had simply passed Embassy Annex Number One, the smallest of three annexes. After passing more embassies which seemed to grow larger in size, we passed the ambassador’s “mini mansion.” It did not look mini to me. Not far from the mansion was a walled compound housing what looked like a typical American neighborhood. This compound, we learned later, is where most of the embassy staff live. We eventually came upon the Gabonese President’s compound that included a large yard, house and high walls. After passing his compound, the city opened up to an enormous field. In the middle of this field was a compound that seemed to be 10 times larger than any other embassy with the same modern, contemporary style as the annexes. As we drove into the parking lot, the Commander turned around, smiled and said, “Welcome to the U.S. Embassy.”



I was very surprised to find how fond the Gabonese are of the U.S. and how eager they are to learn American English and culture. They would often ask the American way of pronouncing words and spelling and absolutely did not want to learn the British or Australian style. They were also interested in American culture and how we live our day-to-day lives. When asked why they were so concerned about learning American English and culture, the Gabonese would often reply that they see American English as the new Latin of modern-age globalism and that America has a big part to play in its future. Many Gabonese also see American English as the future language of international law and international business communication. One person explained that she had recently traveled to Saudi Arabia. She claimed that in every airport she visited, the primary or secondary language was always English.



My team was fortunate to not only to be in Gabon during the same time as Operation Central African Accord, but we also stayed in the same hotel as the top staff and commanders running the operation. Operation Central African Accord is a demonstration of U.S. power and capabilities to the central region of Africa and our wiliness to work with others to protect our allies. Upon learning we were cadets, many personnel approached us in the lobby or during meals and spoke with us about being future Army officers. Additionally, Brigadier General Kenneth Moore, Jr., the Deputy Commander for U.S. Army Africa and Commander of Operation Central African Accord, carved time from his demanding schedule to share lunch with us one day. During this lunch, we discussed topics as varied as the U.S. Army’s future goals in Africa to what it takes become a good officer in the modern world. We also discussed an upcoming part of the operation in which approximately 400 paratroopers were to board planes in the U.S., fly about 17 hours straight and rig their gear in flight. Once they reached Gabon, they would parachute with all of the equipment needed to survive in the country for weeks. This exercise was to demonstrate the U.S. power as a global fighting force and its capability of protecting allies at a moment’s notice. Hearing General Moore describe the exercise gave me chills in a way that before only the most inspiring military power demonstration videos affected me.



When I learned I would be traveling to a foreign country, I was advised to start thinking culturally. I recalled high school English when we discussed heroes such as Gilgamesh in literary culture. I remembered that each culture has its own heroes from which you can gain insight to their culture and values. Upon arriving in Gabon, I expected to hear of their heroes and see statues of their founders and political figures as you would find in the U.S. To my surprise, there were no heroes to be found except for photos of President Bongo. Many of the statues and art around the city were abstract cultural representations. Where I expected to find schools named after great Gabonese heroes, there where schools named after Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King, Jr. and Barack Obama. Also, I noticed a familiar quote that could be found in almost every room in the supreme court building. This quote was not of Gabonese origin but from President John F. Kennedy’s Inaugural Address, “Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.”



When asked to reflect on those cadets and cadre who stood out, I replied none did – the entire team was amazing. I had never been part of a group where things just seemed to work flawlessly. We held meetings at night and within 30 minutes after, all assigned tasks would be accomplished, preparing us for the next day. The cadets were intelligent and competent. The cadre was admirable and worked each day to impart as much knowledge and wisdom as possible. They seemed to find an opportunity to teach something nearly every moment.



The Gabonese Supreme Court judges were remarkable. Upon meeting them, I could immediately tell they were extremely intelligent and enlightened people. They took copious notes and picked up on grammar rules particularly well. They would often surprise us with near perfect English and at times corrected our grammar and writing. I expected our class would be formal and rigid because of the difference in age, position and culture, but as our classes progressed they became less formal. In time, I found that we were all very similar. We had a common love for pets, food and drink. We soon learned through our increased sidebar conversations that they found learning English about as boring and difficult as we did in school. As classes progressed, we would often get in trouble for getting off topic comparing culture and finding many other things in common. There even came a point one day where the judges started to have a coffee break in the middle of class because we had discussed our love of coffee. They overheard us discussing how we could use a coffee during break to help us keep going. Often these breaks would go way over time as we sipped coffee and made casual conversation.



Being a Computer Information Science major and the nerd I am, I guess it was destiny I would become friends with the supreme court’s technical support specialist, Jacque. He spoke near-perfect English as he studied it in South Africa while earning his degree in CIS. When I asked him what made him choose to study English and CIS, he said he was told as a child the future was in computers and English.



I learned many important things on the trip such as what it takes to deploy to a foreign country, new leadership skills and how to understand other cultures. Perhaps out of everything we did on the trip, what stands out most in developing me as a future leader was attending Department of State briefings at the Embassy of the United States in Libreville. These briefings gave me a better understanding of why the United States involves itself around the globe. The lunch we shared with Brigadier General Moore was also important to me. This time with a senior Army leader impressed upon me the need to encourage future leaders.



Through this experience, I better understand how global scale goals affect me as a future Army officer.



To view a related photo album of Wills’ CULP experience, visit nsula.tumblr.com. For more information on NSU’s ROTC/Military Science programs, visit rotc.nsula.edu or email nsurotc@nsula.edu.


17 2016-09-14
Natchitoches

From Natchitoches to the Smithsonian


A piece of Natchitoches Parish history will be on display when the newest Smithsonian Institution museum opens in Washington, D.C., this month.

The National Museum of African American History and Culture, which opens Sept. 24, will include objects made or used by enslaved people on plantations in Natchitoches Parish. About 30 artifacts were loaned to the new museum's collection.

"What better place would there be to display these objects and put our Cane River heritage on the map?" said Dustin Fuqua, chief of resource management for Cane River Creole National Historical Park, which is loaning the majority of the objects.

WATCH: Natchitoches history on a national stage

"We have been drawn to Cane River since the beginning of the Slavery and Freedom exhibition process for its rich and complex history and culture," said Nancy Bercaw, the National Museum of African American History and Culture's curator. "These artifacts help us bring history to life by personalizing the past through men like Solomon Williams or places from churches to homes to work spaces. We look forward to returning often and learning from the residents."

A coffee grinder bench is among the artifacts made
A coffee grinder bench is among the artifacts made or used by enslaved people in Natchitoches Parish that will be displayed at the National Museum of African American History and Culture (Photo: courtesy, Cane River Creole National Histo Park)
Personnel with Cane River Creole National Historical Park, which includes the former Oakland and Magnolia plantations, worked with the Smithsonian Institution for about three years to identify which artifacts would be part of the loan. Because of the significance of the artifacts and the fact that many descendants of enslaved people still live in the area, the process included public input, which Fuqua said was overwhelmingly positive.

The loan duration is 10 years, with an option to renew.

Among the artifacts are two attributed to enslaved blacksmith Solomon Williams of Oakland Plantation — a well-drilling tool that was part of the earliest rotary well-drilling equipment in America and a grave marker for his wife, Laide Williams. Also included are a coffee grinder bench, marbles recovered from the quarters at Magnolia Plantation, a bottle and medal presumed to have been used in spiritual rituals and equipment used for picking and shipping cotton.

Also among the artifacts are an ankle shackle used to bind the legs of enslaved workers and a plantation bell. Both were salvaged from the Bayou Folk Museum/Kate Chopin House after that structure was destroyed by fire in 2008. They were included with permission from the Association for the Preservation of Historic Natchitoches.

Established by an Act of Congress in 2003, the National Museum of African American History and Culture is the 19th Smithsonian Institution museum. It is the only national museum devoted exclusively to the documentation of African-American life, art, history and culture.

Fuqua will attend a preview of the museum opening on Sept. 17, along with Susan Dollar and Vicki Parrish from APHN. APHN President Parrish and board member Dollar are Northwestern State faculty members.

"Artifacts are important to people who study the past because they tell us of the past," said Dollar, a professor of history at NSU. "However, if they stay locked away or stored in boxes somewhere safe, they cannot tell the story they have to tell. They cannot speak to anyone of the past. I’m thrilled that these artifacts from Natchitoches Parish will be cared for by curators who will see to it that they are preserved for future generations and by museum interpreters and professionals who will see to it that the artifacts can tell their stories. And their stories will reach far beyond Natchitoches Parish boundaries and will join in a national/international conversation about our nation’s past."
17 2016-09-14
Natchitoches

BOM renews support of NSU Founder's Circle


Bank of Montgomery renewed their support of the Northwestern State University Founder’s Circle with a $1,000 contribution to the NSU Columns Fund, a tax-deductible giving program that supports academic endeavors, scholarships and building renovations. From left are Damon Jones, BOM loan specialist; NSU Development Staff Kimberly Gallow and Tiffany Chasteen, BOM President and CEO Ken Hale, CFO Mark Lipa and Carrie Beth Hough, assistant vice president and director of marketing. For more information on how to contribute to Northwestern State, contact the Office of University Advancement at (318) 357-4414.
17 2016-09-12
Alexandria

Higher Education in Cenla


Today, more than ever, a higher education may not only set a student on a successful career path, but can prepare the student for a competitive global job market. Albert Einstein once said, “Education is not the learning of facts, but the training of the mind to think.” With the world’s economy as it is, a higher education—a key to training the mind to think—continues to be the best investment a student can make in his or her future. In Central Louisiana, students are fortunate to have several colleges and universities to choose from to continue their postsecondary education, including Louisiana College in Pineville, Louisiana State University at Alexandria, Northwestern State University in Natchitoches or through one of the colleges that offer courses through the Learning Center for Rapides Parish in Alexandria, such as Upper Iowa University.



Dr. Rick Brewer, the president of Louisiana College, says that not only do students recognize that a higher education is a key to opportunity, but that communities and business leaders realize the value of postsecondary education. “A well-educated populace contributes significantly to attract new industry to a community. Students can receive a quality education, both in the public and private colleges, within a 50-mile radius in Central Louisiana,” Brewer notes. With new industries, more jobs are created, which in turn boosts the economy in Cenla. But higher education is more than just a paycheck, college leaders say. It is about increasing critical thinking skills, molding character and building integrity.



Higher education can feed into a person’s heart and soul, Dr. Haywood Joiner, interim chancellor of Louisiana State University of Alexandria, agrees. “Education is the key to one’s future and can be very instrumental in developing character,” he adds. Statistical studies indicate that students who earn a college degree typically engage in more civic involvement, tend to vote, increase personal development, increase their critical thinking skills and have better written and verbal communication skills. In life, the benefits and advantages gleaned through a college education are significant.



lsuaLogo-forSocialLouisiana State University of Alexandria continues to grow and prosper in ways some may have never even imagined only a few short years ago. The university is coming off two straight fall semesters with record 39 percent enrollment growth, along with experiencing a record number of international students, athletes, out-of-state students and highest high school GPA.



Additionally, there are more opportunities for students on campus than ever before. LSUA recently added a student-life coordinator to the staff to continue to make the undergraduate experience the best it can be for both traditional and non-traditional students. Students may also elect to participate in the more than 30 student-based organizations or show off their athletic skills as part of one of the club sports. Currently, LSUA offers four club sports, including golf, rugby, rodeo and pom line. In only their first year, the LSUA Rugby Team won four tournaments and also earned a berth to the National 7’s rugby tournament in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania as one of the top eight teams in the country. Of course, LSUA also offers seven intercollegiate sports that continue to make waves on a conference and national level. Four of the seven intercollegiate teams ended their respective seasons last year with national rankings and trips to their national tournament.



Students can also live entirely on campus thanks to on-campus housing and a completely revamped food service system. Students who live at The Oaks can choose from one-, two- and four-bedroom on-campus apartments that come complete with a common living room, fully equipped kitchen, swimming pool, laundry facility and game room. Students can choose one of several meal plans for use in the recently redesigned and remodeled Magnolia Café. Last year also saw the addition of a Starbucks to the LSUA campus for those who are looking for a cup of coffee or snack during the day. For a quick bite, a Subway restaurant overlooks the 9-hole golf course on campus as well.



The university also continues to offer in-demand, high-quality majors that are attracting students from around the world. LSUA is home to nursing, allied health, business administration, biology, education, arts, English and humanities; math and physical sciences; and behavioral and social sciences degrees. The demand is high for LSUA graduates. Nursing (associate degree), radiologic technology (associate degree), allied health (baccalaureate degree), business administration (baccalaureate degree) and education (baccalaureate degree) graduates frequently obtain jobs in their respective fields immediately upon earning their degree.



LSUA has also partnered with LSU-Eunice in offering a number of two-plus-two programs, where students can earn an associate degree from LSUE before transferring to LSUA to complete a bachelor’s degree. For those who are place bound or just prefer the online experience, LSUA is expanding its offerings of online degrees. Currently, students can earn a bachelor’s degree in a 100 percent online setting in nursing (RN-BSN), criminal justice, psychology, disaster science and emergency management, English, business administration and allied health.



Despite the recent budget challenges, and thanks to an increase in enrollment as well as some strategic belt tightening, school officials say LSUA is in a better financial position than it has been in many years. More information about LSUA can be found at www.lsua.edu.

CenlaHigherEd-LSUA





LouisianaCollegeLogoLouisiana College, in Pineville, is all about transformation. In April of last year, Dr. Rick Brewer became the college’s ninth president, and under his leadership, academic, aesthetic, administrative and athletic transformations abound.



LC’s relevant, relational and rigorous curricula, built on a Christian worldview, saw the addition of a Bachelor of Arts degree in leadership, with majors in business, communications and Christian studies. In addition, two new certificate tracks of study were launched: one in pastoral ministry and the other in missiology. Both certificates offer 16 accredited hours of course work. The college’s “3+2” agreement with Louisiana Tech University offers the successful graduate two Bachelor of Science degrees in only five years.



Passersby will see scaffolding at several buildings, as 18 of 23 campus roofs are being replaced. Recent dorm upgrades include new carpet, paint, ceilings, HVAC, remodeled bathrooms, several flat screens with Bluetooth technology, charging ports for mobile devices, a movie room with theater seating, upgraded electrical power service, fiber-optic internet cable and new wireless internet access points.



Most significant to the community is the total refurbishment of Guinn Auditorium’s interior, including replacement of the ceiling, walls, flooring and seats. Campus landscaping improvements added lighting to both medians at each campus entrance, the planting of numerous trees near the dining hall and low-growth shrubbery at LC’s iconic fountain, which has been repainted.



Brewer recently announced the promotion of Dr. Jerry Pounds as vice president for academic affairs, Dr. Cheryl Clark as associate vice president for academic affairs, Chief Financial Officer Randall Hargis as executive vice president and Dr. Amy Craig as dean of the School of Education. LC’s head basketball coaches, Patrece Carter and Reni Mason, were promoted to associate athletic directors. Carter will manage program operations and Mason will oversee external relations and donor development. Rev. Vincent Smith was appointed to serve as dean of students, and he will focus on student life, retention, service learning, and international student services. By adding volleyball and men’s and women’s indoor/outdoor track and field, the LC Wildcats have 18 sports now sanctioned by the NCAA, Division III and the American Southwest Conference. “These changes in the life of Louisiana College and the uptick in new student enrollment illustrate God’s faithfulness as we pursue LC’s vision for preparing graduates and transforming lives,” Brewer says.

CenlaHigherEd-LC

NSU SealNorthwestern State University, in Natchitoches, begins the fall 2016 semester with an enrollment of more than 9,500 students, which includes a freshman class of nearly 1,300. The university’s mission is to serve its students and its goal to become the nation’s premier regional university through innovative, transformative student learning that prepares graduates for life and career success.



The university is led by its president, Dr. Jim Henderson, a 1994 alumnus of the university, who set a high bar for faculty and staff to focus on the student experience, academic excellence, market responsiveness, athletic prominence and community enrichment. The university has been aggressive in recruiting, engaging alumni of all ages and developing mutually beneficial partnerships with businesses and industry and other institutions.



Northwestern State offers a full range of undergraduate and graduate degree programs. In addition to its main campus in Natchitoches, Northwestern State has satellite campuses in Shreveport, Alexandria and Leesville/Fort Polk. Northwestern State is home to eNSU, Louisiana’s first and largest electronic campus that offers 39 degree programs with accommodating class schedules, personalized instruction, veterans’ benefits and financial aid to those who qualify.



The school offers many experiences outside the classroom that enhance student life. NSU has more than 100 student organizations, Greek organizations, honor societies, student media, service opportunities, a packed schedule of performances, exhibits and lectures, a state-of-the-art Wellness, Recreation and Activities Center, the Recreation Complex and the exciting atmosphere of Demon Athletics. Together, these enhance scholarship by developing leadership, a sense of community, personal integrity and social development.



To keep up with a global economy, new market-responsive programs were developed in the last year including: post associate certificate in quality control, post baccalaureate certificate in quality control, post associate certificate in project management, post baccalaureate certificate in project management, post baccalaureate certificate in business analytics, graduate certificate in writing for business, industry and technology, bachelor of applied science in resource management and associate degree in engineering technology.



Northwestern State’s doctor of nursing practice has been accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. The program’s first cohort graduated this past summer. The university has also recently undertaken an initiative to realign and streamline several degree programs. The university is partnering with Louisiana Economic Development to connect students and new graduates with Louisiana companies in the IT and digital media fields.



LogoBNSU continues to work with several community colleges throughout Louisiana to offer students options for seamless transition from 2-year institutions to Northwestern State. These initiatives include streamlining curricula and aligning programs for the easy transfer of credits, awarding associate degrees to qualifying transfer students while they pursue their baccalaureate degrees and offering add-on certifications specifically targeted to meet industry needs in several disciplines. The university offers a dual enrollment program to students at Bossier Parish Community College and is working in tandem with BPCC to pilot a joint ROTC program.



Recently, Northwestern State’s online RN to BSN program, along with bachelor’s programs in computer information systems, criminal justice and psychology were ranked first in the country by Nonprofit Colleges Online. The bachelor’s in accounting was ranked second. Topmastersineducation.com ranked the master’s in special education third in the nation and the master’s in education fifth. In 2016, Northwestern State was recognized as having one of the top graduate nursing programs in America in a recent ranking by Top Master’s in Healthcare Administration. Editors selected graduate schools based on program flexibility, faculty involvement in the healthcare field and tuition cost.



The university expanded its memorandum of understanding with Fort Polk by signing an addendum in which the university’s Leesville-Fort Polk campus will offer associate degrees in nursing and bachelor’s degrees in business administration, criminal justice, social work, hospitality management and tourism, nursing and general studies with concentrations in arts and communications, computer and natural science and social science.



The university incorporates service into its curriculum and there are many examples of students working, learning and gaining experiences valuable to their courses of study through service on campus and in the community. Most recently, students in the Department of Social Work planned, opened and are operating a student food pantry for students with food insecurity, which has been a valuable asset to many students.



Northwestern State and Louisiana Community and Technical System signed a scholarship transfer agreement, the Purple Prestige Scholarship, which awards scholarships to LCTCS students who earn their associate degree and transfer to NSU to complete their bachelor’s degree. The scholarships are awarded to active members of Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society who meet specified criteria. The Purple Prestige Transfer Scholarship seeks to remove economic obstacles for Phi Theta Kappa students who wish to pursue a bachelor’s degree after completing their two-year degree, administrators said.

CenlaHigherEd-NSU



LCRPcolorLogoUpper Iowa University has been preparing students to succeed—in the classroom and in the world since 1857. That rich history, coupled with a student-centered mission, has created a springboard for UIU to become a recognized innovator in offering accredited, quality programs through flexible, multiple delivery systems, including online and self-paced study, according to Meredith Clark, the director of UIU’s Alexandria center. The university is housed inside the Learning Center for Rapides Parish, located at 1410 Neel Kearby Boulevard in Alexandria.



Upper Iowa University is a private, not-for-profit university providing educational excellence and leadership development to approximately 9,000 students–both nationally and internationally. The university offers an accredited, quality education and has a diverse range of student populations and progressive, flexible options for students of all ages. Whether a new college student or someone returning to college after 20 years, Upper Iowa University works with the student to fit college into their busy life. “At UIU, you can graduate taking two or three classes per term. That means less stress and better focus,” Clark says. The UIU-Alexandria Center offers evening courses or online and self-paced programs. However you blend the coursework for a college degree, all UIU courses count toward a degree.



The Learning Center for Rapides Parish is part of a consortium of colleges and universities, including NSU, LSUA and Texas Wesleyan, which aim to provide for the educational goals and career development for people of Central Louisiana. All classes are offered at the LCRP in the evenings to minimize schedule disruption for working adult learners. Upper Iowa has articulation agreements with Baton Rouge Community College, Bossier Parish Community College, Central Louisiana Technical Community College, Delgado Community College, Nunez Community College and River Parishes Community College to assist transfer students. The college has also partnered with the Fraternal Order of Police and the Louisiana State Troopers Association to assist law enforcement officers obtain continued education.



There are six, 8-week terms offered year-round at UIU so students can access the courses needed. Students can take just two courses most terms and graduate on schedule. Up to 90 college credits may be transferred from other colleges. Professional experience and test scores can also often be applied toward earning college credit. A personal academic advisor can help tailor a student’s academic plan and advise them on financial aid. For more information about UIU, call (318) 484-2184.


17 2016-09-12
Natchitoches

Student at NSU gains as much experience as possible through internships


For most college graduates seeking their first job, relevant experience will likely be replaced by flowery language about work ethic and dedication. But Northwestern State University senior Leighann Westfall won’t have that problem.


17 2016-09-12
Natchitoches

Jaycees award scholarship


Madison Vercher, center, of Natchitoches is the 2016 recipient of a scholarship created by the Natchitoches Jaycees, which is presented to a first year freshman from Natchitoches Parish attending Northwestern State University. Vercher is a graduate of Natchitoches Central High School majoring in criminal justice. She is the daughter Craig and Denise Vercher. From left are Jaycees and NSU staff Jon Caliste and Alan Pasch with Vercher, Jason Stelly and Chris Lyles. For information on established a scholarship or planned gift at NSU, call (318) 357-4414.
17 2016-09-12
Natchitoches

Pi Kapps complete Journey of Hope


NATCHITOCHES – Four members of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity returned to Northwestern State University after a summer experience unlike any of their peers. In August, Thomas Marlbrough, Michael Dailey, Sean Austin and William Devall celebrated their completion of the largest fraternal fundraising and awareness event of its kind, the Journey of Hope.



Every summer, 90 Pi Kappa Phi undergraduate and alumni members from across the United States cycle 4,000 miles from the west coast to Washington, D.C., participating in activities and events to promote a greater understanding of people with disabilities.

Through team member fundraising and corporate sponsorships, the event raises more than $600,000 for fraternity’s philanthropy, The Ability Experience. The national nonprofit organization enhances the lives of people with disabilities through educational programs, awareness raising events, and donations of specially designed equipment and recreational environments.



Austin is a senior from DeRidder, Marlbrough is a junior from Mandeville, Dailey is a junior from West Monroe and Devall is a junior from Denham Springs.



Each team member raises a minimum of $5,500 to qualify for one of the three routes of the annual cross-country bicycle trek that begin on the West Coast. The North Route sets out from San Francisco, the South Route from Los Angeles, and TransAmerica begins in Seattle. The teams arrive together on the East Coast and ride together to the steps of the U.S. Capitol, after having visited 32 states.



This year, Devall’s uncle Wes Breeden, a fellow Beta Omicron Chapter alumnus who also rode the Journey of Hope in 2000, was among the supporters who gathered on the Capitol lawn. Devall says he’ll never forget seeing his family as he rode up.



“It was truly amazing to see so many familiar and loving faces to watch me finish out my journey,” DeVall said. “This summer has challenged me beyond belief and I could not have done it without the other 37 guys who rode along side me all summer. These guys pushed me in ways that I didn’t think were possible.“



The true impact of the Journey of Hope can be felt through its programming across the nation. After riding an average of 75 miles a day, you’d never find these NSU Pi Kappa Phi members napping or preparing for the next day’s ride. The were dancing at a friendship visit with a local group that supports people with disabilities, participating in a game of wheelchair basketball, performing puppet shows to educate children on the abilities of people with disabilities, and learning life lessons that will impact them for the rest of their lives.



Marlbrough said the rewards are great, despite a physically demanding ride.



“This cross country trip has been so eye opening the amazing people we meet with everyday have truly inspired me to push past all the climbs and long days,” he said.



In towns large and small, the Journey of Hope reaches out to people through newspapers, radio and television, civic groups and community leaders, reaching millions of people annually and bringing to the forefront the abilities of people with disabilities.

Many of the cyclists form instant friendships with the people they meet along the route. Austin said he will never forget Hannah, a girl with an intellectual disability he met through the Special Olympics of Denver.



“She is so ambitious, so determined and strong willed,” Austin said. “We had a great conversation and she always said ‘thank you’ and ‘excuse me.’ It was so nice to spend time with someone that was so genuine.”



Austin says his work with The Ability Experience won’t end with this journey.



“I will never be able to repay what I am indebted. I will forever wear my letters proudly and give back whenever I can,” he said.




17 2016-09-09
Monroe

NSU President fires shot at ULM


The football rivalry between ULM and Northwestern State has lain dormant for over a decade now.

That might not be the case anymore.

NSU President Jim Henderson took a playful jab at ULM in a hype video promoting Demon football. Henderson referenced the infamous mascot fight between Vic the Demon and Chief Brave Spirit — the former mascot of then-Northeast Louisiana University — during the 1992 game between the schools and NLU’s name change to the University of Louisiana Monroe in 1999.

“Vic the Demon’s takedown of an opponent’s mascot was so humiliating, they changed the name of their school,” Henderson said at the 41-second mark of the video.


The scuffle left Vic the Demon without his head and Chief Brave Spirit laying on the Turpin Stadium grass before both mascots were separated by the police. Chief Brave Spirit may have lost what came to be known as the “Tussle in Turpin Stadium,” but ULM won the game 28-18.

NSU leads the all-time series with ULM 27-19-1.

The Demons, who were coached at the time by current ULM linebackers coach Scott Stoker, won the last meeting in the series 27-23 in 2005 at JPS Field at Malone Stadium.

Stoker remains the last NSU coach to produce a winning record.

Follow Adam on Twitter @adam_hunsucker


17 2016-09-09
Natchitoches

HMT students learn local culture through local cuisine


Students in a meal management class at Northwestern State University made Natchitoches meat pies from scratch and served to Archie Metoyer, left, and Tina Rachal, right, organizers of next weekend’s Natchitoches Meat Pie Festival. The Hospitality Management and Tourism students are Laura Cornish, Colby Cranford, Ebony Lee. Lee is majoring in Family and Consumer Science with a minor in culinary arts. Several students will present a meat pie-making demonstration at the Festival, which celebrates one Louisiana’s official state foods. Cornish and Cranford are HMT majors.



NATCHITOCHES – With the 14th annual Natchitoches Meat Pie Festival only a few days away, students in a meal management class at Northwestern State University learned the traditional way to make the savory local delicacy that is synonymous with the historic city and Cane River country.



“Virtually every culture worldwide has a meat pie,” said Connie Jones, assistant professor in the Department of Hospitality Management and Tourism. “The Italians have calzones, the Asian cuisines have dumplings, the Hispanic cultures have empanadas. We will be using a variation of the official Meat Pie Festival recipe, with a lot of tips passed down to me by my mother-in-law, Dottie Conant. Dottie is well known in the area for her cooking, and taught me so much about the local foods. I am certain she could take home the grand prize for meat pies. The Natchitoches Meat Pie is the best.”


17 2016-09-09
Natchitoches

Cleco Power supports scholarships for Cenla students


NATCHITOCHES – “Graduates of Northwestern State University’s Engineering Technology programs are equipped to understand, design, analyze and work effectively in industrial settings utilizing product/process control systems and electrical power systems,” said Bill Fontenot, chief operating officer for Cleco Power. “Cleco is proud to support NSU’s Engineering Technology programs as we are dependent on graduates who understand local, national and global issues related to the electrical power industry.”



As a show of support for NSUs’ Engineering Technology program, Cleco recently completed three years of funding $15,000 in scholarships that are awarded to five students each academic year. Three are for entering freshmen focused on Electronics Engineering Technology (EET) or Industrial Engineering Technology (IET). Preference for the entering freshmen scholarships is given to residents of Allen, Avoyelles, Grant, Rapides and Vernon parishes. Two scholarships are awarded to senior students with preference to students from Avoyelles and Rapides parishes.



“I was brought to this program by my love for structure and system,” said Shane Perkins, a freshman from Leesville. “I have always love creating things since I was young.”



Perkins said that uncertainties in the oil and gas industry left his father worrying about paying for Perkins’ tuition and expenses. Being awarded a Cleco scholarship made a big difference.



“This scholarship means more to me than most would assume,” he said. “It’s things such as this scholarship that mean the world to me.”



NSU’s Engineering Technology programs have a long history of providing workforce training and qualified graduates to meet the demands of employers such as Cleco. Students in the Electronics Engineering Technology concentration learn to analyze, build, test, operate and maintain electrical systems. The programs were designated an Area of Excellence by the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors and are accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org.



“I love how open and willing the professors are not only to teach in front of an entire class, but also work side by side with you to find solutions and acquire your goals,” Perkins said. “To any future student interested in joining the engineering program, I encourage you to take this opportunity and dive in head first. These professors are some of the smartest men I know, and I am certain that they share the same vision as any of their students and will do whatever it takes to see you reach your goals.”



Cleco is a regulated utility company headquartered in Pineville. In business since 1935, the company has approximately 1,200 employees serving approximately 287,000 customers from Mansfield to Patterson through its retail business and supplies wholesale power in Louisiana and Mississippi. Cleco owns 10 generating units with a total nameplate capacity of 3,333 megawatts, 11,830 miles of distribution lines and 1,300 miles of transmission lines.



“We are extremely grateful to Cleco for their outstanding support of our Engineering Technology programs,” said Dr. Ali Ahmad, department head. “Enrollment continues to grow in our programs which is helping to meet the demand for technologists capable of using appropriate theory, mathematics and computational technology in support of the electrical power industry.”



For information on NSU’s Engineering Technology program, visit engrtech.nsula.edu.


17 2016-09-08
Natchitoches

NSU to host Louisiana Studies Conference this month


Northwestern State University will host the Eighth Annual Louisiana Studies Conference Sept. 16-17 in the Fine Arts Annex. The conference opens Friday, Sept. 16 at 2 p.m. and presentations start at 3:15 p.m. Scholars from throughout Louisiana and six other states and the Netherlands will make presentations on aspects of Louisiana religion, spirituality, art, history, culture and literature. Admission to the conference is free and open to the public.

17 2016-09-07
Natchitoches

NSU Police get St. Michael visor clips


Larry Paige presented Northwestern State University campus police with St. Michael visor clips for patrol vehicles Monday. The visor clips were blessed by priests at the Minor Basilica of the Immaculate Conception and have been presented to officers from the Natchitoches City Police Department, Natchitoches Parish Sheriff’s Office and the City Marshall’s Office. Paige intends to provide the visor clips to law enforcement officers in outlying municipalities, to EMTs and first responders as well. St. Michael is the patron saint of police officers and the gift is intended as a special measure of protection and support for officers, Paige said. He would also like to provide St. Florian visor clips to firefighters in the parish. From left are Chief Jon Caliste, Chief Craig Vercher, Officer Chase Voorhies, Captain Wesley Harrell, Paige, Officer Rachel Head, Officer Michael Chelette, Sergeant Kerry Anderson and Dr. Marcus Jones, vice president for University Affairs.


17 2016-09-06
Natchitoches

Nearly 200 Northwestern


Nearly 200 Northwestern State University students participated in “1 of 7” service projects Friday as part of Demon Days welcome week activities. “1 of 7” is a project that encourages individuals to pledge one day a week to helping others by performing service activities or volunteering in ways that improve the world around them. NSU’s Office of First Year Experience and Leadership Development annually incorporates “1 of 7” initiatives into Demon Days activities in partnership with several community organizations and non-profit groups. This year, students worked with the Cane River Food Pantry, Wesley Campus Ministries/Foundation, Fort St. Jean Baptiste, St. Augustine Catholic Church, Natchitoches Humane Society (Happy Tails Rescue), Oakland Plantation, Cane River Children’s Service Group Home, Girl’s Transitional Home and Boys Transitional Home. Administrators said the response was overwhelming, both from students and from those who benefitted from volunteer work. For information on Demon Days, visit nsula.edu/fye/demondays. For information on “1 of 7,” visit 1of7.org.




17 2016-09-06
Natchitoches

Photography classes to be held Sept. 10


Northwestern State University’s Office of Electronic and Continuing Education will present two basic photography classes Saturday, Sept. 10 in Room 225 of Kyser Hall.

Basic photography will be held from 1 – 3 p.m. and will teach the skills and techniques of taking great photographs with your DSLR camera. The class will cover lighting and shooting techniques including photo composition and camera functions. This course is designed with DSLR cameras in mind, but could help those wanting to break into the field of more dynamic cameras and images. Participants will need a camera. A Nikon DSLR is preferred.

Basic photography II is from 4 – 6 p.m. This course will cover what to do once the photo has been taken. The instructor will demonstrate basic editing techniques using Photoshop that will enhance your photos. Participants can bring specific images with them for some in-class editing. Those in the class will need a camera with computer cable supplied with camera or SD card reader.

The fee is $30 per class or $50 for both. For more information, e-mail bedgoodm@nsula.edu, visit ece.nsula.edu/non-credit/ or call (800) 376-2422 or (318) 357-6355.


17 2016-09-06
Natchitoches

Louisiana Studies Conference to focus on Sacred Louisiana


Northwestern State University will host the Eighth Annual Louisiana Studies Conference Sept. 16-17 in the Fine Arts Annex. The conference opens Friday, Sept. 16 at 2 p.m. and presentations start at 3:15 p.m.

Scholars from throughout Louisiana and six other states and the Netherlands will make presentations on aspects of Louisiana religion, spirituality, art, history, culture and literature. Admission to the conference is free and open to the public.

This year’s conference theme is Sacred Louisiana. Throughout the two-day event numerous scholars, filmmakers and creative writers will make presentations. Some of the many topics to be discussed include Louisiana literature, film and TV, discrimination, holiday foods in Louisiana, vernacular architecture, voodoo, the Civil Rights movement, food insecurity, cemeteries, the effects of cultural and linguistic heritage, rural gospel music, heritage preservation, Louisiana history, material culture, Louisiana swamps as sacred spaces, iconography, Cajun and Creole music fan videos, Poverty Point, African American spiritual culture, radio evangelism, teaching Louisiana history, Marian devotion, Isleño religious verbal art, wild hog hunting and the Rock Chapel in Carmel, Louisiana.

“This year’s conference theme will highlight some of the many ways that folks in Louisiana find meaning in spirituality,” said Dr. Shane Rasmussen, director of the Louisiana Folklife Center and co-chair of the conference. “The significance of this religious influence upon Louisiana culture cannot be overestimated. I am excited to hear and see what this year’s conference participants will tell us. We want to invite anyone who is interested in the state of Louisiana’s diverse and vibrant spiritual traditions to join us and to take part in these conversations.”

Creative writers will also address the conference theme, including poets John P. Doucet, David Middleton, and Jay Udall and fiction writers Rachel Green and Richard V. McGehee. Also featured will be a harmonica demonstration and performance with Ed Huey. Several Louisiana filmmakers will discuss and screen their films, including Tim van Cleave with his film Juke Joints, Dance Halls, and House Parties: A Legacy of Music on Cane River, Tika Laudun with her film Katrina Ten Years After: A Second Life, A Second Chance, and Bill Robison and Jerry P. Sanson with their film Louisiana During World War II.

The Friday evening keynote, “Spiritual YaYa: Spiritual Tourism through New Orleans and Southern Louisiana,” will be given by New Orleans freelance photographer Mary Lou Uttermohlen at 6 p.m. in Room 206. An exhibit of Uttermohlen’s photographs is currently on exhibit through Sept. 23 in Orville Hanchey Gallery 2.

“Spiritual YAYA is about pulling back the veil shrouding the spiritual culture of New Orleans and Southern Louisiana,” said Uttermohlen. “The series visits a variety of spiritual groups that intermingle here like ingredients in a pot of gumbo. It begins with Mardi Gras, St. Joseph’s Day, All Saints Days and Christmas Eve Bonfires, but then it digs deeper into small spiritual communities such as Vodou. The photographs are about religious freedom and people practicing their beliefs with heartfelt devotion to the divine. It demonstrates the strengths of communities, the depth of our culture and the joy of literally dancing to the beat of your own drum.”

The Saturday morning keynote, “Lighten Up,” will be given by Matt Petty, adjunct instructor of music at Northwestern State University, at 10:30 a.m. in Room 206. Petty’s presentation will consist of a lecture accompanied by the screening of several of his short films about visionary artists, specifically those in Louisiana.

“These pieces represent artists who are working in ways that exist below the radar of mainstream culture,” said Petty. “Grown from the soil of the South, many of them are deeply religious. Juanita Leonard, for example, is a minister as well as an artist. Her artwork ties directly into her ministry as she strives to make the world a better place.”

Petty’s address will be followed by the presentation of the winning essays from the Eighth Annual NSU Louisiana High School Essay Contest. For this year’s contest theme, “Louisiana Inspirations,” students addressed the prompt “What experience in Louisiana has inspired you the most?” The winning essays will be presented at the conference and will also be published in the Louisiana Folklife Journal, the Louisiana Folklife Center’s scholarly journal.

This year’s contest winners are Jadynn Giles from Grant High School in Pollock, for her first place essay “Ripples in the Water,” Luke Paille from St. Paul’s School in Covington for his second place essay “A Boy’s Never Forgotten Experiences in Louisiana,” and Bryce Moulton of the Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts in Natchitoches for his third place entry “I AM FROM.” Three students received Honorable Mention: Robert Kyte of Ruston High School for his essay “Swimming in Louisiana,” Alena Noakes of Grant High School in Dry Prong for her essay “My Poetic Soul and Its Muse” and Kelly O’Neal of Cedar Creek High School in Choudrant for her essay “The World of Cowboys.”

“This year’s essays were simply outstanding,” said Rasmussen, who is co-chair of the essay contest. “The essays conveyed a sense of gratitude these student writers feel for their families, their communities, and their state. Whether describing the love they receive from a parent or grandparent, how their passion for a sport or the great outdoors has made them stretch, or the lessons they have learned from living in communities with so many positive role models, these students have been inspired to successfully meet the challenges of life, and are now inspiring others with their own narratives.”

A complete conference schedule can be found on the Louisiana Folklife Center’s website at https://louisianafolklife.nsula.edu/. For more information call the Folklife Center at (318) 357-4332.

The Conference is co-sponsored by the Northwestern State Department of English, Foreign Languages, and Cultural Studies, The Friends of the Hanchey Gallery, the Louisiana Folklife Center, the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training, the NSU College of Arts and Sciences, the NSU Department of Fine + Graphic Arts, the NSU Writing Project and the NSU Office of the President.


17 2016-09-02
Natchitoches

Cafe Demon formally opens


A ribbon cutting Thursday marked the formal opening of Café DeMon, Northwestern State University’s newest coffee spot in Watson Library. The café is operated by Sodexo and sells Starbucks products. From left are Jennifer Kelly, Academic Support and Auxiliary Services; Steve Kauf, Sodexo, and NSU President Dr. Jim Henderson.


Visitors to the Northwestern State University campus are welcome to stop by Café DeMon, located in the northwest corner of Watson Library, where indoor and outdoor seating is available. Hours of operation are 7 a.m.-11 p.m. Sunday-Thursday and 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Hours may vary on holidays, during finals week and during semester breaks. For more information, visit the NSU Campus Dining Facebook page.


17 2016-09-01
Natchitoches

Board of Regents approves degree in Applied Microbiology at NSU to prepare students for workforce


The Louisiana Board of Regents approved a new bachelor of science degree in applied microbiology at Northwestern State University this week. The new degree will prepare students to enter directly into the workforce in the public or private sectors of environmental compliance, water and air quality, food safety, public health, organic farming/gardening and homeland security.


17 2016-09-01
Natchitoches

Ceramics class to begin Sept. 8


Northwestern State University’s Office of Electronic and Continuing Education will offer a beginning ceramics class starting Thursday, Sept. 8. The class will be held each Thursday from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. in Room 113 of the Fine Arts Annex until Nov. 10.

The fee for the class is $150 plus a $20 material fee paid directly to the instructor on the first day of the course. Beginning Ceramics is an introduction to working with clay. The student will learn hand-building and sculptural techniques, as well as work on the potter’s wheel. There will also be room for intermediate and advanced students to take the class and use the art facilities during the class time.

17 2016-09-01
Natchitoches

NSU band lends a hand to St, Amant band by loaning drums


For any marching band, it all begins with the drum line. St. Amant High School’s band took a big step toward getting whole Wednesday when it received a loan of drums from Northwestern State University.

The university provided St. Amant, which is in Ascenion Parish near Gonzales, with nine snare drums, four sets of tenor drums (six drums each) and five bass drums that would have been sent to state surplus.

“I can’t put into words what this gesture from Northwestern means,” said St. Amant Director of Bands Craig Millet. “The first thing the band does is rally around the drum section. What starts things is the drum cadences. That is what gets the band pumped up.”

Northwestern State Director of Bands Dr. Jeffrey Mathews was closely following news of the flooding that devastated much of southeast and south central Louisiana. He immediately began contacting band directors to offer help.

“When something like that happens, everyone wants to do something,” said Mathews. “I called one band director in the area who told me what happened at St. Amant and we went from there.”

Once Mathews identified the need and how NSU could help, he worked with university and state officials to complete all required paperwork.

St. Amant High was closed after the recent floods. Students began classes Monday on a half-day platoon schedule at nearby Dutchtown High. Millet said about 90 percent of the band students had their instruments stored in the school’s band room. He is hoping to gather enough instruments to allow the band to perform at next Friday’s football home opener.

“I saw the students for the first time Monday and they are very resilient,” said Millet, who has been at St. Amant for 27 years. “They can’t wait to get back to play and practice. Our community has suffered but humanity has not because of the willingness of people to help.”

The donation was also meaningful to Spirit of Northwestern Marching Band member Madison Mayers, a 2016 graduate of St. Amant, where she was the band’s drum major last year.

“It is heartwarming that my new school (Northwestern) loves my former school (St. Amant) and wants to help,” said Mayers, a freshman biology major from St. Amant. “It was so great of Dr. Mathews to make the offer of percussion equipment to St. Amant.”

Mayers’ family had four feet of water in their home. They are staying with friends as they start the rebuilding process.

“I’m glad I have been able to focus on classes and band for the last couple of weeks,” said Mayers. “I know it will be very emotional for me when I go home.”

17 2016-09-01
Natchitoches

NSU establishes agreement with Nepali Institute


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University signed a memorandum of understanding with the Institute of Crisis Management Studies, Samarpan Academy, Nepal, to provide both institutions with opportunities for academic cooperation, student and faculty exchanges and joint research.



NSU President Dr. Jim Henderson signed the agreement via WebEx early Wednesday, when administrators coordinated a nearly 11-hour time difference.



According to the agreement, the two institutions will promote academic cooperation through the exchange of research papers, teaching materials, syllabi and curricula. The agreement encourages both schools to partner in joint research and toe collaborate in instructional and cultural programs and shared access to information networks. The institution may exchange faculty for teaching, lectures or workshops and may exchange up to two students per academic year for study in degree programs and participation in research, cultural activities, language learning and more. The agreement is effective for five years.



Northwestern State’s engagement with Nepal is the result of a relationship between two members of the faculty who became involved with the Empower Nepali Girls Foundation. Drs. Patrice and Michael Moulton and their son Bryce have worked with the Foundation for several years to provide scholarships for Nepali girls to attend school and raise awareness of child trafficking, hunger and gender equity.



Patrice Moulton, a professor of psychology at Northwestern State University, first learned of the Empower Nepali Girls Foundation through a colleague she met at a conference who talked about a grassroots foundation he established after a visit to Nepal where as many as 10,000 girls are abducted and sold into slavery every year. Patrice and Michael, who is a professor in Northwestern State’s Department of Health and Human Performance, have travelled to Nepal several times.



In Natchitoches, the Moultons have worked with First United Methodist Church, St. Mary’s School, Northwestern State ROTC and NSU’s Psi Chi psychology society with projects to benefit the Foundation. Their efforts became even more important after a devastating earthquake occurred in Nepal in April 2015 that killed thousands of people, flattened villages and reduced numerous heritage sites to ruin.



With its ancient culture and the Himalayas as a backdrop, landlocked Nepal was closed to the outside world until the 1950s. About three quarters of the country is covered by mountains. It is home to Mount Everest - the world's highest mountain.



"NSU is very excited to partner with faculty and students at Tribhuvan University/Institute for Crisis Management Studies,” Dr. Patrice Moulton said. “We look forward to future student academic and cultural exchanges.”


17 2016-08-29
Natchitoches

"1 of 7" gets NSU students volunteering




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Submitted by Northwestern1 on Fri, 08/26/2016 - 2:19pm

Nearly 200 Northwestern State University students participated in “1 of 7” service projects Friday as part of Demon Days welcome week activities. “1 of 7” is a project that encourages individuals to pledge one day a week to helping others by performing service activities or volunteering in ways that improve the world around them. NSU’s Office of First Year Experience and Leadership Development annually incorporates “1 of 7” initiatives into Demon Days activities in partnership with several community organizations and non-profit groups. This year, students worked with the Cane River Food Pantry, Wesley Campus Ministries/Foundation, Fort St. Jean Baptiste, St. Augustine Catholic Church, Natchitoches Humane Society (Happy Tails Rescue), Oakland Plantation, Cane River Children’s Service Group Home, Girl’s Transitional Home and Boys Transitional Home. Administrators said the response was overwhelming, both from students and from those who benefitted from volunteer work. For information on Demon Days, visit nsula.edu/fye/demondays. For information on “1 of 7,” visit 1of7.org.
17 2016-08-29
Natchitoches

NSU has new B.S. in Applied Microbiology


NATCHITOCHES – The Louisiana Board of Regents approved a new bachelor of science degree in applied microbiology at Northwestern State University this week. The new degree will prepare students to enter directly into the workforce in the public or private sectors of environmental compliance, water and air quality, food safety, public health, organic farming/gardening and homeland security. Graduates will also be adequately prepared to further their education in medical school or graduate schools in pursuit of master’s or doctoral degrees in microbial biomedical research.



“This is not your traditional or classical microbiology degree, which tends to focus on the medical/pathological side of microbiology,” said Dr. Francene J. Lemoine, acting director of NSU’s School of Biological and Physical Sciences. “Instead, this degree will focus on the application of microbiology; that is, how microorganisms can be used in food and environmental industries. We will be focused on educating and developing students who are capable of understanding complex environmental issues and regulatory demands and how to relate these demands to the human condition. Our program will provide students with the critical thinking, problem solving and applied academic skill sets necessary for success in the workforce.”



U.S. Labor statistics predict a 19 percent increase in the field due to continued growth in the biotechnology industry.



The degree offers two concentrations, an environmental and applied microbiology concentration and a medical and health profession concentration. The environmental and applied microbiology students will take classes that focus on the impact and use of microorganisms in various industries such as food production and quality control as well as environmental control. The medical and health profession students will take traditional microbiology classes as well as some applied microbiology courses to understand the global relationships of microorganisms with man.



“Any students interested in working in the area of environmental compliance or water, air, or food safety would be a great fit for the environmental and applied microbiology concentration of this program. Students interested in careers in biomedical research or who are interested in attending medical school via a route other than biology would be a great fit for the medical and health profession concentration,” Lemoine said.



Lemoine’s appointment as director of the School is pending approval by the University of Louisiana System. She has been on faculty since 2005 and is an associate professor in the Department of Biology, Microbiology and Veterinary Technology. Lemoine earned an undergraduate degree in biology at University of Southwest Louisiana, Ph.D. in cell and molecular biology at Baylor College of Medicine and completed postdoctoral fellowships in genetics and microbiology at the University of North Carolina and Duke University.



Northwestern State’s new School of Biological and Physical Sciences was formed last year through a reorganization of the College of Arts and Sciences. The school offers bachelor of science degrees in physical science or in biology with concentrations in either biomedical science, clinical laboratory science, forensic science, natural science or veterinary technology.



Lemoine credited Dr. Michael Land for spearheading the creation of the new degree program. In addition to Lemoine and Land, other faculty who will teach courses applicable in the degree are Dr. Christopher Lyles and Dr. Bridget Joubert. All have specialties in some area of microbiology. Other faculty will contribute to the medical and health profession concentration.



For information on degree programs offered through Northwestern State’s School of Biological and Physical Sciences, visit biology.nsula.edu.


17 2016-08-29
Natchitoches

ROTC hold Activation Ceremony for 67th Demon Battalion


Northwestern State University’s Department of Military Science hosted an activation ceremony for the 67th Demon Battalion Thursday. The annual ceremony included the uncasing of the unit colors, introduction of the cadet chain of command and remarks from ROTC leadership. Steeped in Army tradition, the uncasing of the colors signifies the unit’s esprit de corps and cadets’ commitment to the program and each other. The annual activation ceremony marks the start of a new academic year and establishes the new Battalion and its leadership. NSU’s Army ROTC cadets are, front row from left, Shaffer Kimball, Joey Wills, Scott Stearns, cadet commander; Steven Bryant, Alexander Stewart, Joshua Perkins, Teamara Judkins, Autumn Mitchell, Cameron Coleman, Taylor Andrews, Danny Hatcher and Ronicia Howze. On the second row are Ramon Stetson, Bryan Lee, Brandon Homan, Aliona Salter, Kari Taffi, Shanice Fields, Ada Tate, Larancion McGee and Sonia Ortiz. On the back row are Logan DeOre, Jaelon Davis, Karl Marzahl, Phoenix Gibson, Angel Rodgers, Brandon Bullock, Adam Barnes, John Ham, Taylor Saucier, Albert Tuiel, Hunter Seck, Dale Granier, Taimata Luafalemana, Neilahldwin Garcia, Crystal Smith, Michael Kingsley and Briyonna Collins.


17 2016-08-29
Regional/National

Public university liberalizes free-speech policy after backlash


After being criticized by a free speech watchdog group, a public university in Louisiana has revised its speech policy to bolster open discourse on campus.
As the Foundation for Individual Rights in Educated reported on Wednesday, Northwestern State University’s previous policy required students to apply 24-48 hours in advance before holding a public demonstration. Assemblies were limited to “one, 2-hour time period every 7 days commencing on Monday” and three predetermined locations on campus.
In response to FIRE’s criticism, Northwestern State promptly revised its speech policy to bolster open discourse on campus. The two-hour time limit was scrapped entirely, while the location and pre-notice restrictions are only on a “preferred” basis.
For his part, University President Jim Henderson also said that the old policy FIRE slammed in their August 24 post as the “Speech Code of the Month” had not been enforced for nearly two years, and the new policy “reflects our current and historic practice.”
In response to the policy change, FIRE has upgradedNorthwestern State’s free-speech rating on Friday from “red light,” its poorest grade, to “yellow light.”
“Given that President Henderson conveyed the university’s strong commitment to free speech, we hope NSULA will continue moving in this positive direction and become Louisiana’s first green light school,” Alex Morey wrote in a FIRE blog post.
17 2016-08-26
Natchitoches

NSU student overcomes accident to pursue her dream


It’s doubtful anyone was looking forward to the fall semester at Northwestern State University more than Lauren Edwards.

The sophomore nursing major from Shreveport was scheduled to begin classes on Northwestern State’s Natchitoches campus last fall. Days before she was to move into a campus residence hall, Edwards was involved in a traffic accident on La. Highway 1 near Shreveport. She had to be extricated from her car and had serious injuries that required months of rehabilitation.

“I don’t remember much about that day,” said Edwards, a 2015 graduate of Byrd High School. “ I don’t remember getting ready or leaving the house. All I remember is my dog Cricket playing with a bunch of socks like they were a toy.”

In the accident, Edwards suffered a traumatic brain injury, broke her left femur, had a skull fracture of the left side and broke her nose, cheek and jaw in three places. She recalls waking up in physical therapy later, but admits the next six weeks are not clear to her. Edwards spent three months in rehabilitation hospitals, the last seven weeks at two facilities in Houston. She was able to take two classes on NSU’s Shreveport campus last spring. Edwards has largely recovered but still has some pain and occasionally may have trouble remembering or thinking of a specific word but she was determined to be at Northwestern State for the start of fall classes.

“I was a little nervous because I didn’t really know anyone on campus,” she said. “But I am also excited and ready to learn. I really wanted to get the full college experience in Natchitoches before starting clinicals.”

Edwards is philosophical about her accident taking a long-term view of the events.

“Maybe this was God’s plan for me,” said Edwards. “Perhaps this will allow me to better understand what the patient goes through and will make me a better nurse.”

Edwards career plan began to take shape during her junior year in high school.

“I love taking care of people,” she said. “I want to be a trauma nurse. That field seems like a calling to me. I would have a chance to help patients who could be going through what I was.”

Edwards admits going through a life-threatening event has changed her.

“I know how things can change in an instant,” said Edwards. “I don’t take things for granted. I have a grateful heart knowing I have the opportunity to pursue my career dream.”

Edwards hopes to enter clinicals next fall and graduate in 2019. Despite the accident, she plans to graduate on her original schedule. While at Byrd, Edwards gained 30 hours of credit at NSU through the dual enrollment program that allows high school students to take college classes during the school day.

17 2016-08-26
Natchitoches

Opera Gala to be held Friday


Northwestern Opera Theater will hold its initial Opera Gala Friday, Aug. 26 at 5:30 p.m. in the Magale Recital Hall lobby. Tickets are $25 and $10 for students.

Formal attire is preferred but not required.

Attendees can walk the purple carpet and enjoy a cash wine bar as Director of Opera Theater Stefan Gordon will announce the upcoming season. Cast members of upcoming Opera Theatre performances will be on hand to meet and greet those attending and perform a short concert.

For more information, contact Gordon at gordons@nsula.edu.


17 2016-08-25
Natchitoches

Members of Northwestern State University’s


Members of Northwestern State University’s Theta Chi chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., collected relief supplies to aid flood victims in South Louisiana and delivered a truck load of the supplies – water, paper goods, cleaning supplies, towels and more – to the NSU Student Services Center. From there the supplies will be sent to south Louisiana with local recovery workers. The group also raised nearly $650 in funds to help purchase more supplies. On the front row from left are Nestor Mercado, Fraternity Vice President Marvaeya Edwards and Malcolm Cooper.


17 2016-08-24
Natchitoches

Alpha Phi Alpha collects flood relief supplies


Members of Northwestern State University’s Theta Chi chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., collected relief supplies to aid flood victims in South Louisiana and delivered a truck load of the supplies – water, paper goods, cleaning supplies, towels and more – to the NSU Student Services Center. From there the supplies will be sent to south Louisiana with local recovery workers. The group also raised nearly $650 in funds to help purchase more supplies. On the front row from left are Nestor Mercado, Fraternity Vice President Marvaeya Edwards and Malcolm Cooper. On the back row are Vice President for the Student Experience Dr. Chris Maggio, Director of First Year Experience Reatha Cox, Fraternity Treasurer Demetri Hill, NSU President Dr. Jim Henderson, Chapter President Richard Duncan and Gabriel White. Northwestern State will continue to collect flood relief items. Donations can be dropped off at the Student Services Center.
17 2016-08-22
Alexandria

What's happening in Cenla education


Central Louisiana colleges return to school

Students at Central Louisiana Technical Community College, Louisiana College, Louisiana State University of Alexandria and Northwestern State University start a new semester on Monday, Aug. 22.

NSU will welcome first-year and returning students back to campus with "Demon Days," while LC freshmen attended "Wildcat Welcome Week" the full week before school started.

NSU seeks donations for students impacted by flooding

Northwestern State University students and staff are seeking donations of personal items, food and supplies for NSU students affected by flooding who will be arriving on campus for classes as they are able.

"Some of our students have lost everything," said Dr. Chris Maggio, vice president for The Student Experience. "We want them to know that we can help them when they are able to arrive on campus and will provide whatever support they need. Our mission is to serve our students and we need the community’s help."


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The university is collecting bedding, personal items and supplies, to be packaged together when possible, and distributed to students as they arrive on campus. Bed and bath packages include a twin comforter, twin sheets and pillowcase sets, pillow, two towels and two washcloths. Toiletry packages include bath soap, hand soap, razors, toothbrushes and toothpaste and feminine hygiene products. Kitchen packages include paper plates, plastic forks, knives and spoons and paper towels. School supply packages include notebooks, pens, pencils and highlighters. Donations can be dropped off at the Student Services Center.

The university created a website, www.nsula.edu/nsu4you where students affected by flooding can address concerns about registration, fee payment, housing and other matters, as well as request bedding, toiletries, counseling, health services and the NSU Food Pantry.

Other campus groups are participating in relief efforts in south Louisiana. Earlier this week, Sigma Nu Fraternity volunteers held a drive to collect water, clothing, cleaning supplies, toiletries, medical supplies and other items that were taken to south Louisiana.

"We were able to successfully raise $6,200 over the course of two days in addition to multiple bins full of canned goods and nonperishables," said Tre Nelson of Baton Rouge, vice president of NSU’s Sigma Nu chapter. "All money and cans were donated to Hebron Baptist Church and other relief groups down in the Denham Springs, Watson and Baton Rouge area. Our guys helped break down houses that were starting to fall apart to begin the rebuilding process while they were down there. We will continue to donate the money to different groups throughout the week."
17 2016-08-22
Natchitoches

Move-In Day kicks off Demon Days




0
Submitted by Northwestern1 on Sat, 08/20/2016 - 12:26pm

Nearly 1,000 students moved into residence halls at Northwestern State University Saturday with help from student, faculty and staff volunteers. Move-In Day kicks off Demon Days, several weeks of activities and events that begin with a Welcome Back Bash, New Student Convocation, President’s Picnic and opportunities to get involved with university life. Classes at NSU will begin Monday, Aug. 22.
17 2016-08-22
Natchitoches

NSU Elementary Lab students collect flood relief supplies




0
Submitted by Northwestern1 on Sat, 08/20/2016 - 9:29am

Students from Northwestern State University Elementary Lab School collected relief supplies to be delivered to south Louisiana last week in conjunction with a Natchitoches Parish 4-H initiative. From left are Madelynn Misuraca, Sarah Stephens, Kaylee Stacy, Caroline Church, Victoria Wiggins, and Mary Hannah Churchman. Items included water, canned food, blankets, sleeping bags, cleaning supplies and toiletries. The catastrophic flood devastating Louisiana is the worst natural disaster to strike the United States since Hurricane Sandy in 2012.
17 2016-08-22
Natchitoches

Community can lend a hand to help returning Northwestern students move in to dorms Saturday


The hustle and bustle of college life will return to Northwestern State University’s campus Saturday as students move in campus residence halls. Move-In Day (7 a.m.-1 p.m.) kicks off a month-long series of events called “Demon Days,” designed to aid firstyear and returning students transitioning back to campus. A full list of Demon Days activities can be found www.nsula.edu/fye/demondays.


17 2016-08-22
Natchitoches

Challenge raises fund to aid NSU student flood victims




1
Submitted by Northwestern1 on Fri, 08/19/2016 - 2:01pm

Northwestern State University’s alumni chapter of Sigma Nu fraternity issued a challenge to other Greek and Registered Student Organizations to raise funds for Northwestern State students affected by flooding in south Louisiana. The challenge raised more than $3,000 in in three days with contributions from several Greek and student organizations and individuals with the total rising daily. From left are Tre Nelson, Sigma Nu vice president; Reatha Cox, director of First Year Experience; Sigma Nu alum Jason Campbell, NSU President Dr. Jim Henderson, Dr. Chris Maggio, vice president for The Student Experience, and Sigma Nu President John Sullivan. Funds will be used to purchase personal and school supplies for NSU students who lost their belongings in flooded homes. The university is collecting bedding, kitchen items, toiletries and school supplies to be distributed as the affected students are able to arrive on campus. For a complete list of items, visit nsula.edu/nsu4you. To make a monetary donation to assist NSU students affected by flooding, make checks payable to the NSU Foundation, Disaster Relief Fund, 535 University Parkway, Natchitoches, LA 71497.
17 2016-08-22
Natchitoches

New Media faculty complete Avid training


Faculty and staff in Northwestern State University’s Department of New Media, Journalism and Communication Arts completed Avid certification last week. Avid is industry-standard video editing software used in broadcasting and filmmaking. Learning the program will be useful to students in Level 1 and Level 2 film and video editing classes who are interested in working in newsrooms or experimenting with filmmaking, according to Collier Hyams, associate professor of communications and coordinator of New Media and Communication Arts. By establishing the university as an Avid learning partner, students will have the opportunity to take the Avid certification course and add that credential to their resumes. Skills in film and video editing also cross over into graphic communications/graphic design. From left are Student Media Coordinator Daniel Thiels, Avid Master Instructor Carlos Rojanos, Emily Zering, instructor in New Media, Journalism and Communication Arts; Davey Antilley, director of NSU TV, and Hyams. Not shown is Mirla Enriquez, instructor of graphic communications in Fine + Graphic Art. For information on New Media, Journalism and Communication Arts visit www.nsula.edu/newmedia.
17 2016-08-22
Shreveport

Family, faith, NSU drive athletic director Greg Burke


Although it was “his day,” Northwestern State athletic director Greg Burke felt a bit uncomfortable Saturday afternoon. A few hours later in Natchitoches, he was to be the center of “Burke Bash: A Toast, Roast and Boast,” to celebrate 20 years as the Demons’ AD.

The roast portion of such programs can get uber uncomfortable.

“I don’t even really know who’s going to be there,” Burke told The Times. “This was a thing way before I had the chance to stop it. All of Natchitoches knows what’s happening except me.”

Burke wasn’t exactly excited about the toast and boast segments, either.

Not only is the event surrounding the impressive round number primed for playful verbal warfare, it offers the Demons family and SEC commissioner Greg Sankey, who worked with Burke at NSU, an opportunity to celebrate Burke’s tenure while he’s still going strong.

“It’s interesting, if you take a look around the league, the successful universities have a continuity of person or philosophy as their foundation,” Sankey told The Times. “A combination is unique and Greg Burke illustrates that as much as anyone.”

And don’t mistake a thing. This is not a professional eulogy.

“I’m not retiring, but I guess it’s OK to reflect a little bit,” Burke said. “I’m extremely driven and inspired because there is still work to do —much work for this university, the athletic program and the fan base.”

Although the accomplishments are obvious (conference championships, APR victories, community service recognition), Burke refuses to acknowledge any personal accolades. If others believe he’s had success, Burke hopes it’s tied to “as often as possible making a difference for student-athletes.

“But whatever that is pales in comparison to what NSU and Natchitoches have given me. I can’t give enough back to balance the scales, but I’m committed every day to try to narrow the gap.”

The proud Ohio native parlayed a nine-month internship at NSU into a beloved family and three decades of professional success.

“It’s God’s plan; it’s the only way I can explain it,” said Burke, the longest tenured AD in the state and in the Southland Conference.

Burke, 59, was a sports writer in the late 1970s before graduating from Mount Union College. A sports information job at Hiram (Ohio) College preceded his opportunity at NSU.

During Burke’s internship, he fell for a local gal, SuSu Williamson, and earned a full-time job at NSU in 1986. However, he chose to return to Ohio to work at the University of Akron in 1992.

“It was a difficult decision, but I heard, ‘you can always come back.”’

In 1996, he did, as the Demons’ athletic director.

“I didn’t even need a split second to think about it,” Burke said. “I’ve been very blessed and continue to consider myself blessed to be here.”


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Nearly a decade ago, Burke developed “cornerstones” that would become a way of life for his department — academic achievement, personal responsibility and competitive success.

“Those have allowed him to succeed here for a long time,” said men’s basketball head coach Mike McConathy, who was hired by Burke in 1999.

According to McConathy, Burke’s character shines during the hiring process.

“He doesn’t hire search firms,” McConathy said. “He wants to know who he’s hiring. He does the research. As an athletic director, you have to know what it takes to make the situation work. Rather than pay $50,000 to a group that gives you three names he works diligently for every hire he makes. I respect that.”

McConathy is also impressed with Burke’s instincts when it comes to the coach-AD relationship. He’s not a micromanager, but isn’t hiding in the weeds, either.

“He has a knack to check on you when things aren’t going very well,” McConathy said. “He has a good feel for understanding how close the relationship needs to be — how involved to be, not involved to be. He knows how to make our situation successful.”

If others view Burke as successful, he has a possible explanation.

“There is family, faith and NSU – there is not a whole lot more that means a lot to me,” Burke said. “I don’t golf, I don’t hunt, and I don’t fish. Fitness is important to me, but it’s not going to ruin my taste buds.

“Family and faith, it’s the way I was raised by two wonderful parents.”

It hasn’t been all strawberries and Clif Bars for Burke at NSU. Dancing around tight budgets can be excruciating, and promoting a family atmosphere can make good days great, but bad days nightmares.

The deaths of freshman football player Chris Waddell (2004) and Christopher Truax (2005), the 11-year-old son of former assistant coach Chris Truax, were “without a doubt two of the most darkest days in 20 years.”

The “difficult days” including firing good friends and former Demon athletes.

“The toughest part of the athletic director job is the personnel side – having to have ‘that conversation’ with somebody and go in a different direction.

“I try to develop a connection with the coaches here – that makes those meetings harder.”

Those talks won’t get any easier, but Burke doesn’t believe a larger paycheck or a high-profile job at a big-name university would solve a thing. Although the opportunities have been there.

“I don’t know if I’ve really considered those to a serious extent,” said Burke, a member of the NCAA Committee on Academics who has served for the NCAA on the championships/sports management cabinet, Division I Football Issues Committee, FCS playoff committee and as the site supervisor for FCS playoff games. “It’s reflective of how strongly I feel about NSU.

“I just like being back on the fringe watching coaches and student-athletes enjoy the fruits of their labor and seeing the alumni and how significant and meaningful those moments are for them. We’re not a Power Five school and we’re not going to be a Power Five school, but we’ve had our moments and I’m driven to make sure we have more of those moments down the road.”

Conference titles are terrific, but Burke’s victories don’t stop when a student-athlete graduates.

“He gets it,” McConathy said. “He knows it’s not about four years, it’s about the rest of the kid’s life.” Proceeds from Saturday’s bash will help establish a permanently endowed “Greg Burke Family Scholarship.”

“At first they wanted to name it the Greg Burke Scholarship, but I said they need to add Family because there are no accomplishments for Greg Burke without my wife and daughter (Catherine),” he said.

Therefore, Burke’s influence on the university will not only figuratively, but literally go beyond the years Demons purple feverishly pumps through his body.

“That’s all that anyone could ask for, to leave a mark of some sort,” Burke said.

Twitter: @RoyLangIII


17 2016-08-19
Natchitoches

NSU establishes website and email address for students affected by flooding


Northwestern State University has created the www.nsula.edu/nsu4you website and email address for students affected by flooding in south Louisiana. Students who may not be able to move in this weekend or be on campus for the first day of classes or those who have questions about registration, fee payment, housing, advising and other issues can visit www.nsula.edu/nsu4you, email nsu4you@nsula.edu or call (318) 357-5286 where university personnel will assist them in meeting their needs.


17 2016-08-19
Shreveport

NSU seeking donations for student flood victims


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University students and staff are seeking donations of personal items, food and supplies for NSU students affected by flooding who will be arriving on campus for classes as they are able.

“Some of our students have lost everything,” said Dr. Chris Maggio, vice president for The Student Experience. “We want them to know that we can help them when they are able to arrive on campus and will provide whatever support they need. Our mission is to serve our students and we need the community’s help.”

The university is collecting bedding, personal items and supplies, to be packaged together when possible, and distributed to students as they arrive on campus. Bed and bath packages include a twin comforter, twin sheets and pillowcase sets, pillow, two towels and two washcloths. Toiletry packages include bath soap, hand soap, razors, toothbrushes and toothpaste and feminine hygiene products. Kitchen packages include paper plates, plastic forks, knives and spoons and paper towels. School supply packages include notebooks, pens, pencils and highlighters. Donations can be dropped off at the Student Services Center.

The university created a website, www.nsula.edu/nsu4you where students affected by flooding can address concerns about registration, fee payment, housing and other matters, as well as request bedding, toiletries, counseling, health services and the NSU Food Pantry.

Other campus groups are participating in relief efforts in south Louisiana. Earlier this week, Sigma Nu Fraternity volunteers held a drive to collect water, clothing, cleaning supplies, toiletries, medical supplies and other items that were taken to south Louisiana.

“We were able to successfully raise $6,200 over the course of two days in addition to multiple bins full of canned goods and nonperishables,” said Tre Nelson of Baton Rouge, vice president of NSU’s Sigma Nu chapter. “All money and cans were donated to Hebron Baptist Church and other relief groups down in the Denham Springs, Watson and Baton Rouge area. Our guys helped break down houses that were starting to fall apart to begin the rebuilding process while they were down there. We will continue to donate the money to different groups throughout the week.”

Individuals or businesses interested in donating bedding, toiletry, kitchen or school packages for Northwestern State students can drop off items at the Student Services Center or contact Reatha Cox at coxr@nsula.edu for more information.


17 2016-08-18
Houma/Thibodaux

Nicholls president outlines successes, challenges


With a freshman retention rate at 71.1 percent, the highest ever, Nicholls State University President Bruce Murphy addressed his faculty today with a message of resilience and pride.

One of Murphy's first slides from his PowerPoint presentation noted the university's mission: to be the intellectual, economic and cultural heart of the region.

"There is probably no other university in the world that has our mission. I want you to embrace that," he told the faculty.

He opened the address with everything the university is doing right, such as avoiding a hiring freeze, hosting successful seminars like the Empowered Women Chefs series and sending off 100 percent of its nursing graduates with jobs.

But Murphy said the most significant news he can deliver is the 71.1 percent retention rate.

"We see the quality and the quantity. We are doing the work we're supposed to be doing," he said.

Murphy also noted the challenges Nicholls faces.

Despite the high retention rate, enrollment has been on the decline for the past several years.

Three years ago, fall enrollment was around 6,500. By the fall of 2014, that number fell to almost 6,300.

Last year, enrollment was a little over 6,000 students. The goal is to boost that number to 8,000.

University staff is still crunching enrollment numbers for this fall, but they saw an uptick in the spring and are expecting it to continue to rise.

To get potential students to commit to Nicholls, Murphy said the admissions staff is trying to make orientation more fun and active. Recruiters also have the power to now give scholarships on the spot, if students meet the criteria.

Murphy also said the university has increased student fees due to budget cuts from state appropriations.

For the first time ever, Nicholls got less than $15 million from the state.

"We had to ask for a fee increase. It's the last thing I want to do but we have to," Murphy said.

The university's budget for the 2016-17 school year is $55 million, but ideally the Nicholls administration would like the budget to be upward of $60 million.

Right now, the focus is increasing enrollment and endowments and decreasing transfers and dropouts.

"Always think of the face of Nicholls," Murphy urged. "We are all the face of Nicholls."

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17 2016-08-18
Natchitoches

NSU presents 2016 faculty/staff awards


PHOTOS
17 2016-08-17
Natchitoches

NSU4YOU website created to help student flood victims


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University has created the www.nsula.edu/nsu4you website and email address for students affected by flooding in south Louisiana. Students who may not be able to move in this weekend or be on campus for the first day of classes or those who have questions about registration, fee payment, housing, advising and other issues can visit www.nsula.edu/nsu4you, email nsu4you@nsula.edu or call (318) 357-5286 where university personnel will assist them in meeting their needs.



“Nothing is more important to us than our students and their safety,” said Dr. Chris Maggio, vice president for The Student Experience. “We will work with those who have been affected by flooding and respond to their concerns. Our mission is to serve our students.”



“We know that every situation will be different,” said Dean of Students Frances Conine. “We need to know who you are, where you are and what you need. We are here to help you.”



In addition to answering questions and making arrangements for accommodations, students who visit www.nsula.edu/nsu4you will also be able to request bedding, toiletries, kitchen and bathroom items and school supplies. Other services available include counseling, health services and the NSU Food Pantry.



Campus groups are coordinating efforts to collect bedding, personal items and supplies for students, to be packaged together when possible. Needed for bed and bath packages include a twin comforter, twin sheets and pillowcase sets, pillow, two towels and two washcloths. Toiletry packages include bath soap, hand soap, razors, toothbrushes and toothpaste and feminine hygiene products. Kitchen packages include paper plates, plastic forks, knives and spoons and paper towels. School supply packages include notebooks, pens, pencils and highlighters. Donations can be dropped off at the Student Services Center. A collection site for canned goods has been set up at Watson Library.



"The flooding in south Louisiana has placed immense burdens on many of our students and their families,” said NSU President Dr. Jim Henderson. “We want them to know their university is committed to helping them in every possible way to ensure their journey to a college degree is not interrupted."



Classes are set to begin at Northwestern State Monday, Aug. 22.




17 2016-08-17
Natchitoches

NSU will extend fee payment for students affected by flooding


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University students affected by flooding in south Louisiana will have extended time for fee payment for the Fall 2016 semester, according to NSU President Dr. Jim Henderson.



“We want to reassure our students who may be flooded out of their homes that they will have extra time to complete fee payment, but they should contact the university to communicate with us about their situation when they are able to do so,” Henderson said. "Right now, we want our students to be free to focus on their safety, family and recovery.”



Students with questions or concerns should contact Dawn Eubanks, assosicate bursar in the Student Services Center, at (318) 357-5055 or email dking@nsula.edu.


17 2016-08-17
Natchitoches

Alumni support HHP



Dr. Dan Denson and his wife Sharon Denson, both 1969 Northwestern State University graduates, presented a donation to the NSU Foundation to benefit the Health and Human Performance degree program and have pledged to give $1,000 annually. Dr. Denson earned a degree in physical education at NSU, a master’s at McNeese State University and a Ed.D. in health education at the University of Tennessee. They both had long careers in education. Dr. Denson was a professor of health at Louisiana State University for six years and at McNeese for 29 years. Mrs. Denson majored in math and English education at NSU, earned a master’s at McNeese and enjoyed 32-year career, mostly in Calcasieu Parish, where she taught math and computer science. Originally from Lake Charles, they have two daughters and five grandchildren. From left are Dr. Jon Dollar, head of the Department of Health and Human Performance; Dr. and Mrs. Denson and Dr. Vickie Gentry, dean of the Gallaspy College of Education and Human Development. For more information on how to contribute to Northwestern State, contact the Office of University Advancement at (318) 357-4414.
17 2016-08-12
Natchitoches

NSU renews exchange agreements with Colombian institution


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University renewed its agreement with Fundación Universitaria Tecnológico Comfenalco, a partner institution in Cartagena, Colombia. Comfenalco President Dr. Mauricio Ruiz, Academic Vice President Dr. Alejandro Dager and Raynel Mendoza, director of research, innovation and social projection, visited the NSU campus to discuss programming, curriculum and opportunities for dual degree programs, course transfer credits, student/faculty exchanges and joint research projects.



The administrators visited department heads and toured facilities in the College of Business and Technology, the Department of Engineering Technology and Department of Psychology. Comfenalco is one of the largest universities, based on student population, in Cartagena.



“Cooperation between institutes of higher learning contributes to cultural enrichment, scientific progress and the consolidation of friendship,” said Dr. Marcus Jones, who coordinated the visit and has led recruiting initiatives in Latin America. “The five-year agreement provides for the exchange of instructional information, research and curricula, faculty, students and joint research.”


17 2016-08-10
Natchitoches

ROTC activation Aug. 25


NATCHITOCHES – An activation ceremony for Northwestern State University’s 67th Demon Battalion will take place at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 25 at the Spirit of the Cadet Park adjacent to the Gov. James A. Noe Armory.



Steeped in Army tradition, uncasing the Demon Battalion Colors during an activation ceremony signifies the unit’s esprit de corps and cadets’ commitment to the program and each other. It opens the new academic year and establishes the new Battalion and its leadership.


17 2016-08-08
Alexandria

What's Happening Cenla Education


NSU hires four women patrol officers

Northwestern State University introduced four new campus police officers to the university community this week. The new patrol officers are Officer Macy Coleman, Officer Rachel Head, Officer Sunni Nelson and Officer Desireé Robinson.

Coleman is a native of Brewton’s Mill. She graduated from Calvin High School where she was involved in art and Future Business Leaders of America. She received a President Honor’s Scholarship and an Opportunity Scholarship to attend Northwestern State where she majored in criminal justice and minored in English. She was involved with the Criminal Justice Club and was awarded two more criminal justice scholarships, the Marion T. Loftin Scholarship and the Doyle and Barbara Bailey Criminal Justice Scholarship. She graduated in May.

"I wanted to choose a career for myself that I could be proud of, that meant something to other people and a community," Coleman said. "I have always felt passionate about our nation's law enforcement, and I wanted to be apart of this movement to help better lives."

Nelson was born in Lafayette and moved to Natchitoches five years ago to pursue a master’s degree. After graduation, she worked for the university while taking more classes and began a career in law enforcement at the Natchitoches Parish Sheriff’s Office where she “found a passion for helping others and serving the community,” she said. She holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s in clinical psychology.

Head is a native of Sikes and enjoys reading and outdoor activities.

"I fell in love with Natchitoches for its beautiful simplicity and Northwestern for its small and beautiful campus community," she said. "I moved here and started school within a year of coming here. I became a police officer to help an entire community one individual at a time, for problem-solving and a strong determination to uphold the law."

Robinson, 22, was born in Germany where her father, now with the East Baton Rouge Parish Sheriff’s Department, was stationed in the military and she grew up in Baton Rouge. She went to work with NSU Police in April, shortly before graduating with a degree in criminal justice. She intends to pursue a master’s degree in homeland security and would eventually like to work for the FBI.

"These officers, along with the rest of the NSU Police Department, are committed to serving students and maintaining a safe, secure environment for the entire university community," said NSU Police Chief Jon Caliste. "Our first priority is the safety of every person who steps foot on campus and these officers are joining a well-trained team."


17 2016-08-08
Natchitoches

It's not too late to start registration process for fall semester at NSU


Registration for the fall 2016 semester at Northwestern State University is taking place through Sunday, Aug. 21

According to Vice President for the Student Experience Dr. Chris Maggio, it is not too late for prospective students to be admitted to the university and register for fall classes.

“The faculty and staff in all areas at Northwestern State are here to answer any questions a student may have and help them through the process of enrolling,” said Maggio. “Sometimes the process can seem overwhelming to a student, but we will work with them through each step. We understand that circumstances may keep someone from starting the process until the last few days before the semester begins.”

Students who have not previously enrolled at Northwestern State can begin the process at nsula.edu/recruiting or by calling (318) 357-4503.

“Northwestern State has a great deal to offer students. The best way to find out what is available is to call us and schedule a campus tour,” said Director of University Recruiting Jana Lucky. “We know each student’s situation and objectives are unique and we want to assist them as they begin one of the most interesting times of their life.”

Registration for returning students is available through NSUConnect, which is available through the university’s homepage at nsula.edu. The fall semester starts on Monday, Aug. 22.
17 2016-08-08
Natchitoches

NSU Music Academy to begin Aug. 22


The Northwestern State University Music Academy will begin its third year Monday, Aug. 22. The academy is under the direction of Northwestern State music faculty Dr. Christine Allen and Dr. Francis Yang and offers piano and guitar lessons for area students in pre-K through 12th grade.

A new initiative this year is group piano lessons which will be offered to beginning students. Yang said this allows students to learn together in the group piano lab and can serve as a stepping stone to private lessons.

Graduate music majors Robyn Tan and Melissa Quek will teach piano. Orlando Enrique Gonzalez will teach guitar.

Last year, academy students performed in a Christmas concert and a spring recital. Some students participated in the National Federation of Music Clubs Festival and the Central Music Teachers' Association Sonatina Festival.
17 2016-08-08
Natchitoches

Nominations being accepted for NSU alumni awards


The Northwestern State University Alumni Association is accepting nominations for its Hall of Distinction, the Long Purple Line along with three new alumni awards.

The Long Purple Line was created in 1990 to provide recognition and appreciation to former Northwestern State students whose career accomplishments or service to their fellow man have enhanced the reputation of the university. Selection to the Long Purple Line is the most prominent honor bestowed by NSU upon its alumni.

The 2016 inductees into the Long Purple Line were Greg Ashlock, Foster Campbell, Dr. James L. Holly, Glenn Talbert and Dr. Randall J. Webb. Since 1990, 115 Northwestern State alumni have been made part of the Long Purple Line.

Nominations can be made at northwesternalumni.com/lplnomination and will be accepted until Nov. 1. A 12-person committee, which will include alumni, will select the 2017 inductees who will be honored as part of the Spring Commencement Exercises on May 12, 2017.

The Outstanding Young Alumni Distinguished Service Award and Outstanding Alumnus/Alumna Distinguished Service Award will be given to an NSU alumnus/alumna who has exhibited their dedication and loyalty to Northwestern's programs and mission.

The candidate must demonstrate an early record of distinguished service to Northwestern and continued interest in serving the university in his/her life as a volunteer, donor and /or advocate.

The recipient of the Outstanding Young Alumni Distinguished Service Award must be an alumnus/alumna of NSU and have attained alumni status within the past 10 years and be 40 or younger at the time of the nomination.

The recipient of the Outstanding Alumnus/Alumna Distinguished Service Award must be an alumnus/alumna of NSU and must have attained alumni status more than 10 years ago and be 40 or older at the time of the nomination.

Nominations may be made by any alumnus or alumna, by any alumni chapter or by any member of the faculty or staff of University.

The NSU Alumni Association Volunteer of the Year Award will be presented to a person who has exhibited his or her dedication and loyalty to Northwestern's programs and mission. The candidate must be a member of the NSU Alumni Association and have continued interest in serving the university in his/her life as a volunteer, donor and /or advocate, an exemplary record of volunteer time, talents and service to the NSU Alumni Association and active involvement with a chapter, alumni interest group, affiliate program, NSU Alumni Board or other forms of volunteer service to Northwestern State University.

Nominations may be made by any alumnus or alumna, by any alumni chapter, or by any member of the faculty or staff of University. Nominations can be submitted at Northwesternalumni.com/outstandingservice, Northwesternalumni.com/youngoutstandingservice and Northwesternalumni.com/volunteeraward. The deadline to submit nominations for the three alumni awards is Oct. 1. The awards will be presented as part of Homecoming activities on Oct. 21-22.
17 2016-08-05
Natchitoches

Theta Chi alumni earn honors at national convention


Northwestern State University Alumni Dr. Tait Martin (1997), center, and Clarence Frank (2000), right, earned recognition at Theta Chi Fraternity’s 160th anniversary convention in Atlanta. They are pictured with Brandon Melancon, president of NSU’s Eta Omicron chapter, left. Martin was elected by the alumni and collegian delegates to served as international vice president on the fraternity’s eight-member Grand Chapter, which serves as its corporate board of directors. It is the highest position ever held by a member of NSU’s Theta Chi chapter. Martin is currently chief research officer and a partner for Taproot Creative, a company based in Tallahassee, Florida, that develops marketing strategies for businesses. Frank, who teaches high school orchestra at Clear Falls High School in League City, Texas, directed the international chorus at the convention and conducted workshops for the over 500 brothers in attendance. He was a member of the faculty at the convention where he led breakout session on public speaking and etiquette tips for life as part of the fraternity’s Resolute Man program that helps young men grow into young professionals. Theta Chi has a total 148 active chapters with an undergraduate membership of 8,187. There are approximately 140,000 living alumni.

17 2016-08-04
Alexandria

Nominations being accepted for four alumni awards


NATCHITOCHES, La. (NSU) - The Northwestern State University Alumni Association is accepting nominations for its Hall of Distinction, the Long Purple Line along with three new alumni awards.

The Long Purple Line was created in 1990 to provide recognition and appreciation to former Northwestern State students whose career accomplishments or service to their fellow man have enhanced the reputation of the university. Selection to the Long Purple Line is the most prominent honor bestowed by NSU upon its alumni.

The 2016 inductees into the Long Purple Line were Greg Ashlock, Foster Campbell, Dr. James L. Holly, Glenn Talbert and Dr. Randall J. Webb. Since 1990, 115 Northwestern State alumni have been made part of the Long Purple Line.

Nominations can be made at northwesternalumni.com/lplnomination and will be accepted until Nov. 1. A 12-person committee, which will include alumni, will select the 2017 inductees who will be honored as part of the Spring Commencement Exercises on May 12, 2017.

The Outstanding Young Alumni Distinguished Service Award and Outstanding Alumnus/Alumna Distinguished Service Award will be given to an NSU alumnus/alumna who has exhibited their dedication and loyalty to Northwestern's programs and mission.\


The candidate must demonstrate an early record of distinguished service to Northwestern and continued interest in serving the university in his/her life as a volunteer, donor and /or advocate.

The recipient of the Outstanding Young Alumni Distinguished Service Award must be an alumnus/alumna of NSU and have attained alumni status within the past 10 years and be 40 or younger at the time of the nomination.

The recipient of the Outstanding Alumnus/Alumna Distinguished Service Award must be an alumnus/alumna of NSU and must have attained alumni status more than 10 years ago and be 40 or older at the time of the nomination.

Nominations may be made by any alumnus or alumna, by any alumni chapter or by any member of the faculty or staff of University.
The NSU Alumni Association Volunteer of the Year Award will be presented to a person who has exhibited his or her dedication and loyalty to Northwestern's programs and mission.

The candidate must be a member of the NSU Alumni Association and have continued interest in serving the university in his/her life as a volunteer, donor and /or advocate, an exemplary record of volunteer time, talents and service to the NSU Alumni Association and active involvement with a chapter, alumni interest group, affiliate program, NSU Alumni Board or other forms of volunteer service to Northwestern State University.

Nominations may be made by any alumnus or alumna, by any alumni chapter, or by any member of the faculty or staff of University.

Nominations can be submitted at

Northwesternalumni.com/outstandingservice,
Northwesternalumni.com/youngoutstandingservice and Northwesternalumni.com/volunteeraward.

The deadline to submit nominations for the three alumni awards is Oct. 1. The awards will be presented as part of Homecoming activities on Oct. 21-22.


17 2016-08-04
Associated Press

Remains found at Grand Canyon may be of missing Louisiana woman


GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK, Ariz. (AP) – Remains believed to be those of a 22-year-old Louisiana woman missing since April have been found in the Grand Canyon.

Park officials say rangers found the remains believed to be those of Diana Zacarias of Natchitoches (NAK-uh-tesh), Louisiana, below Pima Point while conducting training Saturday.

A multiday search was conducted after Zacarias’ family reported her missing April 3. She had arrived on the South Rim on April 2.

Park officials say the tentative identification is based on evidence found at the scene and that the remains have been transferred to the Coconino (koh-koh-NEE’-noh) County medical examiner for positive identification.

Park officials say that the medical examiner and the National Park Service are investigating the incident and that no additional information is immediately available.



17 2016-08-04
Natchitoches

ROTC alum establishes scholarship for outstanding cadet




0
Submitted by Northwestern1 on Wed, 08/03/2016 - 4:36pm

2nd Lt. Alejandro M. Cespedes established a scholarship at Northwestern State University intended for the best of the best cadets. On the front row from left are Cadet Maj. Sonia Ortiz, Battalion S3; Cadet Savannah Carter, Tiffany Chasteen, assistant director of Development; Cespedes, Jill Bankston, associate director of Development; Sid Hall, military affairs coordinator/ROTC program manager; 2nd Lt. Donnette Stokes, Gold Bar Recruiter, and Cadet Lt. Col. Scott Stearns, Battalion Commander. On the back row are Maj. (Ret.) Ted Fowler, NDR Chief of Staff; Cadet Tucker Ellis, Edward Kelly, facilitator of academic operations; Raymond McDowell, recruiting operations officer, and Cadet Taylor Andrews.
17 2016-08-04
Natchitoches

Nursing professor named to maternal health leadership academy


NATCHITOCHES – Dr. Katheryn Arterberry, associate professor in Northwestern State University’s College of Nursing, will serve as a faculty advisor for the Maternal-Child Health Nurse Leadership Academy Cohort VII where she will guide nurses and midwifes and their mentors through a rigorous leadership development program. The program, administered by Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing, is a leadership development experience designed for leaders in maternal-child health who are committed to improving the lives of mothers and children. Fellows in the Academy are chosen through a highly competitive selection process.



During the 18-month-long leadership program, Arterberry will serve as a content expert and presenter at two workshops, attend two site visits at the institution of her fellows and participate in monthly communication with the dyads, each comprised of one fellow and one mentor. This experience will be highlighted by recognition at the 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI) biennial convention to be held in Indianapolis.



The MCHNLA is recognized as a premier leadership development opportunity for nurses dedicated to improving the health of mothers and babies. Through the generous funding of Johnson & Johnson, the MCHNLA continues to offer an exciting, intense, and career-changing experience.



Arterberry began her affiliation with the STTI Maternal Child Health Leadership Academy as a fellow, mentored by retired faculty member Billie Bitowski. She now serves as a faculty mentor for leadership teams in Pennsylvania and Boston. Dr. Arterberry was recently recognized by STTI for her service to the profession.



“Mentorship is essential to professional growth. STTI has provided me with the opportunity to serve the nursing profession in this capacity and I’m honored to do so,” she said. “Sigma Theta Tau International is the honor society for nursing and has global outreach. The academy is over 10 years old and has expanded from North America to Africa. NSU has a chapter of the honor society here, Beta Chi, and I am the immediate past president of our chapter.”


17 2016-08-02
Natchitoches

PLTW Med Tech completers recognized



Northwestern State University hosted a training program for Project Lead the Way’s Gateway to Technology middle school curriculum called Medical Detectives, which introduces students to mathematics, science, technology and engineering concepts applicable to biomedical engineering technology. Completers are, front row from left, Lana Stewart of Lafayette Academy in New Orleans and Dr. Mohammed Benalla, a professor in NSU’s Department of Engineering Technology, with Master Teacher Julie Beck of St. Paul’s School in Covington. Not shown is Michael Gruden from STEM Magnet Academy in Pointe Coupee. Benalla will act as an affiliate professor for the program. On the back row are Dr. Ali Ahmad, head of NSU’s ET Department; Dr. Jafar Al Sharab, ET professor; Christina Lake, affiliate assistant director for Project Lead the Way, and Kim Gibson, administrative assistant. This training session marks a first time collaboration between ET and NSU’s Department of Biological Sciences, which allowed participants to use biological sciences labs.
17 2016-07-29
Alexandria

Noted NSU faculty member Julie Kane to retire


NATCHITOCHES, La. (NSU) - Julie Kane is turning a page in her career as the professor of English at Northwestern State University. She is retiring Friday after 17 years on the faculty.

Kane has brought national attention to Northwestern State through her poetry. She has written five books of poetry, “Paper Bullets," “Jazz Funeral,” “Rhythm and Booze,” “Body and Soul” and “The Bartender Poems.”

Kane won the Donald Justice Poetry Prize for “Jazz Funeral.” A former Fulbright Scholar, Kane was a winner of the National Poetry Series Open Competition for “Rhythm & Booze.” She was a finalist for one of the major prizes in American poetry, The Poets’ Prize for the Best Collection of American Poetry, and a judge for the 2005 National Book Award in Poetry. Northwestern State honored her with the 2004 Mildred Hart Bailey Research Award.

She served as Louisiana’s poet laureate from 2011-13. Her work has been featured twice on “The Writer’s Almanac” on NPR. Kane frequently gives poetry readings around the country.

“I’m lucky to be a poet and not a fiction writer because I can work on a poem for a few hours whenever I have the time and at least get a first draft done,” said Kane. “I look forward to being able to focus on my writing.”


Kane is working on a series of poems relating to Irish-Americans. Kane, who is of Irish heritage, is going back to an area she first started working on in college.

“I’m going to look at women in the culture, how they were shaped in the culture and the choices they made,” she said.

Kane came to NSU in 1999 and only planned to stay for a year. She quickly began to love the university and city of Natchitoches.

“I came here on a one-year appointment as a visiting assistant professor. I had just received my Ph.D. and the department head Ray Wallace was looking to expand the department’s creative writing offerings,” said Kane. “I was going to spend the year getting teaching experience and looking for a permanent job. I really liked it here and it seemed like a good fit for me. My colleagues seemed to like me. A position came open and I was able to get a permanent job. I have enjoyed it here because it is a wonderful atmosphere. The students are friendly and my colleagues are helpful and enjoyable to be around.”

Kane quickly found she could be an effective teacher of creative writing.

“In my second semester, I taught my first creative writing class and knew I had found my niche,” said Kane. “Creative writing is something that gave my students confidence in themselves.”

In her class, Kane uses the Iowa Workshop Method with great success.

"The class as a whole reads each other’s work and gives feedback,” said Kane. “I have found my students to be very sensitive about the feelings of their classmates and open minded. Sometimes, they can be intimidated to get feedback from me, but when they get suggestions for improvement from fellow students, it presents an opportunity for growth.”

Kane said she has found other activities at the university outside of the classroom to be rewarding. For he past six years, she advised the Brainy Acts Poetry Society, a group of Northwestern State students with an interest in writing and presenting poetry.

“Working with the Brainy Acts Poetry Society has been one of my favorite things to do,” said Kane. “There are very few English majors in the group and they use poetry as a way of self expression and a means of bringing about social change because of injustices in society. They are very popular in campus and around the state. They are not interested in poetry for the sake of being in the Norton Anthology. It is a way to express themselves and be inspired.”

She has been faculty advisor for Argus, the campus literary magazine for 13 years. In that period, Argus has been ranked among the top campus literary magazines in the country.

“I have looked back over the past issues and am reminded how talented our students are,” said Kane. “The Argus staff always did a professional job of designing and editing. Each issue had its own identity and let people know what NSU students are thinking and feeling.”


17 2016-07-29
Natchitoches

Boise Cascade supports ET scholarships for Northwood grads



Boise Cascade has for the last three years provided $1,500 in scholarships for graduates of Northwood High School in Lena who pursue degrees in engineering technology at Northwestern State University. From left are Lori Sepulvado, Human Resource Generalist for Boise-Lena; Plant Manager David Elliott, Dr. Ali Ahmad, head of the Department of Engineering Technology, and Brittany McConathy and Erin Dupree, NSU Foundation.
17 2016-07-29
Natchitoches

NSU PD adds new patrol officers


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University introduced four new campus police officers to the university community this week. The new patrol officers are Officer Macy Coleman, Officer Rachel Head, Officer Sunni Nelson and Officer Desireé Robinson.



Coleman is a native of Brewton’s Mill. She graduated from Calvin High School where she was involved in art and Future Business Leaders of America. She received a President Honor’s Scholarship and an Opportunity Scholarship to attend Northwestern State where she majored in criminal justice and minored in English. She was involved with the Criminal Justice Club and was awarded two more criminal justice scholarships, the Marion T. Loftin Scholarship and the Doyle and Barbara Bailey Criminal Justice Scholarship. She graduated in May.



“I wanted to choose a career for myself that I could be proud of, that meant something to other people and a community,” Coleman said. “I have always felt passionate about our nation's law enforcement, and I wanted to be apart of this movement to help better lives.”



Nelson was born in Lafayette and moved to Natchitoches five years ago to pursue a master’s degree. After graduation, she worked for the university while taking more classes and began a career in law enforcement at the Natchitoches Parish Sheriff’s Office where she “found a passion for helping others and serving the community,” she said. She holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s in clinical psychology.



Head is a native of Sikes and enjoys reading and outdoor activities.



“I fell in love with Natchitoches for its beautiful simplicity and Northwestern for its small and beautiful campus community,” she said. “I moved here and started school within a year of coming here. I became a police officer to help an entire community one individual at a time, for problem-solving and a strong determination to uphold the law.”



Robinson, 22, was born in Germany where her father, now with the East Baton Rouge Parish Sheriff’s Department, was stationed in the military and she grew up in Baton Rouge. She went to work with NSU Police in April, shortly before graduating with a degree in criminal justice. She intends to pursue a master’s degree in homeland security and would eventually like to work for the FBI.



“These officers, along with the rest of the NSU Police Department, are committed to serving students and maintaining a safe, secure environment for the entire university community,” said NSU Police Chief Jon Caliste. “Our first priority is the safety of every person who steps foot on campus and these officers are joining a well-trained team.”


17 2016-07-29
Natchitoches

City Bank joins NSU's Loyalty League



City Bank pledged $500 to the Northwestern State University Foundation to join the Loyalty League of the NSU Columns Fund. From left are Foundation Personnel Drake Owens, Brittany McConathy and Tiffany Chasteen with City Bank President and CEO John Ackel, Assistant Senior Vice President Selma Nelken, Banking Officer Heather Fredieu, Mortgage Lender Kenny Thomas, Assistant Vice President Kim Howell and Senior Vice President Brandon McKee. For more information on how to contribute to Northwestern State, contact the Office of University Advancement at (318) 357-4414.
17 2016-07-28
Natchitoches

NSU names new head of English, Foreign Languages and Cultural Studies Dept.


Dr. James J. Mischler has been named head of the Department of English, Foreign Languages and Cultural Studies at Northwestern State University. His appointment has been approved by the Board of Supervisors for the University of Louisiana System.
17 2016-07-27
Natchitoches

NSU alumni inducted into national ROTC Hall of Fame


NATCHITOCHES – Two Northwestern State University alumni were inducted into the U.S. Army ROTC National Hall of Fame last month during the 100th anniversary commemoration and induction ceremony at Fort Knox, Kentucky. Lieutenant General (Ret) Joseph M. Cosumano Jr. and Lieutenant Colonel (Ret) Truman Maynard were among more than 300 distinguished graduates to be honored.



The Hall of Fame is intended to honor graduates of the Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps who have distinguished themselves in military or civilian pursuits. It provides a prestigious and tangible means of recognizing and honoring Army ROTC Alumni who have made lasting, significant contributions to the Nation, the Army and the history and traditions of the Army ROTC Program.



Cosumano is a NSU ROTC Distinguished Military Graduate where he commanded the ROTC Cadet Corps as a senior. He served on active duty from 1968-2004. He served with distinction during the Vietnam, Desert Storm and Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom eras. He was a Patriot Brigade Commander with units in Saudi Arabia and Turkey in Desert Storm and culminated his career as the commanding general of the Army Space and Missile Defense Command with units in both theatres of war.



Cosumano has had significant impact on the future of the Army, having served as the director of the First Quadrennial Defense Review in 1996, the first program manager for National Missile Defense in 1997-98. He was the Army Force Modernizer defining/resourcing all Army programs and the program manager for future combat systems.



Cosumano maintained close ties with NSU ROTC and is a member of the NSU ROTC Hall of Fame and the university’s alumni hall of distinction, the Long Purple Line. He is the first colonel of the NSU Demon Regiment, which provides mentorship and funds to aid and attract ROTC students.



As a civilian, Cosumano continues to support troops, notably as the senior vice president of Kellogg Brown and Root (KBR) executing the COGCAP III contract, building base facilities and providing services to both theatres of warm from 2004-08. Cosumano had over 64,000 civilian contractors reporting he and was often deployed in support of those operations.



Cosumano resides in Huntsville, Alabama, and sits on many community boards and committees, such as YMCA, Still Serving Veterans and the American Cancer Society.



Maynard was commissioned as a second lieutenant of infantry in 1960 through the NSU ROTC program. After entering active duty, he was the top graduate in both his flight school class and infantry advanced course and piloted the Army’s largest plane during the Vietnam conflict. After tours in Vietnam, he was selected for faculty Command and General Staff College and was an author/instructor in the Department of Tactics there. He completed an Army helicopter training course, serviced a helicopter unit commander and was engaged in developing flight simulators.



Maynard retired from active duty in 1980 and operated movie theatres in four Louisiana cities. In 1988 he began his third career as an engineering project manager for Xerox managing printing contracts for the Army and developing large commercial printing systems. Since retiring from Xerox in 2006, he has been a leader in NSU’s ROTC alumni, the Demon Regiment, devoting many hours to strengthening the ROTC program and enhancing resources available to support the program.



Cadet Command is the parent organization of the Army ROTC program. The program produces over 70 percent of the new officers entering the Army each year and is available through nearly 1,000 college campuses nationwide. Nearly 30,000 college-level students are currently enrolled in the program. Cadet Command also oversees the operation of more than 1700 Army Junior ROTC programs at America’s high schools. Over 300,000 high school students are enrolled in that program – which fosters leadership and citizenship skills in the nation’s youth.




17 2016-07-27
Natchitoches

Theatre/dance students, faculty participate in IPAI


NATCHITOCHES – Dr. Corey Trahan, assistant professor of musical theatre at Northwestern State University, and three 2016 graduates of NSU’s Department of Theatre and Dance, Holli Conway, Alexia Mullally and Hally Lambert, traveled to Germany for the International Performing Arts Institute's July 2016 program. In addition to being immersed in the German culture, participants attended daily classes for musical theatre dance, singing, acting and conversational German.



Over the course of three weeks, they worked with a number of internationally known singers, stage directors, conductors and pedagogues. Conway, Mullally and Lambert performed in concerts, master classes and workshops and traveled to Hamburg to audition for Stage Entertainment, Germany's largest producer of musical theatre.



Conway, first runner-up in the 2016 Miss Louisiana Pageant, was later invited to Stuttgart to audition for upcoming productions of “Rocky, The Musical,” “The Bodyguard” and “The Lion King.” Mullally and Lambert have been asked to return to Germany in September 2016 to audition for upcoming productions of “Phantom of the Opera” and “Beauty and the Beast.”



Trahan participated in IPAI's inaugural teaching intern program. The organization has offered Trahan an opportunity to return to Germany in July 2017 as a member of the voice faculty and asked him to coordinate the organization's May 2017 expansion to Bangkok, Thailand.



Trahan was able to attend IPAI's 2016 program thanks to NSU’s School of Creative and Performing Arts’ Prince Endowed Fellowship, established by alumna Lenn Dohmann Prince, and a visiting artist grant from the Northeast Louisiana Arts Council.
17 2016-07-26
Alexandria

NSU’s Ireland honored as Louis Bonnette Sports Media Award winner


NATCHITOCHES — Veteran Northwestern State sports information director Doug Ireland has been named the 2016 recipient of the Southland Conference’s Louis Bonnette Sports Media Award, to be presented during the Southland’s Football Media Day luncheon Wednesday at L’auberge Resort in Lake Charles.

The Southland’s award, named after longtime McNeese sports information director Louis Bonnette, is presented annually to an individual that has made an outstanding contribution in the field of sports information, print journalism, broadcasting or other media focused on the Southland Conference and/or its member institutions. The Southland’s sports information directors, athletic directors or other university personnel, and outside media executives nominated worthy individuals for the honor, and the sports information directors make the final selection.

Ireland, a graduate of Northwestern State, began his sports information career in 1982 at UL Lafayette, where he worked with the men’s basketball program that reached three straight postseasons.

He worked as Natchitoches bureau chief for The Times in Shreveport in 1981-82 while an NSU student, providing news coverage of an eight-parish region stretching from Mansfield to Leesville and Alexandria. After leaving UL Lafayette, he worked at the Natchitoches Times in 1985-86 as the sports editor, then briefly attended graduate school at Louisiana-Monroe before joining the sports staff at The (Alexandria) Town Talk in 1987.

At the Town Talk, he won 15 Louisiana Sports Writers Association writing awards in 18 months while covering Northwestern State, high school and amateur sports, and LSU. His nine awards and six first places in the 1988 contest set an LSWA writing contest record.

In January 1989, Ireland took charge of athletic media relations at his alma mater, where he coordinates publicity efforts for Northwestern State’s 14 intercollegiate teams. While at Northwestern, Ireland has earned awards from the College Sports Information Directors of America, including his 1992 football media guide being named “Best in the Nation” in the FCS division.

He has also earned dozens of writing and editing awards from the LSWA, including 27 honors since 2000. In 2001, the LSWA presented him with the Mac Russo Award for his contributions to the organization. Ireland served on the CoSIDA Academic All-America committee for a decade. NSU student-athletes have won 15 Academic All-America honors during his tenure at NSU.

Ireland received the Northwest Louisiana’s McNaughton Chapter of the National Football Foundation’s “Distinguished American” award in 2008, and in 2012 he was honored by the Alexandria Town Talk with the “CENLA Sportsman of the Year” award.

“Doug Ireland is a well-deserving recipient of the Louis Bonnette Sports Media Award, and has always proven to be a great promoter of Northwestern State and the Southland Conference,” league commissioner Tom Burnett said. “We’re very pleased to rightfully honor Doug for his contributions in the area of sports journalism and recognize his limitless efforts to promote the accomplishments of NSU athletics and its student-athletes.”

The Jonesboro native also serves in the volunteer role of chairman of the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame, a position he assumed in April 1990. His hard work and dedication to the Hall of Fame and the completion of the $23 million museum were acknowledged with a special award from Louisiana Lt. Gov. Jay Dardenne during the grand opening on June 28, 2013. In April 2014, he was honored with the Lois Wyatt Bannon “Heart and Soul” Service Award by the Louisiana Association of Museums.

Among the highlights of his NSU career was the successful promotion of 1993 football senior offensive lineman Marcus Spears for the Football Writers Association of America All-America team, which made Spears a semifinalist for the Outland Trophy given to college football’s top lineman. Spears and legendary receiver Jerry Rice (Mississippi Valley) are the only two FCS players ever to earn a spot on the major college FWAA All-America Team.

“This is such a well-deserved honor for Doug which is best exemplified by an unwavering commitment to his alma mater through the years. I speak on behalf of everyone in the Northwestern State Athletic Department, as well as across our campus and alumni base, in congratulating Doug for being selected to receive this outstanding award from the Southland Conference,” athletic director Greg Burke said.

“Doug comes to the office every day with the goal of generating, and even creatively doing so if need be, positive publicity and recognition for the university that he loves so much. He cares about every one of our student-athletes, staff members, and coaches and wants to tell their story to the world. He is an outstanding writer and is the consummate ‘media relations’ professional,” said Burke. “I have no doubt that being the recipient of this award has special meaning for Doug based on the level of respect that he has for Louis and for the entire Bonnette family.”

Bonnette’s son, Matthew, was associate SID at NSU under Ireland for nine years and succeeded his father as SID at McNeese.

Ireland is the fifth recipient of the award. Previous winners include The Daily Sentinel (Nacogdoches) sports editor Kevin Gore (2015), Sam Houston State sports information director Paul Ridings (2014), longtime Southeast Texas sports journalist and retired Lamar sports information director Rush Wood (2013) and Bonnette, the first recipient of the award in 2012.

Bonnette enjoyed a storied career as the first McNeese SID, holding the position for 46 years. As SID, he boasted a national record of 516 consecutive Cowboy football games worked. He was inducted into the Southland Conference Hall of Honor in 2007 and the College Sports Information Directors of America Hall of Fame in 2009. He has also been honored numerous times by the Louisiana Sports Writers Association, who recognized Bonnette with its prestigious Mac Russo (1995) and Distinguished Service in Sports Journalism (2002) awards, making him a member of the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame.


17 2016-07-25
Alexandria

What's Happening in Cenla education


State fiddle champion named at Folk Festival

Joanna Calhoun, 17, of West Monroe was the winner of the 2016 Louisiana State Fiddle Championship held at Northwestern State University as part of the 37th Annual Natchitoches-NSU Folk Festival.

Jeffrey Boone of Angie was second, followed by Ronald Pace of Alexandria in third, with fourth going to Jovalyn Johnson of Alexandria. The Championship was held in Magale Recital Hall on the Northwestern State campus.

As the new Louisiana State Fiddle champion, Calhoun also performed on the main stage in Prather Coliseum. The West Monroe High School student said that playing in the Championship "was really, really fun."

"I mainly do the Fiddle Championship to get me out of my comfort zone," Calhoun said. "And it’s great to win the Championship because I’m from Louisiana and fiddling is so popular here. I’m sure I’ll have a lot of great experiences through winning the title."

Johnson, a first-time contestant, also enjoyed competing.

"I had a lot fun, more than I expected,” said Johnson. “I learned a lot of things and met some nice people who helped me mature and develop as an artist."

Shane Rasmussen, director of the Natchitoches-NSU Folk Festival and the Louisiana State Fiddle Championship, remarked how wonderful it is to see so many young people taking part in the Championship.

"This year our festival theme was Emerging Artists, so it’s great to see these great young fiddlers grace our stage with such talent," said Rasmussen.

Local company helps students pursue engineering technology

Beta Engineering of Pineville is completing three years of funding $6,000 for scholarships awarded to Northwestern State University students pursing degrees in engineering technology, according to a school release.

From left are NSU Advancement personnel Tiffany Chasteen
From left are NSU Advancement personnel Tiffany Chasteen and Brittany McConathy, Chris Wilson, substation design manager for Beta Engineering and 2005 NSU alumnus; Dr. Ali Ahmad, head of NSU’s Department of Engineering Technology, Dr. Margaret Kilcoyne, interim dean of the School of Business and Technology, and Kimberly Gallow, NSU Advancement. (Photo: Courtesy)
The scholarships are awarded to two students each academic year. One is for an entering freshman focused on Electronics Engineering Technology (EET) or Industrial Engineering Technology (IET). The second is for a senior student, also focused on EET or IET. The scholarship stipulates that both students reside in Rapides Parish with a preference for graduates of Pineville High School.

"We are extremely grateful to Beta Engineering and Crest Industries for their continued support of NSU’s Engineering Technology Programs," said Dr. Ali Ahmad, head of the Department of Engineering Technology. "Enrollment continues to increase in our programs which is helping to meet demand for technologists in the equipment, quality control, process control and other applied engineering fields."

Beta Engineering is one of a group of privately held, vertically integrated companies based in Pineville with Crest Industries as its parent company. Beta provides engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) services for high voltage substations and transmission lines across the United States.

"At Beta Engineering, we are focused on improving the lives of our people, our customers and our communities by delivering the impossible," said Marvin Veuleman, president of Beta Engineering. “We hold ourselves accountable by relentlessly pursing excellence to provide the quality products and services required by our customers."

"Northwestern State University’s Engineering Technology programs stay ahead of the curve by meeting continuing demands of shifting technologies in our industry," Veuleman continued. "It was great to see NSU’s Engineering Technology organization participate in the recent American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) annual conference. Their design showcase exhibit focused on 3D printing and other cutting edge projects demonstrated NSU’s aggressive approach to high quality engineering technology education."
17 2016-07-25
Natchitoches

Youth film prize organizer visits ADVANCE film studies class


NATCHITOCHES – Aspiring young filmmakers attending the ADVANCE Program for Young Scholars at Northwestern State University were the first to hear about a new film competition for high school students. Tobias Kallenberg, 17, visited the film studies class to invite students to submit the short films they are completing as part of the ADVANCE curriculum to the Film Prize Student Division, a competition he organized as an outgrowth of the Louisiana Film Prize.



Screenings of the winning student films will be held during Shreveport’s Artbreak, the largest annual student arts festival in the south, in April 2017.



Kallenberg is an alumnus of the ADVANCE program and said the Film Prize Student Division offers high schoolers the opportunity to showcase their talents and innovation in a no pressure environment. Although hundreds of films have been submitted to the Louisiana Film Prize since it began five years ago, only three films were created by high school students.



The student films should be 3-10 minutes long, which Kallenberg said encourages completion rates, and can involve as many students as necessary. No documentaries will be considered. Students will register their entries under a sponsor program, usually a school, and submit a screenplay in advance. The winner’s sponsor program will receive a $2,500 equipment grant and possibly other prizes.



Eight students from Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas and Georgia are enrolled in the ADVANCE class where over the last several days, they brainstormed ideas and collaborated on writing, shooting and editing their film. Dr. Bill Housel, associate professor of history at NSU, is teaching the course with Mason Joiner as a teaching assistant and the film’s director.



“Mason’s job is to take the students through the process of making the class project film from original ideas generated by the students, through the writing process, shooting the footage and editing to the creation of the final project, in addition to the classroom work of learning film genre and analysis” Housel said.



Joiner, as director, supervises the entire project. He has a degree in film and a master’s in English and considerable experience acting.



The ADVANCE Program for Young Scholars is a three-week residential program for gifted and talented youth. Students enroll in one course for three weeks of intense study to cover an entire year’s worth of high school material or a semester of college level material offered in variety of disciplines in the arts, science, history, mathematics, literature, computer science and more.



“The students generally come in with little or no knowledge of film or filmmaking so there is a real push to gain skill quickly, since they have only three weeks to present a final project at the closing ceremony,” Housel said. “They begin the first day of class generating ideas for a story and characters and work collaboratively to come up with an effective screenplay. By the end of the first week they are ready to begin shooting. The second week, the students work in small groups shooting the different scenes they have written, by the end of the week they begin editing the film. I am unfailingly amazed at their willingness to work hard and their enthusiasm for the class project.”



Kallenberg is the son of Gregory Kallenberg, founder of the Louisiana Film Prize, which was draws filmmakers to the Shreveport-Bossier area to spur economic development through the film industry. The La. Film Prize is one of the largest film competitions in the U.S., but submissions must be filmed in specific areas of northwest Louisiana. This year, through the sponsorship of NSU, the city of Natchitoches Main Street Program and the Natchitoches Convention and Visitor Bureau, filming boundaries were extended to include Natchitoches Parish. Sponsorships for the Film Prize Student Division are available.



Tobias Kallenberg said he began developing the idea of a student competition, rules and criteria earlier this year and, along with his father, will be presenting workshops for teachers in the Shreveport-Bossier area. The ADVANCE class was the first student group he spoke to about the prize.



For more information on ADVANCE, visit advance.nsula.edu. For more information on the Louisiana Film Prize, visit lafilmprize.com.


17 2016-07-25
Natchitoches

Sabine State Bank joins NSU Heritage Club



Sabine State Bank joined Northwestern State University’s Heritage Club with a donation of $2,500 to the NSU’s Columns Fund. From left are NSU Alumni and Development staff Jill Bankston, Brittany McConathy and Tiffany Chasteen with NSU President Dr. Jim Henderson, Sabine State Bank CEO Jim Cole, Senior Vice President John Godfrey and Lacy Merrill, market development manager. Tax-deductible contributions to the Columns Fund provide support for student scholarships, building renovations and academic programs. “Northwestern State has been a foundation of our community that we have built around,” said John Godfrey, Sabine State Bank’s senior vice president/regional manager for Natchitoches and Red River. “We have several NSU alumni on our banking team and are proud to support the school.” “We are so grateful to our business and industry partners for supporting scholarships and programming for our students,” said Tiffany Chasteen, assistant director of Development. For more information on how to contribute to Northwestern State, contact the Office of University Advancement at (318) 357-4414.
17 2016-07-21
Natchitoches

NSU College of Nursing director elected to CCNE board


Dr. Pam Simmons, director of Northwestern State University’s College of Nursing, has been elected to the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) board, the premier accrediting organization for nursing programs. Elected by national ballot of accredited nursing programs, Dr. Simmons will represent faculty on the national board.

17 2016-07-21
Shreveport

NSU programs ranked in top 10 nationally for affordability


Northwestern State University’s online bachelor’s programs in accounting and psychology and master’s program in English have been ranked among the top 10 most affordable programs in the country.

The bachelor’s programs were recognized by the website affordableschools.net. The master’s in English was ranked by bestmastersdegrees.com.

NSU ranked as the ninth most affordable program in accounting and psychology and the 10th most affordable graduate program in English.

Rankings for the affordableschools.net list were compiled with data from National Center for Education Statistics, a bureau of the Dept. of Education.

The site examined institutions that grant bachelor's degrees in accounting via distance education, sorted them by increasing average annual net price and manually selected the 20 most affordable colleges with active online degree programs.

Coordinator of Accounting Dr. Nat Briscoe, “This national ranking indicates our accounting program provides an outstanding education at a low cost for students.”

Briscoe added, “We are mindful of the need to reduce the financial burden on students while working to
prepare them to enter the workforce after earning their degree. Our discussions with employers indicate we are accomplishing that objective.”

Briscoe said the program is designed for those students who want a strong education in accounting specific areas as well as a general education in all areas of business. The program requires a minimum of 120 credits for completion.

The Bachelor of Science in Accounting program prepares diverse career paths by offering courses in financial and managerial accounting, cost accounting, tax, audit, accounting information systems and governmental accounting.

Psychology majors receive a broad science-based education about the ways in which psychology explores and explains the human mind and behavior, with emphasis on current theory, research and applications, according to Dr. Susan Thorson, head of the Department of Psychology.

Students develop mastery and integration of vocabulary and theory, as well as critical thinking and analytic skills, through quality educational experiences enriched with technology and diversity. The program includes optional concentrations in substance abuse counseling and prevention specialist.

Instructor of Psychology and Undergraduate Program Coordinator Terry Isbell said, “While our students have long known about the excellent value represented by our online bachelors degree in psychology, it is gratifying to receive this national recognition. It reflects the quality instruction provided by our dedicated faculty.”

The graduate program in English offers five areas of concentration: folklife/Southern culture, generalist, literature, teaching English to speakers of other languages and writing and linguistics.

Head of the Department of English, Foreign Languages and Cultural Studies Dr. Jim Mischler said, “National recognition is important and useful for our many constituents: Prospective students considering our M.A. in English program, our dedicated department faculty and staff, the university, working hard to meet and even exceed its institutional benchmarks, and our community stakeholders—alumni, businesses, and local, state and national leaders—who provide the resources needed to establish and improve our educational offerings. We thank bestmastersprograms.com for this high praise of our work.”

The rankings for accounting and psychology are available at affordableschools.net. Information on the master’s program in English’s ranking is at bestmastersdegrees.com/top/affordable-online-masters-english-degree.

You can learn about NSU’s accounting degree program at business.nsula.edu/accounting.

Information on the psychology program is at psychology.nsula.edu. To find out more about the graduate program in English, go to langcomm.nsula.edu/graduate-studies.


17 2016-07-21
Shreveport

Young professional establishes scholarship for minority students


A young professional and recent Northwestern State University graduate is paying it forward by creating a scholarship to support minority students.

Kimberly Gallow, a 2015 graduate of Northwestern State, who has begun her career on campus as assistant director of Alumni Affairs, created the Kimberly K. Gallow Minority Scholarship to benefit minority students majoring in business administration.

Scholarship recipients must maintain a 2.0 or better grade point average.

“I learned that it is important to build a culture of giving because it impacts not only our university but our students and the future of Northwestern State,” Gallow said. “Even a short term investment can benefit NSU in a variety of different ways including providing scholarships, covering expenses in academic departments, and also being able to drive real change for NSU.”

Gallow is a native of Lafayette and earned a degree in business administration. She previously held a position at NSU as a recruiter for Acadiana and the greater New Orleans area. As assistant director of Alumni Affairs, she manages programs, events and activities based on geographical region, class years and specifically target young alumni to increase engagement with NSU.

As an undergraduate, Gallow was a member of the Demon Dazzler Dance Line and involved with the Presidential Leadership Program, the Student Government Association, the Student Activities Board, Freshman Connection and KNWD Radio Station. During her senior year, she created an empowerment organization called La Belle Femme.

During her junior year, she traveled to Cartegana, Colombia, with Marcus Jones and Reatha Cox to promote on-going international exchange initiatives to help ease the transition for those planning to study at NSU. She also created a joint marketing presentation with NSU and Colombian students focusing on social media usage of airline companies with the help of her classmates.

“I give much credit to Reatha Cox and business faculty Dr. Begona Perez-Mira, Dr. Margaret Kilcoyne, and Dr. Carmella Parker for supporting me throughout my four years at NSU. They always pushed me to learn more and excel in every aspect of my life.”

“Because of Northwestern State, I was able to gain a valuable education, real world experience and even the opportunity to work for my alma mater,” Gallow said. “The faculty, staff and professors in the College of Business challenged me to think outside of the box. Because of them, I am where I am today. I am confident in my career and carry purple pride with me everywhere I go.”

Gallow said sharing her love for NSU through her contribution will help students from a variety of backgrounds.

“Northwestern State gave me so much to begin with in 2011, so it’s only appropriate to invest back in my university and leave a legacy for others to follow in the future,” Gallow said.


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For more information on how to contribute to Northwestern State, contact the Office of University Advancement at (318) 357-4414.

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17 2016-07-20
Alexandria

Mischler named head of Dept. of English, Foreign Languages, and Cultural Studies at NSU


NATCHITOCHES, La. (NSU) - Dr. James J. Mischler has been named head of the Department of English, Foreign Languages and Cultural Studies at Northwestern State University. His appointment has been approved by the Board of Supervisors for the University of Louisiana System.

Mischler has been acting department head since 2015. In that time, he has worked to update and expand academic programs, revamp and improve the department’s class schedule and re-imagine and remodel departmental classrooms.

“Most Northwestern students come through our department at one time in their college career, so we understand the important role we play in student retention which is vital in the current environment,” said Mischler. “The programs in our department plan to work to better serve the needs of students, faculty, the university and the community in the years to come.”

The department includes the Bachelor of Arts in English, Master of Arts in English, a graduate certificate in teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL), a new graduate certificate program in writing for business, industry and technology, the NSU Writing Project, Louisiana Folklife Center and Argus Literary Magazine.


A member of Northwestern State’s faculty since 2008, Mischler has taught at Oklahoma State University, the University of Oregon, Oregon State University, Northeastern Illinois University, North Park University, several community and vocational colleges and Odawara Christian Center in Odawara, Japan.

At Northwestern State, Mischler was director of the Writing and Academic Resource Center for five years and has been coordinator of the graduate program in TESOL for four years. He designed the TESOL program and serves as its primary instructor and student advisor.

He received a bachelor’s degree at Wichita State University, master’s degrees from Pacific Lutheran University and Northeastern Illinois University and a doctorate at Oklahoma State University and did graduate work at Wichita State and The Pennsylvania State University.

Mischler was the 2016 recipient of the Dr. Mildred Hart Bailey Faculty Research Award for research in cognitive linguistics. Those nominated for the award are evaluated on scholarly or creative significance, national, regional or local impact; originality and ingenuity of project design and critical recognition by experts in the field.

He has made 17 presentations to national and international professional conferences in his academic career on TESOL, linguistics, grammar, language and related subjects. Mischler is the author of the book, “Metaphor across time and conceptual space: The interplay of embodiment and cultural models,” published by John Benjamins and several other peer reviewed publications.


17 2016-07-20
Natchitoches

RICHLAND STUDENTS EARN HONORS AT NORTHWESTERN


NATCHITOCHES – A total of 948 Northwestern State University students were named to the Honor List for the Spring 2016 semester.
Students on the Honor List must be enrolled full-time at Northwestern State and have a grade point average of between 3.0 and 3.49.
Alfred Crockham of Delhi was named to the Honor List.
A total of 1,014 were named to the Spring 2016 Dean’s List at Northwestern State University. Students on the list earned a grade point average of between 3.5 and 3.99.
Rebekah Aultman of Mangham was named to the Dean’s List.
Northwestern State University also released the names of 528 students named to the President’s List for the Spring 2016 semester.
Students on the President’s List must be enrolled full-time at Northwestern State and have a grade point average of 4.0.
Mary Rogers of Rayville was named to the president’s list.

17 2016-07-20
Shreveport

Youngsters learn programming and more at NSU's Robotics Camp


NATCHITOCHES, La. -
Youngsters ages 7-12 are learning how to power and program their own robots during a workshop hosted by Northwestern State University’s Department of Engineering Technology.

The camp introduces concepts in science, technology, engineering and mathematics and are taught in the labs used by engineering technology students.

The annual program is supported by the Natchitoches Area Chamber of Commerce Education Fund and is free to participants.


17 2016-07-20
Shreveport

Peace vigil at NSU calls for unity


NATCHITOCHES, La. -
Students, faculty and administrators at Northwestern State University gathered for a peace vigil Tuesday to honor victims of violence and law enforcement officials who lost their lives in recent weeks.

Campus leaders encouraged others to look past race and religion, be slow to anger, embrace community and maintain an open dialogue to help engagement.

The event included the lighting of candles, singing, a moment of silence and a prayer for healing and unity.


17 2016-07-19
Natchitoches

Peace vigil set for Tuesday, July 19


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Center for Inclusion and Diversity will host a vigil titled “People, Peace, Progression” to remember officers and other victims who have lost their lives within the last two weeks.



The vigil will take place at 9 a.m. Tuesday, July 19 in the Student Union Ballroom and should last no more than 30 minutes.



All are invited to attend.


17 2016-07-19
Natchitoches

AT&T hold ribbon cutting for new tower


AT&T held a ribbon cutting to mark completion of a new cellular tower and the expansion of its 4G LTE wireless network in the Natchitoches area. Functional since mid-June, the new tower sits atop Turpin Stadium on the Northwestern State University campus has improved coverage, capacity and network speeds on campus and in the surrounding area. From left are NSU personnel Brittany McConathy, Dr. Carmella Parker, Kimberly Gallow and Cole Gentry; Brent Craig, AT&T Advanced Communications; Britt Guillory, sales executive/Employee Sponsorship Program ; AT&T Director of External Affairs David Aubrey; Matt Shelby, AT&T Advanced Communications; Rep. Kenny Cox, Jan Waguespack, client solutions executive; Natchitoches Mayor Lee Posey, Natchitoches Chamber of Commerce CEO Tony Davis, NSU President Dr. Jim Henderson, Assistant District Attorney Billy Joe Harrington, Judith Mendes, specialist RAN engineer; Michelle Alonzo, contractor; Sheriff Victor Jones, Melissa Robinson, client solutions executive; District Attorney Van Kyzar, Janice Bolton and Robert Vinet, regional director of AT&T Louisiana. NSU personnel Tracy Brown, Marcus Jones, Dale Wohletz, Gil Gilson, Jon Lentz, Thad Warren, Blayne Henson, Heath Fitts and David Greene were commended for their support of the project. AT&T offers discounts for NSU students and faculty, as well as specialized plans for international students. The company has invested more than $1 billion in its Louisiana wireless and wired networks during 2013-2015.


17 2016-07-19
Natchitoches

ET faculty will participate in DIS-TRAN Expo


Faculty from Northwestern State University’s Department of Engineering Technology will participate in the DIS-TRAN Packaged Substations’ Conference and Expo Aug. 18-20. In addition to hosting an informational exhibit at the vendor fair, Dr. Ali Ahmad, head of NSU’s Department of Engineering Technology, will teach a workshop on team work time management. The expo will take place at Crest industries, 4725 Hwy. 28 East, Pineville.

NSU’s Engineering Technology Programs support companies such as DIS-TRAN by providing graduates with applied engineering education using advanced-level math as well as theory-based courses. These future employees are equipped to support manufacturing operations using advanced data analytics to define real-time decision-making.

DIS-TRAN Packaged Substations has recently completed three years of funding $6,000 in Engineering Technology scholarships for students majoring in Electronics Engineering Technology (EET) or Industrial Engineering Technology (IET). Preference is given to Rapides Parish students who graduate from Buckeye High School.

“NSU Engineering Technology will be there to educate attendees on the EET and IET programs and to attend technical workshops and training sessions which will certainly be beneficial for faculty and staff members to experience leading edge processes and for networking with DIS-TRAN personnel,” Ahmad said. “Other attendees include vendors of DIS-TRAN Packaged Substations and DIS-TRAN personnel.”

For information on NSU’s Department of Engineering Technology, visit engrtech.nsula.edu or email Ahmad at ahmada@nsula.edu.


17 2016-07-18
Alexandria

NSU's Heimerman voted state women's Coach of Year


NATCHITOCHES — For the second time this decade, Northwestern State’s Mike Heimerman has won Coach of the Year honors on the All-Louisiana Collegiate Track and Field Team while 12 slots on the team were filled by NSU competitors.

The team is compiled by the Louisiana Sports Writers Association each summer. The top three performances in each event for men and women earn All-Louisiana status, with individual honors determined by vote of track sports information personnel around the state.

Heimerman was voted the state’s women’s co-Coach of the Year along with LSU’s Dennis Shaver, who was chosen as the top coach on the men’s team. Heimerman first won the state women’s Coach of the Year honor in 2011, when he led the Lady Demons to their best Southland Conference Outdoors finish, second, and coached NCAA discus champion Trecey Rew Hoover.

This spring, the Lady Demons matched that runner-up finish at the 13-team Southland meet, and set a school record with 112.3 points scored. Eight NSU women qualified for the NCAA East Preliminary Round championships, with javelin thrower Ashley Aldredge repeating as an honorable mention All-American with a 19th-place finish at the national meet in Eugene, Oregon.

Heimerman, the overall head coach of the NSU track and field program since Leon Johnson’s retirement after the 2013 season, had five athletes post state-best performances this season among his 12 All-Louisiana winners.

Senior twins Aaron and Emmanuel Williams each were first in Louisiana in their specialties, and also were All-Louisiana in the other horizontal jump.

Aaron Williams was Louisiana’s top triple jumper (52-10) and his 25-1 ¼ long jump best was third ranked. Williams, a 2015 indoor All-American, qualified to compete in the USA Olympic Trials.

Emmanuel Williams, who won All-America honors for the second time in his career by finishing seventh at the NCAA Outdoors in June, had the state’s best long jump (25-8 ½) and second-best triple jump (51-9).

Lady Demon senior Rechelle Bessard had the No. 1 discus throw, a 177-4 mark. She also picked up third-team All-Louisiana honors with a 181-3 hammer throw.

Demon junior George Flaviano was Louisiana’s fastest in the men’s 400 meter hurdles with his 51.21 winning time at the Southland Outdoors. Sophomore Cedric Paul won the Southland Outdoors shot put title for NSU, and led the state with a 57-6 ½ toss earlier in the season at the Leon Johnson NSU Invitational.

Two Demon relay teams ranked second in the state. The All-America 4x100 foursome of Amir James, Micah Larkins, Flaviano and Ty Shilling ran a season-best 39.69 while finishing 15th at the NCAA Outdoors. James, Larkins, Gabriel White and Flaviano earned second-team All-Louisiana honors in the 4x400 relay with a 3:10.18 best mark.


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NSU senior Por’sha Thomas, who closed out a remarkable career by sweeping the Southland’s indoor and outdoor triple jump titles for the third consecutive year, was the second-team All-Louisiana recipient in her specialty. She had a personal-best, wind-legal 42-5 ¼ mark at an LSU meet, and went two inches further on a wind-aided mark while winning the Southland Outdoor title.

Larkins, the Southland 100 meter dash champion as a freshman, picked up third-team All-Louisiana award in that event with a season-best legal time of 10.28. He won the Southland in a wind-aided 10.15 and was an honorable mention All-American in the event.

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17 2016-07-18
Gannett

Unrest won’t cause NSU prof to flee Turkey


A Northwestern State professor is planning to remain in Turkey despite the unrest that has gripped the country.

Davina McClain, a professor of classics at the Louisiana Scholars College at NSU, is spending the summer working on the Sinop Kale evacuation project in Sinop, Turkey. McClain arrived in Turkey on June 23 and has been during the terrorist attack on the airport in Istanbul on June 28 and Friday’s unsuccessful coup by military leaders.

“Taking the situation in stride,” McClain posted Saturday on Facebook. “Yes, there are some real problems and dangers, but they are not here with us in Sinop. Here are friends and sun and sand and water and beverages and a lot of caring from each other and this beautiful, kind country of beautiful and kind people.”

Sinop is an ancient city on the northern edge of the Black Sea. The city, which has a population of nearly 37,000, dates back to the 7th century BC. Sinop is about 425 miles from Istanbul and about 250 miles from the capital city of Ankara, which was the center of the coup attempt.

“Sinop is a beautiful place and what we are doing is valuable to the town and to the country because it is about understanding their history which is also part of our history,” McClain said Saturday in an interview conducted through Facebook instant messaging.

McClain plans to follow her original schedule and return to Louisiana on Aug. 10.

“There is no good reason to leave early,” McClain said. “Here in Sinop, it is as if nothing happened. I have work to do here and I’m going to stay to do it.”

McClain’s trip to Turkey is not officially connected her her position at Northwestern State.

“Davina’s expertise is in that part of the world,” NSU President Jim Henderson said Saturday. “I think it was the history that lured her there. ... We have faculty all over world right now. A lot of those people go on their own. I think that’s one of the things that makes our faculty so strong.”

McClain didn’t know about the attempted coup until she work up at 3 a.m. Saturday morning — Sinop is 8 hours ahead of Louisiana — and saw messages on Facebook from friends concerned for her safety.

“I can hear a bunch of honking, but beyond that, I wouldn’t know anything was going on, except for your messages,” McClain wrote on Facebook. “We are in an incredibly safe place. The excavation director has worked in Sinop 20-ish years. He has good friends in town and in the country. I am so, so grateful for all your messages and concern.”

McClain is working with about 30 people from around the United States as well as Turkey, Germany, Italy and the UK at the excavation site this summer.


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“It is hard work,” McClain said. “It is hot and dirty and requires a sensitivity to what you are doing. It requires communication with lots if different people and patience ... I love it.”

She is the only person from Louisiana in the group.

“The hope is for this to be a multi-year project and a field school for students,” McClain said. “I would love for NSU and other Louisiana schools to be a part of the field school.”

McClain has been at NSU for the past 10 years and spent more than seven years as director of the Louisiana Scholars College. She first visited Turkey three years ago, and quickly grew to love the country and the people there.

“Turkey is a beautiful country with a rich history that is an integral part of western society,” McClain said. “That people here, especially in Sinop, are so kind and friendly. I barely speak any Turkish, but I have been met with the most helpful responses. Learning about other customs and respecting them are an important part of education and being a real part of a world community.”


17 2016-07-18
Natchitoches

Youngsters learn the basics of programming at NSU’s Robotics Camp


Northwestern State University’s Department of Engineering Technology held a beginners robotics camp on July 11-13 for children ages seven to 12. An advanced robotics camp was held on July 14-15 for children ages 13 and up. The camp was held in Williamson Hall on NSU’s campus. The next camp will be next week, July 25-29, at the Boys and Girls Club.


17 2016-07-14
Alexandria

Folk Festival celebrates tradition in Louisiana


Northwestern State University's Folklife Center will host the 37th annual Louisiana Folk Festival this Friday and Saturday.

The theme for this year's festival, "Emerging Artists," will celebrate artists who are keeping cultural and historical tradition alive in Louisiana through their talents.

Visitors are invited to attend the festival and learn more about some of the food, music, lifestyle and talents that have been passed down through generations of families in Louisiana.

The festival will feature multiple stages of concerts, craft workshops and lessons, traditional narrative performances and Cajun food as well as the state fiddle championship, which will begin at 1 p.m. July 16.

"We try to tap into what's really going on in Louisiana culture, but the neat thing is that there are so many communities and so many unique traditions that make us who we are," said Shane Rasmussen, associate professor of English and director of the Louisiana Folklife Center at NSU. "So we bring all of that into one place, giving each person something that interests them. It's truly one of the most unique, fun festivals that's offered in the state."

The rubboard will be the focus of workshops this year, led by master musicians "Zydeco Joe" Citizen, "Tee Don" Landry, Wayne Singleton and Goldman Thibodeaux. The rubboard is an instrument with a long history in Zydeco music — some people refer to it as a "washboard" because of its original use.

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At the workshop, festival patrons will have the opportunity to play the rubboard and other traditional Cajun instruments, including some smaller rubboards for children.

The 37th annual festival will be at the Prather Coliseum on Northwestern State University's campus in Natchitoches. Tickets can be purchased at the coliseum. Ticketing will begin at 4:30 p.m. on Friday and 8 a.m. Saturday. Children under 12 receive free admission.

For more information go to louisianafolklife.nsula.edu/ or visit the Folklife Center Facebook page at www.facebook.com/nsulafolklifecenter.
17 2016-07-14
Natchitoches

NSU alumnus establishes scholarship to benefit Scholars’ College student


A Northwestern State University alumnus is paying it forward to future NSU students through a planned gift that will leave a portion of his estate to the NSU Foundation and establish an endowed scholarship. Todd Huddleston of Metairie established the gift with the intent that it benefits a student in the Louisiana Scholars’ College for all four years of study. Huddleston was in the first graduating class of the Louisiana Scholars’ College at NSU, Louisiana’s only designated honors college that was established in 1987. He earned a degree in mathematics in 1991 and said he appreciated the curriculum that developed critical thinking and communication skills.
17 2016-07-12
Natchitoches

Ribbon cutting for AT&T tower will be Wednesday


NATCHITOCHES – AT&T Louisiana will hold a ribbon cutting to mark completion of a new cell tower placed on top of Turpin Stadium on the campus of Northwestern State University. The new tower, on the stadium’s west side, is online and has improved coverage on campus and in the Natchitoches area.



The ribbon-cutting will be at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 13 at South Hall, directly across the street from the stadium and the new tower.



For more information, contact Robert Vinet, regional director of AT&T Louisiana, at rv972@att.com.


17 2016-07-11
Baton Rouge

In Our Schools: OLOL College graduates, LSU Law Dean's List, Northwestern State Dean's List


NW State Dean’s list

NATCHITOCHES – One thousand and fourteen students were named to the Spring 2016 Dean’s List at Northwestern State University. Students on the list earned a grade point average of between 3.5 and 3.99. Livingston Parish students named to the Dean’s were Hailey Pomes of Albany and Joey Carroll, Christopher Breaux, Mackenzie Byrd, Samantha Cascio, Caitlyn Cutrer and Lakeisha Lee of Denham Springs.


17 2016-07-11
Natchitoches

Endowed Scholarship at NSU will honor beloved math teacher who taught hundreds


A family with a long legacy associated with Northwestern State University established a scholarship to honor the family patriarch who taught math and science to several generations of Natchitoches students. The Peter H. Breedlove Endowed Scholarship will be presented to a Northwestern State student pursuing a degree in a STEM (science, technology, mathematics and engineering). Peter H. Breedlove graduated from Natchitoches High School in 1924 and earned a bachelor’s degree from NSU when it was known as Louisiana State Normal College on June 10, 1929.
17 2016-07-08
Natchitoches

Breedlove Scholarship will benefit STEM student


NATCHITOCHES – A family with a long legacy associated with Northwestern State University established a scholarship to honor the family patriarch who taught math and science to several generations of Natchitoches students. The Peter H. Breedlove Endowed Scholarship will be presented to a Northwestern State student pursuing a degree in a STEM (science, technology, mathematics and engineering).



Peter H. Breedlove graduated from Natchitoches High School in 1924 and earned a bachelor’s degree from NSU when it was known as Louisiana State Normal College on June 10, 1929. He earned a master’s degree in education in 1950 at Louisiana State University. His wife, Ila Harper Breedlove, also graduated from Normal, followed by his only daughter, Frances, and three grandchildren, Mark, Clark and Fair Hyams.



“As an algebra, physics and math teacher at Natchitoches High, he prepared hundreds of students for NSU,” said Fair Hyams, Peter Breedlove’s grandson. “He once told me, ‘I may not be the world's best mathematician, but you'll be hard pressed to find a better teacher of math.’ The 1953 Natchitoches High Chinquapin yearbook was dedicated to him and was filled with praise from his students.... ‘You're the best math teacher, ever!’ "You're the finest teacher I knew’ and a simple, ‘Thank you, Mr. Breedlove.’"



After retiring from teaching in 1969, Breedlove lived the remainder of his life in Natchitoches and was an avid fan of NSU athletics. He passed away in 1982. His daughter, Frances, passed away April 9 after a long battle with Alzheimer’s.



“One of the last times I saw her truly happy was when we talked about the scholarship in her dad's honor,” Hyams said. “My mother was always proud of her father and proud to be known as ‘Pete's beautiful and smart daughter.’ This was her way of honoring her dad for the school he loved.”



Hyams said everyone in Natchitoches seemed to know his grandfather.



“When I was 10 years old, we'd drive through Natchitoches and the policeman directing traffic would say, ‘Hey Mr. Breedlove,’ as we passed through the intersection. Young women in the department stores would greet him and often hug him. Even people on the street as we drove by would shout ‘Hey, Mr. Breedlove.’ I asked him, ‘Granddaddy, are you famous or something?’ He said, ‘I taught half this town.’



“A scholarship supporting students in the STEM areas could not have been created at a more appropriate time,” said Brittany McConathy, assistant director of Development at Northwestern State. “Programs in our Department of Engineering Technology and our College of Arts and Sciences are growing and developing to meet regional workforce needs and this scholarship will enable a student to pursue a path towards a lucrative career here in Louisiana.”



To contribute to the Peter Breedlove Endowed Scholarship, contact McConathy at (318) 357-5215 or email mcconathyb@nsula.edu.


17 2016-07-08
Natchitoches

Phlebotomy course to begin Aug. 1


Northwestern State University’s Office of Electronic and Continuing Education will offer a phlebotomy technician course beginning Monday, Aug. 1. The class will be held on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in South Hall on the Northwestern State campus through Sept. 14.

This course is designed to teach entry-level phlebotomy skills to students interested in pursuing a career in phlebotomy. Students are required to complete 100 clinical hours and 100 venipunctures before they will be allowed to take the board exam. Upon satisfactory completion of this course, students will be eligible to take the National Board Certification Exam on site through the American Certification Agency for Healthcare Professionals. This course also includes Basic Life Support Certification through the American Heart Association.

Requirements to take the class include proof of a high school diploma, GED or official transcript, proof of shot records which include: MMR, last tetanus, TB skin test, and flu vaccine. (Flu vaccine is optional depending on clinical site) a set of solid scrubs of any color for clinical days and the required textbook: Phlebotomy Essentials, 6th edition (Wolters Kluwer).

The fee for the class is $825 which is due July 22 plus $125 paid directly to the instructor on the first night of class for National Board Certification and material fee.

For more information, e-mail bedgoodm@nsula.edu, go to ece.nsula.edu/non-credit or call (800) 376-2422 or (318) 357-6355.

17 2016-07-08
Shreveport

NSU Allied Health program ranked ninth in the nation


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Bachelor of Applied Science in Allied Health program has been ranked as the number nine program in the country by collegevaluesonline.com.

The rankings are available at collegevaluesonline.com/rankings/online-healthcare-degrees-top-values.
NSU Official SEAL
The site said the strengths of the BASAH degree include its low price in high level of flexibility. The program is targeted toward the needs of healthcare professsionals and the marketplace, according to Dr. Laura Aaron, director of Northwestern State’s School of Allied Health.

“The bachelor of applied science in allied health program has made a positive impact on healthcare professionals from a wide range of health care professions,” said Aaron. “The flexibility, cost, and relevant course work have helped to make this program successful. Students are able to tailor the program to meet their specific needs for professional growth.”

The BASAH program enrolled its first students in 2012.

“I chose NSU’s program because it is strictly online. I needed something to work with my busy life,” said Allied Health major Sarena Pundt of Lake Charles, a registered respiratory therapist at Lake Charles Memorial Hospital. “This is a quality program because it offers a well rounded curriculum with excellent academic advisors.”

Pundt, a senior, holds an associate degree in respiratory care and hopes a bachelor’s degree can help her advance to a position in patient education. She plans to graduate in December.

Information on the Bachelor of Applied Science in Allied Health is available at nsula.edu/academics/nursing-allied-health/allied-health-2 or by contacting Aaron at carwilel@nsula.edu.


17 2016-07-07
Natchitoches

RoyOMartin supports ET scholarships for Cenla students



RoyOMartin and the Martin Foundation completed three years of support of scholarships awarded to Northwestern State University students from a 10-parish area in Cenla who are pursuing degrees in engineering technology. The Martin Foundation supports education through workforce development, scholarships for RoyOMartin employees and children, support of local schools and public colleges and timber-related programs. From left are NSU Foundation Executive Director Drake Owens, Tiffany Chasteen, assistant director of NSU Development; Jill Bankston, associate director of Development, Roy O. Martin III and Carole Baxter, Martin Foundation
17 2016-07-07
Natchitoches

Director moves from science honors program to head of Louisiana Scholars’ College at NSU


Kirsten Bartels has been named director of the Louisiana Scholars’ College at Northwestern State University effective July 1. Her appointment has been approved by the Board of Supervisors for the University of Louisiana System. Bartels has been director of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Honors Program at the University of Illinois for the past two years and was associate director of the program for one year.
17 2016-07-07
Natchitoches

PLTW CEO visits NSU


On the front row from left are Michael Kizzar of Mansfield High School; Evans Sanders, master teacher; Bertram, Courtney Guidry of NOLA Charter Science and Mathematics High School, Kim Henry of Warren Easton High School in New Orleans, and Dr. Terri Poehl, professor in NSU’s Department of Teaching, Leadership and Counseling. On the back row are Dr. Margaret Kilcoyne, dean of NSU’s College of Business and Technology; Mike Wolff, vice president of economic development of Natchitoches Community Alliance; Christina Lake, NSU’s affiliate assistant director for PLTW, Josh Concienne of Port Allen High School in Port Allen, Dr. Phil Brown, affiliate director; Nathaniel Sowell of East St John High School in Reserve, Allen Landry of Osceola High School in Osceola, Arkansas, Curtis Desselles, instructor in Engineering Technology; Lynn Paul Schmitt of Plaquemine High School in Plaquemine, Caron Coleman, principal of NSU Elementary Lab School; Dr. Vickie Gentry, dean of NSU’s College of Education and Human Development; Lauren McConnell, PLTW media and public relations specialist, Dr. Jafar Al-Sharab, ET professor, and Dr. Ali Ahmad, head of NSU’s Department of Engineering Technology.


17 2016-07-06
Natchitoches

ET students, faculty participate in ASEE conference


Engineering Technology students and faculty from Northwestern State University participated in the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) annual conference in New Orleans where they were included in a design showcase exhibit focused on 3D printing and other projects, including the design of a mini-golf course for the city of Leesville. From left are Luz Arrieta Jimenez of Cartagena, Colombia; Timeisha Holland of Baton Rouge, Joshua Randolph of Natchitoches and Jacob Shaver of Coushatta. In addition to the student presentations, ET faculty Dr. Ali Ahmad, Dr. Jafar Al-Sharab, Dr. Mohammed Benalla and Dr. Nabin Sapkota presented 5 papers at various tracks related to Engineering and Technology education, including Articulation of Certification for Manufacturing, Fabrication of Nanofibers for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Industry Certification Program in Project Management, Quality Matters: Development of an Online Course Shell for Quality-Control Courses and Technical Project Management Course for Engineering Technology Students.




17 2016-07-01
Natchitoches

Bartels named director of Louisiana Scholars' College


Kirsten Bartels has been named director of the Louisiana Scholars’ College at Northwestern State University effective July 1. Her appointment has been approved by the Board of Supervisors for the University of Louisiana System.

Bartels has been director of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Honors Program at the University of Illinois for the past two years and was associate director of the program for one year.

“What attracted me to the Scholars' College was the people,” said Bartels. “When I am involved with recruiting events, I tell students to use their heads to collect all the information that they need, but then let their hearts decide where they go. And that is really why I am now at Northwestern State. I explored a variety of options, but NSU felt right.”

Bartels was selected after an extensive national search. As part of the interview process, Bartels had an opportunity to meet and talk with Scholars’ College students who made a strong impression on her.

“What really sealed it for me was meeting with the students during my interview,” she said. “Not only were they amazing, but the fact that the search committee scheduled me to teach and time to talk with the students showed how important students are -- their thoughts and opinions are valued at NSU and in Scholars'. My personal values align incredibly well with the school and the commitment to students. Every one I met on the faculty and in administration is student-focused, and supportive of the Scholars' College and that is incredibly important to me.”

From 2010 to 2013, Bartels was on the faculty at the Frederik Meijer Honor’s College Scholar’s Institute at Grand Valley State University as a faculty mentor and team coach, co-facilitator, co-director and honors faculty fellow in residence.

Bartels earned a bachelor’s degree in liberal arts from Hope College in Holland, Michigan and a master’s in ancient philosophy and mythology from the University of Wales, Lampeter. She received a doctorate in English literature from the University of Wales Aberystwyth.

As a faculty member, Bartels has made more than a dozen presentations at local, national and international conferences. She has had research published in peer reviewed and edited publications. Bartels received the Alpha Sigma Alpha Award of Excellence and Pan Hellenic Society Excellence in Teaching Award at Grand Valley State.

Prior to becoming a career in academics, she was executive director of the Lakeshore Children’s Museum in Grand Haven, Michigan and worked as a safety and environmental compliance consultant, environmental specialist, environmental geologist and project manager.

From 2010 to 2013, Bartels was a member of the Frederik Meijer Honor’s College Scholar’s Institute at Grand Valley State University where she served as the first faculty fellow in residence; and team coach, co-facilitator, co-director for their Scholars’ Institute.

17 2016-06-30
Alexandria

Barbier lays out plan for success at NSU


Four years ago, Bobby Barbier created a blueprint for success as a head baseball coach at Northwestern State.

Athletic director Greg Burke held up the thin purple notebook with orange lettering that holds those plans during his introduction of Barbier as the 12th coach in Demons’ history Monday afternoon. Two extra years as an assistant at Alabama and two more under Lane Burroughs at NSU led to some refinements to the blueprint, but Barbier said it remains essentially the same as he looks to move the program forward.

“We’re going to build relationships that transcend wins and losses,” Barbier told a small crowd at the NSU Field House. “We’re going to challenge our players physically…Player development is going to be one of our top priorities.”







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The Demons’ former Academic All-American promised to be “relentless” in recruiting as he searches for the same type of tough, blue-collar player that produced back-to-back 30-win seasons with Barbier as pitching coach. He noted he believes in athleticism and speed where Burroughs might prefer power, but the team’s overall personality won’t change.

Barbier found a winning formula with pitchers by emphasizing preparation and pounding the strike zone. The Demons posted a 3.55 ERA in 2015 and lowered it to 3.01 last season, the school’s best since 2002 and good for ninth in the Division I.

Soon-to-be senior shortstop Matthew Alford believes Barbier’s knowledge and ability to connect with players will also work well with the team’s hitters. He played catcher and first base before teaching every position but pitcher as an assistant at NSU and Alabama under coach Mitch Gaspard.

Burke called hiring Barbier “as easy of a decision as a 3-0 fastball”, noting Barbier’s connections to NSU make him especially passionate about keeping the program at a high level. Four returning starters in the field should help, but Barbier will clearly face some challenges in his first season.

He must find a way to replace senior first baseman Cort Brinson and three MLB draft picks, including Southland Conference Pitcher of the Year Adam Oller. The Demons also lost promising pitcher Tyree Thompson of Edna Karr HS after he signed with the Rangers as a 26th round pick.

Several members of an eight-player recruiting class will be given a chance to play early, just like the three freshmen who shared the closer role this season, led by former Loyola standout Nathan Jones’ five saves. Hitters like NSU home run leader David Fry, Alford and fellow senior Spencer Goodwin will be among those expected to help replace significant lost production in the lineup.

It’s unlikely one pitcher can replace Oller, a second team All-American for Collegiate Baseball Magazine. Instead, Barbier will count on some new junior college arms and veterans such as senior Evan Tidwell, who went 5-3 with a 2.97 ERA in 13 starts.







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“Seeing Adam be the anchor for that pitching staff and be the person everybody can lean on, that’s what I’ve got to do,” Tidwell said. “That’s what I’ll take into effect and just learn from what Adam has done, learn from Coach Barbier and other coaches like that.”

He’ll also work with a yet to be determined pitching coach, as well as new graduate assistant Jeffrey Stovall. The rest of Barbier’s staff will remain the same for a team dedicated to producing well-rounded student-athletes.

“There’s a certain player that it takes to play here and it’s hard to put your finger on it,” Barbier said. “We will not settle for anything less than that standard.”

17 2016-06-30
Alexandria

'Paddlin' Prof' lived life to fullest


Harry Briggs, Northwestern State's "Paddlin' Professor" who earned notoriety for his pioneering, long-distance swimming exploits around the world, died on Saturday at age 95.

Briggs, an adjunct political science professor at NSU's Leesville/Fort Polk campus, was inducted into the International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame in 1997. He created four scholarship funds at NSU and continued to raise money for the school with open-water swims into his 90s.

"He was just a great, big-hearted man," said Tommy Tilley, senior user support specialist at NSU's Leesville/Fort Polk campus and a close friend of Briggs for 15 years. "He was very selfless. That's always been in his character. I'm just blessed that he entered my life. We should all try to follow in his footsteps."

Briggs, a former Marine who served in the Pacific during World War II, achieved notoriety for his marathon swimming in the 1950s and '60s. He was profiled in The New York Times, Sports Illustrated and appeared on the "Ed Sullivan Show."

Perhaps his most notable feat was becoming the first person to swim across Lake Erie in 1957, covering 32 miles from Ohio to Ontario in 35 hours and 55 minutes. He was also the first person to swim from Corsica to Sardinia and the first to swim across Lake Winnipesaukee in New Hampshire, a distance of 36 miles.


Harry Briggs in 2011
Harry Briggs in 2011 (Photo: Town Talk photo)

Briggs completed more than 40 marathon swims — nonstop, open water swims of at least 6.2 miles — over the course of his career, according to his International Marathon Swimming Hall of Fame biography.

Doug Ireland, NSU's assistant athletics director and sport information director, called Briggs "a remarkable, one of a kind human being."

"He had no reluctance to take on a challenge," Ireland said. "He believed we should all keep challenging ourselves as long as the good Lord allows us to do it, and that extended through all areas of his life. He lived life for every ounce he could get out of it, and he was as altruistic a person as you could ever hope to meet."

Indeed, Briggs' spendthrift lifestyle allowed him to be generous. He wore old clothes, drove vehicles that could charitably be called rickety and never lived in a fancy house. He once told Tilley his goal was live on $90 a week.

"He did all that so he could do what was really import to him — help students," Ireland said.

In addition to NSU, Briggs raised money for his alma mater, Tufts University in Massachusetts, and Plymouth State University in New Hampshire.

After giving up distance swimming for 30 years in favor of tennis, Briggs got back in the water in his 70s. His annual swimming challenges in waterways across Louisiana supported scholarships and operations at NSU in programs such as tennis, nursing and radiology.

He was regularly treated for hypothermia. During one swim in Cane River Lake, he lost eyesight (he never told anyone until he was done). But he kept swimming.

NSU is working on plans for a recognition ceremony for Briggs. His body will be cremated and the ashes scattered in bodies of water he swam.

"Harry was a patriot, a 'no quit' sportsman, an old school gentleman, an educator, and a proud, strong United State Marine," said Jill Bankston, associated director of development at NSU. "He was gritty, loyal, determined, and hard-headed. He refused to give up on others and refused to give up on himself. At 95 years old, he was as stubborn as a mule, and as tender as he could be. When someone asked, 'How are you, Harry? I can still hear him say, 'Not bad for an old guy!'"

“We truly lost a wonderful individual in Harry Briggs," said Patrick DuBois, assistant athletics director and director of tennis operations at NSU. "Harry was not only a supporter of our tennis program and NSU in general, he was a great friend. I truly enjoyed the time we have spent over many years and have learned so much from Harry. Harry lived a selfless life and continually served others. He has so done many amazing things over the span of his 95 years, but you would never know as he was so humble.”

Jeff Matthews is the storyteller for the Town Talk. Follow him on Twitter @JeffM_TownTalk and email him story ideas at jmatthews@thetowntalk.com

17 2016-06-30
Baton Rouge

Ascension graduates recognized


Northwestern State University
Northwestern State University released the names of 528 students named to the President’s List for the Spring 2016 semester. Students on the President’s List must be enrolled full-time at Northwestern State and have a grade point average of 4.0.
Ascension students who have claimed the honor are Julie Breaux, Katelyn Marchand and Rebecca Marchand of Gonzales; Shelby Andre, Melissa Bailey, Meagan Brown, Julianna Carmouche, Madison Coleman, Jakalyn Hills and Brooke Thompson of Prairieville.
Students on the Dean's List must be enrolled full-time and have earned a grade point average between 3.5 and 3.99.
Ascension students who earned the honor are Olivia Bridges, Juliana Coletti, Bryn Hughes and Nicole Jones of Gonzales; Carly Bourgeois, Gracyn Migues, Otha Nelson and Regan Wild of Prairieville; Alyssa Buker, Brandon Hairrell and Hally Lambert of St. Amant; Denicia Thompson of Sorrento.

17 2016-06-30
Natchitoches

Ward Scholarship will benefit NSU jazz musician


NATCHITOCHES – F.B. Ward was a band director who loved music and loved maintaining a close network of friends among his colleagues in music education. As a musician and band director F.B. Ward had a long and distinguished career teaching young musicians in Arkansas, Texas, and Louisiana, competing in contests, arranging music and performing jazz standards with different ensembles. In his memory, his children: Mark Ward, Barbara McCoy, Jana Mayeaux and Joel Ward, have established the F.B. Ward Scholarship in Jazz at Northwestern State University.



The scholarship, which has been fully endowed at the $10,000 level through memorial contributions, will be awarded to a student selected by the coordinator of NSU’s Jazz Orchestra and the director of the School of Creative and Performing Arts. The student must maintain a grade point average of 2.5 or better, while striving to excel in jazz band at NSU.



“Our dad had a fantastic career,” Mark Ward said. “Think of what music and jazz were like in the 50s and 60s. A lot of those guys were in the military and there was a big culture of music there, whether it was drilling/marching techniques or playing swing (jazz). There was a close community and a lot of overlap with people who knew each other. The band directors in those days shared best practices, and they played swing, jazz and big band music.”



F.B. Ward was especially gifted at saxophone and piano, playing by ear and performing for friends and family. “He loved modulation, change of key and moving from one song to the next seamlessly,” Mark Ward said. “He wrote arrangements for jazz band by modifying chord progression, rhythm, and instrument voicing. The music and performances in high school jazz were written to fit his band.”



F.B. Ward was born in Hope, Arkansas, in 1926. He served in World War II as a Marine from 1945-46. He completed his bachelor’s degree in music education at Henderson State Teachers College in 1950 and a masters’ degree in music education from Northwestern state in 1963. By 1969, he had completed plus 30 additional hours of education at Louisiana Tech and North Texas State. He was the director of bands in many schools in including DeQueen, Arkansas; Hooks and Atlanta, Texas; and Jonesboro-Hodge and Natchitoches in Louisiana; consistently winning first divisions in marching and playing contests. His students also competed in jazz festivals, winning 2AA championship at Brownwood festival in 1958 and 1959 while at Atlanta, Texas. F.B. Ward later served as principal at Natchitoches Parish schools, including Goldonna, Campti, and Gorum. He was married to Jo Ann Card Ward for 62 years until her death in 2011.



Since his father’s death this past April, Mark Ward has been in touch with F.B.’s friends, former students and colleagues. As a band director, F.B. Ward mentored many student teachers who later became accomplished band directors as well.



“In his career, he won multi-state first divisions with great bands in multiple competitions in different size districts. He was an adjudicator, clinician and performer. But despite his stellar career, his greatest accomplishment probably was in giving back enjoyment to others through his piano.” After retiring, F.B. Ward worked as a piano tuner, and after a broken hip, he entered the Louisiana War Veterans Home, in Bossier City. For four years he played their pianos in the atrium, in the eating areas and in the chapel. “He played the old favorites that he grew up with, using no music, moving from one piece to another as songs came to his mind. He continued to play for veterans, their families, and staff members until his death in April 2016.”



The F.B. Ward Scholarship is only the second established at NSU for jazz musicians.



“The recipient will be a student participating in the University Jazz Orchestra or jazz combos,” said Galindo Rodriguez, director of NSU’s Jazz Orchestra and jazz ensembles.



Rodriguez said there are about 22 students in the Jazz Orchestra and about 12 in the jazz combos. The popular ensembles perform several times a year in many different venues both on and off campus. The scholarship recipient would be a participant in one or more of those groups with consideration to grade point average.



“The man’s life was about music, teaching, and competing to be the best,” Mark Ward said. “Although he had many other interests and obligations, including raising four kids with his loving wife, he continued to press forward towards the high bar of excellence in music education in Louisiana and beyond.”



Contributions to the F.B. Ward Scholarship in Jazz can be made to the NSU Foundation by contacting Tiffany Chasteen, assistant director of Development, at (318) 357-5213 or chasteent@nsula.edu.


17 2016-06-29
Natchitoches

Fun With Music Camp to begin July 11


Northwestern State University’s School of Creative and Performing Arts will present a Fun With Music Camp July 11-16.

Children ages five to 11 can participate in a variety of music experiences including singing, music games, instrumental activities, composing and many other creative music activities.

The camp, staffed by NSU music education students and directed by Assistant Professor of Music Education Dr. Sharon Joy, affords children the opportunity to interact with many aspects of music in a relaxed, camp-like atmosphere. The campers participate in a variety of musical experiences. Each day’s activities centers around a theme (a trip to a different continent, the seashore, or a camping adventure) and begins when the children pass through the “Summer Portal” as they sing the Fun With Music Camp “Traveling” song.

“Music is such an important part of childhood and there are few opportunities for children to participate in group singing of folk songs that are such an enriching aspect of our American culture,” said Joy. “We aim, in some small way, to offer these precious music experiences to our area children. The songs that they learn at camp can be enjoyed with their families throughout the year.”

Activities will begin at 9 a.m. and continue until noon, culminating with a large group singalong. The fee is $140 per student. A sibling discount is available. Snacks and materials will be provided. For additional information contact Sharon Joy at joys@nsula.edu or (318) 357-5754.

17 2016-06-29
Natchitoches

NSU Theatre students working across the country in summer productions


More than 40 Northwestern State theatre students or recent alumni are performing across the country in professional theatre and dance jobs. The students are working in 18 different companies in 10 states.

“The NSU Theatre and Dance program is very proud of the students who are working across the nation in the professional theatre and dance jobs,” said theatre artistic director Scott Burrell. “These students take their training and knowledge received at NSU and put it into practical use. Plus, they’re getting paid for their talent and artistry which gives them the encouragement that they can make it in a tough and competitive market.”

Students earn many of the jobs based on auditions at the annual Southeastern Theatre Conference and other events.

Students working this summer include Jonathan Curruth of Slidell at Tent Theatre in Springfield, Missouri, Briana Acosta of Violet, Myra Martinez of Bossier City, Taylor Smith of Leesville, DeAngelo Renard-Boutte of Mandeville, Tyler Price of Harvey, Chelsey Goldsmith of Enid, Oklahoma and Luke Matherne of Monroe at Cedar Point in Sandusky Ohio, Michael Carrier of Lafayette at Cortland Rep in Courtland, New York and Joshua DeAlba of Apopka, Florida at Unto These Hills in Cherokee, North Carolina.

Also working professionally this summer are Annie Dauzat of Watson, Logan Terrell of Kinder and Kathleen Kerner of Covington at Texas! Outdoor Musical in Canyon, Texas, Patrick Mahoney of Slidell and Savannah Callais of Chalmette at Brevard Music Center in Brevard, North Carolina, Chase Miller of Alexandria at Holiday World in Santa Clause, Indiana, Taylor Young of River Ridge at Rivertown Theaters for the Performing Arts in Kenner.

Other theatre and dance students working this summer are Lari Leber of Shreveport, Rachel Paul of Lake Jackson, Texas, Miranda Beck-Bird of Waggaman and Jesse Kortus of Bossier City at Canterbury Summer Theatre in Michigan City, Indiana, Mackenzie Lauren of Denham Springs at Central Community Theatre in Baton Rouge, Madison Fry of Baton Rouge at Theatre Baton Rouge, Hannah Hays of Baton Rouge at Cumberland County Playhouse in Crossville, Tennessee, Mona Nasrawi of Covington at McKinney Summer Musicals in McKinney, Texas, Savannah Thibodeaux of Baton Rouge at Jenny Wiley in Prestonsburg, Kentucky, Hailey Pomes of Albany at Gainesville Theatre Alliance in Oakwood, Georgia, Erika Stanford at Huron Playhouse in Huron, Ohio and Laura Sharp of Slidell at Frick and Frack Music Tour in Fredericksburg, Virginia.

Students who are working in Northwestern State’s Summer Dinner Theatre are Anna Birbiglia of Metairie, Grace Brumfield and Bethany Lee of Baton Rouge, Leonard Harris of Baker, Christian Dantes of Shreveport, Braxton Hogan of Natchitoches, Sean Grady of Leesville, Erika Jarlock and Titus McCann of Covington, Selene Allain-Kovacs of Charenton, LG Williams of New Orleans, Hector Pena of Miami, Florida, Jay Canova of Marrero, Payton Hartwick of Edmond, Oklahoma, Marissa McMickens of Pineville and Alexia Mullally, Pearland, Texas.

“Even our students who stay in Natchitoches during the summer to work the NSU Summer Dinner Theatre, get a chance to hone their craft as well as make money,” said Burrell. “All the reports coming back to us from our working students has been very positive and their employers have given them and NSU many fine compliments regarding their training and professionalism.”

17 2016-06-24
Natchitoches

Intro to Engineering Design teachers complete certification


High school teachers from throughout Louisiana and Mississippi completed a two-week training boot camp for Project Lead the Way’s Introduction to Engineering Design at Northwestern State University. The teachers are now certified to teach IED in the PLTW high school engineering pathway. On the front row from left are Jaquincia Williams, Northeast High School in Pride, Matthew Gardner of Grenada (Mississippi) High School, Beverly Reed-Turley, East St. John High School in Reserve, and Charles Stallard, UME Prep, Duncanville, Texas. On the second row are Chuck Perkins, Tioga High School; Edward La Bruyere, Sam Houston High School; Allen Landry, Osceola (Arkansas) High School, and Dr. Margaret Kilcoyne, interim dean of NSU’s College of Business and Technology. On the back row are Dr. Ali Ahmad, director of NSU’s Department of Engineering Technology; Maikel Garcia, Leander (Texas) High School; John Thacker, Archbishop Hannan High School, Covington; Ryan Lewis, South Pittsburg (Tennessee) High School; NSU ET Faculty Dr. Jafar Al Sharab and Curtis Desselles and Christina Lake, affiliate assistant director for PLTW at NSU.
17 2016-06-24
Natchitoches

NSU engineering department will hold beginners robotics camp


Northwestern State University’s Department of Engineering Technology will host two Robotics Camps this summer. There is no charge to participate in the camps, but due to space limitations, only the first 15 applicants per camp will be accepted.


17 2016-06-22
Natchitoches

Commercial photographer creates NSU scholarship


NATCHITOCHES – A Northwestern State University alumnus who enjoyed a long career as a successful commercial photographer has created the first-ever endowed scholarship for a student interested in pursuing photography as a career. The Robert Davis Endowed Scholarship will be presented to a junior or senior minoring in photography with first preference given to students who aspire to become professional photographers. The student must maintain a 2.5 grade point average.



Davis of Baton Rouge began was a photography hobbyist but an elective course he took at Northwestern State pointed him in the direction of serious photography. Davis attended NSU majoring in business and participating in ROTC from 1965 until he graduated in 1968. After serving in the Army for three years, he returned to NSU on the GI Bill to pursue an MBA and enrolled in a photography class to learn the darkroom skills of processing film and developing prints.



“Photography was a serious hobby so I took the course and it taught me so much,” he said. “I eventually had a free lance commercial photography business for 38 years. It was really good to me and I always attributed that good fortune to that class at Northwestern.”



Davis’s father, Dwight Davis, was the NSU band director and, although he knew he wanted to go to college, wasn’t sure what field to pursue. The photography course he took turned him to a more serious pursuit of photography.



“When I graduated, I dabbled in some other jobs. I knew I wasn’t going to be happy unless I was working for myself, so I moved to Baton Rouge. Baton Rouge had state government, LSU and a lot of thriving industry. I got here at the right time. There weren’t many commercial photographers at the time, so I went to work and learned a lot on the job. I had lots of luck. It took off from the beginning,” he said.



Commercial photography involved broad-based subject matter in relation to advertising, public relations, brochures, reports, people shots, board rooms and working situations. He migrated to digital photography around 2000.



“After 30 years, the darkroom became a chore and I found I enjoyed Photoshop because it gives you so many opportunities you don’t have in a darkroom,” he said. The industry has changed with technology and today many graphic designers are their own photographers. He retired two years ago and dabbles with computers as a hobby. He has built three.



Davis worked with the NSU Foundation to arrange for a percentage of his investment portfolio to benefit Northwestern State. He said the ideal recipient of the Robert Davis Endowed Scholarship would be a student with a strong desire to pursue professional photography.



“I don’t have any direct heirs and I thought I ought to just pay it back,” he said. “I’d like to help a student in the position I was in at the time.”



“Through the kindness of Mr. Davis, one photography student each year will be able to use these funds to expand their learning opportunities,” said Matt DeFord, coordinator of the Department of Fine + Graphic Art. “The student will be able to purchase photography equipment, pay tuition or use it for other living expenses. Our photography students have a history of success in the field, and with this generous endowment, they will be helped on their way.”
17 2016-06-21
Natchitoches

Crest awards scholarship to future nurse



Erica Greer of Natchitoches, a student in Northwestern State University’s College of Nursing, is this year’s recipient of a $500 scholarship awarded by Crest Industries LLC based on academic achievement, leadership and extra-curricular activities/work experience. Greer will begin nursing clinical rotation this fall at NSU’s Cenla Campus. She is a Dean’s List student and will graduate in 2018. She is pictured with Kenneth Robison, Crest CEO.
17 2016-06-20
Natchitoches

Couple’s gift will ensure summer school tuition for NSU athletic team members


Members of Northwestern State University’s men’s basketball team will be able to attend summer school and worry less about expenses, thanks to a donation from one of the program’s most loyal supporters. Alumnus Steve Stroud and his wife Lori and their daughters Sammy and Vicky of Shreveport donated $35,000 specifically to assist with summer school expenses, which are not covered under athletic scholarships. Stroud is a close friend of Head Men’s Basketball Coach Mike McConathy and over the years has shown generous support to NSU Athletics.


17 2016-06-17
Natchitoches

NSU to be well represented at Miss Louisiana Pageant


NATCHITOCHES – Six Northwestern State University students and alumnae will represent the university in next weeks Miss Louisiana Pageant in Monroe. Among those competing for the Miss Louisiana title are, from left, Breanna Collier, Miss Greater Baton Rouge, Hannah Teutsch, Miss Bossier City, Marissa McMickens, Miss Northwestern Lady of the Bracelet, Taylor Walker, Miss Dixie Stockshow, Holli’ Conway, Miss Heart of Pilot, Lincoln Pearce, Miss Natchitoches. Collier and Walker formerly held the title of Miss Northwestern Lady of the Bracelet.
17 2016-06-16
Baton Rouge

University's historical books are online and searchable


Two historical books about Northwestern State University are available for viewing online. “Northwestern State University of Louisiana: 1884-1984 A History” and “Northwestern at 125,” are available in a searchable pdf format. The publications can be viewed via traditions.nsula.edu/digital-archives.

“Northwestern State University of Louisiana: 1884-1984 A History” was authored by the late Dr. Marietta LeBreton, a long-time professor of history, in honor of school’s centennial. The book is out of print and difficult to locate.

“Northwestern at 125” is a commemorative coffee table book that describes the history and traditions of Northwestern State through pictures and narrative. The book by Jerry Pierce, Dr. Steve Horton, Tom Whitehead and Don Sepulvado was published in 2009 as the university celebrated the 125th year of its founding.
17 2016-06-16
Natchitoches

NSU, LCTCS sign scholarship transfer agreement


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University and the Louisiana Community and Technical College System (LCTCS) signed an agreement in which students who are Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society graduates of LCTCS institutions are eligible for a two-year scholarship upon transfer to NSU after earning their associate degree.



The Purple Prestige Transfer Scholarship seeks to remove economic obstacles for Phi Theta Kappa students who wish to pursue a bachelor’s degree after completing their two-year degree, administrators said.



NSU will provide scholarships to active PTK graduates who meet specific guidelines. Students must have completed an associate degree no earlier than Spring 2017, be an active member of PTK at the time of graduation, have completed their Federal Student Aid application, have applied to and enroll at NSU as a fulltime student the semester after completing their associate degree. Students must maintain full time enrollment for scholarship renewal and maintain a grade point average of 3.0 or better. The Purple Prestige Transfer Scholarship will be awarded at