11/14/2018
ULS NEWS ARTICLES

Today's News

University of Louisiana System

13 2018-06-26
Monroe

Ruston LDCC receives nearly $600K grant


RUSTON, La. (Press Release) - Ruston-Louisiana Delta Community College (LDCC) is the recipient of a $598,973 Advanced Technological Education Grant from the National Science Foundation.
Project COMPLETE (Controlling, Operating, and Measuring: Pathways for Learners to Engineering Technology Employment) is a collaboration between Louisiana Delta Community College and Louisiana Tech University. Says Dennis Epps, Chancellor for LDCC, “This grant award is the result of a strong collaboration between Louisiana Tech and Louisiana Delta Community College and will enable both institutions to continue to develop talent to advance the region's advanced manufacturing workforce.”
According to Fred Dedrick, the Executive Director of the National Fund for Workforce Solutions (NFWS), “In the American south, where advanced manufacturing is a relatively recent growth industry, the skills gap is very real…” The skills gap is due to the retirement of Baby Boomers exiting the workforce making the partnership with LDCC & Louisiana Tech University very timely.

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The goals of the program are to increase engineering technology career pathways for high school students, engage and retain these students through college, and ensure they are employable upon graduation.
"We are pleased to have the strong collaboration between our faculties that led to this grant being developed. This should have a major impact on enhanced pathways for education that will drive economic prosperity for our region.” shares Dr. Les Guice, Louisiana Tech University President.
Doug Postel, Campus Director for LDCC-Ruston is both excited and grateful. “We are extremely excited about this opportunity and the honor that comes with this prestigious award. Much credit goes to Dr. Mikey Swanbom at Louisiana Tech. It was his vision and leadership that made this grant opportunity possible. He led throughout the entire process and we would not have this award if it were not for him. We look forward to working with our partners at Louisiana Tech and high schools throughout North Louisiana as we prepare students for valuable careers in advanced manufacturing engineering,” explains Postel.
An official announcement will take place at the Ruston-Lincoln Chamber of Commerce located 2111 N. Trenton Street in Ruston, Tuesday, June 26, 2018 beginning promptly at 2:30 and concluding at 3 p.m.
“We are excited to have this partnership with Louisiana Delta Community College, our high school partners, and the College of Engineering and Science at Louisiana Tech. This project will help further integrate the pipeline of students interested in instrumentation technology to create multiple pathways for those students to fill needed positions in industry,” says Dr. Hisham Hegab, Dean of the College of Engineering and Science at Louisiana Tech University.
Regional manufacturers will appreciate this news as well. Most already have relationships with both institutions and have partnered aggressively to fill their skills gap. This grant is a bonus in that effort.
“The region is committed to helping existing manufacturers grow and to attract further investment to the region to improve our economy and prosperity. Both institutions are committed to this goal and working aggressively with K-12 systems to promote high tech career opportunities and to develop interest in these opportunities among students,” says Epps, “Economic development is a team sport and we are delighted to have a strong partnership with Louisiana Tech in this pursuit.”
13 2017-08-30
Ruston

GSU, TECH HELP FLOOD-EFFECTED STUDENTS


Grambling State and Louisiana Tech Universities have begun preparations for students affected by Hurricane Harvey and continue to wait as the tropical storm makes it way into Louisiana.

GSU president Rick Gallot said in a prepared statement today the university continues to watch the Harvey-related flooding that has affected a large number of students from the Houston, Texas, and Lake Charles area.


13 2017-08-17
Ruston

THE HAPPENING: ALUMNI EVENT SET FOR THURSDAY


More than 1,000 Louisiana Tech University alumni and supporters, shown here, packed the Monroe Civic Center for The Happening 2016 — Blue Bayou.
13 2017-06-29
Monroe

LA Tech Master of Arts in Teaching


WEST MONROE, La - Louisiana Tech University, College of Education, is committed to the personal and professional development of both current students and other professionals.

The Alternative Certification program at Louisiana Tech University offers a pathway to teacher certification with a Master of Arts in Teaching degree.

This program is designed for persons who already have obtained a bachelors degree in a non-teaching area of study and who are now ready to teach in a PK-12 school.

Watch the video for more details. You can also call 257-2849.




13 2017-06-29
Ruston

LOWEST FEE INCREASE IN A DECADE APPROVED


Louisiana Tech University students will see a $136 increase in student fees per academic quarter while Grambling State University students will not after the University of Louisiana System executive committee special meeting recently approved fee changes for its nine universities.


13 2017-05-22
Ruston

Governor Edwards speaks at La Tech's graduation


RUSTON, La. (KNOE 8 News) - 973 graduated on Saturday, which is the largest graduating class at Louisiana Tech and a special guest speaker Gov. John Bel Edwards encouraged them in their future life endeavors.

"I'm excited today a 100,000 graduates now in the history of Tech," says Edwards.

Despite cuts to the TOPS program the governor says higher education is moving into a better place.

"This year we are currently in, we actually stabilized the state's support for higher education and as a result the tuition increases across the state were the lowest they've been in a decade."

When it comes to the state budget, Edwards says there's still a steep hill to climb, but he already has his eyes set on next year's fiscal cliff.

"There is no other fiscal session scheduled between now and then so in all likelihood unless we can get some big work done in the next three weeks we will have another special session to bring the legislature back to address the fiscal cliff," says Edwards.

Right now it sits at $1.3 billion, which starts June 30th of 2018.


"1.3 billion dollars is so big in the grand scheme of things we don't protect education, higher education, k-12 education, health care we don't protect anything with a cliff that big unless we resolve the problem," says Edwards.

Another big issue facing the state is the removal of four confederate monuments that were taken down in New Orleans..

"Now that the monuments are down that's what the city of New Orleans acting through the mayor and city council opted to do so now that it is done I hope we look forward and unify cause we have a lot of work to do here in Louisiana."

Despite the problems in the state, the governor encouraged all the graduates to stay in Louisiana.
13 2017-05-05
Ruston

FORMER TECH ATHLETE HELPS START LOCAL HEALTHY KIDS RUNNING TO PROMOTE HEALTHY LIVING


Lincoln Parish children ages 2 through middle school have the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of running coordinated by a former Louisiana Tech University track and field athlete.

The nonprofit Healthy Kids Running series is currently underway and local children can sign up to partake in the remaining three sessions of the program to learn, have fun and stay healthy.

Sophia Jackson, a former Tech track athlete and current paraprofessional at Glen View Elementary, said Healthy Kids Running teaches local children how to run over a five-week period.

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13 2017-05-02
Monroe

"Rumors" Showing at Louisiana Tech this Week!


West Monroe, LA - Rumor has it, the Louisiana Tech Department of Theatre is opening their fourth and final production of Rumors that will leave their audiences laughing out loud and wanting more of this dinner party gone wrong! This famous farce will be showing May 2-6, 2017 at 7:30 p.m. and May 7, 2017 at 2 p.m. in Stone Theatre, located in Louisiana Tech’s Howard Center for the Performing Arts. Don’t miss your chance to see this door-slamming, fast paced comedy written by America’s greatest comedic playwright, Neil Simon where there is a secret behind every slamming door. Be aware the show has adult language.

Ticket prices for the shows are as follows: $20 general admission, $10 students with student ID, $15 youth under 14 years old, and $15 seniors 65 years old and up. For group rates, please contact the box office, located in the Lobby of Stone Theatre, at 318-257-3942. Their hours are Monday – Friday from 1:30 p.m. to 4:45 p.m.

Neil Simon's hilarious farce, Rumors, "has nothing on its mind except making the audience laugh," according to Frank Rich's review in the New York Times of the original Broadway production in 1988. The silliness revolves around a dinner party at the home of the Deputy Mayor of New York, who is conspicuously absent from his own party! His lawyer, accountant, psychiatrist, their wives, and an assortment of other guests spend the evening trying to determine why he is absent and how that might affect each of their careers. Filled with confusion and miscommunication, Rumors is a farcical masterpiece from America's greatest comedic playwright.

For more information on the Louisiana Tech Department of Theatre, please visit them at www.latechuniversitytheatre.com , “like” thier Facebook page: facebook.com/latechtheatre, or follow them on Twitter and Instagram at @LaTechTheatre.


13 2017-04-28
Monroe

Louisiana Tech history students honored for research


Two Louisiana Tech University graduate students were honored for their research efforts when the North Louisiana Historical Association held its annual spring banquet in Natchitoches.

Paula J. Rowe, of Bossier City, took first place in the graduate division of the association’s annual W. Darrell Overdyke competition for the best research paper on the history of North Louisiana. Rowe’s paper was titled “Desegregation of C. E. Byrd High School, 1965-1977.”

Receiving third place in the Overdyke competition was graduate student Nolen Leach, of Jonesboro, whose paper focused on “The Desegregation of Schools in Jackson Parish, Louisiana, 1969-2016.”

Rowe and Leach researched and wrote their papers in Dr. Stephen Webre’s graduate seminar on historical research and writing. In addition to a cash prize, winning papers are published in the association’s journal, North Louisiana History.

The Overdyke Student Awards are made in memory of the late Dr. W. Darrell Overdyke (1907-1973), who taught history at Centenary College for more than 40 years. They are made possible through the generosity of the late Martha Walker Overdyke and her brother, E. Laurence Walker of Shreveport.
13 2017-04-26
Ruston

TECH COES NAMES OUTSTANDING STUDENTS, FACULTY


Louisiana Tech University’s College of Engineering and Science recently announced its 2017 Outstanding Students and Faculty.

Each Spring Quarter, COES faculty vote to recognize juniors and seniors who demonstrate excellence in the classroom and participate in service through student organizations.

Graduating seniors vote on the two faculty members who most influenced their educations at Louisiana Tech. The results are announced and awards are presented at Spring Release, the annual crawfish boil and culmination of Engineering and Science Week.

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13 2017-04-25
Monroe

10 Louisiana Tech College of Engineering and Science names outstanding students, faculty


Louisiana Tech University’s College of Engineering and Science (COES) has announced its 2017 Outstanding students and faculty.

Each Spring Quarter, COES faculty vote to recognize juniors and seniors who demonstrate excellence in the classroom and participate in service through student organizations. Graduating seniors vote on the two faculty members who most influenced their educations at Louisiana Tech. The results are announced and awards are presented at Spring Release, the annual craw-fish boil and culmination of Engineering and Science Week.

The 2017 Outstanding Juniors are as follows:

Lucia House (electrical engineering and mathematics),
Joshua Joffrion (electrical engineering and physics),
Samuel Johnson (chemical engineering),
William Byerley (chemical engineering),
Haley Dishman (mechanical engineering),
Caroline Fontenot (cyber engineering),
Christopher Kotar (mechanical engineering),
Alex Pledger (mechanical engineering) and
Matthew Upshaw (civil engineering).
The 2017 Outstanding Seniors are as follows:

Paige Boudreaux (industrial engineering),
Beverly Case (mechanical engineering),
Madeline Collins (mathematics and mechanical engineering),
Danielle Eschete (mechanical engineering),
Sari Freeman (industrial engineering),
Blake Gautreaux (chemical engineering),
John Herren (mechanical engineering),
John Kraft IV (construction engineering technology),
Gabriella Perez (electrical engineering),
Ethan Sullivan (nanosystems engineering),
Caylin VanHook (electrical engineering and physics),
Luke Villermin (mechanical engineering),
Mary Voisin (civil engineering) and
Austin Ward (chemical engineering).
“These outstanding juniors and seniors perform well academically, but their efforts do not stop there,” College Director of Enrollment Management and Employer Relations, Allie De Leo said. “These students are very involved around campus, within our College, and in the community. We, as a College, are very proud of these outstanding students and their accomplishments.”

The 2017 Outstanding Faculty are Dr. Arden Moore (assistant professor of mechanical engineering and nano-systems engineering) and Dr. Timothy Reeves (lecturer of mechanical engineering).
13 2017-04-25
Monroe

Louisiana Tech Division of Nursing earns state award for best undergraduate program


Louisiana Tech University’s Division of Nursing has been tabbed as the state’s top undergraduate degree program.

The award was presented during the 16th Annual Nightingale Awards Gala honoring excellence in nursing, held on April 1 at the at L’Auberge Hotel in Baton Rouge. Sponsored by the Louisiana Nurses Foundation and Louisiana State Nurses Association (LSNA), the gala saw Louisiana Tech’s Division of Nursing honored as the Nursing School of the Year for Undergraduate Degree Programs.

The award winner was determined by a panel of judges composed of nursing leaders from nine states. Nominations addressed the program’s commitment to selecting, retaining and educating future nurses, innovation in nursing education, National Council Licensure Examination first-time pass rates for the past two years, and faculty and student involvement in their professional organizations.

“It is such an honor to receive this recognition at the state level,” said Donna Hood, director of Louisiana Tech’s Division of Nursing. “I am so proud of the excellent work of our faculty and students who go above and beyond what is required. This ongoing effort in retention, innovation and involvement prepares excellent nurses who are making a difference in healthcare throughout our region and even around the world.”

Louisiana Tech’s Division of Nursing was represented by Hood; Nancy Darland, professor; Norlyn Hyde, instructor and also LSNA President; and current student Caleb Faul, President of Louisiana Association of Student Nurses.

Darland was the recipient of the award for Outstanding Community Achievement by a Registered Nurse.

“Nancy Darland does a phenomenal job taking her passion for nursing care of women and children and linking it with needs across the state,” Hood said. “Whether it is through her work with March of Dimes promoting healthy babies or through support of St. Jude's work addressing childhood cancer, Mrs. Darland is a true champion. She continues to devote additional time and effort in her work with professional nursing organizations and sets an amazing example for our students.”

Louisiana Tech nursing alum Deborah Spann, RN-BC, CEN Tri-Regional Coordinator for Louisiana Emergency Response Network, received the award for Registered Nurse of the Year at the gala.

“For a Louisiana Tech nursing alum to be selected as the Registered Nurse of the Year out of 33,000-plus registered nurses in the state of Louisiana is so exciting,” Hood said. “Deb Spann is an excellent example of the caliber of nurses who graduate from our program. She demonstrates excellence as a lifelong learner and is a passionate nurse leader. Her amazing work with emergency nurses across the state impacts the care of us all.”
13 2017-04-20
Ruston

TECH ASCE TEAMS WIN BIG AT DEEP SOUTH CONFERENCE


The Louisiana Tech University American Society of Civil Engineers Steel Bridge and Concrete Canoe teams won first and second place, respectively, at the 2017 ASCE Deep South Conference held recently in Memphis, Tennessee.

Competing against 10 other teams from universities around the region, the Steel Bridge team won first place in the “Display,” “Weight” and “Efficiency” categories, third place in the “Speed,” “Stiffness” and “Economy” categories, and first place overall.

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13 2017-04-18
Ruston

› home › TECH DIVISION OF NURSING EARNS STATE AWARD FOR BEST PROGRAM


Louisiana Tech University’s Division of Nursing has been tabbed as the state’s top undergraduate degree program.

The award was presented during the 16th Annual Nightingale Awards Gala honoring excellence in nursing, held earlier this month at the at L’Auberge Hotel in Baton Rouge.

Sponsored by the Louisiana Nurses Foundation and Louisiana State Nurses Association, the gala saw Louisiana Tech’s Division of Nursing honored as the Nursing School of the Year for Undergraduate Degree Programs.

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13 2017-04-17
Monroe

Louisiana Tech College of Engineering and Science holds Commitment Day 2017


Louisiana Tech University’s College of Engineering and Science (COES) held its inaugural Commitment Day signing event Tuesday, with more than 170 top-tier high school students from across the south committing to pursue their academic careers in engineering and science at Louisiana Tech.

Applicants who achieved qualifying scores on the ACT and their families were invited to attend a luncheon event where they could meet with Louisiana Tech faculty and leaders including President Les Guice, COES Dean Hisham Hegab and COES Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies Heath Tims.

“It was thrilling to see all of the new engineering and science commitments on campus, and getting engaged with our faculty and staff,” Guice said. “I commend Dean Hegab and Dr. Tims for their leadership in developing this program to celebrate those new students who are committed to come to Tech.”

During the event, the invited students and their families received Louisiana Tech memorabilia and signed certificates of commitment. They were also treated to a performance by the members of the Louisiana Tech Band of Pride who are currently pursuing engineering and science degrees. After the Commitment Day luncheon, some of the students took placement exams.

“It was a fun event,” Tims said. “It served as an opportunity for these students to formally share their commitment to being a part of our program. It was also an exciting time for the staff and faculty at Louisiana Tech to see some of the best and brightest that this region has to offer sign with us.”

“We are very excited to host this new event to celebrate with outstanding students that will be joining our programs in engineering and science this fall,” Hegab added. “The turnout was tremendous, and it was great to welcome them into the Tech Family.”
13 2017-04-13
Ruston

LA Tech's elementary education program ranks fourth in the country


Louisiana Tech University’s elementary education program ranks fourth in the nation and first in the state, according to College Choice. College of Education Dean, Dr. Don Schillinger says Tech students complete a full year of student teaching. He says their students are placed in schools in August and stay with a teaching mentor until graduation day.

“So they basically have a full year of teaching before graduation, and we’re seeing that be a pretty positive impact on teacher effectiveness and student test scores and student achievement,” Schillinger said.

Schillinger says they are proud of this ranking and if they are able to produce better teachers it will have a lasting impression on elementary education in this state.

“I think we’re going to see that we can retain them longer and increase the prestige of the teaching profession as we add rigor, and as our student achievement goes up, we’re starting to see the result of that,” Schillinger said.

Schillinger is hopeful this ranking will attract more students, even from other states, to LA Tech. He says they’re also trying to recruit future teachers from rural areas and get them to return home, rather than staying in larger urban areas.

“We’re thinking that might be the lever for change, the initiative, the catalyst that maybe starts changing and improving schools in our rural areas that maybe don’t get the support they need,” Schillinger said.



13 2017-04-11
Baton Rouge

LA Tech, Holtz Agree to Contract Extension


RUSTON - Louisiana Tech University and head football coach Skip Holtz have agreed in principle to a five-year, $3.5 million contract extension, according to Director of Athletics Tommy McClelland.

The new long-term contract extension is pending the approval from the University of Louisiana System's Board of Supervisors.

Holtz has elevated the Bulldog football program to new heights in the Football Bowl Subdivision with multiple appearances in the Conference USA title game and three straight bowl victories. Tech is one of only four FBS teams to record 9 or more wins and a bowl game victory for three straight seasons, joining reigning national champion Clemson, Wisconsin and Utah.

"The level of excitement for Louisiana Tech football is at an all-time high," said McClelland. "Getting a new contract done was critical to maintaining this momentum as we strive to reach even newer heights on the field. Skip Holtz is at the center of this movement. He and his staff have done such a tremendous job over the past four years, and we look forward to what the future holds."

Since his arrival on campus four years ago, Holtz has compiled an overall mark of 31-22 while leading the Bulldogs to three straight 9-win seasons and three consecutive bowl victories, both program firsts since Tech moved to the Football Bowl Subdivision in 1989. Tech has won 19 of its last 24 Conference USA games over the last three years, tied with WKU for the best mark in the league during that time frame.

"Skip's impact on and contributions to our football program have been exceptional," said Tech President Les Guice. "His leadership and mentorship of our student-athletes, and the class with which he has represented our university is a source of pride for all of our fans and friends. I am excited to know that he and his family will remain a part of the Tech Family for years to come."









This past year, Holtz earned Conference USA Coach of the Year honors after guiding the Bulldogs to a 9-5 overall record, a Conference USA West Division title and a 45-42 victory over No. 25 Navy in the Lockheed Armed Forces Bowl in Ft. Worth. It marked Tech's first win over a Top 25 team since the 2005 season.

"I want to thank Dr. Guice and Tommy McClelland for their commitment to me and their confidence in our staff and what we are building at Louisiana Tech," said Holtz. "I am excited to get the deal done and know that I will be a part of the Louisiana Tech family and this program moving forward. I think this agreement displays the University's commitment to us and is a stamp of approval for the way we are building this academically, athletically and socially. The Ruston community and the Louisiana Tech fan base have been tremendous in their support of my family, our staff and this program."

In 2015, Holtz led the Bulldogs to an 8-4 overall record and 6-2 mark in Conference USA, as the Bulldogs defeated Arkansas State in the R&L Carriers New Orleans Bowl.

Holtz led LA Tech to its first ever appearance in the Conference USA title game in 2014 after Tech posted a 9-5 record and won the West Division. Tech posted a five-win improvement from the previous season and defeated Illinois 35-18 in the Zaxby's Heart of Dallas Bowl at Cotton Bowl Stadium. Tech ranked fourth nationally in scoring offense and led the country in points off of turnovers.

For complete coverage of Bulldog Football, please follow Louisiana Tech on social media at @LATechFB (Twitter), /LATechFootball (Facebook) and @LATechFB (Instagram) or visit the official home of Louisiana Tech Athletics at LATechSports.com.
13 2017-04-10
Monroe

Louisiana Tech professional aviation celebrates 50 years with AVFEST 2017


RUSTON, La. (Press Release) – Louisiana Tech University’s Department of Professional Aviation is celebrating its 50th anniversary with its annual Aviation Festival (AVFEST) weekend for aviation students, staff, faculty, alumni and friends.

AVFEST 2017 will take place April 28-29 on the Louisiana Tech campus and will begin with an alumni reception hosted by Louisiana Tech President Les Guice and a jambalaya cook-off social at the Argent Pavilion. Weekend activities continue with an alumni “State of the Aviation Industry” presentation, hamburger lunch at the Ruston Regional Airport, and various other events and committee meetings.

“The Professional Aviation Department continues to receive a tremendous amount of positive feedback and support from alumni, students and their families,” said Jordan Lyons, the Louis W. Waller Endowed Professor and head of the professional aviation department at Louisiana Tech. “The annual weekend tradition will continue to serve a valuable role in maintaining the family bond within this collegiate aviation group.”


AVFEST 2017 will conclude with a formal scholarship banquet in the Davison Athletics Complex. The awards presented at the banquet include academic scholarships and recognition of the Professional Aviation and Aviation Management Student of the Year, Flight Instructor of the Year and several others.

The public is cordially invited to take part in this exciting celebration of professional aviation at Louisiana Tech. For more information on AVFEST or to purchase tickets for the Awards Banquet, visit www.latech.edu/aviation. Tickets are $35 each and must be purchased by April 20. All proceeds go to supporting the professional aviation program and its students.

Louisiana Tech’s Department of Professional Aviation has established itself as a high-quality degree program with a national reputation for outstanding graduates. The Department is a member of the University Aviation Association and is accredited by the Aviation Accreditation Board International. It maintains the highest academic standards and keeps abreast of the latest in technologies and the needs of the aviation industry.


13 2017-04-10
Ruston

LOUISIANA TECH SCHOOL OF DESIGN PROVES ‘HOPE FLOATS’


Groundbreaking ceremonies will be held at 4 p.m, Monday for the Pisces Bridge for the Medcamps of Louisiana at Camp Alabama in in Sibley.

The facility is located at 2090 Hwy. 145.

The bridge project is a partnership between Medcamps of Louisiana and the Louisiana Tech School of Design.

For several years, students in Louisiana Tech’s School of Design’s Architecture 335 class have collaborated with various organizations in Lincoln Parish to design and build structures ranging from homes for Habitat for Humanity to park pavilions around Ruston.


13 2017-04-07
Monroe

Louisiana Tech professional aviation celebrates 50 years with AVFEST 2017


Louisiana Tech University’s Department of Professional Aviation is celebrating its 50th anniversary with its annual Aviation Festival (AVFEST) weekend for aviation students, staff, faculty, alumni and friends.

AVFEST 2017 will take place April 28-29 on the Louisiana Tech campus and will begin with an alumni reception hosted by Louisiana Tech President Les Guice and a jambalaya cook-off social at the Argent Pavilion. Weekend activities continue with an alumni “State of the Aviation Industry” presentation, hamburger lunch at the Ruston Regional Airport, and various other events and committee meetings.

“The Professional Aviation Department continues to receive a tremendous amount of positive feedback and support from alumni, students and their families,” said Jordan Lyons, the Louis W. Waller Endowed Professor and head of the professional aviation department at Louisiana Tech. “The annual weekend tradition will continue to serve a valuable role in maintaining the family bond within this collegiate aviation group.”

AVFEST 2017 will conclude with a formal scholarship banquet in the Davison Athletics Complex. The awards presented at the banquet include academic scholarships and recognition of the Professional Aviation and Aviation Management Student of the Year, Flight Instructor of the Year and several others.

The public is cordially invited to take part in this exciting celebration of professional aviation at Louisiana Tech. For more information on AVFEST or to purchase tickets for the Awards Banquet, visit www.latech.edu/aviation. Tickets are $35 each and must be purchased by April 20. All proceeds go to supporting the professional aviation program and its students.

Louisiana Tech’s Department of Professional Aviation has established itself as a high-quality degree program with a national reputation for outstanding graduates. The Department is a member of the University Aviation Association and is accredited by the Aviation Accreditation Board International. It maintains the highest academic standards and keeps abreast of the latest in technologies and the needs of the aviation industry.
13 2017-04-07
Monroe

Tech hosts national teacher training conference


More than 200 education trainers from around the United States and Canada came to Louisiana Tech University this week for the National Field Experience Conference.

Higher education leaders learn how to tailor teacher candidate's experience as student teachers to best serve the candidates and the communities, said Teresa Washut Heck, one of the program presenters.

Training new teachers: Clinical residency aims to change teacher training in Louisiana | Schools adopt teacher training program | La. Tech showcases innovative clinical residency program

Heck helped develop the St. Cloud State University Co-Teaching Model, which is used to train new teachers throughout the nation. This was her first time attending the conference, and she said she learned a lot from other participants because they're all in the field, learning how to adapt to their communities and meet increasingly difficult accreditation standards while universities are working with fewer employees.

Libby Knepper-Muller designed the program for the event. She said it's all about interactive collaboration.

Teresa Heck gives a prestionation on the St. Cloud
Teresa Heck gives a prestionation on the St. Cloud State University Co-Teaching Model on Tuesday at the National Field Experience Conference pre-conference. (Photo: Courtesy of Amy Massey Vessel)
Amy Massey Vessel, director of the Clinical Residency Center, said the TEAM model used by Louisiana Tech was highlighted as part of the conference. Vessel said the clinical residency plan at Tech incorporates elements of the St. Cloud model. It puts student teachers in the classroom for a full year.

Presenters from Sallie Humble Elementary in Monroe included mentor Shannon Embanat, and Louisiana Tech Sallie Humble Clinical residents, Adriane Meggs, April Palmer and Kerrigan Pettis. Vessel said Embanat shared stories about seeing results in her student firsthand the benefits of having a resident in her room all year.

Educators from accross the country met at Louisinana
Educators from accross the country met at Louisinana Tech University this week for the National Field Experience Conference. (Photo: Courtesy of Amy Massey Vessel)
Heck, who led several workshops, said Louisiana residents should be proud of what the education program at Tech is accomplishing.

Follow Bonnie Bolden on Twitter @Bonnie_Bolden_ and on Facebook at http://on.fb.me/1RtsEEP.
13 2017-04-07
Ruston

TECH CONCLUDES RESEARCH LECTURE SERIES WITH NEUROLOGIST


John Huguenard, professor of neurology and neurological sciences at Stanford University and member of Stanford’s Center for Mind, Brain and Computation, will visit Louisiana Tech University on Monday for the final installment of the 2016-17 New Frontiers in Biomedical Research lecture series.

Huguenard will discuss his research in a presentation, titled “Real Time Control of Seizures in Animal Models of Epilepsy,” at 3:30 p.m. Monday in the auditorium of University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus. The presentation is free and open to the public.

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13 2017-04-04
Ruston

JOHNNY JAM BENEFITS TECH MUSIC


The 18th annual John Simoneaux Memorial Jam will start at 2 p.m. Saturday at Sundown Tavern. The annual event hosts local and regional musicians to benefit the Louisiana Tech University Band of Pride. Pictured is the local band J.T. and Dan playing at last year’s Johnny Jam.
13 2017-03-31
Shreveport

Louisiana Tech classes cancelled due to power outage


Ruston, La. - A power outage that covers the campus of Louisiana Tech has forced classes to be canceled. University officials say power to basic housing and food services are currently being restored. However, classes and academic activities on the main campus have been canceled today but will resume Friday.

13 2017-03-30
Monroe

Community Coffee chairman kicks off College of Business series at Louisiana Tech


Matt Saurage will be featured speaker for 2nd Annual “Inside the C-Suite Series”

The College of Business at Louisiana Tech University welcomes Matt Saurage, chairman of the board for Community Coffee, who will kick-off the 2nd Annual “Inside the C-Suite: A Series of Critical Conversations with CEOs, CIOs, CFOs and Key Executives,” at 6 p.m. April 12 in the Davis Auditorium (COBB 101) of the College of Business.

“The Series strives to stimulate insightful conversation on current business issues by providing a platform for C-level executives to discuss the issues that keep them awake at night,” said Dr. Christopher Martin, dean of the College of Business at Louisiana Tech. “It is particularly exciting to me that all of the leaders who participate in this series are our alumni”.

The conversations in the Inside the C-Suite Series cut across a variety of themes critical to business strategy including globalization, innovation, ethics and technology. Along with Saurage, future speakers will include:

India Carroll, chief executive officer for Green Clinic (April 19, 6-7 p.m.),
Robert LaCaze, executive vice president for Bayer Pharmaceuticals (April 27, 4-5 p.m.), and
John Madden, vice president and owner of Madden Contracting Company, Inc. (May 2, 4-5 p.m.)
The Inside the C-Suite Series presentations take place in the Davis Auditorium (COBB 101) of the College of Business and are open to Louisiana Tech University students, faculty and the general public.

Through market-driven academic programs and impactful scholarship and teaching, the College of Business at Louisiana Tech produces business and academic leaders who are innovative, entrepreneurial, analytical and technologically skilled for a competitive global marketplace.

For more information on the Inside the C-Suite Series, please contact Mary Susan Britt, director of development for the College of Business, at marysusan@latechalumni.org or 318-257-3741.

For information on Louisiana Tech’s College of Business, please visit www.business.latech.edu or connect on Facebook at www.facebook.com/LATechBusiness, Twitter at @LATechBUSN and Instagram at @LATechBusiness.
13 2017-03-29
Monroe

Louisiana Tech to honor high school students, educator for computing accomplishments


The College of Engineering and Science at Louisiana Tech University will recognize 10 high school students and one teacher at its 5th Annual National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) awards breakfast on April 1 in the Ropp Center on the Louisiana Tech campus.

The award recognizes high school women for their computing-related achievements and interests. Recipients are selected for their computing and IT aptitude, leadership ability, academic history and plans for post-secondary education. NCWIT Recognitions Program Director Ammi Ludwick will be in attendance to take part in the presentation of the NCWIT’s Awards for Aspirations in Computing.

Ludwick works closely with the managers of the NCWIT AspireIT K-12 Outreach Program, the NCWIT Collegiate Award and NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Community to increase the depth of the technology talent pool and supports the affiliate teams as they continue to broaden the reach of NCWIT’s message with the Aspirations and Educator Award.

NCWIT seeks to increase women’s participation in technology careers by providing encouragement, visibility, community, leadership opportunities, scholarships and internships to aspiring and technically-inclined young women.

The Award for Aspirations in Computing offers both national and local affiliate competitions to generate support and visibility for women’s participation in communities nationwide. In addition to identifying a pool of talented young women, the Aspirations in Computing Award also identifies outstanding educators who play a vital role in encouraging young women to continue their interest in computing and technology.

In addition to honoring students, the NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Educator Award recognizes educators for their efforts to promote gender equity in computing.

For more information, contact Charlotte Wilkerson at charlott@latech.edu.
13 2017-03-28
Monroe

Louisiana Tech grows innovative TEAM clinical residency model in Caddo Parish


RUSTON, La. – Students and faculty from Louisiana Tech University’s College of Education recently visited several elementary and secondary school sites in Caddo Parish to advance the model for their highly successful and innovative TEAM (Teacher Educators and Mentors) clinical residency program.

The team from Louisiana Tech accepted an invitation from the Caddo Parish School System to tour more than half a dozen schools across the region and learn about the unique aspects of the campuses, meet school leaders and observe a variety of grade levels implementing best teaching practices.

One of the first stops in Caddo Parish for the TEAM administrators was Shreve Island Elementary School where Principal Glenn Colvin and his student ambassador team provided an insightful tour of the school.

“There is no more valuable training for a teacher than what they will receive in the real world classroom under the guidance of an experienced teacher,” said Colvin. “These candidates are going to be so much more prepared for the classroom because of the TEAM programs new approach to teacher preparation.”


The TEAM program is a research-based model designed by Dr. Amy Vessel and Dr. Dawn Basinger from Louisiana Tech’s College of Education, and represents a transformative redefinition of the expectations and roles of teacher educators and school mentors in the clinical experiences. It features the St. Cloud Co-Teaching Model, a TEAM evaluation system, university and district liaisons, edTPA national assessments, on-going professional development for mentors, and a collaborative university/district partnership in the development of future teachers.

“The key to the TEAM model schools continues to be clear communication and mutual respect between the university and the school district,” said Vessel. “We are delighted to work with the leadership of Caddo Parish and look forward to growing rich partnerships with each of their schools.

“Our ultimate goal is to increase quality teachers for our students throughout Louisiana as well as achieve higher retention rates of those that choose this admirable profession.”

In 2014, Louisiana Tech was the only teacher preparation program in north Louisiana to initiate the full-year clinical residency program replacing traditional student teaching. Through the 2016-2017 school year, 100 percent of elementary candidates have participated in the 3rd year of full-year clinical residencies.

Northwood High School Principal Darlene Simons said she has seen an increase in teacher candidates from Louisiana Tech over the past few years. “Our teachers and staff are excited about the transition to the TEAM model as it will allow for an even greater experience for our newest teachers.”

Vessel, who is the director of professional and clinical experiences for Louisiana Tech’s College of Education, said it’s a logical decision for the partnerships to grow into northwest Louisiana parishes as many of the teacher candidates are from there.

“We want to prepare teacher candidates at Louisiana Tech through our outstanding content and methodology coursework and support them throughout their clinical residency program closer to home,” said Vessel.

“I am very excited to have the opportunity to partner with a high-quality university like Louisiana Tech to address the serious teacher shortage issue in our school system,” said Dr. Lamar Goree, superintendent of Caddo Parish Schools. “We’re excited to be able to couple practical experiences with the theoretical practices to create wonderful teachers for our children.”

Louisiana Tech expects future TEAM Model Clinical Residency Schools in Caddo Parish to include Booker T. Washington New Technology High School, Midway Professional Development School, Mooretown Professional Development School, Northwood High School, Shreve Island Elementary School, Southwood High School, Walnut Hill Elementary/Middle School, and Youree Drive Middle Advanced Placement Magnet School.
13 2017-03-27
Monroe

Louisiana Tech, BPCC sign agreement to create pathway to CIS degree


RUSTON, La. – Louisiana Tech University and Bossier Parish Community College (BPCC) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding that creates a pathway for students at BPCC who have completed their associate’s degree in business and are looking to pursue a bachelor’s degree at Louisiana Tech.

Louisiana Tech President Les Guice was joined by BPCC Chancellor Rick Bateman, Jr. Thursday on the Tech campus to officially sign the agreement which ensures that each institution serves the needs of students by providing them with appropriate and accurate transfer and advising information.

The Pathway Articulation Agreement developed by the two institutions enables BPCC students who have earned an Associate of Applied Science in Business Administration to gain admission to the four-year Computer Information Systems (CIS) program in Louisiana Tech’s College of Business.

“Partnerships with higher education institutions like BPCC are critical to creating opportunities for our students to continue their studies and to position themselves to be competitive and productive in their career fields,” said Guice. “These agreements are also of great benefit to our industry partners who are coming to north Louisiana to find talented professionals who can contribute to the growth of their companies from day one.”


“We are always pleased when our partnerships build new bridges to four-year institutions, assist our students in moving on toward advanced degrees and advance our role in the talent development pipeline for a critical industry sector in our regional economy,” said Bateman.

As both institutions are committed to seamless transfer so students may successfully complete their academic goals, the new partnership enhances access for students across north Louisiana to a bachelor’s degree program with the outstanding faculty and resources of Louisiana Tech, and provides excellent credentials for entry-level employment and career advancement.

“We're thrilled to see Louisiana's institutions of higher learning adapt their curriculum to the needs of our industry,” said CSRA President and CEO Larry Prior. “This is another positive example of Bossier Parish Community College and Louisiana Tech working together to identify and develop the skills needed for their students’ careers. CSRA has become a part of the Bossier community and we're happy to support this progress.”

For more information on Louisiana Tech’s CIS program, visit http://www.business.latech.edu/cis.
13 2017-03-24
Monroe

Louisiana Tech, BPCC sign agreement to create pathway to CIS degree


Louisiana Tech University and Bossier Parish Community College (BPCC) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding that creates a pathway for students at BPCC who have competed their associate’s degree in business and are looking to pursue a bachelor’s degree at Louisiana Tech.

Louisiana Tech President Les Guice was joined by BPCC Chancellor Rick Bateman, Jr. Thursday on the Tech campus to officially sign the agreement which ensures that each institution serves the needs of students by providing them with appropriate and accurate transfer and advising information.

The Pathway Articulation Agreement developed by the two institutions enables BPCC students who have earned an Associate of Applied Science in Business Administration to gain admission to the four-year Computer Information Systems (CIS) program in Louisiana Tech’s College of Business.

“Partnerships with higher education institutions like BPCC are critical to creating opportunities for our students to continue their studies and to position themselves to be competitive and productive in their career fields,” said Guice. “These agreements are also of great benefit to our industry partners who are coming to north Louisiana to find talented professionals who can contribute to the growth of their companies from day one.”

“We are always pleased when our partnerships build new bridges to four-year institutions, assist our students in moving on toward advanced degrees and advance our role in the talent development pipeline for a critical industry sector in our regional economy,” said Bateman.

As both institutions are committed to seamless transfer so students may successfully complete their academic goals, the new partnership enhances access for students across north Louisiana to a bachelor’s degree program with the outstanding faculty and resources of Louisiana Tech, and provides excellent credentials for entry-level employment and career advancement.

“We're thrilled to see Louisiana's institutions of higher learning adapt their curriculum to the needs of our industry,” said CSRA President and CEO Larry Prior. “This is another positive example of Bossier Parish Community College and Louisiana Tech working together to identify and develop the skills needed for their students’ careers. CSRA has become a part of the Bossier community and we're happy to support this progress.”

For more information on Louisiana Tech’s CIS program, visit http://www.business.latech.edu/cis.
13 2017-03-22
Monroe

Percussion Festival returns to Louisiana Tech with marimba artist Kevin Bobo


The fifth North Louisiana Youth Percussion Ensemble (NLYPE) Festival will return to Louisiana Tech University’s Howard Auditorium March 24-25.

The event was created in part to provide a performance platform for high school percussionists. “Much like school bands and orchestras attend festivals to gain exposure to classic works in the repertoire, this event was designed to similarly encourage an appreciation for the percussion ensemble genre,” said Gregory Lyons, host and an associate professor of music at Tech. Another benefit comes in allowing students to engage with and learn from their peers in a supportive, non-competitive environment.

Each previous NLYPE Festival has featured a world-class guest artist, and this year is no exception. Appearing for the first time at Louisiana Tech will be marimba composer and performer, Kevin Bobo. Bobo is professor of percussion at Indiana University. He has performed on five continents and nearly 40 states in the U.S. He has also authored two method books and composed numerous pieces for a variety of instruments and ensembles.

The festival begins with an open rehearsal coached by Professor Bobo from 3-5 p.m. Friday from in Howard Auditorium. Then at 7:30 p.m., Bobo will take the stage for the opening festival concert.

On Saturday starting at 8 a.m., spectators will be treated to performances by Ruston High School Intermediate and Advanced Percussion Ensembles, followed by the Neville High School Percussion Ensemble and concluding with the Jena High School Percussion Ensemble.

Next on the schedule is a marimba clinic with Professor Bobo at 10 a.m., followed by percussion related door prizes. Capping off the weekend is the closing festival concert Saturday at noon featuring the Louisiana Tech University Percussion Ensemble and the Honors Youth Percussion Ensemble, a select group comprised of students from each participating high school for this occasion only.

Admission to the Friday rehearsal and the Saturday morning high school performances is free. Admission to the opening and closing festival concerts as well as the marimba clinic is $5 adults/$3 students. All events are free for Tech faculty, staff and students with valid ID. For more information, contact Dr. Lyons at glyons@latech.edu or (318) 257-5470.

MORE NEWS: Audit: $22K in student funds missing from school​
13 2017-03-21
Monroe

Louisiana Tech welcomes medical illustrator as part of research lecture series


Natalie Doolittle, director of medical animation at High Impact, Inc., will visit Louisiana Tech University on March 27 for a presentation titled, “Biomedical Visualization: Art Influencing Science and Medicine,” as part of the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research lecture series.

Doolittle’s lecture will take place at 3:30 p.m. in University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus. The event is free and members of the campus and local communities are cordially invited to attend.

As a medical illustrator, animator and art director, Doolittle specializes in creating engaging visuals to communicate scientific content with clarity. She earned her master’s degree in biomedical visualization from University of Illinois at Chicago in 2013, and went on to become a medical animator for a genetics research lab at the Centre for Molecular Medicines and Therapeutics in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Doolittle currently leads a team of 3-D artists as the director of medical animation at High Impact, where she manages the content and production of animations and 3-D illustrations for litigation, pharmaceutical and medical device companies.

“Ms. Doolittle’s medical illustrations and animations are masterfully crafted,” said Nick Bustamante, associate professor of art in Louisiana Tech’s School of Design. “Her work beautifully brings scientific concepts and medical research to life. This will be a great opportunity for our students to meet a top professional in the field of medical illustration and animation.”

In addition to her role at High Impact, Doolittle also serves as a member of the external advisory board for VISTA (Visual Integration of Science Through Art) at Louisiana Tech and its developing concentration in pre-medical illustration that will be offered to students in biology, biomedical engineering, and art beginning in fall 2017. Her visit is being hosted in partnership with Louisiana Tech’s School of Design and Bustamante, and is supported through the Medical Illustration Foundation at Louisiana Tech with funds raised through the Digital Art Exhibit and Auction.

As an interdisciplinary lecture series that focuses on advancements in the fields of biomedical engineering, biology, physics and chemistry, the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminar program strives to promote an understanding of human health and disease by interacting with leaders in these research fields. The series also seeks to expose students to growing areas of research and to enhance Louisiana Tech’s own impacts in biomedical research.

This year, the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research series expands into a critical area beyond the research bench to explore related career paths and the responsibility of research and education.

Developed by Dr. Jamie Newman, assistant professor in Louisiana Tech’s School of Biological Sciences, and jointly organized by Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research series has brought many internationally known research leaders to Louisiana Tech and is now in its fourth year.

For more information on the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research series and access to recordings of all of the lectures, please visit our website: http://biomedicalresearch.wixsite.com/new-frontiers or contact Dr. Jamie Newman at jjnewman@latech.edu or Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore at mcmoore@latech.edu.
13 2017-03-15
Shreveport

Louisiana Tech to host small business, research funding workshop


Louisiana Tech University will assist small businesses throughout the region in learning more about how federal agencies award funding for research at the 2017 Regional R&D Workshop, March 22 at the Louisiana Tech Shreveport Center.

The workshop, offered by Louisiana Tech and the Technology Transfer Office, will take place from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Louisiana Tech Shreveport Center at 8028 Shreve Park Drive in Shreveport, and will focus on training attendees to take advantage of the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer programs.

SBIR and STTR are programs that require certain federal agencies to reserve a portion of their research and development (R&D) budget for small businesses. The goal is to use federal R&D funding to help increase private-sector commercialization of innovations while still meeting federal research needs. Small businesses can utilize these funds to support their proof of concept and prototype development, thereby preserving their own limited funds for other R&D or commercialization activities.

Jim Greenwood, a nationally recognized SBIR/STTR consultant, will conduct the training and will offer strategies on submitting a winning proposal, as well as insight on topics such as university/industry collaborations, commercializing technology, and cost accounting. Attendees will receive valuable information about funds that can help strengthen their SBIR/STTR proposals.

Registration is $25 if paid by March 18 and $30 on-site. The first 35 who pay and attend will be eligible to receive a free SBIR/STTR proposal review by Greenwood Consulting Group. Advanced registration is required. The registration fee also covers refreshments, lunch, and a program workbook.

To register, go online to https://shreveportsbirsttrmarch222017.eventbrite.com.
13 2017-03-03
Monroe

Prominent engineer, professor to visit Louisiana Tech as part of research lecture series


Dr. Lijie Grace Zhang, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, and biomedical engineering and medicine at George Washington University, will visit Louisiana Tech University on March 13 as part of the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research lecture series.

Zhang’s presentation titled, “Integrating 3-D Bioprinting and Nanomaterials for Complex Tissue Regeneration,” will take place at 3:30 p.m. in University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus. The event is free and members of the campus and local community are cordially invited to attend.

Zhang and her lab at George Washington apply a range of interdisciplinary technologies and approaches in nanotechnology, stem cells, tissue engineering, biomaterials and drug delivery for various biomedical applications. Specifically, her lab is interested in designing nanostructured scaffolds tissue regeneration, studying the influence of environment on directing stem cell differentiation and developing sustained drug release systems for the treatment of cancer.

Zhang has earned a number of awards including the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Sia Nemat-Nasser Early Career Award, Young Innovator in Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering Award, and the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award. She also has an impressive publication record and a history of mentoring students and postdocs.

Most recently, Zhang published a book titled, “3-D Bioprinting and Nanotechnology in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine,” with co-authors, Drs. John Fisher and Kam Long, and was a featured speaker at the 2016 Experimental Biology meeting. She earned her Ph.D. from Brown University and completed a postdoc at Harvard Medical School before joining the faculty at George Washington.

Developed by Dr. Jamie Newman, assistant professor in Louisiana Tech’s School of Biological Sciences, and jointly organized by Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research series has brought many internationally known research leaders to Louisiana Tech and is now in its fourth year. The series focuses on biomedical research with the intent of demonstrating the broad and interdisciplinary nature of this field of research.

Zhang’s presentation is sponsored by sponsored by Louisiana Tech’s College of Applied and Natural Science and the School of Biological Sciences.

All 2016-2017 New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminars are free and open to the public. Seminars begin at 3:30 p.m. at University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus and are recorded for future viewing.

For more information on the series, a schedule of speakers, and to view recordings of the seminars, visit the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research website at http://biomedicalresearch.wix.com/new-frontiers or contact Dr. Jamie Newman at jjnewman@latech.edu.
13 2017-03-01
Monroe

Ruston mayor encourages Louisiana Tech graduates to ‘be bold, be brave and believe’


Saturday, March 25 served as commencement for Louisiana Tech University’s 326 winter quarter graduates, and Ronny Walker, mayor of Ruston, served as the event’s keynote speaker.

Walker focused on three words to emphasize to the graduates: bold, believe and brave.

“I want to encourage you to be bold,” Walker said. “Bold in your work. Bold in your goals and ambitions. Bold with your dreams… Being bold is one reason you are graduating from a nationally recognized university today. It was a bold move by then President Dan Reneau and his staff, one of which is our president today, Dr. Les Guice, who took this university to selective admissions. A move that many thought would hurt this university, but look at us now.”

Walker also encouraged graduates to believe in themselves and others.

“We hear this a lot but I think this is the key to success in so many ways. Have the confidence to move forward,” he said. “Believe in the great education you have received at Louisiana Tech University. This wonderful faculty and staff have prepared you for your future so go out and use that education to change the world in your own way.”

Lastly, Walker told the graduates they have the tools to succeed in this world – they just need to be brave.

“You are ready to face whatever this world has for you,” he said.

New Louisiana Tech graduate Laura Laughlin majored in family and child studies and will return to her alma mater as a graduate counseling student.

“I'm so blessed to be able to graduate from this university,” Laughlin said. “Louisiana Tech has made such a positive impact on my life.”

She also had advice for current students on the same path she recently was.

“I would advise current students to be working on their communication skills,” she said. “They are so necessary in every part of life. If you can hold an intelligent, flowing conversation with people, you can get very far.”

In addition to celebrating the new graduates, the Louisiana Tech Alumni Association inducted Caroline Reaves, a 1985 economics graduate and the CEO of Mortgage Contracting Services, into its Hall of Distinguished Alumni. Brooks Hull, vice president for advancement, presented Reaves with the Tower Medallion officially making her the 78th member of the Hall. Established in 1976, the Hall of Distinguished Alumni honors those alumni of the university who have distinguished themselves by exceptional achievement, community service and humanitarian activity.

Upon graduating from Tech in 1985, Reaves moved to Oklahoma City where she began her professional career at Friendly Bank in the Commercial Loan Department. She went on to be a paralegal at Sun Belt Federal Savings and Loan, followed by a position at McAfee & Taft. In 2007, Reeves was offered a position as COO of Mortgage Contracting Services (MCS) and was promoted to CEO in 2009.

Under Reaves leadership, MCS has grown from 40 employees in one office to over 800 employees in multiple offices across the nation. In 2013, MCS made the decision to bring all jobs onshore and chose Ruston as home for MCS’ third office. The Ruston office currently has 150 employees and growing. Under Reaves’ leadership, the company’s revenues have grown over 300 percent.

Commencement officially ends winter quarter at Louisiana Tech. Spring classes begin Wednesday, March 8.
13 2017-02-27
Ruston

Ruston mayor serves as keynote speaker at LA Tech commencement


RUSTON, La. (KNOE) - Saturday, March 25 served as commencement for Louisiana Tech University’s 326 winter quarter graduates, and Ronny Walker, mayor of Ruston, served as the event’s keynote speaker.

Walker focused on three words to emphasize to the graduates: bold, believe and brave.

“I want to encourage you to be bold,” Walker said. “Bold in your work. Bold in your goals and ambitions. Bold with your dreams… Being bold is one reason you are graduating from a nationally recognized university today. It was a bold move by then President Dan Reneau and his staff, one of which is our president today, Dr. Les Guice, who took this university to selective admissions. A move that many thought would hurt this university, but look at us now.”

Walker also encouraged graduates to believe in themselves and others.

“We hear this a lot but I think this is the key to success in so many ways. Have the confidence to move forward,” he said. “Believe in the great education you have received at Louisiana Tech University. This wonderful faculty and staff have prepared you for your future so go out and use that education to change the world in your own way.”


Lastly, Walker told the graduates they have the tools to succeed in this world – they just need to be brave.

“You are ready to face whatever this world has for you,” he said.

New Louisiana Tech graduate Laura Laughlin majored in family and child studies and will return to her alma mater as a graduate counseling student.

“I'm so blessed to be able to graduate from this university,” Laughlin said. “Louisiana Tech has made such a positive impact on my life.”

She also had advice for current students on the same path she recently was.

“I would advise current students to be working on their communication skills,” she said. “They are so necessary in every part of life. If you can hold an intelligent, flowing conversation with people, you can get very far.”

In addition to celebrating the new graduates, the Louisiana Tech Alumni Association inducted Caroline Reeves, a 1985 economics graduate and the CEO of Mortgage Contracting Services, into its Hall of Distinguished Alumni. Brooks Hull, vice president for advancement, presented Reeves with the Tower Medallion officially making her the 78th member of the Hall. Established in 1976, the Hall of Distinguished Alumni honors those alumni of the university who have distinguished themselves by exceptional achievement, community service and humanitarian activity.

Upon graduating from Tech in 1985, Reeves moved to Oklahoma City where she began her professional career at Friendly Bank in the Commercial Loan Department. She went on to be a paralegal at Sun Belt Federal Savings and Loan, followed by a position at McAfee & Taft. In 2007, Reeves was offered a position as COO of Mortgage Contracting Services (MCS) and was promoted to CEO in 2009.

Under Reeves leadership, MCS has grown from 40 employees in one office to over 800 employees in multiple offices across the nation. In 2013, MCS made the decision to bring all jobs onshore and chose Ruston as home for MCS’ third office. The Ruston office currently has 150 employees and growing. Under Reeves’ leadership, the company’s revenues have grown over 300 percent.

Commencement officially ends winter quarter at Louisiana Tech. Spring classes begin Wednesday, March 8.

Courtesy: Louisiana Tech University
13 2017-02-27
Ruston

Louisiana Tech students, professor win first place in Shell Eco-Car team competition


RUSTON, La. – Four students and one faculty advisor from Louisiana Tech University’s Eco-Car team have won first place in the “Best Overall Team” category at a new event called “Hack-a-Truck,” sponsored by Shell Oil Company last weekend at Google’s headquarters in Palo Alto, California.

Eight universities from across the country were invited to the event, and paired off into four teams tasked with designing the “food truck of the future.” Louisiana Tech students Matthew McHenry (electrical engineering), Matthew LaCroix (computer science), Kyle Dupree (mechanical engineering) and Tommy Naquin (mechanical engineering), along with faculty advisor Dr. Michael Swanbom, worked with students and advisors from the University of Illinois on a superhero-themed food truck that claimed the honor for the best overall team at this element of Shell’s #MakeTheFuture initiative.

“I could not be more pleased with the creativity, innovation, drive and cooperation that I saw from this team during this 42-hour brain-blitz,” said Swanbom. “The Louisiana Tech Eco-Car team will be participating in the Shell Eco-marathon event for the tenth consecutive year this spring.”


The Louisiana Tech-University of Illinois team was tasked with designing a food truck that optimized the customer experience while integrating several emerging technologies focused primarily on energy harvesting and conservation. Design tasks included choosing a menu, picking out appropriate appliances, laying out the food preparation process to maximize the rate of production and the development of an enticing theme.

“Louisiana Tech has had a lot of success competing and winning with our undergraduate programs in regional and national events,” Dr. Heath Tims, associate dean for undergraduate studies at the College of Engineering and Science and Eco-Car team faculty advisor, added. “We are proud of the way these students represented our program, and are already looking forward to sending a team next year.”

In addition to the group winning best overall team, most creative design, best story and best food honors, Shell will commission a food truck based on the Louisiana Tech-University of Illinois team design and, following its use at the Shell Eco-Marathon event in Detroit, Mich. in late April, the food truck will be donated to a low-income community.
13 2017-02-27
Ruston

Tech holds winter commencement


Saturday served as commencement for Louisiana Tech University’s 326 winter quarter graduates, and Ronny Walker, mayor of Ruston, served as the event’s keynote speaker.

Walker focused on three words to emphasize to the graduates: bold, believe and brave.

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13 2017-02-24
Ruston

PROFESSOR RECEIVES STATE PROFESSIONALISM AWARD


Norman Pumphrey, associate professor of civil engineering and program chair of construction engineering technology at Louisiana Tech University, has received the 2017 Professional Engineer Faculty Professionalism Award from the Louisiana Engineering Foundation.

The award, which seeks to recognize faculty who encourage their colleagues and who benefit their students and the profession with the promotion of professionalism within their universities, was presented to Pumphrey at the 21st Joint Engineering Societies Conference held recently in Lafayette.

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13 2017-02-22
Monroe

Medical illustration exhibit, auction at Louisiana Tech to showcase student works


Interdisciplinary course brings together art, science to create digital illustrations

Faculty from Louisiana Tech University’s School of Design, School of Biological Sciences and Biomedical Engineering program will showcase the digital art of their students at the 2nd Annual Student Digital Painting Art Exhibit and Auction, March 10 at the F.J. Taylor Visual Art Center Gallery on the campus of Louisiana Tech.

The exhibit will open at 6:30 p.m. and feature the digital illustrations of 18 talented Louisiana Tech students in their ART 320: Digital Painting course. An auction of the artwork will follow at 7:00 p.m. with proceeds going to building a program in pre-medical illustration and supporting the students involved. Tickets to the event are $10 and can be purchased at Louisiana Tech’s Marbury Alumni Center or at the door.

Last year’s event raised close to $4,000 that was used to support promotion of the program, tablets for use in the digital painting class and an on-campus visit by Natalie Doolittle, director of animation for High Impact.

The Student Digital Painting Art Exhibit and Auction will feature the final project of the students in the ART 320 class, which was a medical illustration designed for the cover of the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research Seminar Series brochure cover. The class is focusing on four thematic topics in biology and medicine: Biology’s Central Dogma, The Brain, The Cardiovascular System, and Drug Delivery. Newman and Caldorera-Moore are the co-organizers of the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research lecture series that has grown into one of Louisiana Tech’s premier interdisciplinary programs.

The winning cover design will be announced at the event and will be one of four pieces auctioned off to raise money for the further development of an academic curriculum in pre-medical illustration.

Nicholas Bustamante, associate professor of art, created this class after collaborating with Dr. Jamie Newman, assistant professor of biological sciences, and Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, to create images, scientific manuscripts and publications. Together, the three professors found a need for other collaborations between the arts and sciences as a way to communicate complex ideas.

As a result of their partnership, Bustamante, Newman and Caldorera-Moore established VISTA (Visual Integration of Science Through Art), a program designed to offer a new interdisciplinary curriculum for students who have an interest in both art and science. The VISTA program will prepare students for application to graduate school in medical illustration and will offer a unique educational experience for students with a passion for art.
13 2017-02-16
Monroe

Louisiana Tech civil engineering students earn scholarships from DOTD


RUSTON, La. – Ten Louisiana Tech University students majoring in civil engineering have each earned $1,000 scholarship awards from the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development.

Cameron Broussard, Cody Abshire, Hunter Calhoon, Lane Brister, Matthew Upshaw, Ryan Barton, Stetson Keen, Taylor Cappe, Tyler Bridges and Victor Seth Bivens were selected from a highly-accomplished pool of applicants from across the state. They received the scholarship awards from DOTD Secretary Shawn D. Wilson at a ceremony held at the DOTD headquarters in Baton Rouge.

The scholarships are funded by the Southeastern Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Louisiana DOTD, and the Louisiana Transportation Research Center, and are awarded to juniors and seniors in civil engineering programs across the state. Students are selected by transportation officials from the DOTD as well as representatives from universities throughout Louisiana.

Dr. Nazimuddin “Wasi” Wasiuddin, associate professor of civil engineering and construction engineering technology and advisor of the Transportation Leadership Council at Louisiana Tech, says that the scholarships illustrate that Louisiana Tech Civil Engineering students are well prepared for the industry after graduation.


“Louisiana DOTD puts special emphasis on summer internship, co-op, and industry experiences in the transportation area when awarding these competitive scholarships,” said Wasiuddin. “The involvement of students in transportation-related activities here at Louisiana Tech also plays a key role in scholarship decisions. The Transportation Leadership Council, a student group at Louisiana Tech, which is organized under our American Society of Civil Engineers student chapter, hosted a number of outside speakers and participated in activities to build student leaders in the transportation industry.

“The success of our students in securing these scholarships reflects their readiness to serve the State and the transportation industry, and we are thankful to Louisiana DOTD, SASHTO and LTRC for their support.”

Dr. David Hall, director of the civil engineering and construction engineering technology programs at Louisiana Tech and associate director of the Southern Plains Transportation Center, says that scholarships such as those offered by the DOTD help students leverage their time for educational activities.

“Scholarship funds reduce financial stress for students, providing a financial boost that allows them to focus more on their studies and involvement in campus life,” Hall said. “We have worked to expand student exposure to the transportation industry through the TLC, and I am thrilled that our students have the academic background, work experience, and campus activities needed to successfully compete for these scholarships.”

The Louisiana Tech applicants’ internship experience and interests in the transportation field, along with their outstanding grade point averages, earned them the awards.
13 2017-02-14
Monroe

Louisiana Tech Concert Association set to raise curtain on ‘Romeo and Juliet’


RUSTON, La. – The Louisiana Tech Concert Association welcomes the American Shakespeare Center’s 2016-2017 Hungry Hearts Tour for their production of William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” at 7:30 p.m. February 21 in the Howard Center for the Performing Arts.

With its ravishing language and uproarious comedy, “Romeo and Juliet” celebrates love's triumph and trivialities. Verona's walls embrace the volatility of youth as well as the wisdom and restraint that often escape young and old alike. Thumb-biting dance and swordplay share the stage with sonnets, bawdy wit and soul-searching speeches in this profoundly human and always surprising treasure.

Ticket prices for the show are $25 for general admission, $10 for students with a valid ID, $20 for youth under the age of 14 and $20 for seniors age 65 and up. For group rates or to purchase tickets, contact the Box Office at (318) 257-3942. The Box Office is located in the lobby of Stone Theatre. Its hours are from 1:30-4:45 p.m. Monday through Friday. Online sales for adult only tickets can be purchased at www.latechuniversitytheatre.com.


The American Shakespeare Center brings a unique performance style to the Howard Center for the Performing Arts, blending the bard’s stage craft with modern sensibility. The company uses Shakespeare’s staging conditions, including universal lighting, minimal sets, doubling, cross-gender casting and music. In Shakespeare’s day, the company couldn’t turn the lights out on the audience; actors and audience shared the same light. The Hungry Hearts Tour leaves the lights on for a type of audience contact rarely seen in modern day theater. Audience members share directly in the action onstage as they become citizens of Verona.

Since 1988, the American Shakespeare Center has toured the country with shows incorporating Shakespeare’s staging conditions. Based out of Staunton, Virginia, the company mission is to recover the joys and accessibility of Shakespeare’s theatre, language, and humanity by exploring the English Renaissance stage and its practices through performance and education.

For more information on the Louisiana Tech Concert Association or the upcoming production of “Romeo and Juliet,” please call (318) 257-3942 or visit www.latechuniversitytheatre.com.
13 2017-02-10
Monroe

Ruston mayor to serve as keynote speaker at Louisiana Tech’s winter commencement


Ronny Walker, mayor of the City of Ruston, will serve as the keynote speaker for Louisiana Tech University’s winter commencement exercises at 10 a.m. February 25 at the Thomas Assembly Center.

Walker has been deeply involved in the economic growth and civic well-being of Ruston and Lincoln Parish, both prior to and during his term as mayor, and has long been an advocate of and supporter for Louisiana Tech. After graduation from Flora High School, Walker earned his bachelor’s degree in education from Mississippi State University and his master’s degree from the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. After graduation, Walker served at Temple Baptist Church in Ruston from 1981 to 1989.

It was around this time that Walker’s interest in business and the economic future of our community began to grow. For more than two decades, Walker has devoted himself to building a better future for Lincoln Parish, Louisiana Tech, and the City of Ruston. He has held positions at the Ruston State Bank, Community Trust Bank, Louisiana Tech, and First National Bank in Ruston.

Walker has applied his skills, knowledge and energy to assisting the community and its people. He has served as president on the boards of the Ruston-Lincoln Chamber of Commerce, Lady Techsters Tip-Off Club, Louisiana Tech Quarterback Club, Lincoln Parish GIS Commission, Louisiana Peach Festival and ARCO. Walker has also served on the Lincoln Parish Police Jury, Lincoln Parish Library, H.E.L.P. Agency, Ruston-Lincoln Industrial Development Committee, and the Louisiana Tech Alumni Board.

In November 2014, Ruston voters put their trust in the leadership strengths of Walker by electing him as their mayor. One of the first calls he made after taking office in January 2015 was to Louisiana Tech President Les Guice, to discuss how to partner with the university to further benefit the community and people of Ruston. The City of Ruston and Louisiana Tech have continued to work together to provide Ruston and Lincoln Parish with new opportunities for business, education and community growth.

Following Walker’s commencement address, the graduates from each of Louisiana Tech’s five academic colleges and the Graduate School will receive diplomas as well as their Tenet Medallions inscribed with the 12 Tenets of Tech and their year of graduation. The Tenets of Tech are guiding principles and personal characteristics that students and graduates are expected to embrace and uphold during and after their time at Louisiana Tech.

Winter commencement officially marks the end of the winter quarter at Louisiana Tech. Spring quarter classes are scheduled to begin on March 8.
13 2017-02-09
Monroe

Louisiana Tech faculty, student elected to lead national biomedical engineering society


RUSTON, La. (KNOE 8 News) – Two Louisiana Tech University biomedical engineering faculty members and one student have been appointed to leadership roles within the Alpha Eta Mu Beta National Biomedical Engineering Honor Society – an organization founded nearly 30 years ago by Louisiana Tech President Emeritus Dr. Daniel D. Reneau.

Dr. Teresa Murray, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Louisiana Tech, was reelected to a second two-year term as president of AHMB (formerly known as AEMB). Prior to her appointment as president, Murray served in numerous other posts including as a member of the Board of Directors, interim national treasurer, national student president and national student vice president.

Under Murray’s guidance, AHMB has established the annual Student Ethics Workshop, which is sponsored by AHMB and held at the Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting each year. She also established a series of Student Public Policy Sessions relating to topics of high importance to the field. One of these sessions was developed to discuss the implications of the patent law change from “first-to-invent” to “first-to-file” on the field of biomedical engineering.


Dr. Bryant Hollins, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, was reelected to a six-year term on the Board of Directors after previously serving a two-year term. As an undergraduate student at Louisiana Tech, Hollins was the university’s AHMB chapter president and served in leadership roles in other organizations including the Louisiana Tech chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers.

Shyanthony Synigal, a senior biomedical engineering student at Louisiana Tech, who was inducted into AHMB as a junior, was elected as the AHMB national student treasurer. Synigal will help to make financial decisions for the organization in addition to serving on a national committee to increase AHMB’s presence at international BME conferences.

AHMB was founded in 1979 by Reneau, who was a pioneer in biomedical engineering education, as an honor society to recognize and encourage excellence in the field of biomedical engineering and bioengineering. Since its inception, AHMB has grown to over 45 chapters nationwide and is actively seeking to establish chapters at universities in other countries. The AHMB seeks to bring elected students and faculty into closer union in order to promote an understanding of the biomedical engineering profession.

“It’s amazing to see just how far Alpha Eta Mu Beta has come and what an outstanding membership it has attracted over the years,” said Reneau in a 2012 interview. “There’s nothing more rewarding for me than to be able to pass along my vision and experiences in biomedical engineering to those who will become its future leaders.

“From a trailblazer in the 1970s to a nationally recognized leader today, I’m proud of the reputation that Louisiana Tech has built in the field of biomedical engineering.”

Reneau established the biomedical engineering program at Louisiana Tech in 1972. It was one of the first of its kind in the United States and only the fifth undergraduate program in the nation to become accredited.

Over the years, other Louisiana Tech faculty have made significant academic and leadership contributions to AHMB. Dr. Paul Hale, professor emeritus of biomedical engineering, and Dr. Stan Napper, currently the vice president for research and development at Louisiana Tech, served in leadership roles in the growing honor society. Hale, who served as the AHMB national president for six years (1992-1998), was later instrumental in reinstating the organization’s IRS non-profit status. He remains the point of contact for this important role.

At the local level, Dr. Steven Jones, program chair and associate professor of biomedical engineering, has served as the Louisiana Tech chapter faculty advisor for several years. He also organizes the department honors banquet each year, which is where new AHMB members are inducted.

Under the leadership of this year’s chapter president Timothy “Noah” Hutson, the chapter is initiating a new program that focuses on tutoring younger biomedical engineering students at Louisiana Tech to foster a passion and commitment to the field. Seven students were inducted into the society this year, including two graduate students and five undergraduates.
13 2017-02-07
Ruston

Director of A.E. Phillips Lab School at Louisiana Tech elected to national post


Joanne Hood, director of A. E. Phillips Laboratory School at Louisiana Tech University, has been elected to serve as the State of Louisiana’s representative with the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP).

The NAESP, founded in 1921, is a professional organization serving elementary and middle school principals throughout the United States, Canada and overseas. Hood was elected to the NAESP post by the Board of Directors of the Louisiana Association of Principals (LAP), a local affiliate for NAESP. Both organizations advocate for the support of principals and their desire to achieve the highest results for children, families and communities.

“I am honored to have been a part of the Louisiana Association of Principals for the past ten years,” said Hood. “It has been so rewarding to serve on the Board of Directors and work with school leaders all across the state. I am humbled to have been selected to serve in this new capacity and am looking forward to being an advocate for all Louisiana administrators.”

As the state representative, Hood will participate in the NAESP’s annual convention, national leaders’ conference and will maintain an active role on the LAP executive board. As the liaison between the two agencies, she will also ensure that information provided by the NAESP is disseminated to LAP members.

Hood has been a member of the executive board of LAP since 2006 and served as the organization's president from 2012 to 2014. This is her 28th year in education and 16th year as a school administrator. Hood said her desire is to create a lasting foundation for learning, drive school and student performance, and to shape the long-term impact of school improvement efforts to align with the NAESP’s vision.

“Following this year’s recognition by multiple, national and state organizations regarding the excellence in education occurring at A. E. Phillips, it seems very appropriate that Hood would be recognized as a national leader in her profession,” said Don Schillinger, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Education. “I am very proud of her and the accomplishments of the outstanding faculty, staff, and students she guides and directs.”

Known for its strong academic focus and innovative teaching strategies as well as its emphasis on the arts, A.E. Phillips Laboratory School at Louisiana Tech is a K-8 school that serves as a model for the use of research-based instructional practices as well as the integration of technology in the classroom. Additionally, it offers a site for Louisiana Tech education majors to observe and practice effective teaching strategies in a supportive environment.
13 2017-02-07
Ruston

Director of A.E. Phillips Lab School at Louisiana Tech elected to national post


Joanne Hood, director of A. E. Phillips Laboratory School at Louisiana Tech University, has been elected to serve as the State of Louisiana’s representative with the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP).

The NAESP, founded in 1921, is a professional organization serving elementary and middle school principals throughout the United States, Canada and overseas. Hood was elected to the NAESP post by the Board of Directors of the Louisiana Association of Principals (LAP), a local affiliate for NAESP. Both organizations advocate for the support of principals and their desire to achieve the highest results for children, families and communities.

“I am honored to have been a part of the Louisiana Association of Principals for the past ten years,” said Hood. “It has been so rewarding to serve on the Board of Directors and work with school leaders all across the state. I am humbled to have been selected to serve in this new capacity and am looking forward to being an advocate for all Louisiana administrators.”

As the state representative, Hood will participate in the NAESP’s annual convention, national leaders’ conference and will maintain an active role on the LAP executive board. As the liaison between the two agencies, she will also ensure that information provided by the NAESP is disseminated to LAP members.

Hood has been a member of the executive board of LAP since 2006 and served as the organization's president from 2012 to 2014. This is her 28th year in education and 16th year as a school administrator. Hood said her desire is to create a lasting foundation for learning, drive school and student performance, and to shape the long-term impact of school improvement efforts to align with the NAESP’s vision.

“Following this year’s recognition by multiple, national and state organizations regarding the excellence in education occurring at A. E. Phillips, it seems very appropriate that Hood would be recognized as a national leader in her profession,” said Don Schillinger, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Education. “I am very proud of her and the accomplishments of the outstanding faculty, staff, and students she guides and directs.”

Known for its strong academic focus and innovative teaching strategies as well as its emphasis on the arts, A.E. Phillips Laboratory School at Louisiana Tech is a K-8 school that serves as a model for the use of research-based instructional practices as well as the integration of technology in the classroom. Additionally, it offers a site for Louisiana Tech education majors to observe and practice effective teaching strategies in a supportive environment.
13 2017-02-03
Monroe

La. Tech lecturer named 2016 Visionary Educator of the Year


Jeffrey A. Pike, senior lecturer of civil engineering and construction engineering technology at Louisiana Tech University, has been named the Vantage Health Plan 2016 Visionary Educator of the Year.


The honor is awarded to outstanding faculty and staff members who have shown a strong commitment to the field of education through hard work and dedication to the field. Billy Justice, director of marketing and sales for Vantage Health Plan, presented Pike with the award before a crowd of thousands at the Thomas Assembly Center during halftime of the Bulldog’s basketball game against Rice University.


“It was a pleasant surprise and an honor to be recognized in this way,” Pike said of the award. “I get great satisfaction from being an educator at Louisiana Tech because it's such a great place to invest in our future.”


Pike has exhibited leadership and service at Louisiana Tech since becoming a full-time faculty member in 2009. He is a member of the Louisiana Professional Engineering and Land Surveying Board and serves as chair of the Louisiana Engineering Society and Monroe Chapter of the Professional Engineers in Education Committee. He was also awarded the 2016 F. Jay Taylor Undergraduate Teaching Award at Louisiana Tech’s spring quarter commencement ceremony last spring.


Pike earned his bachelor’s degree in engineering from the United States Military Academy at West Point, and his master’s degree in engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. He went on to teach at the United States Military Academy in its Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering from 1995 to 1998, and Department of Chemistry and Life Sciences from 2001 to 2003. Pike was also the Professor of Military Science at Stephen F. Austin State University from 2003 to 2007.


Pike served as an active duty infantryman in the United States Army for more than 22 years and earned the rank of Lieutenant Colonel before retiring from the armed services in 2007. He has earned professional engineering licenses in Virginia, Texas and Louisiana, and is an active professional engineer in Louisiana.


13 2017-02-02
Ruston

Louisiana Tech’s New Frontiers lecture series to host renowned cancer researcher


RUSTON, La. – (KNOE 8 News) Dr. Philip Salem, president of Salem Oncology Centre in Houston Texas, will visit Louisiana Tech University on February 6 as a featured speaker of the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research lecture series.

Salem’s presentation titled “Lessons I Have Learned from Cancer Research and Treatment,” will take place at 3:30 p.m. in University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus. The event is free and open to the public, and is sponsored by the Lincoln Health Foundation.

Salem, who is a physician, researcher, educator and international expert in cancer medicine, is a renowned pioneer in the field of cancer biology. In addition to his role as president of Salem Oncology Centre, he is also director emeritus of cancer research at Baylor-St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital in Houston. Salem was one of the first researchers to demonstrate that a chronic infection in the intestine may eventually lead to the development of cancer. His work on intestinal cancer, known as Immunoproliferative Small Intestinal Disease (IPSID), and the relationship between infection and the development of intestinal cancer has become a classic in modern medicine.


“We are tremendously honored to have Dr. Salem on our campus,” said Louisiana Tech University President Les Guice. “I know that our faculty and students will be inspired by his presentation of his research findings. I’d like to offer special thanks to our faculty for organizing this lecture series which we are finding to be most impactful on our campus and in our community.”

Salem has been honored with many awards for his contributions to the cancer research and has been invited to serve on the editorial boards of several prestigious cancer research journals. His research on IPSID was recognized by the Nobel Prize Committee as the gateway for research on H. pylori in the stomach, and its causal relationship to peptic ulcer and stomach cancer, which won the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine in 2005. In the early 1990s, Salem served on a healthcare advisory committee to the White House and, in 1994, received the Republican Senatorial Medal of Freedom. In 1998, he was awarded the Ellis Island Medal of Honor for his “exceptional humanitarian efforts and outstanding contributions to American science”. Salem was honored in 2006 as “Scientist of the Year” by the National Italian Foundation for the Promotion of Science and Culture, and was decorated in a special ceremony held in Rome, Italy.

As an interdisciplinary lecture series that focuses on advancements in the fields of biomedical engineering, biology, physics and chemistry, the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminar program at Louisiana Tech strives to promote an understanding of human health and disease by interacting with leaders in these research fields. The series also seeks to expose students to growing areas of research and to enhance Louisiana Tech’s own impacts in biomedical research.

All New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminars are free and open to the public. Seminars begin at 3:30 p.m. at University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus and are recorded for future viewing.

For more information on the series, a schedule of speakers, and to view recordings of the seminars, visit the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research website at http://biomedicalresearch.wix.com/new-frontiers or contact Dr. Jamie Newman at jjnewman@latech.edu or Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore at mcmoore@latech.edu.
13 2017-02-01
Monroe

Statement from LA Tech President Les Guice re: Executive Order on Immigration


RUSTON, La. - Dr. Les Guice, President of Louisiana Tech University, releases statement on executive order on immigration:


The Louisiana Tech campus is home to a unique community of people who use their cultural and life experiences to educate and enrich those around them. From the classrooms and labs to the campus grounds to the residence halls, our university is a place where everyone should feel safe enough to share ideas so that together, we can build a better tomorrow for all. In working and living together, Louisiana Tech essentially becomes a “hometown” to students from every corner of the globe.


As a result of the President’s recent executive order on immigration, many of our international students are facing uncertainties and restrictions in their ability to travel to Louisiana Tech to begin or continue their studies. In light of this situation, I want all our international students, especially those from nations identified in the executive order, to know that Louisiana Tech is united and unwavering in its commitment to them, and will do everything possible to support them during this time of uncertainty. Our international students are an important part of what makes our university special and successful, and they need to know that we will speak in a strong and singular voice on their behalf.


Please keep these students and their families in your thoughts and prayers, and let them know that you support them as valued members of the Louisiana Tech family. Let them know that the Louisiana Tech campus is a place they can call home and that you will be an advocate for them. We will continue to monitor the situation and will provide updates as we learn additional information.


Dr. Les Guice
President
Louisiana Tech University


13 2017-02-01
Monroe

TECH DOES WELL AT HEALTH CONFERENCE


The Louisiana Tech University Department of Kinesiology and the Lincoln Parish School were system represented well at the Society for Health and Physical Education America Southern District conference taking home several awards and making presentations.

Department professors recognized were YuChun Chen for the Louisiana Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance Ethnic Minority Award; C. Smiley Reeves as the LAHPERD College and University Health Professional of the Year; and Dakota Hill as the Outstanding Major Award recipient.


13 2017-01-31
Monroe

LA Tech Exchange Students Impacted by Travel Ban Exchange Students Worried About Trumps Travel Ban


Louisiana tech has more than a dozen foreign exchange students who will be affected. This ban could prevent students from coming to Louisiana for School in the Spring.


Courtesy KNOE

Many foreign exchange Students felt sad when they heard the news Friday. Donald Trump is placing a 90 day travel ban on international travel between Iran, Iraq, Syria, Sudan, Libya, Yeman, and Somalia.

"I planned to go back to my country to see my mother but I cannot anymore," Said Maryam Sayyahmanesh, who is from Iran.

Amirhosein Foulad also hoped to go home this summer but fears if he does he cant get back into America due to visa issues.

"I was thinking to go home this Summer but right now it's impossible for us to go home and back here."

The news was also hard for Dan Erickson, who's the Director for the International Student office. He says he already recruited six students from those Countries and now they cant come.

"It gives off the perception that international students aren't wanted," He Said.


But these students say the opportunity to study in America was great for them."United States has best Universities and i wanted to make a good future."

But with this travel ban it's putting them in a tough spot. Either go home or stay here for the opportunity.

"I don't know what i should do. I have to chose between going home or staying here to study."

A tough choice many will have to make over the next few months. In Ruston Dylan Robichaud KNOE 8 News


13 2017-01-30
Ruston

LOUISIANA DELTA COMMUNITY COLLEGE, TECH FORMALIZE PARTNERSHIP


Better together” applies to many ventures and it is certainly true when considering higher education institutions and their abilities to serve students, employers, and the region.

Louisiana Delta Community College and Louisiana Tech University formalized their commitment to ensure students have pathways from one institution to the other.

The agreement address cross enrollment for developmental courses in mathematics and English and is a strong movement toward greater partnership between the two institutions.


13 2017-01-27
Shreveport

BPCC and La. Tech forge new partnership


Bossier Parish Community College and Louisiana Tech University signed a memorandum of understanding today allowing qualified BPCC employees who wish to enroll at Louisiana Tech University to receive reduced tuition benefits.

“We are so grateful to be able to offer our faculty and staff this opportunity to further their education with such an outstanding leader in higher education,” said BPCC Chancellor Dr. Rick Bateman Jr. “Not only will our employees benefit from world-class instruction at a tier one research university… they will do so at a reduced cost.”

Under the agreement, full-time faculty and staff at BPCC will be allowed to enroll at Louisiana Tech University for undergraduate or graduate courses at a reduced rate plus certain applicable fees.

BPCC named award finalist for second consecutive year
"Louisiana Tech and BPCC have a shared commitment to producing graduates with the skill sets to compete in today's global economy,” said Louisiana Tech President Dr. Les Guice. “Providing BPCC personnel with an opportunity to strengthen their educational credentials will benefit the region and the State. We are honored to partner with BPCC in this new way."

Full-time BPCC employees must be a degree-seeking student at Louisiana Tech. They will be able to register for up to six hours per quarter at a reduced rate of $25 per credit hour, not to exceed $75 for any three credit hour undergraduate course and for up to six hours per quarter at a reduced rate of $50, not to exceed $150 for any three credit hour graduate course.


13 2017-01-26
Monroe

LDCC, Louisiana Tech formalize partnership


“Better together” applies to many ventures, and it is true when considering higher education institutions and their abilities to serve students, employers and the region.

Louisiana Delta Community College and Louisiana Tech University formalized their commitment to ensure students have pathways from one institution to the other. The agreement addresses cross enrollment for developmental courses in mathematics and English and is a strong movement toward greater partnership between the two institutions.

“Transitions should be seamless,” said Dennis Epps, acting chancellor for LDCC. “This agreement ensures that each institution serves the needs of students by providing them with appropriate and accurate transfer and advising information.”

Les Guice, president of Louisiana Tech and Epps signed the Memorandum of Understanding Tuesday on the campus of Louisiana Tech. This provides a richer experience with more options for students desiring to ultimately attend Tech.

“We are proud to partner with Tech and look forward to all of the great opportunities we can provide for our students,” Epps said.


13 2017-01-26
Monroe

Small fire closes Tech bookstore


The Louisiana Tech University bookstore is closed Wednesday while employees clean up after a small fire.

Dave Guerin, director of marketing and public relations for the university, said the cooling pump on a drink cooler caught fire around 11:30 p.m. Wednesday. A student was walking by and alerted campus police, who quickly put out the flames.

There were no injuries and no damage to the structure, Guerin said. There was some smoke damage.

The bookstore is closed Thursday, and basic supplies, such as test books, are being sold in front of the bookstore.

Follow Bonnie Bolden on Twitter @Bonnie_Bolden_ and on Facebook at http://on.fb.me/1RtsEEP.


13 2017-01-25
Ruston

TECH SCHOOL OF ART TO HOST JURIED EXHIBITION


At 6 p.m. Thursday, Louisiana Tech University will open the Louisiana Biennial — the School of Design’s fourth national juried exhibition in the F. Jay Taylor Visual Arts Center on Tech campus.

This is a multi-media show for two and three-dimensional works, as well as video and installation works exploring any theme, said Nicole Duet, assistant professor of drawing and painting at Tech.


13 2017-01-24
Ruston

TECH’S COLLEGE OF BUSINESS INTRODUCES HYBRID PROGRAM


For many business professionals, the opportunity to return to college to obtain a master’s degree is hindered by work schedules.

But with the introduction of Louisiana Tech College of Business’s hybrid program, employees will be able to earn a degree while maintaining their current jobs.

Doug Amyx, the interim associate dean of graduate programs, said the hybrid program, which will be offered in the spring, is a combination of live and online classes for computer information specialists.
13 2017-01-23
Baton Rouge

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13 2017-01-23
Monroe

LA Tech students post political signs, campus police respond to conflict Trump sign controversy at LA Tech


RUSTON, La. (KNOE 8 News) - Several strong feelings being expressed today across the country, and here locally at Louisiana Tech, for Donald Trump's inauguration as the 45th president of the United States.

Courtesy: Nick Smith
Courtesy: Nick Smith

Early Friday morning, students posted a large sign on a brick wall outside the student center on campus, which says, "Trump may be president, but hope, equality, peace, opportunity, justice and love still trumps hate".

"It shows that we are not apathetic. It shows we actually want to have these hard discussions, be forward and unite," Nick Smith, a senior political science major, said.

Smith is one of several students who posted the sign. He says it was meant to start conversations, but instead, it started controversy with other students, one of which posted a sign in response which read,"Make America Great Again". It's a move Caressa Winkler says wasn't needed.

"It wasn't against Trump, it was to bring an inclusion of everyone," Winkler said.

Students say once campus police arrived, the conflict was resolved quickly, but the signs were taken down.


13 2017-01-18
Regional/National

My Residency Experience: Paying it Forward


As a second-year 5th grade English Language Arts and Social Studies teacher at Cypress Springs Elementary in Ruston, Louisiana, I know I owe much of my current classroom success to Louisiana's Believe and Prepare program for providing the support and yearlong residency training that prepared me to be the teacher I am today.

I entered the residency program in the summer of 2014 as a "pioneer" of the program. I was a single mom with a two-year-old son, and I was apprehensive because I knew the amount of time and dedication it would require. The decision to participate in the program has been one of the best of my college career.

Over the course of the yearlong residency, the mentor teachers, my fellow residents, and I became a team who grew together. The residency program gave me the full-immersion experience that I needed to be successful. Through co-teaching with my mentor teacher, I learned how to establish classroom procedures. I experienced the first day of school and the last and all that comes between: field trips, holidays, award ceremonies, class parties. I learned professionalism, planning, instruction, and assessment, and I improved my ability to collaborate with my students' families and my colleagues.

Before I even graduated, I had multiple job offers and over 1,000 clinical hours. I was so prepared that it felt great to be in my own classroom. Being hired at my residency school provided a smooth transition into my teaching career with the same support system of mentors surrounding me. As a first year teacher, I scored highly effective on my teaching evaluation.

I am grateful that Lincoln Parish and Louisiana Tech University chose to invest in me.

I am grateful that Louisiana's Board of Elementary and Secondary Education has ensured that all future teachers will have an experience like mine beginning fall 2018.

And, most importantly, I am grateful to have the opportunity to pay the investment forward to my students--Louisiana's future--and in the coming years thousands of Louisiana's new teachers will be able to as well.

Shavonda Washington

Teacher, Cypress Springs Elementary

Lincoln Parish, Louisiana


13 2017-01-12
Monroe

The Ragin’ Cajuns Athletic Foundation (RCAF), the official fundraising arm of University of Louisiana at Lafayette's Ragin’ Cajuns Athletics, announce


WEST MONROE, La.

Our friends from Louisiana Tech's IDEA Place and SciTec Center demonstrate fun science experiments that kids can do at home!

Watch the video to see what you can do at home to get your own results.

At the IDEA Place, the mission is to awaken the excitement of learning by doing in both children and adults.

Central to the IDEA Place philosophy is the belief that real objects, direct experiences, and enjoyment promote learning.

Children, their families, and their teachers are given the opportunity to study and investigate the wonders of the world around them through the interactive exploration of scientific phenomena.

These experiences, along with more formal learning approaches, will stimulate curiosity, motivate further exploration, and increase appreciation and understanding in the area of science and mathematics.

Approved by the Louisiana Board of Regents in 1991, The IDEA Place opened its doors to children across North Louisiana on April 23, 1994.

Since then, tens-of-thousands of children from across North Louisiana, Southern Arkansas, and beyond have found a new approach to learning in the IDEA Place.

You can find more information online at https://www.facebook.com/TheIDEAPlace or by calling 318-257-2866.


13 2017-01-12
Monroe

Louisiana Tech geographer earns prestigious national honor


Louisiana Tech University associate professor of geography Dr. Taylor E. Mack is the latest recipient of a rarely awarded distinction conferred by the Conference of Latin Americanist Geographers (CLAG).

The CLAG Outstanding Service Award, a highly-prestigious honor which has only been awarded five times since 1970, is given to a member of the association who has earned distinction and performed major service to the organization over a period of years. CLAG is the premier national organization of geography professionals specializing in the study of Latin America.

Mack received the honor during a public event at the organization’s general conference held in New Orleans earlier this month.


Among Mack’s many services to the organization cited by the CLAG selection committee was membership on the CLAG Board of Directors from 2003 to 2015, including terms as vice-chair and chair. He also served for almost 10 years as editor of the CLAG newsletter, during which time he achieved conversion of the publication to a new format for digital distribution.

Committees Mack has served on include juries for graduate student paper competitions, travel awards and summer field work awards. He has also conducted professional field trips to Guatemala for academic geographers in Chichicastenango and Guatemala City, and has chaired the organizing effort for the CLAG general conference held in Granada, Nicaragua in January 2009.

A member of the Louisiana Tech faculty since 2006, Mack holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree in geography from the University of Kansas, and Ph.D. from Louisiana State University. He is a specialist in historical geography and his research interests include port cities and transportation systems in general, with an emphasis on Central America.

Mack’s current projects focus on interoceanic transit projects in Honduras and Nicaragua and agricultural change in north Louisiana since 1950.

At Louisiana Tech, Mack teaches a wide variety of geography courses and he also serves as a member of the Honors Program faculty.

13 2017-01-12
Regional/National

Pierry Inc. Opens Innovation Hub at Louisiana Tech University


REDWOOD CITY, Calif., Jan. 12, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Pierry, an industry-leading marketing software and solutions company, today announced it has opened an office in Ruston, Louisiana, on the campus of Louisiana Tech University. The office, which is expected to employ a mix of students and full time employees, will serve as an innovation hub for the Company and the University, implementing state-of-the art digital software solutions for a variety of clients in the region and throughout the United States.


"Pierry is extremely pleased to open this office at my alma-mater, Louisiana Tech, as it provides us with on-the-ground implementation resources, establishes a foothold in the Southeastern region of the US, and gives us a first-look at some of the amazing talent coming out of the University," said Ben Lee, Chief Marketing Officer of Pierry (LA Tech '04). "Our LA Tech outpost is also an opportunity to bring a bit of Silicon Valley to North Louisiana, giving the students an opportunity to get real-world experience in the rapidly growing field of digital marketing, and get a taste of what working with a start-up tech company is like."

Named the 538th fastest growing company by Inc. Magazine in their 2016 "Inc. 5000" list, and #6 Fastest Growing Company in the San Francisco Bay Area by the San Francisco Business Times, Pierry – which began as a team of 2 people in the emerging digital marketing space in 2008 – now has employees in offices throughout the United States and in Japan, and serves a wide range of clients, from start-ups to multi-billion dollar global brands. Pierry coined the term MaaS (Marketing as a Service) to describe the unique way it helps its clients design, develop and execute marketing solutions that dramatically improve efficiency and impact, and increase ROI.

"The partnership between Louisiana Tech University and Pierry Inc. brings together two innovative and entrepreneurial organizations. It's great to see Ben Lee, a Tech grad, reaching back to his alma mater to connect Ruston and Silicon Valley," said Dr. Dave Norris, Chief Innovation Officer, Louisiana Tech University. "We are excited about what a leading-edge company like Pierry can bring to our campus and to the community."

About Pierry

Ranked #6 in the "2016 Fastest Growing Companies" by the San Francisco Business Times, and #538 in the 2016 Inc. 5000, Pierry helps companies optimize their digital marketing campaigns through Salesforce Marketing Cloud implementations, email campaign creation and management, creative services, and marketing strategy. Founded in 2008 by Josh Pierry, the company has grown into a global preferred digital marketing partner for companies in all sectors, and now has offices in Redwood City, CA, Boulder, CO, Cleveland, OH, Ruston, LA, Albany, NY and Kyoto, Japan. For more information about Pierry, visit www.pierryinc.com.


13 2017-01-10
Ruston

TECH THEATRE TO PERFORM ‘LOVE ... AND MURDER’


Beginning at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Louisiana Tech University’s Theatre Department will raise the curtain on “Love … and Murder,” a mash up of several of Broadway’s most beloved musicals and a famous opera, in Stone Theatre, located in Louisiana Tech University’s Howard Center for the Performing Arts.

The performance will be directed by Lisa Maxedon and feature a 15-member cast, said Katie Brumfield, promotions and marketing for Louisiana Tech University’s Department of Theatre.


13 2017-01-10
Shreveport

‘Opera Workshop: Love…and Murder’ set for Tech's Stone Theatre


Louisiana Tech University’s Department of Theatre is ready to raise the curtain on its second production of the 2016-17 season, “Opera Workshop: Love…and Murder.”

The production is directed by Lisa Maxedon, associate professor of music and director of the Opera Workshop at Louisiana Tech.

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The 15-member cast will take to the stage of Stone Theatre at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 11-14 for an exciting mash-up of Broadway hit musicals and a fun night of jazzy dance numbers and iconic songs. The Stone Theatre is in Louisiana Tech’s Howard Center for the Performing Arts. For more information, please contact the Louisiana Tech Theatre Department office at (318) 257-2930.

This year’s Opera Workshop is all about love…and murder, as seen through the eyes of musical geniuses through the years. From Leonard Bernstein’s West Side Story to John Kander and Fred Ebb's Chicago, “Love…and Murder” will prove to be fun and laughter through the mayhem of tyranny and tender affection. The production will take guests on a journey to see how these two seemingly opposing forces are actually often felt in the same moment.

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Ticket prices for “Opera Workshop: Love…and Murder” are $20 general admission, $10 students with student ID, $15 youth under 14 years old, and $15 seniors (65 and up). To purchase tickets or group rate information, please contact (318) 257- 3942. The box office is located in the lobby of Stone Theatre and is open Monday – Friday from 1:30 p.m. to 4:45 p.m.

IF YOU GO

What: “Opera Workshop: Love…and Murder," an exciting mash-up of Broadway hit musicals and a fun night of jazzy dance numbers and iconic songs.

When: 7:30 p.m. Jan. 11-14

Where: Stone Theatre at the Howard Center for Performing Arts, corner of Dan Reneau Drive and Adams Boulevard

Cost: $20 general admission, $10 students with student ID, $15 youth under 14 years old and $15 seniors (65 and up).


13 2017-01-09
Monroe

La. Tech first-year, senior students highly rate college experience


RUSTON – Ninety percent of first-year students and 89 percent of seniors at Louisiana Tech University said they would rate their overall educational experience at the institution as “excellent or good,” according to the National Survey of Student Engagement’s (NSSE) “Engagement Insights – Annual Results 2016” survey report.

In addition to their feedback on their overall experience at Louisiana Tech, nearly 90 percent of both first-year students and seniors said that, if given the chance to start over in selecting a college or university to attend, they would “definitely or probably” choose Louisiana Tech again.

“Louisiana Tech’s commitment to creating an unparalleled educational experience for every one of our students is at the heart of our role and responsibility as a national research university,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “Student engagement and leadership, and the impacts of their success are benefiting people and communities throughout the state. The dedication and tireless efforts of our faculty and staff is clearly translating into student satisfaction, and it is something that continues to distinguish Louisiana Tech.”

The objective of the annual NSSE survey is to gauge student opinions and perspectives on all facets of academic and student life for the institution’s undergraduates. Louisiana Tech plans to use this data and other interactions with students to improve the overall educational experience, supplement state accountability and accreditation efforts, and support the mission and vision of its Tech 2020 strategic plan.

“Through the collective efforts of our faculty, staff and students, Louisiana Tech has been successful in creating a campus where students are active participants in the growth and governance of our institution,” said Dr. Jim King, vice president for student advancement at Louisiana Tech. “They are partners with us in guiding our institution forward and have embraced the opportunity and responsibility to improve the Louisiana Tech experience for future generations of students.”

When evaluating the perceived gains that seniors made in their base of academic knowledge, skills and personal development during their time at Louisiana Tech, 85 percent considered the gains in thinking critically and analytically to be “very much” or “quite a bit.” In working effectively with others, 76 percent said they had gained “very much” or “quite a bit.” Nearly three in four seniors said they had also gained “very much” or “quite a bit” in learning experiences such as speaking clearly and effectively, writing clearly and effectively, and acquiring job- or work-related knowledge and skills.

The NSSE survey was administered online to Louisiana Tech first-year and senior level students during the 2016 spring quarter. Students were sent a series of invitation emails soliciting voluntary participation. Both segments of the student body received and responded to the same set of questions.

NSSE annually collects information from hundreds of four-year colleges and universities around the nation about student participation in programs and activities that institutions provide for their learning and personal development. The results provide an estimate of how undergraduates spend their time and what they gain from attending college.


13 2017-01-05
Monroe

Louisiana Tech's SciTec Center; Home Grown Science Fun!


WEST MONROE, La.

Our friends from Louisiana Tech's IDEA Place and SciTec Center demonstrate fun science experiments that kids can do at home!

Watch the video to see what you can do at home to get your own results.

At the IDEA Place, the mission is to awaken the excitement of learning by doing in both children and adults.

Central to the IDEA Place philosophy is the belief that real objects, direct experiences, and enjoyment promote learning.

Children, their families, and their teachers are given the opportunity to study and investigate the wonders of the world around them through the interactive exploration of scientific phenomena.

These experiences, along with more formal learning approaches, will stimulate curiosity, motivate further exploration, and increase appreciation and understanding in the area of science and mathematics.

Approved by the Louisiana Board of Regents in 1991, The IDEA Place opened its doors to children across North Louisiana on April 23, 1994.

Since then, tens-of-thousands of children from across North Louisiana, Southern Arkansas, and beyond have found a new approach to learning in the IDEA Place.

You can find more information online at https://www.facebook.com/TheIDEAPlace or by calling 318-257-2866.
13 2017-01-03
Monroe

West Monroe High School places in Louisiana Tech High School Quiz Bowl


Members of the WMHS Quiz Bowl team recently competed at the annual Louisiana Tech High School Quiz Bowl Tournament where they were awarded Third Place out of 19 teams in attendance. Members competed in 10 rounds of competition, winning 8 of those rounds at the all day tournament. Members of the team are (from L to R): Magi Sumpter, Brian Duke, Connor Wiediemier, Taylor Martin, Grant Martin, and Logan English.


13 2017-01-03
Monroe

Institutional growth, leadership highlights Louisiana Tech’s success in 2016


Ten stories from past year that defined strength of university’s impacts and achievements

Institutional growth, strength of leadership and the significant impacts of its regional and national partnerships are just some of the successes that helped to define Louisiana Tech University in 2016.

In chronological order, the following are ten of the most impactful stories released this past year by Louisiana Tech’s Department of University Communications.

Louisiana Tech ranked No. 1 in state in MONEY’s 2016-17 Best Colleges report
Louisiana Tech was ranked No. 1 in the State of Louisiana according to MONEY’s 2016-2017 Best Colleges report. The annual report evaluated the top public and private higher education institutions in the nation to determine those that offered students the best value and return on investment. Louisiana Tech also ranked No. 14 in the nation in lowest estimated price for 2016-2017 for students without aid, and No. 15 nationally in lowest estimated price for students with average financial aid.

Louisiana Tech researchers use radar technology to locate post-Katrina damage
An innovative underground radar technology developed at Louisiana Tech’s Trenchless Technology Center is helping the City of Slidell to identify and document underground infrastructure damage that had gone undetected in the months and years following Hurricane Katrina. The pipe-penetrating scanning technology, based on ultra-wide band (UWB) pulsed radar, allows for the inspection of buried pipelines, tunnels and culverts to detect fractures, quantify corrosion and determine the presence of voids in the surrounding soil often caused by storm water leaks and flooding.

A.E. Phillips Laboratory School named top elementary school in state
A.E. Phillips Laboratory School at Louisiana Tech was been named Louisiana’s top elementary school by StartClass, an education research site powered by Graphiq – an international technology company that delivers insights and analyses from worldwide data. StartClass ranked the top elementary schools in every state based on metrics such as exam passing rates, school environment and disciplinary actions.

Louisiana Tech cited among global universities that could ‘challenge the elites’ by 2030
Times Higher Education and World University Rankings identified Louisiana Tech as one of 20 universities in the world and just one of nine universities in the U.S. that could “challenge the elite universities” and become globally renowned by the year 2030. A study conducted by Firetail, a strategy consulting firm in Great Britain, identified a “Class of 2030” that consisted of an emerging group of “challenger” universities that are quickly rising in the world rankings and “have an opportunity to become globally renowned in the next 10 to 20 years.”

PayScale.com ranks Louisiana Tech No. 1 in state in average mid-career salaries
Graduates with a bachelor’s degree from Louisiana Tech earn higher average mid-career salaries than graduates from any other public or private university in the state, according to PayScale.com’s 2016-2017 College Salary Report. In addition to leading the State of Louisiana, Louisiana Tech is ranked No. 57 in the nation in median mid-career earnings among public institutions and No. 81 in the nation in median earnings for graduates from research universities.

Louisiana Tech achieves record enrollment, increase in freshman class
Louisiana Tech announced that it enrolled more students for the fall term than at any time in its history, and had achieved a nearly 55 percent growth in first-time freshmen since fall of 2012. Tech enrolled 12,694 students for the fall quarter – a 2.3 percent increase over last year and eclipsing the previous record enrollment of 12,414 students set last fall. Louisiana Tech also had an all-time high of 155 incoming students who earned an ACT score of 32 or higher, and met the qualifications for Presidential Scholar or National Merit Scholar designation.

Louisiana Tech earns another Tier One ranking from U.S. News & World Report
For the sixth consecutive year, U.S. News & World Report ranked Louisiana Tech in its highest tier of “National Universities”, according to its 2017 Best Colleges list. Louisiana Tech and Louisiana State University were the only two public institutions in the state to achieve a Tier One National Universities designation. Louisiana Tech’s overall score increased by six points over last year, primarily as a result of a rise in its peer assessment score and freshman retention rate.

Architecture faculty win national film prize for inspirational ‘Rebuilding MedCamps’
Brad Deal and Robert Brooks, architecture faculty in Louisiana Tech’s School of Design, won the Grand Prize and the People’s Choice Award in the American Institute of Architects’ (AIA) 2016 I Look Up Film Challenge for their inspirational short film titled, “Rebuilding MedCamps.” The film showcases an amazing partnership between the Design Build Studios of Louisiana Tech and MedCamps of Louisiana, and tells the story of how the Tech faculty and students partnered with MedCamps to enrich the lives of young campers through the design and construction projects at the MedCamps grounds. View this inspirational, award-winning film at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4MPd-SpW5w.

Louisiana Tech creates scholarship to honor first African-American students
Louisiana Tech and its Office of Multicultural Affairs created a scholarship to honor the legacy of James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson, who were the first male and female African-American students to attend Louisiana Tech. The scholarship will support educational opportunities for minority students attending Louisiana Tech and will contribute to enriching the cultural and diversity experiences of the university’s campus community.

Kiplinger ranks Louisiana Tech as best public university value in Louisiana
Kiplinger, the nation’s most recognized publisher of business forecasts and personal finance advice, has ranked Louisiana Tech No. 1 overall among the Louisiana’s public institutions in its Best College Values 2017 report. Louisiana Tech also ranked No. 1 in Louisiana among public universities for out-of-state students and No. 72 nationally, and was second in the state for in-state students and No. 78 nationally.

For the most up-to-date news and information from Louisiana Tech, visit http://news.latech.edu.


13 2016-12-30
Monroe

Louisiana Tech professor named LACUE Post-Secondary Teacher of the Year


Dr. Arden Moore, assistant professor of mechanical engineering and nanosystems engineering at Louisiana Tech University’s Institute for Micromanufacturing (IfM), has been selected as the Louisiana Association of Computer Using Educators (LACUE) Region 8 Post-Secondary Teacher of the Year.

LACUE selects teachers from across the state who push the boundaries of education through the use of technology. Moore was chosen from a pool of accomplished educators from across 14 northeast Louisiana parishes.

Moore received the honor for his use of technology in the classroom, including hands-on activities and demonstrations involving engines, heat pipes, thermoelectrics, and high-resolution thermal imaging. He has also worked to integrate advanced technologies such as 3D printing, engineering with sustainable materials, and high-altitude science into real-world problem solving for students.

“I was very honored to be nominated for this award, and even more honored to receive it.” Said Moore. “LACUE does great work across the state to promote technology in education. I'm very appreciative of their efforts and am now more motivated than ever to incorporate new technology into all phases of my teaching.”

“We are grateful to the LACUE for recognizing Dr. Moore for his innovative teaching methods,” Dr. Hisham Hegab, dean of the College of Engineering and Science said. “The College is fortunate to have faculty like him that are passionate about student learning and are engaging students in the classroom with the latest technologies.”

Moore was recognized during the 32nd Annual LACUE Conference in New Orleans, held earlier this month. LACUE is a professional, nonprofit organization with more than 10,000 members that recognizes and promotes the use of computers in Louisiana education. The group seeks to share best practices, increase service to members, and strengthen impact in their local education communities.


13 2016-12-22
Monroe

SciTec at the Idea Place; Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Demonstration


Our friends from Louisiana Tech's IDEA Place and SciTec Center show us an experiment using Bromothymol blue to demonstrate how oxygen and carbon dioxide work.

Watch the video to check out how!

At the IDEA Place, the mission is to awaken the excitement of learning by doing in both children and adults.

Central to the IDEA Place philosophy is the belief that real objects, direct experiences, and enjoyment promote learning.

Children, their families, and their teachers are given the opportunity to study and investigate the wonders of the world around them through the interactive exploration of scientific phenomena.

These experiences, along with more formal learning approaches, will stimulate curiosity, motivate further exploration, and increase appreciation and understanding in the area of science and mathematics.

Approved by the Louisiana Board of Regents in 1991, The IDEA Place opened its doors to children across North Louisiana on April 23, 1994.

Since then, tens-of-thousands of children from across North Louisiana, Southern Arkansas, and beyond have found a new approach to learning in the IDEA Place.

You can find more information online at https://www.facebook.com/TheIDEAPlace or by calling 318-257-2866.


13 2016-12-22
Ruston

DOGS WITH A CAUSE PROMOTES STUDENTS TO READ


Editor’s note: This is the first part of a two-part series about Dogs with A Cause, a partnership between Louisiana Tech University’s College of Education and Athletics Program, benefiting third- through fifth-graders at Ruston schools.

Ruston third- through fifth-graders recently received a surprise chance to not only read and discuss books with Louisiana Tech University athletes, but also learn from the athletes what it takes to be a college student.


13 2016-12-16
Monroe

Kiplinger ranks Louisiana Tech as best public university value in Louisiana


Louisiana Tech also among Top 100 in nation for in-state, out-of-state students

Kiplinger, the nation’s most recognized publisher of business forecasts and personal finance advice, has ranked Louisiana Tech University No. 1 overall among the Louisiana’s public institutions in its Best College Values 2017 report released Thursday.

Based on quality and affordability, Kiplinger’s Best College Value analyzed over 1,200 colleges and universities across the country to determine the top 300 best values. Specifically, they looked at factors such as competitiveness, graduation rates, academic support, cost of financial aid and student indebtedness. The quality measures account for 55 percent of total points with cost measures accounting for 45 percent.

Louisiana Tech ranked No. 1 in Louisiana among public universities for out-of-state students and No. 72 nationally, and was second in the state for in-state students and No. 78 nationally. Louisiana State University was the only other public institution to make the Best College Value list, ranking No. 65 nationally for in-state students and No. 85 for out-of-state students.

“Educational value and a high return on investment have become keystone factors for students and parents when selecting a university to attend,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “Louisiana Tech has been focused and intentional in creating value and opportunities for students to attend a top-tier institution in our state and receive an unparalleled education and college experience.

“Recognition like this from Kiplinger is great to see and I hope will be a source of pride and inspiration for our campus community. They are the reason we are successful and having such broad and significant impacts on our students and our state.”

A total of four Louisiana institutions made the overall list of the best 300 public and private institutions including Tulane University (138), Louisiana Tech (235), Louisiana State (262) and Centenary College (291). Swarthmore College (PA) topped the overall list followed by Davidson College (NC), Princeton University, Duke University, and Washington and Lee University (VA).

Kiplinger’s Best College Values Report caps a strong 2016 for Louisiana Tech that included a number of national and international rankings. In addition to its sixth consecutive Tier One National Universities ranking from U.S. News & World Report, Louisiana Tech was named Louisiana best higher education institution by MONEY’s 2016 Best Colleges Report. Louisiana Tech also ranked No. 1 in the state in median mid-career salaries for graduates, according to PayScale.com’s 2016-2017 College Salary Report.

Louisiana Tech also received international recognition recently when Times Higher Education and World University Rankings identified Tech as one of 20 universities in the world and just one of nine universities in the U.S. that could “challenge the elite universities” and become globally renowned by the year 2030.

For the complete list of Kiplinger’s Best College Values, visit http://www.kiplinger.com/links/college.


13 2016-12-15
Monroe

SciTec at the Idea Place; Gravity Demonstration


West Monroe, LA

Our friends from Louisiana Tech's IDEA Place and SciTec Center have a fun device you can make at home that demonstrates the effects of gravity!

Watch the video to check out how!

At the IDEA Place, the mission is to awaken the excitement of learning by doing in both children and adults.

Central to the IDEA Place philosophy is the belief that real objects, direct experiences, and enjoyment promote learning.

Children, their families, and their teachers are given the opportunity to study and investigate the wonders of the world around them through the interactive exploration of scientific phenomena.

These experiences, along with more formal learning approaches, will stimulate curiosity, motivate further exploration, and increase appreciation and understanding in the area of science and mathematics.

Approved by the Louisiana Board of Regents in 1991, The IDEA Place opened its doors to children across North Louisiana on April 23, 1994.

Since then, tens-of-thousands of children from across North Louisiana, Southern Arkansas, and beyond have found a new approach to learning in the IDEA Place.

You can find more information online at https://www.facebook.com/TheIDEAPlace or by calling 318-257-2866.


13 2016-12-14
Monroe

Nungesser talks about drawing tourists to NELA


Louisiana Lt. Gov. Billy Nungesser shared his office's plans to highlight northeastern Louisiana's assets and draw tourists to the area on Tuesday at the West Monroe Convention Center.

Nungesser was the keynote speaker at the West Monroe-West Ouachita Chamber of Commerce's annual banquet, and he discussed how the Louisiana Office of Tourism will work to draw more international tourists once direct flights from Germany and London are coming into New Orleans. International tourists, he said, stay longer and are willing to travel to see several states rather than just one town.

He pointed to Poverty Point World Heritage Site as a jewel in need of polishing. He said a team at Louisiana Tech University is working with CenturyLink to provided a high-tech "wow" factor for the site to encourage additional and returning tourism.

Nungesser said his department is pulling $1.4 million out of tourism to fund arts in order to keep $500,000 in federal dollars.

For the state, tourism offers a $38 return for every dollar spent, he said.

Nungesser also highlighted plans for a "staycation" tourism campaign that will encourage Louisianians to see parts of the state they've never visited and a separate push for residents to sign on as ambassadors and upload photos and information about attractions in their area.

Chamber President Courtney Hornsby said it's important that we all serve as advocates and ambassadors for our communities.

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Doug Caldwell accepts the West Monroe-West OuachitaBuy Photo
Doug Caldwell accepts the West Monroe-West Ouachita Chamber of Commerce's A.O. Evans Award on Tuesday at the Chamber's annual banquet. (Photo: Bonnie Bolden/The News-Star)
The Chamber presented its annual awards to local business leaders.

Diplomat of the Year: Stuart Hodnett
Entrepreneurial Success Award: Tom Sanders
A.O. Evans Award: Doug Caldwell
Public Safety Officers of the Year were:

West Monroe Police Department — Detective Ray Spoon
West Monroe Fire Department — Training Officer Lance Smithson
Ouachita Parish Fire Department — Cpt. Mike Jackson
Ouachita Parish Sheriff's Office — Lt. Tom Hargrove and Sgt. Johnny Robinson
Hargrove and Robinson were shot while serving a warrant in June. Both have returned to work. Hornsby said their recovery was described as "nothing short of miraculous."

Follow Bonnie Bolden on Twitter @Bonnie_Bolden_ and on Facebook at http://on.fb.me/1RtsEEP.


13 2016-12-08
Monroe

Louisiana Tech poinsettia auction breaks record, helps fund student scholarships


RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech Release) - Brightly-colored poinsettias helped Louisiana Tech University’s Department of Agricultural Sciences bring in a lot of green at its annual Poinsettia Show and Auction held recently at Squire Creek Country Club.

The auction brought in a record $25,575 that will primarily be used to fund student scholarships for the department.

“I was pleased and surprised,” Kennedy said. “I don’t expect it to keep growing and wouldn’t have been shocked if we actually would have dropped from last year’s total, which was $24,830. When we moved the auction out to Squire Creek, my goal that first year was to break $10,000, which we did. And it took bigger jumps every year until coming closer to balancing out this year, although we did set a new record. We also had a $1,000 donation at the end. I don’t know what drives it and even expected it to fall off a little bit this year after it took such a big jump last year.”

Proceeds from the auction are used to pay for the event with the remaining being used for scholarships.


“This year we’ll net out about $22,000 for scholarships after paying expenses to hold the auction,” Kennedy said.

A stained glass artwork piece featuring a Mama Santa and Papa Santa with a poinsettia in-between them that was created by Louisiana Tech Vice President Emeritus Dr. Virgil Orr earned the highest bid of the night, selling for $2,250.

“Dr. Orr said this might have been last year because he said he just can’t do it like he used to,” Kennedy said. “The poinsettia was kind of on a different plane than the Mama and Papa Santa figures. It was kind of 3-D. It was an usual piece — a big piece. The bidding for it got pretty fierce for a while there.”

Kennedy said a number of the lots auctioned off sold for $1,000 or more.

“We had four lots go for $1,000 each, one for $1,100 and one for $1,200,” Kennedy said. “The last lot of the night sold for $1,400. There were 30 lots we sold with somewhere between three and seven plants each, and the stained glass piece included two poinsettias.”

Kennedy said the Tech Farm Sales Room’s supply of holiday poinsettias is already running low for those who which to purchase them.

“We’re about out of them quickly,” Kennedy said. “We’re still moving a few out of the Sales Room, but there’s really not much left. Pre-orders this year pretty much did it for us. We’ve had years where we had a lot of poinsettias left after the auction, but that’s not the case this year. People just got them early this year. We’re not usually done by now, but there’s that much left this year. It’s been a really good year.”

Proceeds from the Sales Room poinsettia purchases go to the Tech Farm greenhouse fund.

“Those proceeds are crucial toward making the greenhouses self-funded,” Kennedy said. “We had somewhere in-between and 4,000 plants to begin with, so it’s been a good year.”


13 2016-12-08
Regional/National

La. Tech's Skip Holtz named Conference USA Coach of the Year


Bobby Wilder took an Old Dominion football team picked to finish sixth in Conference USA’s East Division and led the Monarchs to a 9-3 record, a first-place tie with Western Kentucky in the East division and the program’s first bowl game.

But the conference’s Coach of the Year award went elsewhere. Skip Holtz, who led Louisiana Tech to the conference championship game and an 8-5 record, was named winner on Wednesday afternoon.

+5
Skip Holtz
Courtesy of Louisiana Tech
Louisiana Tech, which had seven members on the all-league team announced Tuesday, also did well with other C-USA honors. Quarterback Ryan Higgins was named Most Valuable Player and wide receiver and kick returner Carlos Henderson was named Offensive Player of the Year and Special Teams Player of the Year.

Florida Atlantic end Trey Hendrickson was named Defensive Player of the Year and Western Kentucky quarterback Mike White was Newcomer of the Year. Texas-San Antonio linebacker Josiah Tauaefa was named Freshman of the Year.

Holtz, the former head coach at East Carolina and South Florida, managed to win eight games with a team that lost 13 starters from last season and placed seven players in the NFL.


ODU placed just one player, linebacker T.J. Ricks, on the 30-man All-Conference USA first team. ODU athletic director Wood Selig said that’s an indication of just what a fine job Wilder did this season.

“I think Bobby and his staff turned in one of the better coaching jobs in college football considering preseason league rankings and the final standings,” he said.

“It was a total team effort this year under outstanding leadership by our head coach.”

Wilder came to ODU in 2007 from Maine, where he was offensive coordinator and assistant head coach, to build a program from scratch.

The Monarchs were 9-2 in 2009, their first season, and qualified for the Football Championship Subdivision playoffs in 2011, the first season they were eligible. ODU won the Colonial Athletic Association title in 2012, finishing 11-2 and was ranked sixth nationally.

The Monarchs then began the transition to the Football Bowl Subdivision, finishing 8-4, 6-6 and 5-7 in the next three years before this season’s breakthrough.

Wilder is 66-30 in eight seasons at ODU, with one game left to play: Dec. 23 against Eastern Michigan in the Popeyes Bahamas Bowl.


13 2016-12-06
Monroe

Louisiana Tech’s A. E. Phillips Lab School among Top 25 public schools in state


RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech Release) - A. E. Phillips Laboratory School at Louisiana Tech University is one of the 25 best public schools in the state, according to its School Performance Score (SPS) released recently by the Louisiana Education Department as part of its 2016 accountability assessment of the state’s publically-funded schools.

A. E. Phillips’ SPS of 126.7 is an increase of 3.5 points over last year, earning the school an overall letter grade of “A” and the highest score of any non-magnet school in the northern region of the state. School Performance Scores are based on a variety of factors including student achievement, academic indicators and measures of career and college readiness (such as Carnegie credits earned through 9th grade), and graduation rates.

“Phenomenal parental support and the family atmosphere at A. E. Phillips contribute to our students’ academic success. The faculty, staff and students continue to amaze me. Each day our teachers come to school prepared to provide the best education possible for our boys and girls,” said Dr. Joanne Hood, director of A. E. Phillips. “Our teachers establish a classroom environment where education excellence is expected and they are truly dedicated to preparing our students for the future. A. E. Phillips Laboratory School is a wonderful place to work and learn and I am honored to be part of such an outstanding school.”


Known for its strong academic focus and innovative teaching strategies as well as its emphasis on the arts, A.E. Phillips is a K-8 school that serves as a model for the use of research-based instructional practices as well as the integration of technology in the classroom. Additionally, it offers a site for Louisiana Tech education majors to observe and practice effective teaching strategies in a supportive environment.

Directed by Hood and her 16 years of experience as an effective educational leader, teachers at A.E. Phillips have received numerous awards and are highly qualified with substantial amounts of experience, and advanced education. The AEP faculty are an integral part of the College of Education as many mentor teacher candidates and serve as adjunct professors.

“As a distinguished laboratory school, A.E. Phillips and the teacher preparation programs housed with the College of Education accrue mutual benefit from the research-based collaboration that occurs between the college’s faculty and teacher candidates and AEP’s highly qualified teaching professionals,” said Dr. Don Schillinger, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Education. “It is a privilege to play a role in providing excellence through education as evidenced by A.E. Phillips most recent School Performance Score.

“The score is a tribute to the entire A.E. Philips family – teachers, administrators, staff, parents, community partners, Louisiana Tech University and most importantly, the students of A.E. Phillips Laboratory School.”

According to the Louisiana Education Department’s website description of the School Performance Scores, elementary school (K-6) scores are based entirely on student achievement on annual assessments in English language arts, math, science, and social studies. Schools may also earn points for significant improvement with students who are academically behind.

Middle school (7-8) scores are based 95 percent on student achievement on annual assessments with the final 5 percent based on credits earned through the end of students’ 9th grade year. As is the case with elementary schools, middle schools may also earn points for significant improvement with students who are academically behind.


13 2016-12-01
Monroe

Tech president: External focus is key


President Les Guice said an external focus is one of the keys to increasing Louisiana Tech University's growth, which he thinks will lead it to compete with elite universities by 2030.

In a meeting with The News-Star editorial board on Wednesday, Guice discussed plans to develop partnerships with businesses and maintain high academic quality for the school.

In the most recent academic year, the state provided approximately $27 million, or about 25 percent of the university's total budget. A decade ago, the state would have provided about $60 million, which constituted 60 percent of the total budget.

That, combined with decreased TOPS funding, has led Louisiana Tech to increase fundraising for scholarships and set aside some money to help students with financial hardships. Guice said Tech has too many students who receive TOPS for the university to pay all of the expected losses. The university won't see the full effect of TOPS cuts until the spring quarter, he said.

At Tech Pointe, national technology companies get access to students by having employees working on campus. The university also works with CenturyLink in Monroe, CSRA in Bossier City and other companies along the Interstate 20 corridor. These companies are not only hiring graduated from STEM programs. They're mining talent from communications, graphics and business departments, among others.

"This is what needs to be replicated all across this region so that when paper mills collapse, we have a more diverse economy around here that allows us to retain our graduates that come out of our high schools. They can actually stay and work in northeastern Louisiana," Guice, a Bastrop native, said.

Read more: CenturyLink CEO on merger: We're staying in Monroe | CSRA leading community into next generation of technology

It's important, Guice said, to maintain high academic standards and courses that encourage innovation and interaction. Tech's mission, he said, is to develop students for a diversified workforce while encouraging a broad understanding on a variety of topics that includes the liberal arts. It's important to avoid being seen as a four-year technical school.

Guice said the university has a staff that's dedicated to providing students an unparalleled education, and increasing enrollment numbers reflect that. The university is building new student housing, plans to update older dorms and has added parking lots.

The next major construction need, he said, is a new engineering and science building. The university has privately raised approximately $9 million toward the effort, and $37 million toward the project is in the state's capital outlay budget but has been delayed. The Wyly Tower demolition project also has been postponed because of a shortage of capital outlay funds.

Follow Bonnie Bolden on Twitter @Bonnie_Bolden_ and on Facebook at http://on.fb.me/1RtsEEP.


13 2016-12-01
Monroe

Tech president eyes Dallas as top bowl choice


Louisiana Tech can solidify its bowl of choice by winning this weekend's Conference USA football championship against Western Kentucky.

The Bulldogs' top selection would be a bowl Tech fans are familiar with from 2014.

Tech president Les Guice said Wednesday his top preference is the Heart of Dallas Bowl on Dec. 27 for the Bulldog football team.

“We had a great experience there two years ago with a Big Ten opponent,” Guice said during a meeting with The News-Star’s Editorial Board.

“We’re building a lot of momentum with an alumni and recruiting base in Dallas, so our visibility there elevates our presence and it’s an easy trip for our local fans.”

Heart of Dallas pits C-USA against the Big Ten. Dallas is last in the pecking order among bowl eligible Big Ten teams, and there's a chance the league can't fill the slot, which would open a spot for an at-large team.


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Tech waiting for bowl picture to take shape

Tech beat Illinois at the 2014 Heart of Dallas Bowl. Tech played in the New Orleans Bowl last year, and Guice said fans enjoyed the experience at the Superdome to watch the Bulldogs beat Arkansas State.

“I wasn’t sure that they would, but it turned out to be fantastic," Guice said. "Our fans loved it and we made some marketing inroads there.”

On Monday, Tech athletic director Tommy McClelland didn't get into specifics about which bowl Tech would prefer if it had its choice.

C-USA officials prefer to avoid sending the same team to a bowl game in consecutive years, and McClelland confirmed this notion Monday.

C-USA has six primary tie-ins for 2016 via the New Mexico Bowl, the New Orleans Bowl, the Boca Baton Bowl, the Bahamas Bowl, the Hawaii Bowl and the Heart of Dallas Bowl. That numbers is now five after Old Dominion on Monday accepted an invitation to the Bahamas. The conference has a secondary tie-in with the Independence Bowl in Shreveport.

Depending on how the College Football Playoff rankings pan out and if the SEC games more than two teams in the playoff system, a spot in Shreveport, which pits the SEC against the ACC, could open up.

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Guice weighs in on Holtz contract

Tech has a chance to win 10 games this year by beating Western Kentucky and whichever opponent it plays in a bowl game.

Whenever the season is over, Tech's primary focus is to lock up coach Skip Holtz for the future.

“Obviously, we generally don’t get into contract discussions during the middle of the season, but at the end of the season we’ll sit down with Coach Holtz and begin working on a new contract,” Guice said.

At the completion of the 2016 season, Holtz has a year remaining on his original five-year deal that pays $500,000 annually.

Holtz has been one of the best bargains in the country operating among the lowest paid coaches in C-USA. He has won 26 games during the past three years with two C-USA West Division championships.

“Coach Holtz has been a great coach for us and he’s building the program the right way from the ground up,” Guice said.

Gannett Louisiana reporter Greg Hilburn contributed to this report.


13 2016-12-01
Monroe

Ruston officials break ground for new bike and walk trail 00:01 01:33


RUSTON, La. (KNOE 8 News) - Pieces of railroad track can still be spotted along the former Rock Island Railroad established back in the late 1800's. Ruston officials are trying once again to make it a spot of transportation.


Courtesy: KNOE

"The Rock Island Greenway is a one mile shared use path and linear park which is going to connect neighborhoods here in Ruston with downtown Ruston and LA Tech," says Ammond Jordan, director of development.

Runners and bikers already take advantage of the picturesque scene and walkway near West Kentucky Ave. Now it will not only be a path for leisure and recreation, but also a way to get around the city.

"Our hope is that the citizens of Ruston will want to see the greenway extended both north and south," says Jordan.

The path will also be handicap accessible connecting neighborhoods, businesses and Louisiana Tech.

"When the construction is complete we envision this being a place where mothers in strollers, dog walkers, birders, cyclist, runners can all enjoy themselves as they get out for recreation or they travel from A to B," says Jordan.


This is all part of Moving Ruston Forward and it's only the first phase. Jordan hopes it becomes the backbone of a citywide trail system.

The one million dollar project is being funded through the Moving Ruston Forward sales tax passed in April.
13 2016-11-30
Shreveport

Racist social media post prompts La. Tech investigation


Louisiana Tech University investigated a student's social media post this month that made racist and threatening comments.

The student's post to the popular social media site Snapchat used a racial slur about another student in a history class. "All I can think of is leaving her half dead," the student wrote in hte post.

The post then was distributed more widely on social media. Students took screenshots of the Snapchat post and vented about it on social media. Snapchat is an app for smartphones that permits users to share images and videos.

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The student who published the racist, threatening post appears in a selfie distributed via social media to be Asian, and his name was attached. The Times is not publishing the name because it has been unable to contact him to confirm that he is the author of the post.

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University President Les Guice emailed students and faculty on Nov. 11 to address discrimination on campus and the recent social media post.

"At the heart of a university is the opportunity for people from different cultures and backgrounds to come together in an open and safe environment to share ideas, perspectives and viewpoints without fear of ridicule or reprisal. However, recent comments made on social media have compromised this security and freedom of expression," Guice wrote.

"Given these recent social media comments, I want to be clear that I take any and all reports of intimidation, racially insensitive remarks, or attempts to incite violent behavior very seriously. We are actively investigating this matter and will take the necessary steps and corrective measures to ensure that we continue to provide an open and secure learning environment for our entire campus community.

"Make no mistake, Louisiana Tech does not tolerate students, faculty or staff who deliberately or implicitly threaten others, and will investigate thoroughly any reports of these behaviors. That being said, we have a responsibility as an institution to do our due diligence in any investigation, and to take the necessary time and steps to collect information in order to take the most appropriate actions."

A Louisiana Tech spokesman, Dave Guerin, said the university started an investigation but ended the review after determining that the student had not enrolled for the winter quarter, which starts this week.

"One thing we have to be careful of is not making a knee jerk reaction before we're able to talk to all students involved, so that (we) can make sure the decision we make is based on all the facts that we have," he said. "With that being said, our university does not tolerate hate speech or individuals who are directly trying to intimidate or incite violence or demean any segment of our campus population."

Guerin said the university has a social media policy governing what may be posted on social media accounts tied to the university and university organizations. But there is no policy governing what students, faculty and staff post to individual or private social media accounts, he said.

"We certainly respect the rights of free speech and we just hope people use that freedom responsibly, and understand that social media communication can sometimes be incomplete and misconstrued," Guerin said.

The Times received an anonymous email from someone identifying himself as a Louisiana Tech student claiming the university was allowing racism to flourish.

"David Duke and Phil Roberston have both been invited to Louisiana Tech, and just recently there was an uglier instance of hate speech and racism on our campus, about which nothing was done," the email stated. "Drawing attention to the historical systemic racism at this University is important, as many of the students are black, and do not feel safe at this University."

Attached to the email was a screenshot of the racist and threatening post that prompted this month's investigation.

Guerin said the university did not invite former Imperial Wizard of Ku Klux Klan David Duke or Duck Dynasty cast member Phil Roberston to speak on campus. He said Tim Wise will be on campus Dec. 1. Wise is a writer and anti-racism activist.

Robertson was interviewed by GQ Magazine in 2013, where he made remarks that were interpreted by some as racist and anti-gay.

"To our knowledge, we haven't had anybody on the campus, that we know of, who has invited those folks to campus," he said. "Again, we support the opportunity and rights of different folks with different viewpoints. So in no way has our president tried to prevent the Tim Wise visit from happening."


13 2016-11-23
Monroe

Louisiana Tech, CenturyLink partner for regional robotics event


RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech Release) - Faculty from Louisiana Tech University and CenturyLink employees recently welcomed students from Louisiana and Arkansas for the inaugural Northeast Louisiana Regional Autonomous Robotics Circuit (RARC) hosted at CenturyLink headquarters in Monroe.

The event, which was developed as an extension of the Bossier RARC competition developed and hosted by the Cyber Innovation Center’s NICERC division, featured over 20 teams that competed in elementary, middle and high school categories. The inaugural northeast Louisiana competition was hosted by the Louisiana Tech College of Education’s Science and Technology Education Center (SciTEC) and CenturyLink.

“The theme for the 2016-2017 RARC competitions is ‘Exploring the Wonders of the World,’” said JoAnn Marshall of NICERC. “The elementary and middle school teams programmed their robots to crisscross a competition mat that resembles a map of the world and accomplish tasks related to three specific Wonders of the World. Meanwhile, the high school teams programmed and designed their robots to survey one of the many uninhabited land masses on Earth and collect resources that will be necessary for future explorations.”


“Opportunities like the Northeast Louisiana RARC competition not only allow students to showcase and refine essential STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) skills, but more importantly, they foster the use of 21st century skills such as collaboration, perseverance and critical thinking,” said Dr. Don Schillinger, dean of the College of Education at Louisiana Tech.

Lindsey Keith-Vincent, director of SciTEC and the Office of Outreach and External Funding at Louisiana Tech said the university is thrilled that SciTEC, NICERC and CenturyLink have the opportunity to support and connect with such talented students and community partners through this effort. “We are hopeful that these talented young people competing will one day be on Louisiana Tech’s campus preparing for STEM related careers in our region at places including CenturyLink.”

“This competition shows the impact the technology industry has had along the I-20 corridor and Northeast Louisiana. CenturyLink values our community partners and recognizes the importance of investing in STEM education,” Bill Bradley, senior vice president of cyber engineering & technology services for CenturyLink said.

Keith-Vincent said the efforts and support of CenturyLink’s Bill Bradley, Alex Bohl, Kristy LaCroix; Louisiana Tech’s Jaicee Choate; NICERC’s Jo Ann Marshall, and numerous volunteers, coaches, parents and teams contributed to making this event possible. “We also thank BASH Booth’s Sarah Jeffords, Collin Bailey from Louisiana Tech University Admissions and Lisa Dick with AXI Education Solutions for attending and making Saturday a success,” she said.

Additional RARC competitions are being scheduled for the winter and spring with dates, locations and times to be posted soon on the NICERC webpage and Louisiana Tech University’s College of Education Facebook site.


13 2016-11-23
Monroe

Masur artist-in-residence, La Tech professor emeritus to open exhibits Nov. 28


Solo exhibitions featuring artists Beili Liu and Dean Dablow will be on display Nov. 28- March 11 at the Masur Museum in Monroe.

Liu — the most recent artist in residence at the museum — is a Texas artist known for combining folk craft traditions with a sense of place to create metaphorically rich installations. Dablow is a professor emeritus at Louisiana Tech University in Ruston.

Gain insight into the creative process behind the work of these artists at receptions Nov. 28 and Jan. 17. Liu will discuss her exhibit "Sky Well" on Nov. 28, and Dablow will detail his retrospective work in "Everything is Abstract" on Jan. 17. The receptions are 6-8 p.m. with artist talks at 6:45 p.m. Refreshments will be provided at both.

Vankaal I is a 2013 work of art by Dean Dablow. A
Vankaal I is a 2013 work of art by Dean Dablow. A retrospective exhibit of his work "Everything is Abstract" will be on display at the Masur Museum Nov. 28-March 11. (Photo: Courtesy photo)
Liu became entranced by electrified shine of water trapped on top of lily pads while on Black Bayou Lake this spring. Upon touching it, she discovered the bubbling, flashing water flowed like quicksilver. Since hearing about the Louisiana folk crafts, and their ties to the land, Liu has endeavored to capture this fluid relationship in a single work of art. The name of the work of art Liu made for this exhibition is "Sky Well."

"Everything Is Abstract"is a retrospective featuring examples of Dablow’s work beginning in 1974, and running through 2016.

Dablow purposefully engaged with a variety of media over the course of his career, often mining one for all it is worth before moving on to another for a time. While this progression is sequential and can be tracked chronologically, "Everything Is Abstract" is laid out in our gallery spaces in a non-linear fashion. This is meant to be more indicative of Dablow’s goals as an artist.

IF YOU GO

What: Solo exhibitions featuring artists Beili Liu and Dean Dablow

When: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.Tuesday – Friday and noon-5 p.m. Saturday Nov.28-March 11

Where: Masur Museum, 1400 S Grand St, Monroe

Cost: Free


13 2016-11-21
Monroe

Louisiana Tech fall graduates encouraged to ‘enjoy the journey and attack life’


Life is about changes, and learning to roll with them is the most important lesson of all.

That was the message presented by William E. Bradley, senior vice president for cyber engineering and technology services at Century Link, to 268 new graduates Saturday morning at Louisiana Tech University’s 318th Commencement Exercise at the Thomas Assembly Center.

The group of new graduates included 195 undergraduate degree recipients and 73 graduate degree honorees, including 12 who earned doctoral degrees. Louisiana Tech also honored longtime Ruston resident Benjamin Denny as the 73rd Tower Medallion Recipient and newest member of Louisiana Tech’s Hall of Distinguished Alumni. The award recognizes those exceptional individuals who have brought honor not only to themselves, but also to Louisiana Tech University.

Bradley, a 1985 graduate from Louisiana Tech with a degree in computer science, has worked for Century Link for more than 30 years in a number of roles ranging from software developer to chief technology officer to chief information officer. One of the new graduates he was speaking to Saturday was his daughter Rebecca, who graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree from Tech’s College of Business.

“It’s been 11,508 days to be exact that’s a long time since I sat in the very seat you sit in today,” Bradley told the new graduates. “And I want to share a few things I learned since sitting there 31 years ago. Graduation is one of the major milestones in your life…it means your life is changing. You’ll never be the same. As a software designer, I never dreamed about being an executive leader. I guess I should have paid more attention in those accounting classes.

“Through that time I learned many things. No. 1, change is constant. No. 2, how we embrace change makes all the difference. Some changes are fun, but some are challenging changes like finding a job and setting out on your own. Or perhaps changing careers later in life. You have to own that change. You must determine now how you will react. You must embrace change if you want to be successful. I encourage you to take that one step further. And No. 3, you should create change. Be bold enough to express a new idea. Be persistent enough to see that idea through. Mentor someone younger than you, or help someone in a knowledgeable way with the skills your degree shows you have.”

To be successful in the midst of challenges brought about by an ever-changing world, Bradley offered the new graduates three principles to live by and principles to succeed: follow your passion, work hard and give back.

Denny, the Tower Medallion recipient and newest member of the Hall of Distinguished Alumni, was recognized during fall commencement for his numerous achievements and tireless service to Louisiana Tech. Established in 1976 by the Louisiana Tech University Alumni Association, the Hall of Distinguished Alumni honors those alumni of the university who have distinguished themselves by exceptional achievement, community service and humanitarian activity.

Denny holds three degrees from Louisiana Tech, earning a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Data Processing in 1970, and a Master of Business Administration with a Finance Specialty in 1980. He also received an Honorary Doctor of Humanities degree in 2012.

A former director of Louisiana Tech’s Alumni Association, Denny received the Distinguished Alumnus Award from the College of Business in 1985, the Robert E. Russ Awards for Community Service from the Ruston-Lincoln Chamber of Commerce in 2010 and the Ruston Civic Leadership Award from the city of Ruston in 2013. He retired as President of Bank of Ruston in 2013 and continues to serve as Director for Bank of Ruston and Century Next Financial Corp.

At the close of his remarks, Bradley noted one last change the new graduates should remember.

“Today you are an educator, or an engineer, a scientist, nurse or accountant,” Bradley said. “Today you are an alumnus of Louisiana Tech University. But tomorrow is a new day, and I hope you take the same sense of accomplishment that you rightly feel today with you tomorrow. And that you enjoy your journey and attack life the same way you attacked your degree. Your future is bright it belongs to you.”


13 2016-11-21
Monroe

La. Tech’s aviation department receives Top Hawk award


RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University’s Department of Professional Aviation was recently named one of five programs in the nation to receive Textron Aviation’s Top Hawk 2017 award.

“Our selection as a Top Hawk winner places Louisiana Tech among the leaders in collegiate aviation,” said Jordan G. Lyons, aviation’s department chair.

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As a result of the award, the professional aviation department will take possession of a brand new, custom-branded Cessna Skyhawk aircraft that is expected to arrive in February, and that the department will be able to use until the end of the academic year. In addition to use of the plane, the Top Hawk award guarantees an internship spot at Textron Aviation for one Louisiana Tech professional aviation student.

“The internship opportunity with Textron will be available to both professional aviation and aviation management majors,” Lyons said. “Each applicant will be required to apply and complete an interview unique to the Top Hawk program.”

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This year is the first year that Louisiana Tech has applied for the award, which seeks to promote collegiate aviation awareness.

“Our department submitted an Operations and Marketing Plan to Textron Aviation and was one of five programs nationwide selected for the award,” said Danielle Gray, administrative coordinator for the department.

The Cessna Skyhawk does not land in Ruston until next year, but the honor of being the first to test drive and ride in the Cessna Skyhawk may have already been reserved.

“Danielle Gray and Kary Randall made significant contributions to the project, I would like to extend the invitation to them first,” Lyons said.

Louisiana Tech’s Department of Professional Aviation provides two accredited professional degree programs in professional aviation and aviation management. Both bachelor degree programs focus on setting a standard of excellence by providing graduates with the knowledge, skills, experience, and attitudes necessary to shape and lead the aviation industry in the 21st century. The department is a member of the University Aviation Association and is accredited by the Aviation Accreditation Board International.


13 2016-11-16
Monroe

Louisiana Tech history professor appointed to Oxford editorial board


Oxford University Press announced recently the appointment of Louisiana Tech University history professor Dr. Stephen Webre to serve as a senior editor of its long-term online reference project, the “Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Latin American History.”

During his first three years on the project, Webre will be responsible for identifying potential topics for entries, as well as contributors to produce them. Entries differ from those found in conventional encyclopedias in that “they are detailed, documented and intended for a specialist readership,” Webre said. He will be in charge of recruiting entries related to the history of Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Belize and Panama.

In recommending the appointment, project editor-in-chief William H. Beezley of the University of Arizona stated that he looked forward to working with Webre, whom he described as “an outstanding Central America specialist.”

According to Beezley the Oxford University Press’s online research encyclopedias incorporate many of the advantages of Wikipedia, including the flexibility and efficiency of electronic publishing. They differ, however, in that authors are recruited by the editors on the basis of demonstrated expertise, entries are subject to external peer review and the articles are signed.

Commenting on his appointment as senior editor, Webre said, “I’m delighted to have been asked to participate in this exciting project, and I expect to learn a lot by working with Professor Beezley and the other highly accomplished members of the editorial board.”

A member of the Louisiana Tech faculty since 1982, Stephen Webre holds a Ph.D. in Latin American history from Tulane University. He is a specialist in Central American history and his publications include three books and numerous articles in scholarly journals. Webre is a contributing editor of the Handbook of Latin American Studies and a corresponding member of the Guatemalan Academy of Geography and History. At Louisiana Tech he holds the Garnie W. McGinty Chair in History and serves as associate dean of the College of Liberal Arts.


13 2016-11-16
Shreveport

Governor: CSRA opening inspires community to 'dream big'


The opening of the CSRA Integrated Technology Center in Bossier City on Tuesday was lauded by Gov. John Bel Edwards as the result of a strong community partnership and the foundation for a bright future in the area.

“Let that collaboration be our guide for the future as we continue to dream big and continue to build a National Cyber Research Park that will be the envy of the world,” Edwards said. “There is no reason it can’t happen right here in Bossier, none, but we have to remain committed to it, we have to persevere.”

A ribbon-cutting ceremony marked the completion of the $39 million, 96,000 square-foot facility on East Texas Street near the Cyber Innovation Center and Bossier Parish Community College. The ITC is expected to bring 800 jobs to Bossier by June 2018, and another 300 jobs are anticipated through CSRA’s engagement contact center on Benton Road.

CSRA is a global company that brings next-generation technology services to the federal government. Bossier City was selected out of 134 potential cities to be the site of the ITC.

“As someone who has been governor for a rather challenging time for 10 months and four days, it’s a pleasure to be out celebrating,” Edwards said. “The dream was really rather simple – let’s build a foundation for the future. Let’s make technology that foundation and increase our educational capacity to attract technology jobs.”

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Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards speaks to the crowd during the CSRA Integrated Technology Center Grand Opening Celebration Tuesday afternoon. Henrietta Wildsmith/The Times
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Other officials in attendance included Bossier Mayor Lo Walker, Bossier Parish Police Jury President Wanda Bennett, Northwestern State University President Jim Henderson, Louisiana Tech University President Les Guice and Louisiana Economic Development Secretary Don Pierson, who said the Northwest Louisiana area is only getting more diverse economically.

“The tourism industry is here, you’re a healthcare center, Barksdale Air Force Base [has] very vibrant and robust support, manufacturing activities are still very strong in this part of the state,” Pierson said. “Today at this facility we establish… a new beachhead that makes a new addition to this economy around information technology and jobs of the future and well-paying jobs. That’s music to our ears.”

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CSRA’s community endeavor agreement partners for the project include the City of Bossier, Bossier Parish and the Cyber Innovation Center, as well as the state and Louisiana Economic Development. Its education partners include Louisiana Tech, Northwestern State and BPCC.

CSRA employees, which grew from one person in early 2014 to about 400 today, were housed in the Cyber Innovation Center during the two-year construction period of the ITC.

“All this work, all this energy is focused on one thing: delivering tomorrow’s technology today,” said CSRA CIO John Dancy. “We’re excited about this community, we’re excited to be here and we’re looking forward to the opportunities that this grand opening represents.”
13 2016-11-16
Shreveport

La. Tech creates scholarship to honor first African-American students


Minority students attending Louisiana Tech University will now have the opportunity to receive a scholarship dedicated to enhancing student achievement and education.

Louisiana Tech University and its Office of Multicultural Affairs have created a scholarship to honor the legacy of James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson, who were the first male and female African-American students to attend Louisiana Tech.

“James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson serve as an inspiration and a clear example of the impacts that people of vision and integrity can have on our history,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “Mr. Potts and Mrs. Bradford-Robinson truly exemplify the Tenets of Tech, and the strength of character that all of our students and alumni should aspire to emulate.

"They are an important part of the Tech Family and our institution’s history, and I am excited by the opportunities this scholarship will provide for future generations of students.”

Transferring from Grambling College (now Grambling State University), Potts was admitted to Louisiana Tech in the spring of 1965, followed by Bradford-Robinson a few months later.

“I am truly grateful that a scholarship will be created in James Earl Potts and Bertha Lee Bradford Robinson Honor,” said Shirley Potts Hicks, sister of James Earl Potts. “It was a long time coming, but I am glad it came in my life time. This is another history making event.”

Potts, a native of Quitman, Louisiana, and Bradford-Robinson, a native of Jonesboro, Louisiana, helped blaze a path forward for 28 new African-American students who would enroll at Louisiana Tech in the fall of 1965.

Following Potts and Bradford-Robinson’s enrollment, the African-American student population continued to grow each year at Louisiana Tech, and by 1968, African-American students were represented in every department on the campus.

“I am deeply honored and grateful to have a scholarship in my name at my undergraduate alma mater, Louisiana Tech University,” said Bradford-Robinson. “The struggle was real, but it was also necessary. To know that my classmate and I affected change so that African-American students could matriculate at this esteemed university is confirmation that our efforts were not in vain.”

Louisiana Tech University and its Office of Multicultural
Louisiana Tech University and its Office of Multicultural Affairs have created a scholarship to honor the legacy of James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson, who were the first male and female African-American students to attend Louisiana Tech. (Photo: Courtesy of Louisiana Tech University)
Students will have to be in good standing with the university, earning a 2.5 or better GPA. This scholarship is available for incoming and current students.

Awards will be given in various amounts and will be need-based, Washington said.

Since the scholarship was recently created, the school will not be able to award any monies until funding is available, according to Coordinator of Alumni Gifts and Special Programs Jimmy Washington.

"We were looking at some opportunities to increase the minority population at Tech and Dr. Guice has given us his blessings to try find ways to do it," Washington said.

Alumni and friends of Louisiana Tech can help to support the James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson Scholarship Fund by contacting Jimmy Washington at (318) 257-2067 or jwashington@latech.edu.


13 2016-11-15
Monroe

Louisiana Tech student elected to lead Louisiana Association of Student Nurses


Louisiana Tech University nursing student Caleb Faul has been elected as president of the Louisiana Association of Student Nurses for 2016-17.

Faul was elected as he joined nine Louisiana Tech Student Nurses Association members along with chapter advisers Tanya Sims and Melissa Madden, in attending the 62nd annual LASN Convention held recently in Shreveport.

“Caleb has already been an outstanding leader on campus,” said Donna Hood, director of the Division of Nursing at Louisiana Tech. “Under his leadership of the Louisiana Tech chapter of the Student Nurses Association, the chapter has grown and has been involved in many outreach projects both locally and across the state. This level of involvement resulted in recognition of Tech's chapter at the state convention.”

The convention hosted keynote speakers and nursing focus sessions that included integrative medicine, leadership, healthcare policy, pharmacology, nursing careers and licensure examination preparation.

Louisiana Tech's SNA chapter gained statewide recognition by earning four awards: Best Community Health Project, First and Second Place for the Image of Nursing Service Projects, and the SNA with the most School Spirit for the Convention.

Hood said Louisiana Tech’s Division of Nursing congratulates Faul as he leads student nurses across the state throughout the upcoming year.

“Caleb is the third Louisiana Tech nursing student to be elected as state president,” Hood said. “This is excellent exposure for our nursing program and is a wonderful opportunity for his personal growth as a leader. Caleb has great vision for the future and knows how to work hard to make that vision a reality.”


13 2016-11-15
Ruston

TECH HONORS FIRST AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDENTS


Louisiana Tech University and its Office of Multicultural Affairs have created a scholarship to honor the legacy of James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson, who were the first male and female African-American students to attend Louisiana Tech.


13 2016-11-14
Monroe

La. Tech creates scholarship to honor first African-American students


RUSTON, La. (Louisiana Tech) - Louisiana Tech University and its Office of Multicultural Affairs have created a scholarship to honor the legacy of James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson, who were the first male and female African-American students to attend Louisiana Tech.

The scholarship will support educational opportunities for minority students attending Louisiana

“I am deeply honored and grateful to have a scholarship in my name at my undergraduate alma mater, Louisiana Tech University,” said Bradford-Robinson. “The struggle was real, but it was also necessary. To know that my classmate and I affected change so that African-American students could matriculate at this esteemed university is confirmation that our efforts were not in vain.”

“I am truly grateful that a scholarship will be created in James Earl Potts and Bertha Lee Bradford Robinson Honor,” said Shirley Potts Hicks, sister of James Earl Potts. “It was a long time coming, but I am glad it came in my life time. This is another history making event.”


Transferring from Grambling College (now Grambling State University), Potts was admitted to Louisiana Tech in the spring of 1965, followed by Bradford-Robinson a few months later.

Potts, a native of Quitman, Louisiana, and Bradford-Robinson, a native of Jonesboro, Louisiana, helped blaze a path forward for 28 new African-American students who would enroll at Louisiana Tech in the fall of 1965.

Following Potts and Bradford-Robinson’s enrollment, the African-American student population would continue to grow each year at Louisiana Tech, and by 1968, African-American students were represented in every department on the campus.

Bradford-Robinson would eventually earn her degree in early childhood education from Louisiana Tech in 1976.

“James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson serve as an inspiration and a clear example of the impacts that people of vision and integrity can have on our history,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “Mr. Potts and Mrs. Bradford-Robinson truly exemplify the Tenets of Tech, and the strength of character that all of our students and alumni should aspire to emulate. They are an important part of the Tech Family and our institution’s history, and I am excited by the opportunities this scholarship will provide for future generations of students.”

Alumni and friends of Louisiana Tech can help to support the James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson Scholarship Fund by contacting Jimmy Washington at (318) 257-2067 or jwashington@latech.edu. Information on sending financial contributions can be found at http://www.latech.edu/students/multicultural-affairs.
13 2016-11-14
Monroe

Tech Officials investigating threatening social media post allegedly made by student


RUSTON, La. (KNOE 8 News & La. Tech.) – The Louisiana Tech Police Department and university are investigating a social media post allegedly made by a student with racially insensitive and threatening remarks. Louisiana Tech’s Director of Communications says university officials immediately began looking into the source and intent of the message when they were alerted Wednesday night.

In the Snapchat post, shared widely on social media, the student made a racial slur against students in a history class and allegedly threatened the life of a black female student.

Tech officials say they take these remarks very seriously and they do not tolerate deliberate attempts to intimidate students, faculty or staff. They say they are actively investigating the matter and they will take all necessary steps and corrective measures to ensure they continue to provide an open and secure learning environment for the entire campus community.

The following is Louisiana Tech’s official statement re: the social media incident that occurred this week.

“Upon learning of this social media post Wednesday evening, the Louisiana Tech Police Department along with university officials immediately began looking into the source and intent of the message. It should be clear that Louisiana Tech University takes racially-insensitive or threatening remarks very seriously and does not tolerate deliberate attempts to intimidate students, faculty or staff, or to incite violent behavior. We are actively investigating this matter and will take the necessary steps to ensure that we continue to provide an open and secure learning environment for our entire campus community.”


Here’s the Friday morning email from Louisiana Tech President Les Guice to all students, faculty and staff.

“At the heart of a university is the opportunity for people from different cultures and backgrounds to come together in an open and safe environment to share ideas, perspectives and viewpoints without fear of ridicule or reprisal. However, recent comments made on social media have compromised this security and freedom of expression.

Given these recent social media comments, I want to be clear that I take any and all reports of intimidation, racially insensitive remarks, or attempts to incite violent behavior very seriously. We are actively investigating this matter and will take the necessary steps and corrective measures to ensure that we continue to provide an open and secure learning environment for our entire campus community. Make no mistake, Louisiana Tech does not tolerate students, faculty or staff who deliberately or implicitly threatens others, and will investigate thoroughly any reports of these behaviors. That being said, we have a responsibility as an institution to do our due diligence in any investigation, and to take the necessary time and steps to collect information in order to take the most appropriate actions.

I believe that every student at Louisiana Tech has something special to offer his and her classmates. Through each person’s background and experiences, there are learning opportunities that we are afforded, both in times of agreement and in times of conflict. Thank you for your feedback and for sharing your concerns with me. I am proud to serve you and to work together to create and preserve a peaceful and productive campus environment.”

Leslie K. Guice
President
Louisiana Tech University
13 2016-11-14
Ruston

TECH TO CELEBRATE DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AT LUNCHEON


Louisiana Tech University will honor some of its most distinguished and faithful alumni today at its annual Alumni Awards Luncheon as part of the university’s Homecoming 2016 celebration.

The event, scheduled for noon in the Davison Athletics Complex, will recognize the Alumnus of the Year, Young Alumnus of the Year and Distinguished Alumni from each of Louisiana Tech five academic colleges.


13 2016-11-11
Monroe

Louisiana Tech research series welcomes precision medicine, healthcare expert


Tim Cooley, former executive vice president of operations for molecular health and former director for health outcomes and economics at Eli Lilly, will visit Louisiana Tech University on November 14 to speak to faculty, students and staff as part of the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research lecture series.

Cooley’s will share his insights and expertise during a presentation titled, “Innovation in Healthcare and the Promise and Challenges of Precision Medicine” beginning at 3:30 p.m. in the auditorium of the Institute for Micro-manufacturing on the Louisiana Tech campus. The event is free and open to the public.

“Mr. Cooley’s visit will enlighten our students to innovation in the field of precision medicine and the role of the pharmaceutical industry in that area,” said Dr. Jamie Newman, founder and co-organizer of the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research series. “This is a critical and growing area of research and development and something many of our students may find themselves a part of in the future.”

Cooley is a senior technology leader with extensive experience managing information technology and operations for life science and healthcare organizations. He is recognized for driving business value through strategic vision, innovation and operational excellence.

“Today, we are arguably beginning to reap some of the benefits associated with the Human Genome Project and other basic science investments via the concept of precision medicine,” explains Cooley. “However as we move forward, the promise of precision medicine and its cousin ‘consumer driven medicine’ are running into a range of challenges which threaten to limit rapid uptake of these advances. As we move forward, it is important to understand these challenges and encourage rapid adoption of new technology without sacrificing patient safety and quality.”

This is the fourth year for the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminar program. As an interdisciplinary lecture series that focuses on advancements in the fields of biomedical engineering, biology, physics and chemistry, it strives to promote an understanding of human health and disease by interacting with leaders in these research fields. The series also seeks to expose students to growing areas of research and to enhance Louisiana Tech’s own impacts in biomedical research.

The 2016-2017 series continues to expand on critical areas beyond the research bench to explore related career paths and the responsibility of research and education.

All New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminars are free to attend and open to the public. Unless otherwise noted, seminars begin at 3:30 p.m. in University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus, and are recorded for future viewing. For more information on the series, a schedule of speakers, and to view recordings of the seminars, visit the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research website at http://biomedicalresearch.wix.com/new-frontiers or contact Dr. Jamie Newman at jjnewman@latech.edu.
13 2016-11-11
Monroe

Louisiana Tech holds homecoming parade LA Tech hosts homecoming parade


RUSTON, La. (KNOE 8 News) - Students and faculty came to Louisiana Tech's Joe Aillet Stadium Thursday night to kick off their homecoming weekend with a parade.


Courtesy: KNOE 8 News

The parade started at the stadium, and wound its way all through campus.

The band led the way, and was followed by cars carrying student-made floats, and homecoming king and queen hopefuls.

The LA Tech cheerleaders and Regal Blues also made an appearance, waving to the crowds who flooded the campus streets.


13 2016-11-11
Ruston

TECH CHOIR TO PERFORM AT HOWARD AUDITORIUM


The Louisiana Tech University choir, established in 1894, has had a long history of standing out from the crowd.

John Petzet, assistant professor of music and director of choral activities, said the upcoming choir concert would be no exception.

Beginning at 7:30 p.m. Thursday in Howard Auditorium, the event will include selections by Dan Forrest, Ola Gjeilo, Joan Szymko and The Beatles.


13 2016-11-10
Monroe

Louisiana Tech announces the creation of James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson Scholarship


Louisiana Tech University and its Office of Multicultural Affairs will announce the creation of a scholarship to honor the legacy of James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson, who were the first male and female African-American students to attend Louisiana Tech. The scholarship will support educational opportunities for minority students attending Louisiana Tech and will contribute to enriching the cultural and diversity experiences of the university’s campus community.

Transferring from Grambling College (now Grambling State University), Potts was admitted to Louisiana Tech in the spring of 1965, followed by Bradford-Robinson a few months later. Potts, a native of Quitman, Louisiana, and Bradford-Robinson, a native of Jonesboro, Louisiana, helped blaze a path forward for 28 new African-American students who would enroll at Louisiana Tech in the fall of 1965.

Following Potts and Bradford-Robinson’s enrollment, the African-American student population would continue to grow each year at Louisiana Tech, and by 1968, African-American students were represented in every department on the campus.

If you plan to attend and cover the event for your media organization, please RSVP to Dave Guerin at dguerin@latech.edu or (318) 257-4854.

WHAT: Announcement of James Earl Potts and Bertha Bradford-Robinson Scholarship

WHEN: Friday, November 11 – 11:00 a.m.

WHERE: Davison Athletics Complex at Louisiana Tech University (access facility through west entrance, take elevator to 3rd floor club level.)


13 2016-11-10
Monroe

Louisiana Tech to celebrate distinguished alumni at Alumni Awards Luncheon


Louisiana Tech University will honor some of its most distinguished and faithful alumni Friday at its annual Alumni Awards Luncheon as part of the university’s Homecoming 2016 celebration.

The event, scheduled for 12 p.m. in the Davison Athletics Complex, will recognize the Alumnus of the Year, Young Alumnus of the Year and Distinguished Alumni from each of Louisiana Tech five academic colleges. Tickets can be purchased for $30 per person or $240 for reserved table of 8 by calling the Louisiana Tech Marbury Alumni Center at (318) 255-7950 or visiting www.latechalumni.org/2016alumniawards.

Tim Petrus, a 1976 electrical engineering graduate, is being honored as the 2016 Alumnus of the Year and Nathan A. Burkhalter, a 2010 mechanical engineering graduate, will be named the 2016 Young Alumnus of the Year.

Petrus currently serves as executive vice president and general partner of MorningStar of Fort Worth, Texas. After graduating from Louisiana Tech, he began career at Exxon Company USA (now ExxonMobil) in Lafayette, Louisiana where he was involved in both reservoir and production engineering. In 1980, Petrus moved to Fort Worth, Texas to work with the Petroleum Lending Department of Texas American Bank where he rose to the position of vice president.

In February 1988, he joined the newly formed Cross Timbers Oil Company in Fort Worth as a regional engineer, and later took over the Acquisitions Group of XTO (formerly Cross Timbers Oil Company) and was promoted to the position of executive vice president. Joining three other members of XTO’s executive management team, Petrus formed MorningStar Partners in 2012. MorningStar, a privately held partnership that acquires and manages oil and gas properties, and its team formed a new private equity-backed company in 2015 named Southland Royalty Company which to date has completed $1 billion in oil and gas property acquisitions.

Petrus resides in Fort Worth, Texas with his wife Elaine, who is a Louisiana Tech accounting graduate. He is the immediate past president of the Louisiana Tech Engineering and Science Foundation Board, and director of the Louisiana Tech University Foundation Board.

Burkhalter is a production engineer for West Africa for ExxonMobil, where he has worked in power plants, refineries, on offshore drilling rigs and production platforms in equipment design, project management and operations support roles. He was recently selected to receive the ExxonMobil “Power On” award for innovation, design, and operational execution excellence for 2015.

Burkhalter has appeared as a national finalist and three-time competitor on NBC’s American Ninja Warrior, and was selected to compete on Team Ninja Warrior which will air in February 2017. He is also an active advocate, volunteer, adventurer, speaker, global traveler, church/missions volunteer, and has drilled fresh water wells in around the world as an active member and advocate for a number of non-profit organizations and ministries. Burkhalter is originally from Eunice, Louisiana, and currently resides in Houston, Texas.

Brian N. Thomas is the College of Applied and Natural Sciences Distinguished Alumnus for 2016. A 1995 graduate in health information administration, Thomas is senior vice president and chief operating officer for Jefferson Regional Medical Center in Pine Bluff, Arkansas. He has served in executive positions for several medical centers and physician practices, including Crestwood Medical Center in Huntsville, Alabama and John F. Kennedy Memorial Hospital in Indio, California. Thomas was appointed to the Governor’s Trauma Advisory Council for State of Arkansas in 2014, and currently resides in Benton, Arkansas with his wife Angela, and their two daughters.

The College of Business honors Karen Dyson Taylor, a 1979 graduate in accounting, as its 2016 Distinguished Alumna honoree. Taylor serves as senior vice president of human resources of Enterprise Products, a midstream energy company in Houston, Texas. She has been named an Outstanding Woman in Business by Leadera Consulting Group, and one of the most powerful and influential women in Texas by Texas Diversity Magazine. Taylor was also named one of the “Women Worth Watching in 2006” by Profiles in Diversity Journal. She is a member of the Louisiana Tech College of Business Advisory Board and lives in Houston with her husband, two daughters and son.

Jeanette Jarrell Hinckley, a 1978 English education graduate, has been named the College of Education’s Distinguished Alumna for 2016. During her career, Hinckley served as librarian and branch manager for libraries in Palm Beach Gardens and Tequesta, Florida as well as Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. She also served as records manager for Mobil Oil in Lafayette and New Orleans, Louisiana, and later owned and managed Books, Etc. in Pineville, Louisiana. Hinckley is past president and secretary of the Pineville Rotary Club and involved in many community activities and professional groups. She currently lives in Pineville with husband Justin, a Louisiana Tech graduate and 2010 Louisiana Tech Alumnus of the Year.

The College of Engineering and Science recognizes William E. Bradley III, a 1985 computer science graduate, as its 2016 Distinguished Alumnus. Bradley is currently senior vice president of cyber engineering and technology solutions for CenturyLink, where he has served for 31 years in roles ranging from software developer to chief technology officer to chief information officer. He also serves on the board of directors of RiskSense and is an active advocate for promoting the growth of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Bradley has been a director on the Louisiana Tech Engineering and Science Foundation Board and is a director of the Louisiana Tech University Foundation Board. Bradley resides in Choudrant with his wife Lisa.

Christopher W. Coe, a 1983 general studies and 1985 architecture graduate, is the College of Liberal Arts’ 2016 Alumnus of the Year. Coe is founder and president of COE Architecture International, a Los Angeles-based design firm recognized for its unique approach to architecture as city-making through its experience designing mixed-use, urban in-fill developments. In addition to his Louisiana Tech degree, Coe earned a Master of Architecture from Yale in 1987, and served as a lecturer in architectural design at the University of Southern California from 1992 through 2009. Originally from Bossier City, Core currently resides in Los Angeles with his wife Sophie Li.


13 2016-11-09
Associated Press

CenturyLink executive to keynote La Tech’s fall commencement


RUSTON, La. (AP) - William E. Bradley, senior vice president for cyber engineering and technology services at CenturyLink, will be the keynote speaker for Louisiana Tech University’s fall commencement.
Bradley, a 1985 graduate from Louisiana Tech in computer science, will address the graduates at 10 a.m. Nov. 19 at the Thomas Assembly Center on Tech’s campus.
The Shreveport Times (http://bit.ly/2eKgcEm ) reports Bradley has worked for CenturyLink for over 30 years in a number of roles ranging from software developer to chief technology officer to chief information officer to his current post.
In addition, Bradley provides expertise to several academic boards at Louisiana Tech and serves on the board of cyber security company RiskSense.
Fall commencement officially marks the end of Tech’s fall quarter. Winter quarter classes are scheduled to begin Nov. 30.
13 2016-11-09
Monroe

Retired senior intelligence officer to speak at Louisiana Tech science seminar


Ronald I. Miller, retired senior intelligence officer for the United States Department of Defense, will speak at 4 p.m. Thursday in Carson-Taylor Hall 322 as part of the weekly Science Seminars at Louisiana Tech University.

As a guest of Louisiana Tech’s physics department in the College of Engineering and Science, Miller will talk about his non-traditional physics career, focusing on work with the U.S. Intelligence Community. He will discuss two unclassified projects on directed energy weapons that he led at the Defense Intelligence Agency’s Missile and Space Intelligence Center.

“Dr. Miller’s long service in our nation’s intelligence community is both fascinating and an important example of the career opportunities for math and science majors outside of academia,” Dr. Lee Sawyer, director of chemistry, nanosystems engineering and physics said. “This seminar is a unique opportunity for students and faculty to hear about some of the most interesting and exciting developments in Directed Energy Weapons, as well as a general overview of our nation’s intelligence agencies.”

Miller served on the Directed Energy Weapons Staff at the Defense Intelligence Agency’s Missile and Space Intelligence Center (MSIC) at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama for 32 years. He also served on the Directed Energy Weapons Subcomittee of the U.S. Intelligence Community in Washington, D.C., which he chaired for eight years.

Prior to joining the MSIC, Miller was employed by the Boeing Aerospace Company where he contributed to NASA research in the solidification of materials in micro-gravity environment of space. Experiments on Skylab, the Apollo-Soyuz mission and other sub-orbital rocket flights helped lay the foundation for materials science in space projects currently on the Space Station.

Miller is the author of 78 scientific journal articles, books and government reports in the fields of liquid state physics, low temperature physics, electromagnetic field theory and laser science/systems engineering, including the first book covering the history of the development of laser weapons at Redstone Arsenal. He has received numerous NASA, Intelligence Community and United States Department of Defense honors, including the National Intelligence Medal.

“Our seminar series has had a very successful quarter with exciting speakers, and we are grateful to Dr. Miller for participating in the last seminar of fall 2016,” said Dr. Neven Simicevic, professor of physics and event organizer. “We are grateful that each of the speakers has offered their time to contribute to the education of anyone interested in science.”

Miller earned his bachelor’s degrees in mathematics and physics from Austin Peay State University, a master’s degree in physics from Clemson University and a doctorate in physics from Clemson Southeastern Institute of Technology.

The Louisiana Tech Science Seminars are weekly talks offered by the physics program and are free and open to the public. The physics-related talks are geared toward general audiences and begin at 4 p.m. on Thursdays in Carson-Taylor Hall 322 on the Louisiana Tech campus.
13 2016-11-09
Ruston

HOMECOMING WEEK 2016 AT TECH CELEBRATES SCHOOL TRADITION, PRIDE


Louisiana Tech University’s Alumni Association, in conjunction with the university’s Student Government Association and various student organizations, academic colleges, athletics department and campus and community partners, has announced its official calendar of events for this week’s Homecoming Week 2016.

For more information on Homecoming events and activities taking place on and around the Tech campus, call the Marbury Alumni Center at 255-7950 or visit www.latechalumni.org/homecoming2016.

Thursday

• Campus Cook-off at noon in Centennial Plaza


13 2016-11-08
Monroe

Louisiana Tech accountancy student part of winning team at national competition


Darrian Carr, a graduate student in the College of Business’ School of Accountancy at Louisiana Tech University, recently participated in the annual Beta Alpha Psi (BAP) Honor Society’s “Project Run With It” competition and was part of the winning team that analyzed and assisted the Ulman Cancer Fund.

Carr, who is from Benton, Louisiana and is the Louisiana Tech BAP chapter president, was selected through a highly-competitive process to participate in PRWI on behalf of Louisiana Tech. Attendee selections are based on service to BAP, grade point average, research, ability to work well in groups and strength of presentation skills.This is the second consecutive year that a Louisiana Tech student has been selected.

After talking with fellow student Jordon Collis, who represented Louisiana Tech in 2015 and was part of the 2015 PRWI winning team, Carr decided to try for a spot in the 2016 competition. “According to Jordon, the competition was high intensity and required a lot of hard work,” said Carr. “Being a part of a winning team is a huge honor for me and for our chapter because only 72 BAP representatives are selected each year. This project required my teammates and me to provide a real-world solution to a real-world problem. I feel the knowledge that I have gained in the Louisiana Tech College of Business really helped prepare me to be successful in this competition.”

Carr and his team were assigned the Ulman Cancer Fund as their not-for-profit organization.The Ulman Cancer Fund’s goal is to make sure that no young adult has to face cancer alone. Carr’s team worked to provide the Ulman Cancer Fund with a method of calculating their return on investment and creating the framework for a procedures manual that would ensure the proper usage of organizational resources.

The “Project Run With It” competition brings together 72 selected BAP students to analyze and recommend solutions to problems faced by three real not-for-profit organizations, over a three-day period. Student teams are formed with four students per team and are given two days to gain further understanding of the assigned organization, and to develop their recommendations. Teams will present their recommendations on the third day to a panel of judges. Winners of the PRWI competition are announced at the closing ceremonies of the National BAP Annual Conference with each winner’s chapter receiving a $1,000 award.

“It was great for Darrian to be selected to participate in this competition,” said Carol Shaver, Burton Risinger Endowed Professor in the School of Accountancy and faculty advisor for BAP. “To have one of our Louisiana Tech students participate on the winning team two years in a row is awesome.”

Each year, Moss Adams, LLC, one of the largest public accounting firms in the nation, partners with BAP to offer the “Project Run With It” competition at the annual meeting. Beta Alpha Psi is a premier international honor and service organization for accounting, finance, and information systems students. Its mission is to encourage the study and practice of accounting, finance, and information systems while providing opportunities for service, professional development, and interaction among members. Louisiana Tech’s chapter was founded in 1956 as the nation’s 54th chapter.


13 2016-11-04
Monroe

Louisiana Tech Trenchless Technology Center to host municipal forum in Shreveport


The Trenchless Technology Center (TTC) at Louisiana Tech University will host a gathering of regional industry professionals working in the water and wastewater sector during the “Shreveport Municipal Forum and Exhibition on Trenchless Technology 2016” on November 10 at the Louisiana Tech Shreveport Center.

The Shreveport forum is one of five forums organized by the TTC this fall. The purpose of municipal forums is to educate attendees about trenchless technology basics and the latest developments, and to enable the exchange of information on topics of mutual interest. Louisiana Tech’s TTC has developed the program over the past 15 years with the intent to schedule six to seven highly-educational and non-commercial presentations and one ‘municipal participants only’ discussion session at each forum.

“The Shreveport forum is targeted for regional professionals working in the water and wastewater sector, including employees of the City of Shreveport and other municipalities in the area, consultants working on behalf of municipalities, and contractors and vendors within driving distance from the forum location,” said Jadranka Simicevic, assistant director of Louisiana Tech’s Trenchless Technology Center. “TTC municipal forums offer a unique learning and networking environment where attendees have access to presentations and exhibits in the exhibition hall, and printed resources.”


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La. Tech basketball teams face adjustments

The presentations at the Shreveport municipal forum will cover topics such as live water main inspections, engineering design and case studies for spray on geopolymer liners, cured-in-place pipe, and sealing the collection system with focus on main-to-lateral rehabilitation. It will also focus on diverse and evolving private service lateral liner market and lessons learned, and manhole rehabilitation.

“The TTC has served as a global leader in education and technology transfer of various trenchless technology methods,” said Simicevic. “The forum program has been running for over 15 years making impact on a large number of people and companies working in water and wastewater industry. A total of 170 forums have been organized in over 30 cities in the U.S. and Canada.”

Over the past two decades, Louisiana Tech’s TTC has become a leading research facility for the development of technologies influencing almost every aspect of trenchless construction methods and has served as a point of reference for representatives of the trenchless industry. The TTC evolved from the Trenchless Excavation Center at Louisiana Tech, established in 1989 by Dr. Tom Iseley, with a primary focus on microtunneling and horizontal directional drilling. Expanding its reach to other trenchless technologies, the structure and name was changed to the Trenchless Technology Center in 1991.

The Shreveport Municipal Forum and Exhibition on Trenchless Technology 2016 will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. November 10 at the Louisiana Tech Shreveport Center, located at 8028 Shreve Park Drive in Shreveport.

To register for this forum, please visit http://ttclatech.eventbrite.com. For more information on Louisiana Tech’s Trenchless Technology Center, visit http://ttc.latech.edu.


13 2016-11-04
Ruston

BOARD OF REGENTS GET TASTE OF GSU LIBRARY WOES


The Louisiana Board of Regents experienced what Grambling State University students feel and see when they visit the A.C. Lewis Library. During a campus visit Tuesday evening, board members saw mold and felt what amounts to a two-temperature heating, ventilation and air conditioning system.

“It’s hot or cold,” GSU President Rick Gallot told the group. “There’s no in between.”

Gallot told the visiting board members he wanted them to see the library, built in 1987, so they can better understand why Grambling State students deserve a new library.


13 2016-11-02
Monroe

Settlement reached with Louisiana Tech to desegregate A.E. Phillips Laboratory School


WASHINGTON (US Atty Office) - The Justice Department announced that it has reached a settlement agreement with Louisiana Tech University to ensure that black students have access to the high-quality education programs at the A.E. Phillips Laboratory School, a K-8 public school operated by Louisiana Tech on its campus in Lincoln Parish. The U.S. District Court for the Western District of Louisiana today approved the court-ordered agreement, which will reduce barriers to enrollment for black students and further desegregate A.E. Phillips’ faculty, staff and facilities.

A.E. Phillips, which opened in approximately 1910 as a segregated school serving only white students, was first ordered to desegregate in 1984. Following an investigation the Justice Department concluded, and Louisiana Tech agreed, that more work is needed to open up A.E. Phillips’ quality educational program to all students of Lincoln Parish. As a laboratory school, A.E. Phillips is known for its strong academic programs and teaching, and serves as a resource for Louisiana Tech’s College of Education to train future teachers and apply innovative education techniques.


The University of Louisiana System, the Louisiana Board of Regents, the Louisiana Board of Elementary and Secondary Education and the Louisiana State Superintendent of Education are also parties to the settlement agreement.

Under the consent order, Louisiana Tech and A.E. Phillips will do the following:

• increase the percentage of black student enrollment so that the percentage of black students enrolled at A.E. Phillips reflects the percentage of black students in grades K-8 enrolled in Lincoln Parish School Board’s schools by the 2020 through 2021 school year;

• take steps to expand A.E. Phillips’ existing facilities to two classrooms per grade level to accommodate additional black student enrollment;

• develop a comprehensive plan to recruit black students for incoming kindergarten classes and for available vacancies in other grade levels;

• offer full and partial tuition scholarships to admitted black students who are eligible for free and reduced price student meals under the federal guidelines;

• offer free and reduced price meals to admitted black students who meet the federal requirements for assistance; and

• take affirmative measures to recruit black candidates for administrator, teacher, certified staff and other staff vacancies at the school.

“We commend the Louisiana Tech community for its firm commitment to make the promise of equal access to education a reality for all children, regardless of the color of their skin,” said Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Vanita Gupta, head of the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division. “Our consent order establishes long overdue protections critical to increasing the enrollment of – and support for – black students at A.E. Phillips.”

“All students should have a quality education and should not be barred from any school that provides them that education,” said U.S. Attorney Stephanie A. Finley of the Western District of Louisiana. “This consent order will have an important and lasting impact for all the students in the Lincoln Parish community. The children of Louisiana should always be the focus. We look forward to continuing to work with Louisiana Tech, A.E. Phillips and the state education agencies to ensure that the order is successfully implemented.”

The order dismisses the court’s supervision of the desegregation of A.E. Phillips in the areas of transportation and extracurricular activities. Upon full implementation of the consent order, Louisiana Tech and the state education agencies may seek the court’s approval to dismiss the desegregation case against A.E. Phillips.

Promoting school desegregation and enforcing Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is a top priority of the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division. Additional information about the Civil Rights Division is available on its website [link posted in the related links section of this story]

** The full Louisiana Tech University Consent Order has been posted in the related documents section of this story. **


13 2016-11-01
Ruston

NORTH LOUISIANA INNOVATORS TO PITCH IDEAS AT TECH ‘WON IN ONE’ COMPETITION


Entrepreneurs and innovators from across north Louisiana will be pitching their ideas with the goal of impressing a panel of judges as well as audience members in an attempt to win cash prizes in the Won in One idea pitch competition at Louisiana Tech University at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, November 1 in University Hall.


13 2016-10-31
Ruston

Contract talks between Tech, Holtz tabled until after season


RUSTON — Skip Holtz is enjoying his time in Ruston as Louisiana Tech's football coach, and the university plans to make every effort to keep Holtz around.

Holtz has less than two years left on his original contract that is set to expire following the 2017 season, but any extension talks won't happen until the conclusion of the season.

The third-year head coach, who signed a five-year, $2.5 million deal in December 2012, told The News-Star on Wednesday that Tech has discussed a new deal but "nothing has been resolved at this point."

"I think the university is making strides in doing what they can do. I'm very appreciative of that. Once we start getting into the season, I'm not looking to do contract negotiations," said Holt, who holds a 27-20 record at Tech. " Now's not the time to do them. Your focus and your energy is what you gotta do on that field right now.

"I'm sure we'll sit down at the end of the season and talk again about it. We haven't had any conversations since we went to camp in August."

Tech is 5-3 and in contention for the Conference USA West Division crown for the third straight year. The Bulldogs host Rice on Saturday.

On Thursday, Tech athletic director Tommy McClelland confirmed there haven't been any contract discussions since the summer.

"The last time we had a direct conversation about that was right before camp. We'll have conversations. We'll make sure he understands we desire him to be here whether we're in season or not," McClelland said. "But in terms of being able to 'talk business,' we'll do that whenever he wants. If his preference is after the season then we'll respect that, too.

"Our confidence and our feelings and thoughts on coach aren't going to change. We continue to feel great about him. When we get those conversations going, then we'll pick that ball up and start rolling."

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Tech's Holtz remains one of best bargains in FBS, C-USA

Last winter, Holtz said he and McClelland would sit down and talk about a new deal following Tech's second consecutive nine-win season that ended with a bowl win.

McClelland declined to go into specifics of how things progressed from the winter to the summer, only adding the talks were "positive" in terms of keeping Holtz at Tech for the "long term."

"We had a conversation about what we need to do and had dialogue, and we're going to continue that conversation," McClelland said.

Holtz made $540,000 in 2015 when factoring in pay from football camps and a $25,000 bonus for a "non-BCS bowl game."

Under the current contract, Holtz receives $200,000 from the school and $300,000 from Tech's athletic foundation. During a 2015 interview, McClelland indicated a raise would come through private donations.

"The misconception is the AD sits back and says, you’ve done great, I’m going to put that in the budget. It’s not that easy," McClelland said. "In order to get where I want you to get, I have to make 10 to 15 phone calls. I have people saying ‘yes, let’s do that.’"

By 2017, Tech will have pumped in more than $40 million into stadium upgrades, which includes money from private donors.

Earlier this week, USA Today Sports released its annual FBS coaches salary database. Holtz's base salary of $500,000 ranks tied for the lowest in Conference USA.

The numbers are nothing new. Tech's coaches across all sports regularly rank toward the bottom of conference and national lists. Tech's athletic budget is the lowest in C-USA.

But, this year, Holtz is the best bargain in C-USA when digesting the salary numbers. Holtz holds a league-best $55,555 based on price-per-win (base pay divided by total wins from 2015).

"I'm not over there after every win going, hey, hey. Once you sign your contract, it's 'Go do your job.' That's the only way I've been looking at this," Holtz said. "I have a job to do and I'm trying to find a way to win games. I haven't looked at mine compared to everybody else — am I getting fair market value, compare me to him, you know what I mean? Or look at my win percentages. I haven't done any of that. At this point I'm trying to win football games.
13 2016-10-28
Ruston

LA Tech's "Rock Steady Boxing" helping people fight Parkinson's Disease


RUSTON, La. (KNOE 8 News) - Deep in the heart of Ruston, Louisiana Tech is offering a program that certainly hits a nerve.
Courtesy: KNOE 8 News

"If we could help, we felt like it was something we needed to do," Director of Recreation Bobby Dowling said.

What they're doing is called Rock Steady Boxing. But why, you ask?

"[Because] They go from tremors, to rock steady," Trainer Johnny Mitchell said.

An hour and a half of floating like a butterfly and stinging like a bee, for patients who've been stung for life by Parkinson's. But, since they started the program on October first, it's relieved some of the pain, and helped calm their tremors.

"They're stronger, their faster, they're more determined," one of the boxers, Dr. Larry Neal said.

Neal was an ENT specialist until he got hit by the disease just a few years ago. That's when he started his research, and found Rock Steady Boxing in Indiana. He knew once he saw it, he had to bring it home to Ruston.

"Parkinson's steals your confidence, steals your ability to do simple things. unfortunately there's no cure. what we do is reduce symptoms waiting for somebody to find a cure for this thing."

From there, it was all about recruitment. Brad Jones was one of those recruits. He's been fighting this for almost four years and says since he started, he's never felt better..

"It gives me a little more energy, which somebody my age probably needs," the 74-year-old Jones said.

And that's all the coaches could ask for.

"You get to make a difference," Mitchell said. "You're connecting with someone in a way that's truly, truly rewarding from heart to heart."

And for these Parkinson's patients, hitting the heavy bag helps just as much mentally, as it does physically.

"We all have the same problem, we're all looking for the same solution," Neal said. "Some of us are a little further along the line than others, but the team concept has caught on."

A team full of bulldogs fighting to win a round against this debilitating disease.

13 2016-10-25
Monroe

Louisiana Tech professor publishes book on technical communication in global context


A new book just published by Louisiana Tech University English professor Kirk St. Amant focuses on preparing technical writers, engineers and technical professionals to communicate effectively in an international market.

Co-edited with Professor Madelyn Flammia of the University of Central Florida, the book, “Teaching and Training for Global Engineering: Perspectives on Culture and Professional Communication Practices” (Wiley-IEEE Press, 2016), features contributions from different perspectives written by both industry professionals and academic researchers.

Among the issues addressed are language and cultural differences as they affect translated text, visual design, software use and ethical practices. Technology applications for training technical communicators, engineers and technical professionals are stressed as well.

According to the publisher, the book will be of use to university and college educators, organizational trainers, industry professionals and graduate and undergraduate students.

Kirk St. Amant, who joined the Louisiana Tech faculty this year, is professor of English and holds the Eunice C. Williamson Endowed Chair in Technical Communication. St. Amant earned the Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota and has worked on international projects for companies such as Medtronic, VERITAS Software, the Braun Corporation, Unisys, the Humanitarian Demining Information Center, and the Consortium for the Enhancement of Ukrainian Management Education.
13 2016-10-24
Monroe

North Louisiana innovators to pitch ideas at Louisiana Tech ‘Won in One’ competition


Entrepreneurs and innovators from across North Louisiana will be pitching their ideas with the goal of impressing a panel of judges as well as audience members in an attempt to win cash prizes in the 'Won in One' idea pitch competition at Louisiana Tech University at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, November 1 in University Hall.

Like “Shark Tank,” the presenters will pitch their idea to a panel of business experts who will select the most appealing opportunity. The audience also weighs in by voting for their favorites. As done in an elevator pitch, competitors have only one minute to share their idea in a way that is exciting, informative and financially appealing. After all have presented, scores are tallied and $5,350 in cash prizes are announced.

In addition to competing for prizes, contestants may gain feedback on their venture, identity potential collaborators, attract prospective investors, meet other trendsetters, and connect to resources supporting the development and growth of their ventures.

Registration for a limited number of competitor spaces is available at https://woninone2016.eventbrite.com. Audience guests who also register in advance will be eligible for door prizes.

By also competing in the Delta Regional Authority’s Delta Challenge on the same day, entrepreneurs may vie for one of three positions to represent Louisiana delta businesses at New Orleans Entrepreneur Week in the spring. Challenge winners receive intensive technical assistance training, business development resources, mentoring and networking, plus travel and lodging for NOEW. Contestants must submit a written application for the Delta Challenge by October 28 at http://dra.gov/.

Any pitch competitors who want to improve their presentation can schedule a rehearsal time for Tuesday, October 25 and receive feedback on how to persuasively and convincingly convey their message and introduce their enterprise.

For more information on the Won in One competition, email tbdc@latech.edu or call 318 257-3537.


13 2016-10-21
Ruston

TECH BASKETBALL TEAM READS TO ELEMENTARY STUDENTS


Qiydar Davis, left, a senior guard for the Louisiana Tech University basketball team, reads “What Do You Do With a Problem?” by Kobo Yamada with Kristie Braud, standing, a Tech education major, to more than 30 Ruston Elementary students in Jillian McAlpin’s fifth grade class Wednesday. Those students included, from left, S’aryiah Andrews, 10, Ja’Tyler Johnson, 10, Myson Jackson, 10, Bryant Crook, 10 and Bridger Allen, 11. Davis was part of a collaborative effort between the Louisiana Tech University’s TEAM Model Clinical residency program and Tech athletics called “Dogs with a Cause.”


13 2016-10-20
Baton Rouge

College of Business at Louisiana Tech to host annual Banker’s Day


Local and regional banking executives will share their expertise on a variety of topics during the 12th annual William D. Tindol Banker’s Day on Friday, October 28 in Louisiana Tech University’s College of Business.

“We are honored to have professional leaders in the world of banking and finance come to campus and participate in Bankers Day,” said Dr. Chris Martin, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Business. “I strongly encourage your attendance at the afternoon presentation by economists from the Dallas Federal Reserve Bank, as this always proves to be highly informative for our students, faculty, and external stakeholders.”

Among the executives scheduled to speak are Bill Hogan, president of Bank of Ruston; Harold Turner, chief corporate development officer of Red River Bank; Ryan Kilpatrick of Origin Bank and several Louisiana Tech alumni including Greg Lott, David Darland, Stan Elkins, Nick Oliver, and Jeff Parker. The morning guest lectures will be followed by a presentation by Princeton Williams and Thomas Siems from the Federal Reserve Bank in Dallas.

“Our annual Bankers Day activities provide a unique experience for our students as we host leaders in the banking industry from around the state in our classrooms,” said Dr. Otis Gilley, head of the department of economics and finance. “This personal contact always excites and enlightens our students.”

The afternoon presentation is open to the public and will take place at 1:30 p.m. in the Davis Auditorium (COBB 101) in the College of Business Building.

Banker’s Day is made possible through the generosity of the Tindol family. College of Business officials said this support of Banker’s Day allows the memory of William D. Tindol to continue to impact the future of banking by educating the next generation of banking executives. Through market-driven academic programs and impactful scholarship and teaching, the College of Business at Louisiana Tech produces business and academic leaders who are innovative, entrepreneurial, analytical, and technologically skilled for a competitive global marketplace.


13 2016-10-18
Monroe

Louisiana Tech English instructor publishes novel


Genaro Kỳ Ly Smith, a Louisiana Tech University instructor of English, will read from his new novel, “The Land South of the Clouds,” at 6 p.m. Tuesday, November 1, in Room 105 of George T. Madison Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus.

The new work, which will be released by University of Louisiana at Lafayette press Oct. 25, will be available for purchase and signing after the reading which is free and open to the public.

According to Neil Connelly, author of “The Midlife Crisis of Commander Invincible,” “Buddy Cooper Finds a Way” and “St. Michael’s Scales,” Smith’s novel is a “part coming-of-age, part historical family drama, part love story, and all good. Smith bravely tackles the tribulations of being biracial, the impact of a mother’s abandonment, and the far-reaching consequences of war.”


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The press describes the novel in its publicity: It is the summer of 1979, the year of the film “Apocalypse Now,” long lines at the gas pumps and American hostages in Iran and our 10-year-old narrator, Long-Vanh, is burdened with the secret his mother, Vu-An, entrusted him to keep: not to tell anyone of her desire to return to Vietnam to be with her father who is serving hard labor in a reeducation camp. As a con lai half Vietnamese, half black Long-Vanh struggles to see his place in “Asia Minor,” an enclave of Los Angeles comprised of veterans and their foreign war wives. He sees his inability to speak or read his mother’s native language, or even maneuver chopsticks properly, as flaws, and that if he can compensate for them, his mother will stay in America to keep the family intact.

Eric Nguyen, diacritics.org, said, “Genaro Kỳ Ly Smith skillfully balances the philosophical and the surreal in a powerful novel that explores identity in post-Vietnam War America. His unforgettable cast of characters ache with life and humanity as they struggle to find a place where they belong and the love that they deserve.”

“The Land South of the Clouds” serves as the companion piece to “The Land Baron’s Sun: The Story of Ly Loĉ and His Seven Wives,” Smith’s first book of poetry, also published by ULL Press.

Smith was born in Nha Trang, Vietnam. He earned an M.A. and M.F.A. in creative writing from McNeese State University in Lake Charles. He has numerous works of poetry and fiction published in a number of journals and magazines. Smith has taught composition, literature and creative writing at Louisiana Tech University since 1999.


13 2016-10-18
Monroe

Tech athletic department prepared to host possible C-USA title game in Shreveport


Louisiana Tech is once again in the thick of a Conference USA West Division race for the third consecutive year, and the athletic department may soon need to prepare to possibly host the C-USA title game, although this year that would come in Shreveport instead of Ruston.

Tech's existing press box and sky box at Joe Aillet Stadium will be demolished Nov. 14 to make way for a new press box and suites, which forced Tech to secure a site in the offseason in the event of hosting a championship game at Independence Stadium.

With five games to play, Tech (4-3, 2-1) is amid a three-way tie with Southern Miss and UTSA. Tech athletic director Tommy McClelland said last week the hosting process — assuming Tech keeps winning — would begin to pick up at the end of the month, possibly after an Oct. 29 date with Rice.

"We'll receive an email from the conference office that begins basically saying, a generic email, saying you're still in contention for hosting the title game," McClelland told The News-Star. "You have to fill out these forms. We would go through that. We've done that the past two years, so it's an easier process for us, but it will be different this year with the way we fill out it will have to be with Shreveport and Independence Stadium as the host."

McClelland said information provided to the conference includes signage and measurements. The league would wrap Independence Stadium with C-USA marketing material. Preparation for securing hotels, transportation and standard normal home game measure, like ticket tackers, security, game event staff, would also occur.


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Tech's chances of hosting received a boost over the weekend when Western Kentucky knocked off Middle Tennessee. The team with the highest winning percentage hosts, and the first tiebreaker is head-to-head record. If Tech and WKU win out and finish at 7-1 in league play, Tech would host due to its 55-52 win earlier this month.

McClelland explained how the league owns the C-USA title game, so the operation would be similar to how Tech has previously hosted NIT basketball games.

"We're putting forth the execution of the game from an event management and facility and those things. Our resources would be used," he said. "My guess is we'd be allowed, since we pay ourselves back, we wouldn't have any expense, but the money that's made off of it goes to the conference. You also have to fly in a team, put them up in a hotel. The conference owns that game whether we host it at Joe Aillet or we host it at Shreveport."

Tech played for the C-USA title at Marshall in 2014 and headed into the final week of the 2015 season in a tie for first with Southern Miss. The Golden Eagles ran through the Bulldogs to secure a spot against WKU in the championship.

This year, the West Division crown could come down to the final weekend again. Tech plays at USM on the Friday of Thanksgiving weekend.

Press box, suites construction on schedule

As for the actual construction of the press box, McClelland said everything is "going well" and on schedule.

Construction on Tech's new press box started in August, and the school will demolish the existing building in November following its home finale against UTSA.

"Everything is moving forward. People may think nothing's happened. Again, nothing was supposed to happen," he said. "We can't do anything about the structure until the end of the season and then people will start to see things happen. It's on target, it's on pace. They're moving forward. They're doing a lot of the grunt work, a lot of things people don't necessarily see or know what goes into it. It's all positive."

The new press box and suites will run $16.7 million with an additional $2.1 million invested toward stadium improvements like LED lighting, a permanent west side ticket booth, renovations to the bathroom and "aesthetic" improvements to stadium entrances.

Plans for production upgrades still ongoing

When C-USA's new TV deal was announced in the summer, Tech, along with several other member schools, explored the option of in-house production for sporting events in order to create its own telecasts.

McClelland called those plans "ongoing" after Tech brought in outside parties to assess and determine how much it would cost to upgrade equipment.

The costs to have a studio and upgrade camera equipment would run several hundred thousand dollars, McClelland said.


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"Obviously, we knew it would be expensive and that's what we got. From our standpoint, what we're trying to do is work with our local multimedia rights partner, which is Learfield Sports, and try to figure out a way where we can maybe partner for them in order to launch this platform," he said. "Those conversations are going. It's not something that's going to be up and running for this basketball season. It's not something we've put on the back burner, it's just we're still trying to strategize on a way to get it done."

McClelland indicated if Tech will do it the right way and not cut corners, which is why securing a partner is important.

"With the projects we have with the press box, it's a little bit probably too high for us to just go out there and do a complete ownership on it, which I think we'll be successful in, but we're hoping to be able to partner with our multimedia rights partner to help kind of bridge that and get a co-owner if you will, for a lack of a better term, to help launch this," he said.


13 2016-10-18
Monroe

Tech RB Jaqwis Dancy diagnosed with cancer


RUSTON — The Louisiana Tech football program will be playing the rest of the 2016 season with heavy hearts.

Tech coach Skip Holtz announced Monday that sophomore running back Jaqwis Dancy has been diagnosed with Stage 3 Hodgkin's Lymphoma, a type of of cancer that starts in white blood cells.

Dancy, who was sidelined with an ankle injury for the start of 2016, complained about a lymph node while he was recently rehabbing. Tests came back positive Oct. 7, the morning after Tech's win over Western Kentucky, and Holtz informed the team that weekend.

"What they're going through is traumatic. It is hard to deal with," Holtz said of what Dancy and his family are dealing with now. "I've sat in those meetings when you hear that c (cancer) word and how has that is to deal with especially when you're a 19-year-old sophomore in college athletics who is fit and healthy with what he's battling. Jaqwis is in a different battle right now.

"For everybody on this team, it has brought a real sense of togetherness and really an appreciation for the blessings we have on a day-to-day basis. We find a way to complain, moan and groan over some of these issues we have, but it's real easy when something like this close to home, one of your teammates, is fighting a battle for his life. He's in our thoughts and prayers in everything he's going through."

Dancy spent last week at St. Jude's hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, and the Junction City, Arkansas, native is headed back Monday to start a treatment program.


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Since the diagnosis, Holtz has kept the team up to date with daily news about Dancy's status. Dancy has been inundated with calls and texts of support from Bulldog players.

"It's been hard because when you first told them of the diagnosis, shock, like, big eyes, wide open mouths," Holtz said.

"We have looked at statistics, numbers, survival rate, you know everything we can that we have talked with this team about. The hard part the day you told them is it's cancer. And let me tell you, I've sat in that meeting when that's what the doctor tells you and you don't hear anything else they say. You just heard cancer and you just walk out and you're like, What else did he say? He talked to me for 30 minutes and I heard the "c" word.'"

The five-year survival rate for Stage 3 Hodgkin's Lymphoma is 80 percent, according to cancer.org.

Dancy played in all 13 games as a true freshman in 2015 as a reserve running back and kick returner. He was expected to play a role in the backfield before he injured his ankle in fall camp.

Tech honored Dancy over the weekend at UMass by wearing a blue decal with Dancy's No. 20 that read "compete." Holtz said the leadership council, led by senior safety Xavier Woods, came up with the idea to support Dancy and his fight.

A photo a decal honors Louisiana Tech RB Jaqwis Dancy
A photo a decal honors Louisiana Tech RB Jaqwis Dancy during Saturday's game against UMass. Dancy was recently diagnosed with cancer. (Photo: TOM MORRIS/LATechSportsPix.com)
There are two well-documented cases of Hodgkin's Lymphona that prominent football players have beat. Kansas City Chiefs safety Eric Berry overcame cancer and is now back playing in the NFL. Pittsburgh running back James Conner was diagnosed with Stage 2 Hodgkin's Lymphona in 2015. He beat cancer in time for the 2016 season opener.

Cancer has directly affected several members of Tech's staff. Holtz's mother has dealt with numerous cancer battles, and his wife is a breast cancer survivor. Offensive coordinator Todd Fitch defeated a bout of testicular cancer in 2004.

However, just because cancer is common doesn't make it an easier pill to swallow.

Holtz's message to the team is one of a learning experience — always let people know how much you appreciate them.

"(Cancer) doesn't care about your race, your color, your political views, your socio-economic status. It doesn't care about any of that, white, black, old, young. It attacks everybody," Holtz said. "It's unfortunate we're dealing with what you're dealing with, but it is something as a football team I'm really proud of the leadership and kind of the way they circled the wagons and to really appreciate what we have and the great opportunity we have to play this game, to be together as a family, to represent Louisiana Tech; things that you take for granted on a day-to-day basis."


13 2016-10-14
Ruston

LOUISIANA TECH FACULTY EARN RECOGNITION


Brad Deal and Robert Brooks, architecture faculty in Louisiana Tech University’s School of Design, have won the Grand Prize and the People’s Choice Award in the American Institute of Architects’ 2016 I Look Up Film Challenge for their inspirational short film titled, “Rebuilding MedCamps.”

Deal’s production was selected as the Grand Prize winner from a field of 47 participants from across the United States. The film also took home the 2016 I Look Up Film Challenge People’s Choice Award with over 43,000 votes from the public and industry professionals across the country.
13 2016-10-12
Ruston

La. Tech's live mascot retires


RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University's mascot, Tech XXI, is retiring from active service, according to the university.

The university announced on Tuesday that the live English bulldog mascot will retire from sideline duties and public appearances.

Tech's retirement comes after a recommendation by veterinarians and guidance from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Tech's retirement, according to university officials, follows Louisiana Tech's length-of-service protocol for the live mascot, developed before Tech's XXI's selection in 2013.

Tech will be transferred to a veterinary family where he will live out his retirement as a family pet, university officials say. The decision and process for replacing Tech XXI will be determined by Louisiana Tech officials. There is currently no time frame on finding a replacement.

Tech XXI retirement was announced the same day that LSU's live mascot, Mike VI, passed away following his battle with cancer.


13 2016-10-11
Ruston

Louisiana Tech architecture faculty win Grand Prize in national film challenge


RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech News Release) - Brad Deal and Robert Brooks, architecture faculty in Louisiana Tech University’s School of Design, have won the Grand Prize and the People’s Choice Award in the American Institute of Architects’ (AIA) 2016 I Look Up Film Challenge for their inspirational short film titled, “Rebuilding MedCamps.”

Deal’s production was selected as the Grand Prize winner from a field of 47 participants from across the United States. The film also took home the 2016 I Look Up Film Challenge People’s Choice Award with over 43,000 votes from the public and industry professionals across the country.

“Rebuilding MedCamps” is a three-and-a-half minute film showcases Deal’s work with Brooks and the partnership between the Design Build Studios of Louisiana Tech and Medcamps of Louisiana, a non-profit organization that provides free summer camp experiences to children with chronic illnesses and disabilities. It tells the story of how the faculty and students from Louisiana Tech’s School of Design partnered with MedCamps to enrich the lives of campers through the design and construction projects at the MedCamps grounds.


“Our partnership with Medcamps has not only been mutually beneficial, it has exceeded everyone’s expectations,” said Deal. “MedCamps mission is to
provide transformative and empowering experiences for those they serve, and at its core, that is the same goal of great architecture. MedCamps’ mission
is highly motivational to our students, allowing them to serve a marginalized community and to see their design take shape in the real world
for the first time and change the lives of children. It’s a powerful formula.”

The projects captured on film and that emerge from the Design Build Studio experience at Louisiana Tech create engaging and meaningful learning
experiences for students. Three projects have been completed thus far with one project, the Larkin Gibbs Memorial Pavilion, winning the AIA Louisiana
Merit Award and the Members’ Choice Award at the annual AIA Louisiana Design Awards Ceremony. New plans are already being made for a new project set to
begin next spring.

“It was our hope that the film would capture a few things,” said Brooks. We hoped it would capture our belief that design can be humble yet mighty, that
education outside of the traditional design studio is not only worthwhile, but inwardly meaningful and outwardly powerful, and that design can
represent that which we aspire to as compassionate and hopeful educators of the next generation of architects.”

The 2016 I Look Up Film Challenge, which seeks to shine a light on the stories of architecture and design through the power of film, presented Deal
and Brooks with the Grand Prize during the AIA Architecture and Design Film Festival held last week in New York City. Deal and Brooks have been invited
to screen the film at the SXSW Eco Conference in Austin, Texas later this month, and at the Architecture and Design Film Festival in Washington D.C.
next spring.

“What the School of Design’s collaboration with MedCamps offers and what this film communicates are how profoundly people’s lives can be impacted through our empathy, our time and our talents,” said Karl Puljak, director of the School of Design at Louisiana Tech. “Through this single architecture course and this three minute film, people have experienced how powerful design can be when it serves us well. Perhaps no group is more transformed more by the experience than our own students and faculty.”

Louisiana Tech’s architecture programs seek to provide a comprehensive and uncompromising, balanced and demanding education in the art, craft and
practice of ethical building through the polytechnic tradition of “hands-on” experiences and empirical learning that prepares students to be an architect
in the fullest sense of the term. The School of Design offers three undergraduate degree programs (Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies,
Bachelor of Interior Design and Bachelor of Fine Arts) and two graduate degree programs (Master of Architecture and Master of Fine Arts).


13 2016-10-10
Ruston

FFA HOSTS FORESTRY CONTEST AT TECH


Photo
13 2016-10-05
Monroe

Tech’s research society announces Science Café series


The Louisiana Tech University chapter of the Sigma Xi research society Chapter is launching its 2016-2017 Science Café discussion series at 5:30 p.m. October 11 in the community room at Gibson’s Natural Grocers in Ruston.

Sponsored by Sigma Xi, Science Café is a series of public “chats” with researchers during the fall, winter and spring academic quarters where members of the campus and local communities can have a conversation with a scientist about their work. All sessions are free to attend.

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“One of the main goals of Sigma Xi is to promote scientific communication and we’d love for everyone to have the opportunity to learn about the exciting research that’s happening at Louisiana Tech,” says Sigma Xi Chapter President Dr. Terri Maness, assistant professor of biological sciences at Louisiana Tech. “We’re really excited to start this program and, with the diversity of research happening at Louisiana Tech, I’m sure everyone in the community will find topics of interest to them.”

Maness says the idea is for the Science Café to be less formal than a typical lecture, so that people can really engage and feel comfortable asking questions.

Dr. Lee Sawyer, Charles and Newllyn Spruell Endowed Professor of Physics and academic director of chemistry and physics at Louisiana Tech, will kick off the 2016-2017 series on October 11 with a discussion titled, “From Quarks to the Cosmos (Q2C)” which is also the theme of this year’s American Physical Society’s annual meeting.

Sawyer’s discussion will be followed by a discussion with Dr. Jamie Newman, assistant professor of biological sciences; Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore, assistant professor of biomedical engineering; and Nick Bustamante, chair and associate professor of studio art, on January 24, 2017. They will hold a session titled, “Visual Integration of Science Through Art (VISTA): Medical Illustration at Louisiana Tech,” which is a very exciting collaborative program between the arts and sciences.

Dr. Heidi Adams, assistant professor of forestry, will conclude the 2016-2017 Science Café series on April 11, 2017 with her discussion titled, “Are Your Deer Picky Eaters? An evaluation of white-tailed deer preference among commercial food plot seed mixes.”

All talks will be in the community room at Gibson’s Natural Grocer located at 1305 Commerce Street in Ruston and begin at 5:30 p.m. For more information, contact Dr. Terri Maness at tmaness@latech.edu.


13 2016-10-03
Monroe

Tech to launch Biomedical Research series


Louisiana Tech University is set to launch the 2016-2017 edition of its highly-popular New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminar series, featuring interdisciplinary collaborations and research discussions with some of the nation’s most renowned scientists and speakers.

The 2016-2017 New Frontiers in Biomedical Research series schedule continues to expand on critical areas beyond the research bench to explore related career paths and the responsibility of research and education. Over the past three years, the program has continued to grow and demonstrate the interdisciplinary nature of biomedical research. The seminar series now involves four of the academic colleges at Louisiana Tech, with 11 individual programs participating, creating a truly interdisciplinary seminar experience.

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The success of the seminar series has led to wide recognition within academia of Louisiana Tech and its co-organizers, Dr. Jamie Newman, assistant professor of biological sciences and the Scott Weathersby Endowed Professor of Zoology and Premedicine, and Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore, assistant professor of biomedical engineering in the College of Engineering and Science. Newman and Caldorera-Moore presented on the development and success of the series at the 2016 American Society of Engineering Education conference held this summer in New Orleans.

“We are excited about the continued popularity and growth of the series and incorporating more departments and programs at Louisiana Tech,” said Newman. “The enthusiasm for the series across campus and the community has been great for the success of the series and, in turn, the success of the students and faculty involved. We are especially proud this year to have original student art work featured on the cover of our program brochure.”

Newman, Caldorera-Moore and Nicholas Bustamante, associate professor and program chair of studio art at Louisiana Tech, have also been invited to present at the 2017 Louisiana Academy of Sciences meeting in March 2017, on the new digital painting course that has introduced students to medical illustration and the development of a curriculum track for students interested in pursuing this field.

“This past year, with the collaboration between biology, engineering and art, we saw the series become more than we had imagined,” said Caldorera-Moore. “We now work with four colleges on the Louisiana Tech campus to demonstrate the interdisciplinary nature of biomedical research and science, bringing together students and faculty to form novel collaboration that benefits the university.”

Two lectures during the 2016-2017 series will highlight the interdisciplinary nature of the seminar program. In collaboration with Louisiana Tech’s Waggoner Center for Civic Engagement and Public Policy, and Sigma Xi scientific research society, the series will host Dr. Karen Kashmanian Oates, dean of arts and sciences at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, who will speak on her involvement in promoting civic engagement and responsibility of scientists. In partnership with Louisiana Tech’s School of Design, the series will also feature Natalie Doolittle, director of medical animation, high impact and syntropy studios, who will present on the professional field of medical illustration and the need for visual communication of science.

The 2016-2017 New Frontiers in Biomedical Research series will begin at 3:30 p.m. October 24 with Dr. Claude Bouchard, the John W. Barton Sr. Chair in Genetics and Nutrition at the Human Genomics Laboratory and the Pennington Biomedical Research Center. Bouchard will share his research on “Physics, Physiology, and Behavior as Drivers for the Obesity Epidemic” in University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus.


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The series continues to benefit from support from a number of community and university organizations. The Lincoln Health Foundation (LHF) which seeks to improve health outcomes for members of the community has been a long-time advocate for the series and will continue its support throughout the year. Support is also provided by Louisiana Tech University’s Office of the President, College of Applied and Natural Sciences, College of Engineering and Sciences, and Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Sciences.

“I am very pleased with the impacts this seminar series is having on our campus,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “The leadership provided by our faculty in organizing meaningful seminars from such renowned researchers is truly appreciated. This is stimulating new collaborations and ideas for research that we had never anticipated.”

All New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminars are free to attend and open to the public. Unless otherwise noted, seminars begin at 3:30 p.m. in University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus, and are recorded for future viewing. For more information on the series, a schedule of speakers, and to view recordings of the seminars, visit the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research website at http://biomedicalresearch.wix.com/new-frontiers or contact Dr. Jamie Newman at jjnewman@latech.edu.


13 2016-10-03
Monroe

Lincoln Parish developed during Reconstruction


Editor’s note: One in a series of history pieces published in conjunction with The News-Star’s 125th anniversary. This story by Art Taylor originally ran in July 1976 and has been edited.

RUSTON — Lincoln Parish was the child of the Reconstruction period. Although the product of that turbulent era, the parish is an educational and industrial leader in north central Louisiana.

Lincoln was incorporated in the Territory of Orleans in 1803 following the Louisiana Purchase.

When the Orleans Territory was admitted to the union in 1812 as Louisiana, the northern part of the state was divided into Natchitoches and Ouachita parishes.

The area was largely unexplored wilderness of dense forests abundant with wildlife — deer, turkey, buffalo, wolf, bear, wild horses and cattle, panther and waterfowl. Tracts of virgin timber continued for miles, interrupted only by the streams and bayous.

The only people within the area were the original Caddo tribes and French and Spanish explorers raising the Bourbon flag. These coureurs de bois (forest runners) seldom ventured from waterways in their quest for furs and trade with Native Americans.

When the infant state created Claiborne Parish in 1812, named in honor of Gov. William C.C. Claiborne and carved from Natchitoches Parish, the first settlement believed to have been made in Lincoln was at a site near the present village of Vienna.

Few settlers

Few settlers entered the area following the Louisiana Purchase, but those who did were Anglo-Scotch from Georgia, South Carolina and Alabama.

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Following the Civil War, the Reconstruction administration in 1873 created the parish from portions taken from Jackson, Union, Claiborne, Bienville and Ouachita parishes. Named after Abraham Lincoln, the parish suffered indignities and corruption in the person of Allen Greene, a Vienna man.

Backed by Gov. William P. Kellog's administration, which had the support of federal authority and troops, Greene was seated as state senator from Jackson and Union parishes after claiming victory over E.M. Graham of Vernon. Graham contested the election on the grounds that he had received the majority of the votes, but Greene was recognized as senator.

Together with his son C.J. Greene, the Jackson Parish representative, Greene ruled with dictatorial whim and removed government officers as he pleased.

With popular support behind them, the deposed officials refused to vacate their offices when Greene's appointees came to assume their positions. This action resulted in the illegal removal of court records to Greene's home and suspension of regular parish and district court sessions.

The possibility of revolt by the people was quelled with the lawful support of a petition calling for the resignation of Greene and his three sons.

Ruston's origin

In 1883 construction of the Shreveport, Vicksburg & Pacific Railroad was begun in the parish. The next year saw the beginning of Ruston as a way-station. That followed the establishment of the stations of Shuder (now Choudrant) and Simsboro, which was already an established community.

Land for the establishment of Ruston was donated by Robert E. Russ, a prominent landowner after whom the town is named.

The rail route provided transportation, commerce and industry. The town and parish prospered, and Lincoln Parish today has a diversified economic base, with agricultural heritage and the progress of industry. Among the agricultural activities are cattle raising and truck farming. The peach has been a leading crop in the parish. Each year, the parish celebrates with the Louisiana Peach Festival in June.


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Education

The parish is the home of Louisiana Tech University and Grambling State University.

Louisiana Tech University was founded in 1894 as the Louisiana Industrial Institute. Today, the university is noted for its innovative technology and cyber programs.

Founded in 1901, Grambling State University was created to offer higher education for African-Americans.

While these institutions stand as beacons of higher education, the early history of the organized education was tied to Chautauqua. Started in 1891, this religious and educational organization helped develop Ruston as an entertainment and intellectual center for the area.

On a 15-acre tract north of town, the Chautauqua Springs hotel offered lectures by noted personalities in education, literature, religion, politics and ethics. It also provided community songfests. The property later became known as Toma Lodge and is currently part of Toma Lodge Community Estates.


13 2016-09-30
Ruston

LOYAL BLUE WEEKEND SET


Loyal Blue Weekend events celebrating Louisiana Tech’s home football game begin at 5:30 p.m. Friday in Railroad Park with kids’ activities, including inflatables and face painting. Tech spirit groups perform at 6 p.m. From 6:30 – 8:30 p.m., Code Blue and Flatliners perform on the Railroad Park Stage.


13 2016-09-28
Monroe

Louisiana Tech theater professor publishes directing textbook


RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech Press Release) - Paul B. Crook, a professor in Louisiana Tech University’s department of theater, has published a new directing textbook, “The Art and Practice of Directing for Theatre.”

The text helps young directors learn how to discover, harness and meld the communication and vision of a production. Providing both a practical and theoretical foundation for directors, the book explores how to craft an artistic vision for a production and sparks inspiration in directors to put their learning into practice. The textbook was published by the Focal Press imprint of Routledge publishing and can be purchased from the Routledge site or from Amazon.

Crook teaches undergraduate and graduate acting and direction courses and supervises all student directing projects. He also directs for the university theater and serves as a director of recruiting for the university theater.

He has served as associate artistic director for the Oklahoma Shakespearean Festival, a summer rep theater in Durant, Oklahoma, and currently serves as the artistic director of The B & B Theatre, a company that he formed with his wife, Mary Fran, a theater professor at Grambling State University. Two of the plays Crook has written: “Brit Lit, OR All You Need to Know to Survive Senior English but Were Afraid to Ask” and “AMLIT!” were commissioned for production by Stage Centre, an educational touring theater company and toured across the state of Alabama.


Two of his ten-minute plays: “Front Porch Requiem” and “LAVALOOOOO!!!” were selected for performance at the nationally known Kentuck Festival of the
Arts Ten Minute Play Festival. Crook is also a member of the Southeastern Theatre Conference, where he is a past-chair of the College and University
Division, the Leighton Ballew Scholarship Committee, the KEAP Award, the Publications Committee, and the Acting/Directing Committee.

As part of his work for SETC, Crook writes occasionally for the “SETC News” and Southern Theatre magazine. He also is a past-chair for the state of Louisiana for the Kennedy Center/American College Theatre Festival, Region VI.
13 2016-09-27
Ruston

GUICE CONGRATULATES STUDENTS, TEACHERS


Louisiana Tech University President Les Guice spoke to students at A.E. Phillips Laboratory School this morning about the school’s being named Louisiana’s top elementary school by StartClass, an education research site powered by Graphiq — an international technology company that delivers insights from worldwide data.


13 2016-09-27
Ruston

FORMER TECH COACH JIM MIZE DIES AT AGE 99


Longtime Louisiana Tech University track and field coach Jimmy Mize died Sunday at the age of 99 in Baton Rouge.

Mize began coaching at Ruston High under L.J. “Hoss” Garrett after graduating from Louisiana Tech in 1938. After two years, Garrett insisted Mize take the vacant coaching job at Arcadia High, 20 miles west, and in that year, 1940, Arcadia won the Class B state championship.


13 2016-09-26
Monroe

Tech College of Business receives funds for student managed investment fund


The College of Business at Louisiana Tech University has received over $100,000 of contributions and pledges to create a Student Managed Investment Fund (SMIF) that will be managed by undergraduate finance students who will be responsible for all investment research, portfolio positions and reporting.

With initial seed capital provided by Louisiana Tech College of Business graduates Randy (‘78) and Ann Fowler (‘81) of Houston, Texas, the SMIF will provide real-world experience in managing a long-term investment portfolio with an annual growth objective relative to appropriate benchmarks. The portfolio will be governed by an advisory board comprised of industry professionals. Student managers will provide performance reports to the board and make a formal presentation to the board each year.

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In addition to providing real-world experience for students, the SMIF’s spending rule will provide the College of Business with funds for technology upgrades, student travel and other program enhancements.

“We are delighted to support the College of Business’ effort to substantially enhance the learning experience for finance majors at Tech through the creation of the Student Managed Investment Fund,” said Randy and Ann Fowler. “This fund enables Louisiana Tech students to have a ‘hands-on’ experience in researching capital markets, allocating and investing actual money as opposed to simulated computer investing. The Student Managed Investment Fund will provide students with a great springboard into investing whether they become professional money managers, financial advisors or simply managing their own personal investments.”

Dr. Chris Martin, dean of Louisiana Techs College of Business said he is honored and thankful to receive this support from Randy and Ann Fowler for the students. “Their gift contributes greatly to our commitment of providing a world-class education to our students,” Martin said. “The Student Managed Investment Fund will provide the framework for the growth of applied investing education and experiential learning in the College of Business.”


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Through market-driven academic programs and impactful scholarship and teaching, the College of Business at Louisiana Tech produces business and academic leaders who are innovative, entrepreneurial, analytical, and technologically skilled for a competitive global marketplace.

For more information on how you can support the College of Business, please contact Mary Susan Britt, director of development at marysusan@latechalumni.org or 318-257-3741.


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13 2016-09-23
Monroe

PayScale.com ranks Tech No. 1 in state in average mid-career salaries


RUSTON – Graduates with a bachelor’s degree from Louisiana Tech University earn higher average mid-career salaries than graduates from any other public or private university in the state, according to PayScale.com’s 2016-2017 College Salary Report released Tuesday.

Louisiana Tech graduates, who have earned a bachelor’s degree as their highest degree, rank No. 1 in Louisiana with median mid-career salaries of $88,000. Tech is followed in the rankings by graduates from Tulane University earning an average of $87,800 and Louisiana State University graduates earning $82,800. Louisiana Tech also ranks No. 3 in the state for early-career salaries with graduates earning an average of $46,900. The University of New Orleans was first in the early-career category with $47,700 followed by Louisiana State at $47,000.

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In addition to leading the State of Louisiana, Louisiana Tech is ranked No. 57 in the nation in median mid-career earnings among public institutions and No. 81 in the nation in median earnings for graduates from research universities.

“We have a responsibility, as a national research university, to prepare our graduates to compete and to become leaders in their fields,” says Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “National rankings like this one from independent organizations like PayScale.com help to highlight the efforts of our faculty and staff, and how valued and sought after Louisiana Tech’s graduates have become.

“As we continue to recruit the best and brightest students to Louisiana Tech, we will continue to focus on our mission to provide them with an unparalleled educational experience that positions them for personal and professional success.”


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PayScale.com defines early career graduates as those who are employed full-time with five years of experience or less in their career or field, and who hold a bachelor's degree and no higher degrees. Mid-career graduates are employed full-time and have at least 10 years of experience in their career or field, and who hold a bachelor's degree and no higher degrees.

According to PayScale.com, the 2016-2017 College Salary Report includes nearly 1,000 schools, which is representative of institutions that enroll nearly 75 percent of the estimated undergraduates in bachelor’s degree programs in the U.S.

Louisiana Tech’s No. 1 ranking from PayScale.com is preceded by recognition from MONEY’s 2016 Best Colleges Report which named Louisiana Tech as the state’s top institution. Earlier this month, Louisiana Tech earned its sixth consecutive Tier One National University ranking from U.S. News & World Report. Tech also received international recognition last month when Times Higher Education and World University Rankings identified Tech as one of 20 universities in the world and just one of nine universities in the U.S. that could “challenge the elite universities” and become globally renowned by the year 2030.


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13 2016-09-22
Monroe

La. Tech achieves record enrollment


RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University has enrolled more students this fall than at any time in its history, and has achieved a nearly 55 percent growth in first-time freshmen since fall of 2012.

According to its fall 2016 headcount announced Wednesday, Louisiana Tech has enrolled 12,694 students for the fall quarter – a 2.3 percent increase over last year and eclipsing the previous record enrollment of 12,414 students set last fall.

Along with the record number of students attending Louisiana Tech, the quality of students in the freshman class has continued to increase. This year’s first-time freshmen have an average ACT score of 24.7 – a significant increase of two-tenths of a point over last year. A further indication of Louisiana Tech’s incoming student quality is reflected by an all-time high of 155 incoming students who have earned an ACT score of 32 or higher, and meet the qualifications for Presidential Scholar or National Merit Scholar designation.

“The incoming freshman class of 2016 represents one of the largest and certainly the most academically accomplished in the history of Louisiana Tech,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “Student recruitment, retention and engagement is something our entire campus community promotes throughout the year, and we could not have achieved this milestone in quantity and quality without them. The growth of our institution and its high-caliber student body is a credit to the tireless efforts of our faculty and staff.”

At the college level, Louisiana Tech’s College of Applied and Natural Sciences had the largest overall enrollment increase (amongst those who have declared a major) followed by the College of Engineering and Science, College of Business, College of Liberal Arts, and College of Education.

“The campus-wide commitment to recruiting and retaining good students is a cornerstone of Louisiana Tech’s strategic plan and growth strategies,” said Dr. Jim King, vice president for student advancement. “Led by our admissions staff, we will continue to seek the best and brightest students, and provide them with educational opportunities and experiences they can find only at Louisiana Tech.”

The record enrollment was accompanied by a slight increase in the retention of students to Louisiana Tech, from the 2015 freshman cohort. 80.6 percent of first-time, full-time freshmen from fall 2014 returned to Louisiana Tech this year, which is an increase of one-tenth percent increase over last year.


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13 2016-09-20
Monroe

Tech College of Education dean to serve as president of state association


Dr. Don Schillinger, dean of Louisiana Tech University’s College of Education, has been elected to serve as president of the Louisiana Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (LACTE).

“I am very honored and humbled to be entrusted with this leadership role by representatives of the higher education teaching programs throughout Louisiana and I will earnestly strive to function as a collaborative catalyst for raising the level of achievement, productivity and prestige of teacher education,” said Schillinger of his election as president of the LACTE.

In addition to his leadership of LACTE, Schillinger serves as the Louisiana representative to the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, which represents more than 800 postsecondary institutions across the nation.

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As President of LACTE, Schillinger represents other educational leaders from Louisiana institutes of higher education that offer teacher preparation programs.

Prior to becoming dean of the College of Education at Louisiana Tech, Schillinger had served as an associate professor in the College since 2006. He also served as associate dean of undergraduate studies and director of clinical and field experiences in the College of Education from 2009 to 2012, and director of assessment and accreditation (IT supervision) from 2012 until he assumed the COE interim deanship in 2014. Schillinger took over the role of permanent dean on July 1, 2015.

During his tenure at Louisiana Tech, Schillinger has been honored with the College of Education’s Outstanding Service Award (2009) and Outstanding Faculty Grants Award (2008) as well as the College’s Outstanding Grantsmanship Award in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction (2008.) He is a member of the State of Louisiana ACT Council and the Advisory Board for L-STEM: The Louisiana STEM Initiative.

Prior to joining the faculty at Louisiana Tech, Schillinger was a department head in McNeese State University’s Burton College of Education. He came to Louisiana from Mississippi where he served as co-director for assessment for the Center for Educational Research and Evaluation at the University of Mississippi, and director of the Teach Mississippi Institute
13 2016-09-19
Monroe

Louisiana Tech CBERS to co-host Industry Day 2016


The Louisiana Tech University Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science (CBERS) will co-sponsor Industry Day 2016 along with the Center for Cardiovascular Diseases and Sciences at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport (LSUHSC-S) and the Biomedical Research Foundation of Northern Louisiana (BRF) in Shreveport.

The Industry Day 2016 conference will take place on October 1 at the Louisiana Tech Shreveport Center, located at 8028 Shrevepark Drive. Students, trainees, scientists and clinicians are encouraged to attend and learn more about ongoing research in the biomedical industry.

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Dr. Leonidas Iasemidis, director of CBERS and professor and Rhodes Eminent Chair of biomedical engineering at Louisiana Tech, said that Industry Day helps foster collaboration between biomedical engineering experts in industry and academia, and aids in sparking new ideas and their translation into commercial biomedical products for the betterment of human health and services, as well as the creation of start-up biomedical companies that would contribute to the economic development of the region.

“We are very pleased with the participation of our students and faculty and our collaboration with local and national leaders from the biomedical industry in the organization of this important event for Northern Louisiana,” Iasemidis said. “Following the successful completion of Industry Days 2014 and 2015, Industry Day 2016 is geared to offer a display of current translational research in nanobiotechnology and drug delivery, as well as talks by keynote speakers and feedback from prominent panelists of global healthcare companies, like Sanofi S.A., Dow Chemical and Google Life Sciences.”

The event’s keynote speakers include Dr. Yuri Lvov, professor of chemistry and T. Pipes Eminent Endowed Chair of micro and nanosystems engineering at Louisiana Tech; Dr. Oswald Crasta, genomic breeding lead and research and development fellow at DOW AgroSciences in Indianapolis, Indiana; Dr. Rona Scott, associate professor of microbiology and immunology at the LSUHSC-S and the Feist Weiller Cancer Center; and Dr. Mehdi Keddache, sequencing specialist for Illumina, Inc.


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In addition to the keynote speeches, the conference will feature a poster session where local investigators, faculty and students, will present their work, a panel session with industry experts that will entertain questions from the audience on optimization of the relation of academia with the industry, and company exhibits in parallel with the poster session.

For complete information about Industry Day 2016, as well as a downloadable event schedule, please visit http://coes.latech.edu/cbers/industry-day-2016/index.php.
13 2016-09-16
Monroe

Educators, education secretary talk teacher training


Shannon Glover teared up as she told a story about how Louisiana Tech education major Adriane Meggs noticed one of her third grade English Language Arts students at Sallie Humble struggling on a test during the second week of school. Meggs took him out into the hall and read the test to him. He wound up with a B on the test.

Meggs, a college senior, is a clinical resident in the Believe & Prepare yearlong teacher residency. It differs from a traditional teacher training program in that residents spend a year working in a classroom with a mentor. This year, Glover is one of those mentors.

It was the moment she started to think of Meggs as a co-teacher, not as her student teacher.

Glover and Meggs shared their experiences as participants in the Believe & Prepare teacher residency program during a discussion the U.S. Secretary of Education John King facilitated.

Three Louisiana Tech students teach at Sallie Humble as part of the residency program. One Louisiana Tech student is a resident at Neville High School. They participated in the discussion along with their mentors, Louisiana Department of Education staff, Louisiana Tech faculty, Sallie Humble’s principal and Monroe City Schools Superintendent Brent Vidrine.

The panel discussion was part of the education secretary’s annual Back-to-School Bus Tour. The tour left Washington, D.C., on Monday and visited other cities in the south. It will stop in Baton Rouge and New Orleans before heading back to Washington at the end of the week.


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All of the panelists agreed that the investment – of time on the part of residents and teachers, of money on the part of school districts and state and federal government – was worthwhile. The program is funded by local school districts, state and federal government, as well as the residents’ universities.

Monroe City Schools Superintendent Brent Vidrine said that retaining teachers can be a challenge because they start out underprepared.

Teacher turnover is a national problem. School districts retain teachers who are better prepared when they start their careers, King said.

Hannah Dietsch, an assistant at the Louisiana Department of Education, said that the Louisiana Board of Education and state legislature have raised expectations for both teachers and students. She compared training teachers to training doctors, dentists and architects, all of whom go through a residency or apprenticeship as part of their education.

“I do think one of our national challenges is this question of are we willing to invest what it takes to make the profession stronger,” King said. “Too often there’s this conversation where we say, ‘Yes, residencies work. Yes, residencies make a difference for the teacher candidates. Yes, they are a learning and growing opportunity for the mentors. Yes, they’re better for students long term. But, we’re not willing to commit the resources.”


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King said he would take the stories the panelists told back to Washington.

Don Schillinger, Dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Education, said that education students miss out on building a partnership with their mentor teacher when they experience a traditional student teaching, which is a shorter period of time.

Glover said that students miss out, too. She isn’t sure if she would have picked up on her struggling student’s inability to read if it weren’t for Meggs. She might have had too many students with different needs to have noticed. Now, that student is getting extra help with his reading skills.


13 2016-09-16
Monroe

StartClass names A.E. Phillips Lab School at Louisiana Tech top elementary school in state


RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech News Release) - A.E. Phillips Laboratory School at Louisiana Tech University has been named Louisiana’s top elementary school by StartClass, an education research site powered by Graphiq – an international technology company that delivers insights and analyses from worldwide data.

StartClass released its findings Wednesday, ranking the top elementary schools in every state based on metrics such as exam passing rates, school environment and disciplinary actions. According to the study, exam passing rates include math proficiency rates and reading and language arts proficiency rates, over the last three years. School environment consists of factors such as the student-teacher ratio, teacher experience and teacher absence rate. Disciplinary actions measures take into account the school’s retention rate, in-school suspension rate and out-of-school suspension rate.

“It is such a blessing to be a part of A. E. Phillips Laboratory School where educational excellence has been the focus for ninety-nine years,” said Dr. Joanne Hood, principal of A.E. Phillips. “The combination of great students, great faculty, great parents and a great university all play a part in our school's success. We take pride in the various educational opportunities we can offer our students and are honored to have been recognized as the top school in Louisiana.”


The StartClass study analyzed data from the National Center for Education Statistics and the Civil Rights Data Collection to determine the top schools in every state.

“This high ranking is a testimony to the leadership provided by Dr. Joanne Hood, the school's director, our dedicated teaching professionals, quality staff, and of course, the exceptional students and their families who all contribute to Excellence Through Education,” said Dr. Don Schillinger, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Education.

In Louisiana, A.E. Phillips achieved a School Performance Score of 123.2 in the most recent assessment by the Louisiana Education Department, earning the school an overall grade of “A” which was the highest of any school in north central Louisiana, and one of the highest in the northern region of the state. Louisiana’s School Performance Scores are based on a variety of factors including student achievement, academic indicators and measures of career and college readiness (such Carnegie credits earned through 9th grade), and graduation rates.

Known for its strong academic focus and innovative teaching strategies as well as its emphasis on the arts, A.E. Phillips is a K-8 school that serves as a model for the use of research-based instructional practices as well as the integration of technology in the classroom. Additionally, it offers a site for Louisiana Tech education majors to observe and practice effective teaching strategies in a supportive environment.


13 2016-09-15
Ruston

COLLEGE FAIR HELD IN RUSTON


The Lincoln Parish Career night for area high school juniors and seniors was held Tuesday at Louisiana Tech University. More than 75 colleges, universities, vocational/technical schools, businesses and branches of the armed forces were represented at the fair. Pictured, from left, is Leslie Brister, Louisiana Tech University admissions recruiter, answering questions from Christine Strebeck and her son Thomas Strebeck, a Ruston High School senior, at the fair. Thomas will be attending Tech as a history major in the fall.

13 2016-09-14
Monroe

Louisiana Tech is recognized among top National Universities


RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech News Release) - U.S. News & World Report has ranked Louisiana Tech University in its highest tier of “National Universities” for the sixth consecutive year, according to its 2017 Best Colleges list released Tuesday.

Louisiana Tech and Louisiana State University were the only two public institutions in the state to achieve a Tier One National Universities designation. Tulane University (private) also earned a Tier One National University ranking. Louisiana Tech landed at No. 202 out of the over 230 institutions to achieve Tier One status on the 2017 Best Colleges list. Louisiana Tech’s overall score increased by six points over last year, primarily as a result of a rise in its peer assessment score and freshman retention rate.

Princeton University retained the No. 1 spot on the National Universities list followed by Harvard University, Yale University and University of Chicago (tied for No. 3), and Columbia University and Stanford University (tied for No. 5).

“The recognition we continue to receive from organizations like U.S. News & World Report is a strong indication of the national impacts we are making and the unparalleled educational experience we are providing for students that enroll at Louisiana Tech,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “The foundation of these achievements is our faculty and staff who have embraced our vision for the future and dedicated themselves to serving our campus community.


“I am grateful for all their contributions and their commitment to graduating students who will represent Louisiana Tech and the next generation of leaders and innovators for our state and nation.”

Louisiana Tech’s Tier One National University ranking comes on the heels of being named Louisiana’s best institution by MONEY’s 2016 Best Colleges report released in July. Louisiana Tech also received international recognition last month when Times Higher Education and World University Rankings identified Tech as one of 20 universities in the world and just one of nine universities in the U.S. that could “challenge the elite universities” and become globally renowned by the year 2030.

In addition to its overall U.S. News & World Report ranking, Louisiana Tech’s place among the nation’s Top Public Universities rose from No. 119 last year to No. 110. Tech also earned national rankings for its undergraduate engineering programs (No. 135) and undergraduate business programs (No. 248).

U.S. News & World Report assessed more than 1,600 four-year colleges and universities across the country, and classified over 300 as “National Universities.” Based on categories developed by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, “National Universities” include institutions that offer a full range of undergraduate majors, plus master’s and Ph.D. programs, and emphasize faculty research. The Carnegie classification has served as the basis for the Best Colleges ranking category system since the first rankings were done in 1983.

Several key measures of quality are used to analyze and rank schools including assessment of excellence as defined by feedback from academic peers and high school guidance counselors, graduation and retention rates, faculty resources, student selectivity, financial resources, graduation rate performance which is defined by the difference between actual and predicted graduation rates, and alumni giving. Scores for each measure are weighted to determine a final overall score.


13 2016-09-13
Ruston

LOYAL BLUE WEEKEND A SUCCESS


Several hundred Louisiana Tech Bulldog fans turned out for the first Loyal Blue Weekend Friday evening in Railroad Park. Clockwise from top, Tech President Les Guice, left, gets a visit from Champ, the university’s athletic mascot; Tech cheerleader Kellie Webb, right, teaches Esther Allen, 2, how to make the Bulldog hand sign; bottom left, Parker Sutton, 9 months, enjoys the evening from her stroller.
13 2016-09-12
Ruston

LOUISIANA TECH UNIVERSITY INTERNS LEARN FROM MENTORS IN CLASSROOM


The 2016-17 school year at Glen View Elementary is off to a fantastic start. Throughout the month of August and the beginning of September, many wonderful happenings have taken place. From the first Boo Hoo Breakfast, to Open House nights for first and second grade and even the first Independence Day for Kindergarteners, there has been quite a bit to be excited about.


13 2016-09-09
Monroe

Toyota executive, Tech alumnus to launch College of Business lecture series


Dr. Cole Napper, Talent Analytics Manager at Toyota North America and Louisiana Tech University alumnus, will present the 11th annual Marbury Lecture at 6 p.m. on Sept. 27 in Room 111 of Louisiana Tech’s College of Business Building.

The lecture, open to all Louisiana Tech students and the public, is part of the annual William Ardis Marbury, Jr. and Virginia Lomax Marbury Lecture Series hosted by the College of Business and Cedar Creek School.

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Prior to his evening lecture, Napper will make a presentation at Cedar Creek School at 9 a.m. to Cedar Creek High School students, Future Business Leaders Club members and to all faculty members.

“Growing up in north Louisiana, and having known Mr. and Mrs. Marbury, it is a great honor to speak on their behalf to the community’s high school and university students,” said Napper. “I intend to stress how the importance of business acumen and integrity, which were embodied by the Marbury’s, play a role in future success. I look forward to reflecting on my experiences in the business world, as well as how my upbringing and education still shape my aspirations and achievements.

“Although my career is far from over, I hope others can glean wisdom from my learnings in the private sector, consulting and teaching. It is an honor to have a platform in which to invest and embolden Louisiana’s future leaders.”

Napper serves as the Talent Analytics Manager at Toyota North America based at Toyota’s US-based headquarters in Dallas suburb in Plano, Texas. Napper has also served in an internal consulting role for other Fortune 500 companies, including PepsiCo-Frito Lay, Anadarko Petroleum and north Louisiana’s own CenturyLink.

Napper received his bachelors, masters, and doctoral degrees from Louisiana Tech. He continued on to earn his Ph.D. in the burgeoning field of Industrial/Organizational Psychology. Napper was born and raised in Monroe, Louisiana, and has been a lifelong Louisiana Tech fan and supporter.

The William Ardis Marbury, Jr. and Virginia Lomax Marbury Lecture Series began in 2006 and is named for William Ardis Marbury, Jr. and his wife Virginia. The couple, both Louisiana Tech graduates, established William A. Marbury & Company, Inc., a managing general insurance agency. This corporation grew to be the largest agency in Louisiana and one of the largest in the South.

The general agency was sold in the 1950s to Commercial Union Insurance Company with the Ruston branch remaining the company’s largest in the country. In 1959, the Marburys and their associates founded Bankers Life of Louisiana, which became the largest credit life insurance writer in the state.

Today the Marbury Companies continue to thrive in Ruston, serving the banking, investment, and insurance sectors. The companies founded by the couple continue to have had a major impact on the economy and the community.

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13 2016-09-08
Ruston

TECH STUDENTS PREPARE FOR SCHOOL


Macey Roark, left, a Louisiana Tech University sophomore nursing major, buys her textbooks from Barby Meyers, a junior speech pathology major, at the Tech bookstore Tuesday. Tech officially starts the 2016-17 school year Thursday.


13 2016-09-08
Ruston

GUICE HIGHLIGHTS TECH ACHIEVEMENTS, PRIORITIES


Academic and research achievements, institutional growth and progress, and providing students with an “unparalleled and integrated educational experience” served as the theme for Louisiana Tech University President Les Guice’s presentation during the annual Fall Faculty and Staff Convocation.


13 2016-09-06
Monroe

LA Tech may give athletic director new contract, raise


RUSTON, La. (AP) - Louisiana Tech wants to give its athletic director a new five-year contract and a $23,000 raise.

The News-Star reports that the Louisiana Tech Foundation would supply the proposed raise for Tommy McClelland, bringing his pre-bonus total to $248,000 a year.

Tech says the school would still pay $140,000 a year, while the foundation's share would rise to $108,000.

McClelland could earn up to $40,000 in bonuses for bowl games, tournament appearances and fundraising.

It's one of three Tech contracts the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors is to consider Sept. 9.

Men's basketball coach Eric Konkol is being offered a one-year extension to the five-year contract he signed in 2015. He'd still get a $400,000 salary.

New women's basketball coach Brooke Stoehr would get $175,000 a year for six years, plus foundation additions rising from $31,000 to $71,000. She could also earn up to $135,000 in bonuses.
13 2016-09-06
Monroe

Tech hoops to bring in more than $200K in game guarantees


Louisiana Tech's men's basketball program will receive more than $200,000 via a pair of game guarantees for the 2016-17 season.

Tech will bring in $105,000 for a road game at South Carolina on Nov. 11 and $100,000 for a road game at Nebraska on Nov. 19, according to documents obtained by The News-Star on Thursday through an open records request.

Additionally, Tech will pay $70,000 to play in the California Bears Classic, a multi-team event similar to the one Tech participated in 2016 with Memphis, Ohio State, UT-Arlington and Grambling.

In that tournament, Tech received $125,000 for playing three games with just one home game coming against UTA. This year, Tech travels to California on Nov. 30 to play the Golden Bears. In return, Tech will host Maryland Eastern-Shore on Nov. 27, Southeastern on Dec. 3 and Alcorn State on Dec. 5.

The contract lists Basketball Promotions and Events, LLC out of Tennessee as the organizer of the tournament. The agreement states Tech is responsible for all travel expenses for the Nov. 30 game at Cal.

The organizer is responsible for travel costs for the three teams playing in Ruston. Tech is entitled to sell tickets and retain all revenue for the three home games.

To put the $70,000 payment in perspective, Tech dished $180,000 for three home games against HBCU schools in 2016. A typical Power Five game guarantee runs brings in anywhere from $90,000 to $100,000 to make up for those costs.

Tech has yet to release its entire 2016-17 schedule. The Bulldogs travel to UL Lafayette on Dec. 10 and host Florida Gulf Coast on Dec. 29, both of which are part of return games from a home-and-home agreement

GUARANTEE GAMES

NEBRASKA

Tech receives: $100,000
Buyout: $100,000
Tickets: 50 complimentary (34 behind opponents' bench, 14 elsewhere in the arena)

SOUTH CAROLINA

Tech receives: $105,000
Buyout: $100,000
Tickets: 75 complimentary, 75 additional for purchase

CALIFORNIA BEARS CLASSIC

Tech pays: $70,000
Buyout: $100,000
Tickets: Visiting teams receive 50 complimentary passes
13 2016-09-06
Monroe

Tech AD McClelland to receive new 5-year deal


Louisiana Tech athletic director Tommy McClelland is set to receive a new five-year deal equipped with a salary raise.

Tech has requested approval from the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors for a proposed five-year contract that would pay McClelland an annual salary of $248,000. McClelland, who enters his fourth year at Tech, signed a three-year deal in 2013 that expired July 31, 2016. The contract is set for approval at a Sept. 9 board meeting.

McClelland is one of three department employees whose contracts are up for approval, joining men's basketball coach Eric Konkol and new women's basketball coach Brooke Stoehr.

The new deal for McClelland, which would run Aug. 1, 2016 through July 31, 2021, includes the same $140,000 base pay from the school. However, his salary from Louisiana Tech University Foundation increases from $85,000 to $108,000, good for a $23,000 raise. The $108,000 is described as McClelland's "role as a fundraiser for the Foundation, and to promote Louisiana Tech athletic programs."

In addition, McClelland can earn $15,000 for participation in a New Year's Six Bowl and $5,000 each for a men's NCAA Tournament appearance, a women's NCAA Tournament appearance and an NCAA baseball tournament Super Regional appearance. McClelland can also earn up to $10,000 a year if certain fundraising goals are met.

The original contract from 2013 had bonuses of $20,000 for a BCS bowl bid or a similar playoff game, $5,000 for a bowl game and $5,000 for a men's or women's NCAA Tournament appearance.

Specific details of McClelland's buyout weren't listed in the executive summary, only stating he would pay "certain amounts stipulated for each year in the contract. Per his old contract, McClelland's buyout started at $50,000 and went to $25,000 in year two and $20,000 in year three.

The new deal stipulates Louisiana Tech's foundation would owe McClelland 18 months salary if he was terminated prior to the last 18 months of his contract, which amounts to $372,000.


THENEWSSTAR.COM
Details on Brooke Stoehr's salary at Tech

Konkol received a one-year extension, effective Aug. 23, on his original five-year deal he signed in 2015 when he took over for Mike White. Konkol's $400,000 annual salary doesn't change, nor do his bonuses. Konkol led Tech to a 23-10 season.

Stoehr's salary was previously reported in May as part of a six-year, $1,376,000 deal. Stoehr, who was hired in April, will receive a base salary of $175,000 per year plus $31,000 in the first year from the foundation for her role in the Louisiana Tech Radio Network and as a fundraiser for the program, per the executive summary. That amount will increase by $10,000 a year until Stoehr reaches a maximum of $71,000.

Stoehr's buyout starts at $350,000 prior to April 18, 2017 and decreases by $50,000 per year until 2021 when it drops to $150,000. Prior to April 18, 2022, Stoehr would owe the lesser of $100,000 or the portion of remaining sums until April 18, 2022.

There are a laundry list of incentives as part of the contract, which went into effect April 18. The maximum bonuses Stoehr can earn in one season is $135,000. They include:

$50,000 — NCAA championship
$20,000 — regular season conference championship
$20,000 — conference tournament championship
$10,000 — NCAA Tournament appearance
$10,000 — NCAA Tournament second round appearance
$10,000 — Sweet 16 appearance
$10,000 — Elite 8 appearance
$10,000, — Final 4 appearance
$10,000 — National Coach of the Year
$5,000 — Conference Coach of the Year
$2,500 — APR higher than national average (beginning in spring 2017)

13 2016-09-06
Ruston

TECH CITED TO POSSIBLY “CHALLENGE THE ELITES”


Times Higher Education and World University Rankings have identified Louisiana Tech University as one of 20 universities in the world and just one of nine universities in the U.S. that could “challenge the elite universities” and become globally renowned by the year 2030.


13 2016-08-31
Ruston

TECH EARNS RECOGNITION FOR VALUE, LOW STUDENT DEBT


Students at Louisiana Tech University incur less average student loan debt than students attending any other four-year institution in the State of Louisiana, according to LendEDU’s “Student Loan Debt By State By School Report 2016.”

LendEDU ranks Louisiana Tech No. 1 in the state among the four-year schools with students averaging $18,284 of debt for their college educations. Louisiana Tech also ranks No. 25 in the nation in a list of least average debt for students at public colleges and universities.


13 2016-08-30
Monroe

Louisiana Tech to host DRA entrepreneur contest


Entrepreneurs from across the Delta region will have the opportunity to win $40,000 in small business training – and access to national and international investors – as part of the Delta Regional Authority's third annual Delta Challenge pitch competition.

The entrepreneurial competition, which will begin the second week of September and run through November, will select 20 entrepreneurs and 16 support organizations to be a part of the DRA's Delta Entrepreneurship Network.

The pitch competitions will include resources and a small business fair. The winners will have the opportunity to pitch investors during New Orleans Entrepreneur Week in March 2017.

The Delta Challenge kicks off with a full-day kickoff event in North Little Rock, Ark. and over the course of the six competitions will identify up to twenty entrepreneurs and sixteen entrepreneurship support organizations.

The final competition will be Nov. 1 at Louisiana Tech University in Rustion.

"Our message today is simple: if you're an entrepreneur in the Delta – or you are someone with an idea of launching a start-up – sign up for the Delta Challenge and give your dream a shot," DRA Chairman Chris Masingill. "We created the Delta Challenge and the Delta Entrepreneurship Network because we dream of a day when our part of the world, like Silicon Valley, is synonymous with entrepreneurship. Our region has low taxes and low energy costs, we have access to ports and natural resources – all essential components for attracting and growing businesses. Now we need our hard-working people to step up and test their ideas."

"Entrepreneurs need to know they don't have to leave home to find funding or assistance – we will provide them with the funding, the support, and the mentorships they need to grow their business right here in the Delta," Chairman Masingill added.

Entrepreneurs interested in competing can register for each competition at www.dra.gov/entrepreneur, where they must submit a business summary at least a week before the competition they plan to attend.

If selected, entrepreneurs will:

Receive a fellowship in technical assistance and training to enhance their entrepreneurship capacity and opportunities
Participate in special investor meetings in New Orleans Entrepreneur Week
Access engaging workshops and mentorships from panelists and other industry experts.
"We are thrilled to once again partner with the Delta Regional Authority on the Delta Challenge to support entrepreneurship and innovative thinking in New Orleans and across the region," Emily Madero, Acting CEO of The Idea Village, said. "Our work focuses on the power of entrepreneurship to strengthen our local economy and transform our community, and the Delta Entrepreneurship Network helps apply this principle across the entire Delta Region. We look forward to meeting this year's cohort when they join us at the 9th annual New Orleans Entrepreneur Week."

"The Delta Regional Authority has been a steadfast catalyst in expanding access to the types of services and resources that founders from the Delta need to successfully launch new companies," Codefi Founder James Stapleton said. "Increasingly, entrepreneurs in the Delta and those we are attracting to our region find resources and talent that rival anywhere in the U.S. The Delta Challenge is another example of an amazing opportunity for local entrepreneurs to connect to individuals and resources that may make the difference between failure and success, or success and giant success."

Want to compete?

The regional pitch competitions will identify two types of entrepreneurs, those that are in their "idea" or pre-revenue phase, and those entrepreneurs that have highly scalable, investable ventures throughout the region, or are in the "post revenue" phase. The deadline for ESOs will be midnight Nov. 1.

Entrepreneurship support organizations that serve communities and entrepreneurs in the 252 counties and parishes within the DRA's footprint must submit an application online at dra.gov/entrepreneur outlining the current services they provide and their expectations for utilizing DEN technical assistance and programming.

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13 2016-08-30
Monroe

Tech has lowest student debt in state


Students at Louisiana Tech University incur less average student loan debt than students attending any other four-year institution in the State of Louisiana, according to LendEDU’s “Student Loan Debt By State By School Report 2016.”

LendEDU ranks Louisiana Tech No. 1 in the state among the four-year schools with students averaging $18,284 of debt for their college educations. Louisiana Tech also ranks No. 25 in the nation in a list of least average debt for students at public colleges and universities.

The LendEDU recognition is just the latest in a series of national rankings that Louisiana Tech has earned over the past year for education value and graduating student with some of the lowest average loan debt totals in the United States.

Last September, U.S. News & World Report ranked Louisiana Tech No. 1 in the nation among national public research universities for graduating students with the least average debt. Business Insider followed in November ranking Louisiana Tech the sixth most underrated college in the nation, according to its list of the 50 Most Underrated Colleges in America for 2015. In December, Louisiana Tech earned recognition from Kiplinger who ranked Louisiana Tech No. 1 in the state and No. 66 in the nation in its Best College Values 2016 report, for in-state students at public institutions.

“Given the financial challenges all students and parents are facing in our state, Louisiana Tech is proud of the fact that it is providing students with one of the best educational values in the nation and a diploma from a top tier, national research university,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “Our faculty and staff continue to dedicate themselves to the growth and success of our students. I am proud to serve them and support their tireless efforts to advance Louisiana Tech locally, regionally and nationally.”

According to their “Student Loan Debt By State By School Report 2016,” LendEDU says students currently attending college in the United States are leaving campus with an average of over $28,000 in student debt. As a state, institutions in Louisiana ranked No. 39 in the nation in average student loan debt at $25,452.

This latest ranking is the second time this calendar year that LendEDU has recognized Louisiana Tech for value. In March, LendEDU ranked Louisiana Tech No. 35 in the nation according to its 2016 College Risk-Reward Indicator (CRRI) list. Louisiana Tech had the highest CRRI of any public or private university in Louisiana, and is one of only two schools in the state to earn a spot in the Top 100. The University of New Orleans was the other Louisiana institution, coming in at No. 81.

The complete Student Loan Debt By State By School Report 2016 can be viewed at https://lendedu.com/blog/student-loan-debt-statistics-by-state-by-school#interactivemap. The school-level rankings can be found by visiting https://lendedu.com/blog/student-loan-debt-ranking-college-level-statistics#tab-con-5
13 2016-08-26
Monroe

La. Tech researchers use underground radar to locate post-Katrina damage


RUSTON, La. (KNOE & La. Tech) - An innovative underground radar technology developed at Louisiana Tech University is helping the City of Slidell in south Louisiana to identify and document underground infrastructure damage that had gone undetected in the months and years following Hurricane Katrina.

This radar technology is a pipe-penetrating scanning system based on a new technology called ultra-wide band (UWB) pulsed radar. UWB allows for the inspection of buried pipelines, tunnels and culverts to detect fractures, quantify corrosion and determine the presence of voids in the surrounding soil often caused by water leaks and flooding.

Developed at Louisiana Tech’s Trenchless Technology Center, this technology incorporates leading-edge simulation, electronics, robotics, signal processing and three-dimensional (3-D) renderings in a package that can be mounted on existing pipe-inspection robots.

Dr. Arun Jaganathan, associate professor of civil engineering and construction engineering technology at Louisiana Tech, began developing this technology as the basis for his Ph.D. dissertation research.


Partnering with fellow Louisiana Tech researcher Dr. Neven Simicevic and others, his vision was to eventually develop it into a tool that municipal engineers can use for their routine pipeline condition assessment.

“Our UWB technology was based on recognizing the need within the trenchless industry for an advanced pipeline inspection tool that can quantify the structural integrity of buried municipal pipes like sewers and storm drains, and be able to see through the pipe wall,” said Jaganathan. “The radar system emits ultra-short electromagnetic pulses from inside of a sewer pipe and captures the signals ‘back-scattered’ from the pipe to determine the condition of various layers hidden behind the wall which we cannot directly see using visual tools such as a camera. The radar is integrated into a robot which crawls through a pipe and relays the data back to the operator in real time.”

Jay Newcomb, City of Slidell Council Member for District F and a Louisiana Tech alumnus, learned of this technology and the possibilities for partnership through his connections with his alma mater.

“During my campaign for City Council, myself and many others all espoused a need in the city for small, high tech, clean industry,” said Newcomb. “I was already well aware of what Tech was doing with the business incubator on campus and, though we have no university to attach an incubator to, we took a trip to Tech in September of 2010 to check things out and make ourselves be known to any interested companies.

“At that time, Louisiana Tech’s radar technology was still in the developmental stages, but the research team said that if the innovation proved useful in lab tests, Slidell would be used as a Beta site in actual field studies.”

Following successful testing and development, Jaganathan and other researchers came to Slidell in the summer of 2013 to pinpoint the spots in the city that would be most beneficial for using the UWB, and to test and investigate the underground infrastructure issues.

As had been predicted by the group in their initial research, compromised infrastructure was able to be seen using the UWB technology and, most importantly, became provable.

“While we were aware of the depth and breadth of the problems that plagued our underground utilities and we knew surrounding communities had experienced similar problems, I believe it wasn't until we made the trip to Ruston in 2010 and then saw the results of the UWB investigation that we actually realized we could have quantifiable evidence of the scope of that damage,” said Newcomb.

As a result of the work of Jaganathan, Simicevic and the Louisiana Tech researcher team, and consultations with other engineering firms, the City of Slidell was able to secure $75 million in funding from FEMA to begin the underground utility restoration process.

“Our FY2017 total budget for the City of Slidell is just under $43 million,” said Newcomb. “We have almost two whole budgets to spend on streets, drainage and sewer thanks to the collective efforts of many, beginning with the research conducted by Louisiana Tech University.”

“This technology is unique in its capability to generate high resolution images which allow engineers to inspect a particular spot in detail,” Jaganathan said. “Unlike many other radars, our system does have to be in contact with the pipe wall and this provides capability for rapid inspection to finish scanning a long pipe in a timely manner.”
Jaganathan says this project demonstrates the value of academic research at Louisiana Tech.

“What started as an academic research ultimately led to the development of a practical tool that our municipal engineers can use on a daily basis for the betterment of our infrastructure and society, as a whole,” says Jaganathan. “The sophistication and complexity of electronics involved in this system speaks to the capability of Louisiana Tech researchers to design and develop advanced sensing technologies.”

“As for the State of Louisiana, I think they would be wise to look closely at what is going on at such a dynamic institution as Louisiana Tech and its dynamic leadership team,” Newcomb says. “I truly believe that far too municipalities’ first response to problems is, ‘Who do we hire to consult/fix this?’, instead of asking, ‘I wonder if any of our public universities have researched this topic or have any prior experience dealing with a similar situation?’”

“I am glad the City of Slidell asked for help from Louisiana Tech. All we had to do was just ask!”


13 2016-08-24
Monroe

Abraham announces $6 million for Louisiana Tech


WASHINGTON – Congressman Ralph Abraham, M.D., R-Alto, announced Monday that Louisiana Tech University has received a $6 million grant from the National Science Foundation.

The grant will focus on understanding the initiation of epileptic brain seizures and longer-term impacts of brain function, such as memory. The project will use minimally invasive implantable sensors to monitor brain activity before, during and after seizure events.

The study will result in new jobs, new equipment and new courses of study for undergraduate and graduate students. Leonidas Iasemidis will serve as the lead investigator, and co-investigators Mark DeCoster, Teresa Murray, Jerzy Szaflarski and L. John Greenfield will join him.

Louisiana Tech
Louisiana Tech (Photo: Courtesy)
Abraham toured the research facility this spring. He also wrote a letter to the NSF in support of the grant application.

“This is a tremendous win for Louisiana Tech’s students, faculty and staff. As a doctor, I have worked with many patients who suffer from epilepsy. I’m proud to have supported this grant application because it represents not only an investment in Tech, but also an investment in the futures of all of those who suffer from these seizures,” DrAbraham said.

The project is projected to begin in September and run through the end of August 2020.


13 2016-08-23
Ruston

Tech professor receives NSF grant to advance brain research in epilepsy


RUSTON – The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded a team led by Dr. Leonidas Iasemidis, the Rhodes Eminent Scholar Chair and professor of biomedical engineering at Louisiana Tech University, a $6 million grant over four years to investigate the origins and impacts of brain seizures associated with epilepsy.

Through its Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR), NSF announced 11 awards totaling $55 million aimed at building research capacity to address fundamental questions about the brain and develop new innovations at the intersection of food, energy and water systems. Iasemidis’ project titled, “Probing and Understanding the Brain: Micro and Macro Dynamics of Seizure and Memory Networks,” seeks transformative advances and understanding of the brain’s function, in particular the explanation of the foundations of transitions of brain networks from normal states into crises such as seizures.

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“Epilepsy can serve as a unique window into the brain function because it causes impairment of functions depending on the location of the epileptogenic focus and the extent of the seizure networks in the brain,” said Iasemidis. “In this project, our team will conduct and analyze long-term, in-depth, electro-encephalographic (EEG) and electrochemical recordings, long-term in-depth optical imaging, and short-term magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings from the brains of animal and human subjects with epilepsy to uncover the causes of seizures, as well as their impact on higher brain functions such as memory.

“Completion of the scientific goals of the project would significantly advance the state-of-the-art in probing the brain at multiple levels at once and the mathematical study of spontaneous brain transitions to crises, as well as contribute to novel applications in epilepsy.”

Iasemidis is leading a team of investigators that includes Dr. Teresa Murray, Dr. Mark DeCoster, Dr. Prabhu Arumugam, Dr. Katie Evans and Dr. Ioannis Vlachos from Louisiana Tech; Dr. Jerzy Szaflarski, Dr. Sandipan Pati, Dr. Timothy Gawn and Dr. Roy Martin from the University of Alabama; and Dr. John Greenfield, Dr. Linda Larsen-Prior, Dr. Jennifer Gess and Dr. Jennifer Kleiner from the University of Arkansas. The collaborative effort will investigate the origins and impacts of brain seizures – a disorder affecting approximately one percent of the global population.

Iasemidis, who also serves as director of Louisiana Tech’s Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science (CBERS), is the founder and director of Louisiana Tech’s Brain Dynamics Lab, and is a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineers (AIMBE) and the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), closely aligned his team’s proposal with NSF’s “Understanding the Brain” initiative, focusing on neuroscience and cognitive science, and which supports the BRAIN initiative announced by the White House in April 2013.

“Louisiana Tech is playing a key role in Understanding the Brain, a key Presidential Priority for President Barack Obama and for many federal agencies,” said Dr. Stan Napper, vice president for research and development at Louisiana Tech. “Led by Dr. Iasemidis and joined by active researchers at Louisiana Tech, the University of Arkansas and the University of Alabama, this research will lead to new knowledge about how to detect and resolve epileptic seizures and memory deficits.”

As part of EPSCoR’s Research Infrastructure Improvement (RII) Track2 investment strategy, the four-year NSF awards announced Monday support 27 institutions in 18 jurisdictions and build national research strength by initiating collaborations across institutions in two or more EPSCoR jurisdictions. The RII Track2 awards support research while also requiring award recipients to invest in developing a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce particularly of early career faculty researchers.

“These awards represent a tremendous value for the scientific community, as they foster research into some of the most pressing issues facing U.S. society while simultaneously supporting collaborative research programs and workforce development,” said Denise Barnes, head of NSF EPSCoR. “Whether by expanding our knowledge of the brain, or by improving how our water, food and energy systems work efficiently together, these projects hold the promise of transforming our daily lives.”

Iasemidis is an internationally recognized expert in nonlinear dynamics and the detection, prediction and control of crises in complex coupled systems. He is also one of the founders of the field of seizure prediction, is a co-founder of two companies involved in neuromodulation and control of epilepsy, and is the co-author of 10 patents in this area. Iasemidis has had nearly 5,000 scholarly citations and his research has been highlighted in multiple forums, including the New York Times, Discover magazine, the Teaching Company, and the American Society for the Advancement of Science.


13 2016-08-19
Monroe

Owens congratulates Louisiana Tech graduates, reminds them that ‘words matter’


RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech) - “Words matter. You have to connect with people before you can communicate, persuade, understand, inform, influence and much more.”

That was the message presented to 267 new Louisiana Tech University graduates by keynote speaker Dr. Reginald Owens during the school’s 317th commencement ceremony held Thursday morning at the Thomas Assembly Center.

Owens, who retires at the end of the month as the former department head for journalism and F. Jay Taylor Endowed Chair of Journalism at Louisiana Tech, said the theme of his speech was inspired by something Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings said in the first news conference following the horrific police killings in his city this summer.

“(Rawlings) said at his first news conference ‘Words matter, leadership matters at this time.’ Over the period of this tragic event consumed our attention, Mayor Rawlings shortened the phrase to ‘words matter,’” Owens said.

Yes, words do matter, Owen added.

“I have known that for a long time,” Owens said. “I have known, too, that we can’t solve anything if we are screaming at each other. How can you hear? How do you know what is being said? Are you listening? Yes, listening is the major factor in communication. The phrase ’words matter’ here, therefore, is a metaphor, actually, for the ultimate perception of communication meaning.”


Owens told the graduates that it is crucial that they build a proper bridge from interpersonal to mediated communication.

“This is essential in today’s intersection of words and technology,” Owens said. “In digital communication, words can be more powerful — and more ambiguous — because the receiver can’t hear the inflections in voice delivery and can’t see the body language of the sender delivering the message apparent face to face.

“I am talking about such platforms as email, Facebook, Integra, Pinterest, Snapchat and Twitter, among others.”

Owens told the gradate that in order to help prepare future Tech graduates about our new world of words, the university has put a new emphasis on teaching communication skills beginning with the fall 2016 freshman class.

“As the university’s new curriculum evolved over the past few years, I often heard the former vice president of advancement, Corre Stegall, tell the story about the recruiter moaning that too many graduates don’t have proper communication skills,” Owens said. “The recruiter noted that it was easier for his company to hire someone who could communicate and then teach them engineering, rather than the other way around. Employers consistently rank communication skills as one of the most important when hiring graduates.”

Before introducing Owens, Louisiana Tech President Les Guice told the graduates it was a day they’ll always remember.

“Many of those who started Louisiana Tech with you aren’t here today,” Guice said. “Despite the challenges you faced, it was you who set goals and worked tirelessly to achieve them. It was you who showed perseverance and dedicated countless hours to study, research and attending class.

“You have made many memories that will truly last a lifetime. Today is truly a milestone in your life’s journey.”

Jeffrey Scott Arney of Floydada, Texas, was the top graduate as he picked up a Bachelor of Science degree from Tech’s College of Engineering and Science, graduating summa cum laude with a perfect 4.0 grade point average. Arney is also a military veteran.

There were 162 undergraduate, 110 graduate and 21 doctoral degrees conferred in all.

As Owens began his speech, he did so by offering his signature greeting he’s opened each class he has taught over the past 40 years.

“Greetings! Salutations! Exultations! As-salamu alaykum! Muli Bwanji! Muli shani! Dobre utra! Konnichiwa! Guten Morgen! Bonjour! Buenos dias! Habari gani!,” Owens said. “I started this greeting for two reasons: First, to get students’ attention. Secondly, a goal was to engender some empathy and understanding of their diverse culture and this multicultural world.

“In this class introduction, besides English, students were introduced to greetings in these languages: Arabic, Bantu and Bemba languages spoken in southern Africa, Russian, Japanese, German, French, Spanish and Swahili, the lingua franca language spoken throughout Africa. The point of this greeting as a teaching tool is this: You have to connect with people before you can communicate, persuade, understand, inform, influence and the list can go on and on.”

And Owens closed his speech in much the same way.

“Let me part as I began: in English, Arabic, Bantu and Bemba, Russian, Japanese, German, French, Swahili and Spanish,” Owens said. “See you later. Commence your journey. Maa salama. Salani. Chisuma. Da sveedaneeya. Sayonara. Auf wiedersehen. Au revoir. Kwaheri. Adios.

“That’s the final word. Peace.”


13 2016-08-16
Monroe

Tech players affected by flooding in south Louisiana


RUSTON — Louisiana Tech coach Skip Holtz said Monday the families of about a third of the football roster has been impacted in some way by the devastating floods in south Louisiana.

Holtz said in-state players from Baton Rouge and surrounding areas had their families "picked up, moved, driven out of their homes" over the weekend as heavy rainfall forced massive flooding in the southern portion of the state.

Baton Rouge and areas along I-12 like Walker and Denham Springs were hit hard. Holtz said a few unnamed players went home for two days to help their families but have since returned to practice.

"They don't have phone service down there to their families. They are communicating through pictures and comments through Facebook," Holtz said after Monday's practice. "It's hard for them right now because they're out here practicing, going through meetings but everybody is worried about the safety and health of their families right now."

More than 12,000 people were in shelters, 40,000 homes and businesses were without power and 20,000 high-water rescues have been made since Friday, Gov. John Bel Edwards said Monday.


THENEWSSTAR.COM
Stranded I-12 motorists finally reached, rescued, governor says

The federal government declared Tangipahoa, St. Helena, East Baton Rouge and Livingston parishes as major disaster areas. Tangipahoa includes Hammond, while Livingston covers Walker and Denham Springs.

Tech's roster lists more than 20 players from the Baton Rouge, Lafayette and Northshore area in east Louisiana.

Players from either Baton Rouge or surrounding areas include Jonathan Barnes (Baton Rouge), Reggie Cleveland (Baton Rouge), Donald Freeman (Baton Rouge), Deldrick Canty (Baton Rouge), Matthew Ydarraga (Baton Rouge), Clayton Landry (Denham Spring), Shane Carpenter (Walker), Boston Scott (Zachary), Kam McKnight (Ethel), Russell Farris (Ventress), Willie Baker (New Roads), Cee Jay Powell (Maringouin) and Dominique Williams (Gonzales).

Walker and Denham Springs were especially hit hard. On Saturday, Carpenter, a sophomore offensive lineman, asked for prayers to those who had been affected by the flooding.


Players from east Louisiana include Conner Smith (Covington) Marcus Gaines (Covington) and Charles Adeola (Slidell). O'Shea Dugas (Lafayette), Rhashid Bonnettee (Loreauville) and Taylor Fondal (New Iberia) are from areas that were affected. A 60-plus mile stretch of Interstate 12 from Baton Rouge to Covington was closed over the weekend.

"It definitely puts things in perspective with where our values are and what we're doing right now," Holtz said. "We're trying to do everything we can to help them make sure they are in communication with their families and their families are safe. They can't do anything there. As long as their families are safe. It's a hard lesson to learn and hard to go through at 18, 19, 20 years old."


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Gov. Edwards to tour Acadiana flooding today

The devastating images and videos were picked up nationally as television and camera crews embarked on south Louisiana to report on the matter.

Holtz said the impact of the flooding goes beyond what the public sees on TV.

"It's a terrible thing because the national news puts their television cameras on their for this week while the waters are up and everything is flooded, but then all of a sudden the TV cameras and everybody goes away because the water rescinds but there's still not electricity for a month, nobody has air conditioning units, everybody is trying to get water damage back," he said. "They can't move back into their homes, their jobs are on holds, they have mortgages to pay.

"It's a tragedy right now."


13 2016-08-16
Monroe

Tech's latest upgrades a reminder of facility arms race in athletics


Tommy McClelland remembers how frequently donors and supporters of Louisiana Tech would come up to him last fall to mention how poor the school's press box at Joe Aillet Stadium looked.

In his mind, the fourth-year Tech athletic director considered the obvious: The structure, which opened in 1968, has looked bad for the last 15 to 20 years.

But even as recent as 10 years ago, college fans and supporters in north Louisiana would be hard pressed to find notable facility upgrades on their campuses. In 1989, 7,000 more seats were added as part of Tech's stadium expansion. The next major upgrade came in 2009 with a video board — Tech installed turf in 2006.

Years went by without change at schools like Tech, ULM, Grambling and Northwestern State.

Within the past two weeks, Tech and ULM, two of the largest colleges in north Louisiana Tech, continued to up the ante. ULM debuted a 11,750-square foot, $4.1 million dollar field house as the first new athletic building on campus since 1983. A week later, Tech unveiled plans for $18.6 million worth of upgrades to Joe Aillet Stadium, the second major upgrade within the past year after the school opened the $22 million Davison Athletics complex in 2015.

"The old adage is you're either growing or you're dying," Tech coach Skip Holtz said last week. "It's hard to say Louisiana Tech is not on a pretty big growth spurt right now."

Programs across the country are trying to position themselves in the best possible light. For name-brand programs, millions are poured in to keep up with the Joneses .

Now, the trickle down effect has hit programs in the area.

"It's a sign of the times. Everybody talks about the quote, unquote arms race at the Power Five level. It definitely has become a factor at the other levels of Division I," Northwestern State athletic director Greg Burke said.

ULM's $4.1 million, 11,750-square foot field houseBuy Photo
ULM's $4.1 million, 11,750-square foot field house includes a new locker room and coaches offices. (Photo: Adam Hunsucker/The News-Star)
A race that won't end

Few knew what started with a video board in 2009 would turn into three sides of Joe Aillet Stadium seeing upgrades by 2017.

Count Tim Fletcher among those folks.

Fletcher, who covered Tech for 18 years at KTBS in Shreveport and is now host of the Tim Fletcher Show, remembers how the addition in 2009 was "cool" and "unique."

"I don’t think I would have ever thought they would have this kind of improvements, especially the press box. The easy way to do the press box is to refurbish it and make some more room," Fletcher said. "To do what they’re doing is beyond what any of us who covered Tech would have expected."

Tech has strong alumni and donor support and has capitalized on a rejuvenation of sorts under McClelland and president Les Guice, Fletcher said. What started with winning under former coach Sonny Dykes has continued under Holtz.


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How Tech is pulling off 2 big stadium upgrades for $40 million

At ULM, the Warhawks battle the lowest athletic budget in FBS football while trying to compete with both regional peers and conference foes.

"I’m going on 20 years in college athletics. When I was at the University of Missouri (as assistant athletic director) in 1999-2000, facilities weren’t that important," ULM athletic director Brian Wickstrom said. "Now that I’m in the Sun Belt, we’re competing against everyone in our conference to have great facilities and that isn’t going away any time soon."

Grambling has yet to make a splash in the facility race as it transitions through new leadership. That doesn't mean Broderick Fobbs, who enters his third year as football coach, isn't keeping tabs.

"I’m very happy for those programs and the strides in which they are making. They are good programs and successful programs," he said. "We’re well on our way as well."

Not chasing anybody

All four schools in the area all in four separate conferences. Two are FBS, two are FCS.

"We pay attention to those we consider our peers in certain areas. I think it’s also important we reiterate we have a vision that is put forth for the university and we’re following the plan," said Brooks Hull, Tech's Vice President of University Advancement. "These things are part of that overall plan. We do keep our tabs on what’s going on at other institutions, but we’re not chasing anybody. Louisiana Tech University is its own entity."

McClelland echoed Hull's comments, indicating Tech prefers to say in its own lanes while "running our race."

It's certainly a talking point, though.

While competition between local schools may not be at the forefront, bragging rights among conference members exists.

“It has absolutely become a race,” said Marco Born, Tech's associate athletic director for external affairs, in a recent interview with the Denton Record-Chronicle when discussing Conference USA facilities.


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And it's not limited to football, either.

A $500,000 donation is being used to upgrade the reserved chair back seats on the lower deck of stands along the west side at Northwestern State's Turpin Stadium, but NSU has plans for $1.7 million worth of upgrades to baseball complex, tennis and track and field.

NSU also spent $1.5 million on a new parking lot between their facilities. Burke also said there's a new $35 million arena in capital outlay, although the future plans are unclear with the state's budget tightening. When completed, it will be "a jewel in our crown," Burke said.

Tech pumped in $1.2 million for new turf fields for baseball and softball last fall. Upgrades to the basketball arena included a new $1.2 million video board and sound system in 2013. A new indoor facility is likely the next task for Tech's football program.

At ULM, Wickstrom indicated a new training room, a new track at Brown Stadium and upgrades to the restrooms and concession areas at Fant-Ewing Coliseum are among his future priorities. ULM also wants to close in the end zone at Malone Stadium.

Grambling put $30,000 into a new weight room in 2013 and has aspirations of making improvements to Eddie Robinson Stadium.

"You’re definitely seeing an evolution and it’s something that all of us, Monroe, Tech, Grambling, us, like institutions ... it’s something that has to be on your radar," Burke said.

The proposal for the NSU baseball complex includes
The proposal for the NSU baseball complex includes a concession stand and public restrooms. (Photo: Demons Unlimited Foundation)
An everyday dialogue

Fobbs had a vision ever since he stepped foot on Grambling's campus in December 2012.

He knew what he wanted his program to look like, the university to look like, the athletic department to look like and facilities to look like.

The right leadership must be in place, and Fobbs thinks Grambling has it with Rick Gallot as the new president.

Back in 2014, then interim president Cynthia Warrick said one of her priorities was to renovate Robinson Stadium with a Jumbotron, new turf, a new drainage system.

"Everything is going to be focused on that stadium," she said in 2014.

So far, it hasn't happened.

Fobbs stressed those improvements are still in the future plans. However, he stressed a foundation needs to be implemented and the right people need to be hired before change can come.

"We want to build it the right way and we want to take our time and build it from the inside out. Eventually things will start to come to surface and people will see the changes we’re making," he said.

"You have to ask yourself the question of who’s going to run the scoreboard? There’s certain things that come before that. There’s foundation we’re doing now that will show up later on."


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NSU Demons may get new basketball arena

While Grambling is starting from the ground up, NSU is making strides with fundraising and support, but Burke said it's not enough.

"It’s a fact of life here that we have to put more effort into that," he said. "The facility subject has got to be a part of your every day dialogue as well."

Burke used the word "ambitious" to describe what NSU has done.

It's a common theme for schools around here. All four programs have among the lowest athletic budgets in their respective conferences.

And some, like Tech, have larger donor bases. But Burke said he hopes the power moves made by Tech and ULM set in with NSU supporters.

"Quite honestly, you kind of hope in my shoes, you say to yourself that our people, who I know do a lot for us already, some maybe more than others, they see what’s going on around north Louisiana, let alone our conference and across the country, and becomes an inspiration to them," he said.

Keeping an edge

The new facilities at Tech and ULM have helped rejuvenate interest in athletics.

The real boom has come with attracting new coaches and recruits to campus.

Last summer, Tech was able to land a commitment from Willie Baker, who compared the new end zone facility to what some schools in the Southeastern Conference have. It was as glowing of an endorsement as Tech could receive.

ULM has seen recruiting pick up, too. The Warhawks have nine verbal commitments, which is unheard of for the program at time of year.


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"If you talk to (football coach Matt) Viator, the biggest thing for the recruits that have taken visits here are taking their selfies in the building and in the uniforms," Wickstrom said. "That’s what this is, college football is an arms race now. You could have a great coach, but to maximize your chance to get good players, you have to have facilities."

Places like NSU and Grambling may be behind on the times, but they've managed to stay competitive. NSU upset Tech in Ruston in 2014, while Grambling played for the Southwestern Athletic Conference title in 2015.

"We’ve done some nice things here and we’ve seen some very nice things that have been done and are being done at other schools," Burke said. "It definitely helps you keep your edge, that’s for sure. You don’t lose an edge when you see what’s going on at other places."

The News-Star sports reporter Adam Hunsucker and The Times sports reporter Luke Thompson contributed to this report.


13 2016-08-16
Shreveport

How La. Tech is upgrading stadium for $40M


RUSTON — Momentum is contagious.

That's what Louisiana Tech is using to label how it was able to announce plans for $18 million more in stadium upgrades less than a year after the school opened a $22 million end zone facility at Joe Aillet Stadium.

Tech plans on pumping $16.7 million into new suites and a new press box and an additional $1.9 million in stadium enhancements. The new upgrades will begin in November with a completion date for September 2017.

"To be honest with you, when you complete a building like this (the DAC) and you're able to deliver, and probably maybe to some degree over deliver, people trust you," Tech athletic director Tommy McClelland said last week.


SHREVEPORTTIMES.COM
Tech unveils plans for new suites, press box

Tech originally announced plans to begin fundraising for the DAC in 2010. It took four years to break ground and five years for the completed project. Since Tech started construction on the end zone facility in April 2014, new turf projects for baseball and softball were spawned.

Once the DAC opened last fall, interest in athletic improvements was booming. That's when Tech capitalized.

This new project will mark four separate improvements totaling more than $40 million in the past few years.

"Momentum is so key, particularly in this economic climate, and so we wanted to stay on a path where we had a lot of momentum right now as an institution," said Brooks Hull, Tech's Vice President of University Advancement "It really gave us an opportunity to reach further into our plans and bring this project up to a fast pace but not to big of a rush where we weren’t prepared to go into this project fully knowing the level of commitment it was going to take to get it done."

Hull came aboard last fall just after the DAC was completed. He said Tech was still in the early stages of raising money for the west side stadium upgrades at the time of his hiring.

The public may view this announcement as a quick turn, but McClelland said the planning for the stadium upgrades was 18 months in the making.

Contributions picked up within the last three or four months to where Tech felt comfortable announcing the project. With the DAC, Tech used a quarterly $50 student fee passed in 2014 along with private donations, most notably from the Davison family, for whom the building is name after, to fund the project.

"In a project like this you have to get as much heavyweight lifting up front," McClelland said. "The reality is if you go around and trying to do it with $100 here and there, you might get a lot of people, but the net gross is not enough to actually get the thing off the ground. We've been focused on making sure we can make the progress we need to get there. The back end of this is where everybody's got to help, too."


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Area college athletic departments part of arms race

Million dollar gifts from multiple people, according to Hull, helped catapult the project forward.

Hull, members of his team, McClelland and even Tech coach Skip Holtz spanned the country during the summer to help secure contributions.

"Part of my role in this, my small role, was to provide support and vision on where we want to build this athletic department and this football program and this university," Holtz said.

Holtz said he and McClelland were on "a lot of planes" traveling to see donors. They explained the vision and the role the new suites would have. McClelland said earlier this week the DAC and the new suites will help generate more than $1 million in annual income for the athletic department.

The pitch centered around how their contributions can make a difference and how it will change the way Tech is perceived as an athletic department.

"We have teams coming in and fan bases coming in and you want them all to walk out and go, wow, Louisiana Tech is first-class now ... You go over there now and it's amazing. It's a hidden gem over there on I-20 that a lot of people don't know about," Holtz said.
13 2016-08-12
Shreveport

La. Tech adds hoops assistant coach


RUSTON – Louisiana Tech head coach Eric Konkol announced on Thursday that Yaphett King will be joining the men’s basketball staff as an assistant coach.

King comes to Tech after recently serving four years as an assistant coach at Texas A&M—Corpus Christi.

“Yaphett King is a talented coach and skilled recruiter with an energetic personality,” Konkol said. “He has tremendous experiences as a player, junior college head coach and has been an integral part of building successful programs.

Yaphett is a relentless recruiter with ties to this region and our recruiting areas. Our student-athletes will benefit from his genuine interest in their development and his ability to help them become their best. We are very happy to welcome Yaphett and his family to the Ruston community and to Louisiana Tech University.”


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While at A&M–Corpus Christi, King played a key role in turning the Islanders program around. The team posted a 12-win improvement from 2012-13 to 2013-14, the third most improved program in the nation.

The Islanders went from finishing ninth in the Southland Conference to finishing second and making a postseason appearance in the CollegeInsider.com Tournament. They followed that up with a 20-win season and another berth in the CIT.

“I would like to thank coach Eric Konkol for giving me the opportunity to work here at Louisiana Tech University which has a proud basketball tradition,” King said. “Coach Konkol is an outstanding person of great integrity and character. I look forward to helping him execute his vision of bringing championships to Ruston.”

This past season, the program had one of its most successful years in school history. A&M-Corpus Christi registered 25 victories, the second most in program history, while also reaching the league championship game for the first time since 2007. The Islanders ended up making the postseason for the third straight season, a first in school history.

Part of the A&M-Corpus Christi’s success stemmed from King being instrumental in landing and developing forward Rashawn Thomas who was Southland Conference Defensive Player of the Year and named to the Lou Henson Mid-Major All-America team this past season after averaging 16.6 points and a league-best 8.0 boards per game. He also finished with a school record 75 blocks.

Prior to joining the Islanders, King spent four years as head coach at Redlands Community College where he led the squad to 72 wins during his tenure, highlighted by a 21-win season and a trip to the National Junior College Athletic Association Tournament in 2010-11.


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On the court, King was an All-American as a freshman at Redlands in 2001-02 while leading the team to the NJCAA Division II national title.


He went on to play at Cal State Fullerton where he helped the Titans to postseason play for the first time in 15 years, advancing to the Round of 16 in the National Invitation Tournament.

After playing professionally in Austria for two years, King returned to Redlands as an assistant coach in 2007. Redlands finished the season as regional runner-ups with a 31-2 overall record. Seven players went on to attend Division I programs.

The following year he joined Cowley College as an assistant coach, assisting the team to a 31-2 overall mark in route to an appearance in the regional championship game.

King is a native of St. Petersburg, Florida. He and his wife, Charlena, have a daughter, Caydance.

The hiring of Yaphett King is subject to final approval from the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors.


13 2016-08-11
Monroe

Louisiana Tech historian honored at Central American conference


RUSTON – Dr. Stephen Webre, the Garnie W. McGinty Chair in History and interim associate dean for Louisiana Tech University’s College of Liberal Arts, was recently honored for distinction at the 13th Central American Historical Congress held in Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

In presenting the certificate of recognition on the behalf of congress authorities, Professor Rolando Sierra Fonseca, director of the Honduras branch of the Latin American College of Social Sciences, and Dr. Mélida Velásquez Lambur, director of history majors, recognized Webre’s long record of contributions to the field of Central American history and his many activities over the years in support of the biennial academic meeting.

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The Central American Historical Congress is the single most recognized gathering for area specialists. This year’s event drew some 400 researchers, teachers and students from 13 different countries to participate in a program featuring more than 200 original papers, plus featured lecturers, workshops, round tables and book launches.

Active in the organization since its founding in 1992, Webre has served as coordinator of the program section devoted to the history of the Spanish colonial period. At this year’s meeting, he presented a research paper titled “The Misfortunes of Doña Bárbara del Castillo,” in which he reconstructed the life of a widow in seventeenth-century Guatemala, demonstrating how she found ways to survive, despite repeated tragedies and acts of betrayal.

Webre received his doctorate at Tulane University and been a member of the Louisiana Tech faculty for the past 34 years. He is a specialist in Latin American history with a special interest in Central America. Webre’s publications include three books and multiple articles in academic journals.


13 2016-08-10
Shreveport

Tech unveils plans for new suites, press box


RUSTON — The latest makeover to Joe Aillet Stadium is set to begin following the 2016 season.

Louisiana Tech unveiled plans Tuesday for a new press box and suites as part of $18.6 million worth of total stadium improvements at Joe Aillet Stadium. The new press box and suites will run $16.7 million with an additional $2.1 million invested toward stadium improvements like LED lighting, a permanent west side ticket booth, renovations to the bathroom and "aesthetic" improvements to stadium entrances.

The project will be funded through private donations with an expected completion date of September 2017 in time for Tech's home opener against Northwestern State. Tech athletic director Tommy McClelland says the new facility will bring in more than $1 million annually.

The facility is four times larger than the current structure and will stretch from the 10-yard line to the 10-yard line of the stadium. The first floor of the facility includes 13 suites plus a presidential suite. Each suite can hold 20 people with 12 outdoor seats.


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Demolition of the existing structure begins Nov. 14, which coincides with the final home against against UTSA. The November start date means if Tech were to host the C-USA championship game, it would be played in Shreveport at Independence Stadium.

Tuesday's announcement means that Tech has raised enough private funds to move forward and announce the project. McClelland previously said that number was 70 percent.

In April, Tech requested permission and received approval from University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors to enter a ground-facility lease for an estimated $11.5 million project to expand the press box and build new suites to replace the existing Sky Box.

New lighting and other factors brought the total from $11.5 million to $16.7 million.

Tech's Sky Box was constructed in 1985 above the press box, which opened in 1968, to provide additional seating.
13 2016-08-09
Monroe

Tech loses new hoops assistant to SMU


Louisiana Tech is suddenly in search of a new assistant men's basketball coach less than two months away from the start of preseason camp.

CBS Sports reported Monday that new assistant coach Shawn Forrest is leaving to join the staff at SMU. It marks the second Tech assistant to leave this offeseason.

Forrest, a former Western Kentucky and Texas-San Antonio assistant replaced Corey Barker in May. Barker, who was hired by Tech coach Eric Konkol as a Texas recruiter in 2015, left for TCU.

This is Forrest's third job within the past few months. He spent the 2016 season at WKU and was hired by UTSA on May 9. He was at Tech by the end of the month and went through summer workouts with the program.


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Barker and Forrest both have ties to Texas, which is what made them targets for the staff at TCU and SMU.

This marks Konkol's third departure in a little more than a year at Tech. Matt McMahon accepted a job with Tech in 2015 only to return back to Murray State to become the new head coach.

Barker, Tony Skinn and Duffy Conroy were Konkol's first three assistants he hired. Skinn and Conroy are still on staff, as is Andy Fox, the director of basketball operations.

It's not often to see coaching movement in August, but SMU is in a unique situation with new coach Tim Jankovich. Former SMU coach Larry Brown announced he was resigning on July 8. Jankovich earned the promotion to head coach and had to finalize his staff.


13 2016-08-09
Monroe

Owens to serve as Louisiana Tech summer commencement speaker


RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech News Release) - Dr. Reginald Owens, former department head for journalism and F. Jay Taylor Endowed Chair of Journalism at Louisiana Tech University, will serve as the keynote speaker for Louisiana Tech’s summer commencement exercises at 10:00 a.m. August 18 at the Thomas Assembly Center.

Owens, who retired last month after a distinguished 19-year career at Louisiana Tech, is also the former director of Louisiana Tech’s News Bureau and member of the University Communications Department. He worked closely with and mentored students of The Tech Talk student newspaper, Lagniappe student yearbook and SPEAK Magazine, all of which were nationally award-winning student media.

As a student at Louisiana Tech in the late 1960s, Owens was one of the founders of the university’s first African American student organization, Soul Tech, and served as its first president. He was also instrumental in bringing to campus the first black fraternity, Alpha Phi Alpha. Owens went on to earn a Ph.D. in journalism from the University of Texas-Austin and a master's in advertising from the University of Illinois-Urbana following his bachelor's in journalism from Louisiana Tech.


Owens began his professional career as a police reporter at the Houston Post and later worked for Southwestern Bell Telephone Co. in Houston in public relations and advertising, where he was associate editor of Telephone Times, a publication serving some 15,000 Bell employees in Southeast Texas. Owens was managing editor of The (Houston) Informer, the third oldest black newspaper in the nation, and was a founding vice president of the Houston Association of Black Journalists.

Owens teaching career began at Grambling State University where he was newspaper publication director for The Gramblinite, an award-winning student newspaper, before coming to Louisiana Tech in 1997. He has also taught in Houston at Texas Southern University, and in Austin, Texas at Huston-Tillotson University and Austin Community College. Owens has been a visiting professor at the University of Texas-Austin, Poynter Institute for Media Studies in St. Petersburg, Florida, Southern Newspaper Publishers Association Foundation Traveling Campus, and Zambia Institute for Mass Communication (ZAMCOM) in Lusaka, Zambia.

Owens has written, edited, published and presented more than 100 scholarly articles on the topics of African American publications and the communication environment in which they operate, and on journalism pedagogy. He serves on the boards of directors for the Dow Jones News Fund, the Shreveport Journalism Foundation, and the Greater Grambling Chamber of Commerce and is a member of the Friends of the Eddie G. Robinson Museum Committee, where he has served as editor for major museum publications.

During the commencement ceremony, graduates from each of Louisiana Tech’s five academic colleges and the Graduate School will receive diplomas as well as their Tenet Medallions inscribed with the 12 Tenets of Tech and their year of graduation. The Tenets of Tech are guiding principles and personal characteristics that students and graduates are expected to embrace and uphold during and after their time at Louisiana Tech.

Summer commencement officially marks the end of the summer quarter at Louisiana Tech. Fall quarter classes are scheduled to begin on September 8.
13 2016-08-09
Ruston

› home › ACCIDENT CLAIMS LIFE OF TECH STUDENT


A Louisiana Tech University student is dead and two other people are injured as a result of a single-vehicle crash at approximately 3 a.m. Sunday morning on the Tech campus.

Omar Rashad Khodr-Agha, 23, of Ruston, died at the scene after being ejected from the vehicle, police said.

Khodr-Agha was the front-seat passenger in a vehicle driven by Turki Mohammed Qaramish, 23, a Grambling State University student from Saudi Arabia. Qaramaish and a second passenger, Elise Salsberry, 50, of Ruston, were taken to Northern Louisiana Medical Center for treatment of their injuries.

Salsberry was transferred to LSU University Health Center in Shreveport.

Officials say Qaramish was driving westbound on Bulldog Drive at a high rate of speed when he apparently lost control of his vehicle, first hitting a fence, then a steel pole and finally, a tree.

Alcohol use is suspected, Ruston Deputy Police Chief Clint Williams said. Toxicology reports are pending, he said. Authorities have not been able to determine if any of the three were wearing seat belts.

Both Ruston and Tech police worked the accident. Tech police will handle any further criminal investigation into the case, university police Chief Randal Hermes said this mornin
13 2016-08-03
Monroe

Education residents get school assignments


The Louisiana Tech University College of Education's Clinical Residency Research Center hosted more than 60 educators Monday for Big Reveal Day.

Members of the research-based Teacher Educators and Mentors Model gathered in Woodard Hall so clinical residents could meeting the trained mentors and school leaders from their assigned teams and prepare for the beginning of school.


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The residents (early childhood, elementary grades 1-5, and dual 1-5 majors) will directly affect schools in Lincoln Parish, Ouachita Parish and Monroe City through their involvement in classrooms. Classrooms will have mentors and residents co-teaching together throughout the academic year offering multiple opportunities for learning.

This year, all Ruston elementary schools are hosting clinical residency teams.
13 2016-07-29
Ruston

TECH’S ‘THE HAPPENING’ SET FOR AUG. 4 IN MONROE


It’s always the biggest Happening for Louisiana Tech University before the start of a new academic and athletic school year, and it’s only a week away.

The Happening XXXV, presented by Argent Financial, will take place at 6 p.m., Aug. 4 at the Monroe Civic Center and will again feature a relaxed and casual tailgate-style atmosphere with remarks by Louisiana Tech President Les Guice and Athletics Director Tommy McClelland, who will also hold a question and answer session with football coach Skip Holtz and Bulldogs basketball coach Eric Konkol and new Lady Techsters basketball coach Brooke Stoehr.

Catering by Catfish Charlie’s, music by Code Blue and the Flatliners and a cash bar will open beginning at 6 p.m. with featured guests addressing the gathering starting at 7 p.m.

“Louisiana Tech had an amazing year last year, both academically and athletically,” said Wes Cavin, director of alumni relations at Tech. “It’s hard to beat a second-straight bowl victory and an outstanding academic year. Those are the kinds of accomplishments that make you really proud to be a member of the Tech family. The Happening provides us with a great opportunity to celebrate the success we’ve had but also to talk about the future.

“As great and exciting as the past year was, I think the future is going to be even better for Louisiana Tech. It’s a great time to be a Bulldog and it’s always fun to get together with other alumni and friends of the University to talk about Louisiana Tech.”

Argent CEO and Louisiana Tech alumnus Kyle McDonald said his company is always proud to sponsor the annual Happening.

“The Happening serves as the kick off for the new school year and the new tailgate atmosphere format will connect Tech alumni and supporters with that spirit,” McDonald said.

“Excitement about the upcoming athletics year and the continued announcements of high academic and value rankings of the university should make this a powerful event.
Argent and our many Tech alumni staff members are proud to again sponsor the Happening.”

Individual tickets are available for $30 while packages of 10 tickets are $250. A limited number of reserve tables (40), seating eight people, are also on sale for $500. For more information or to make reservations, call the Marbury Alumni Center at 255-7950 or go online to www.latechalumni.org/Happening2016.

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13 2016-07-25
Monroe

The IDEA Place: Nurturing love of science


Sometimes you are just looking for a fun and educational getaway that can entertain the kids while maybe teaching the kid inside all of us a thing or two. Ruston is home to just the place to expand your love and knowledge of science. This is the IDEA Place.

A division of Louisiana Tech University, The IDEA Place is a top destination to take children of all ages as they engage in interactive science exhibits.

The IDEA Place offers interactive lessons and has delighted thousands of children and their families since opening in Ruston in 1994.

Children can see how tornadoes and clouds form in the atmosphere as well as the different types of artificial lighting and an earthquake simulator.

The IDEA Place also offers opportunities for birthday parties, sleepovers and private shows at our Planetarium. Children are also invited to the NASA-related day camps that are scheduled this summer. For more information on all exiting activities at The IDEA Place call 318-257-2866.
13 2016-07-25
Ruston

TECH PAVES THE WAY FOR NEW LOT


Construction crews began demolishing Louisiana Tech University’s old natatorium building Wednesday. Demolition of the old natatorium will pave the way for a new student parking lot.


13 2016-07-22
Monroe

Tech’s “Bulldogs Without Borders” restores water desalination system in Haiti


RUSTON – A team from Louisiana Tech University’s “Bulldogs Without Borders” (BWB) student-led service organization recently traveled to Sous-a-Philippe, Haiti, where they began restoration on a water desalination system that was destroyed by a cattle stampede more than 40 years ago.

Ryan Joseph (mechanical engineering), Kendra Britton (accounting), Logan Caskey (mechanical engineering), Blaine Johnson (civil engineering), Uriel Salazar (mechanical engineering) and Savannah Burch (animal science) worked with the Louisiana Tech University Wesley Foundation to develop and implement an economically sustainable solution that will serve the community.

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Louisiana’s general contractors make donation to La. Tech
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Schools adopt teacher training program

During the summer trip, the BWB and Wesley Foundation teams used skills developed at Louisiana Tech to reverse engineer the system to understand what critical repairs were required and how to deliver materials to the village. They worked to ensure that the majority of the materials were available in Haiti and to educate the community on how to construct future solutions and make repairs.

“We had to do a lot of reverse engineering to understand how this system worked,” said Joseph. “To do that, we had to use skills we learned from our classes.”

Although a team of six members traveled to Haiti, the entire organization was involved in the project. Before the summer trip, members of the organization brainstormed, researched and prepared plans to be implemented during the restoration.

Additionally, the organization raised more than $15,000 through grants, fundraisers and donations to cover travel expenses for the six-member team.

“It is always rewarding to see our students put their knowledge and skills to work to help improve the lives of other people,” Dr. Hisham Hegab, dean of the College of Engineering and Science, said. “Programs like Bulldogs Without Borders offer special opportunities to truly enhance our students’ learning experiences and prepare them to have productive careers.”

Bulldogs Without Borders is a student-run organization that is open to students of all majors. BWB strives to improve the quality of life for communities both locally and worldwide.


13 2016-07-20
Monroe

Louisiana’s general contractors make donation to La. Tech


RUSTON – The Louisiana State Licensing Board for Contractors and the Contractors Educational Trust Fund (CETF) have made donations totaling over $362,000 to Louisiana Tech University in support of the construction engineering technology program in the College of Engineering and Science.

Representatives of these and supporting organizations visited Ruston last week to present Louisiana Tech President Les Guice with the generous gift during a ceremony in his office in Wyly Tower on the Louisiana Tech campus.

“Louisiana’s construction industry has been highly supportive of construction education for many years and we are grateful for their continued financial investments in Louisiana Tech University,” said Guice. “Their gift is enabling us to enhance support of our students and faculty. Through the industry’s guidance, we are making curriculum improvements and offering excellent career opportunities for our graduates here in Louisiana.”

The donations to Louisiana Tech were made possible through the generosity of the state’s general contractors who voluntarily assesses themselves a fee during the licensure application or renewal process. The funds collected from these fees are awarded to Louisiana universities with accredited construction programs in an effort to enhance these programs and provide opportunities to educate and prepare students to contribute to the construction industry in Louisiana.

READ:Report: La. Tech ranked no. 1 in state for value

“The timing of these contributions could not be better,” said Steve Terrill, area manager for Louisiana Associated General Contractors, which is instrumental in creating the funding mechanism for these donations. “As the State of Louisiana struggles to provide needed funding for higher education, the Louisiana Associated General Contractors, State Licensing Board for Contractors and the CETF are able to step forward and support quality programs such as construction engineering technology at Louisiana Tech that will produce the next generation of construction professionals and leaders in our state.”

The Louisiana State Licensing Board for Contractors was created in 1956 for the purpose of protecting the general public from incompetent and fraudulent acts of a contractor while promoting the integrity of the construction industry. The State Licensing Board for Contractors consists of 15 Commercial members appointed by the Governor representing all segments of the contracting industry, and five Residential Subcommittee members.

Louisiana Tech’s construction engineering technology program provides students with a background in math, science, engineering, construction and business to prepare graduates for leadership positions in the construction industry. The program prepares graduates for the responsibility of managing and supervising activities related to converting the plans and specifications prepared by engineers and architects into finished facilities.

For more information on Louisiana Tech’s construction engineering technology program, visit coes.latech.edu/construction-engineering-technology


13 2016-07-18
Alexandria

What's happening in Cenla education


Louisiana Forestry Foundation awards scholarships to local students

The Louisiana Forestry Foundation awarded 45 scholarships to college students for the 2016-2017 academic year totaling $54,500. Seven of those went the following students from right here in Central Louisiana:

Auston Aymond, Pollock.
Brandon Blackmon, Leesville.
Matthew Carlin, Dry Prong.
Koby Garrett, Anacoco.
Nicholas Goins, Winnfield.
Tristen Nicholas, Anacoco.
Christopher Cook, Boyce.
All of the scholarships went to forestry majors attending either Louisiana Tech University, Louisiana State University or the Oakdale Technical College in the fall. Cook is a Oakdale Technical College student, and the rest of the Cenla recipients attend Louisiana Tech in Ruston.

According to a release, the Louisiana Forestry Foundation has awarded about $819,000 in scholarships since 1969.


13 2016-07-18
Ruston

NUNGESSER VISITS TECH, LEARNS ABOUT SCITEC


Louisiana Lt. Gov. Billy Nungesser visited Louisiana Tech University Wednesday to learn more about Sci-TEC, the school’s Science and Technology Education Center and efforts by Tech’s College of Education in partnering with outside organizations for mutual benefits.


13 2016-07-13
Associated Press

John Bel Edwards cuts $44M from Louisiana construction budget


BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) - Gov. John Bel Edwards stripped $44 million in projects from the state's multiyear construction budget, saying Tuesday that Louisiana can't afford them amid its continuing financial struggles.

Twenty-five projects were struck from the bill by the governor, including money for LSU Eunice, Louisiana Tech University, a recreational complex in Iberia Parish, natural gas system improvements in Grant Parish, renovations to a New Orleans playground, roadwork in Caldwell Parish and water system improvements in Columbia.

The two largest items cut from the construction budget were $15 million for a road project in the city of Scott and $11 million for an arts district in St. Tammany Parish. Both projects are in areas with Republican lawmakers who voted against some of the governor's tax proposals in two special sessions aimed at raising more money for the state budget.

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The Democratic governor has sought to shrink the size of the construction budget, known as the capital outlay bill. In a statement, Edwards said he wanted to "be realistic with the limited financial resources we have at our disposal."

"For too long, the capital outlay process gave false hope to the people of Louisiana that construction dollars were on the way when, in fact, they were not. I've promised to budget openly and honestly with the people of Louisiana, and this capital outlay bill is representative of that approach," he said.

But even with the vetoes, the construction budget still contains more projects than Louisiana can afford.

The $4.4 billion, multiyear budget contains $1.6 billion in projects with cash earmarked for them, like federal and state highway dollars that pay for road and bridge work. Another $2.8 billion in projects are slated to be financed with state borrowing through bond sales.

Louisiana is so over-committed in projects financed with borrowing it would take years to pay for everything with state lines of credit. Meanwhile, the state also faces stricter limits for the next few years on how much money it can borrow because of its financial problems.

Bond-financed projects that weren't vetoed still aren't assured to receive money because the budget bill contains more items than available money. The State Bond Commission will vote on which ones advance, largely based on the governor's recommendations.

Edwards wants to steer the limited money available mainly to port improvements, roadwork and a backlog of deferred maintenance on state-owned and college campus buildings.


13 2016-07-13
Monroe

AT&T contributes $25,000 to benefit first-generation college students at Louisiana Tech


RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech News Release) - AT&T announces a contribution of $25,000 to Louisiana Tech University to support its scholarship program for students who are the first in their family to attend college. These scholarships will be based upon financial need and will serve to recruit predominantly minority students to the university.

“Higher education is essential to creating an advanced workforce that is critical to Louisiana’s success, and I applaud universities like Louisiana Tech for playing a pro-active role in fueling the economic engines in our state,” said State Representative Rob Shadoin. “Our university and my alma mater supports the state economy and workforce, and this continued financial support is critical to help students close the gap as tuition costs increase.”

“Historically, first-generation students represent demographics which are underrepresented in colleges and universities. A top priority for us is to continue to provide valuable tuition assistance for capable students who have the skills to succeed in college, but don’t necessarily have the family resources to allow them to further their education,” stated Dr. Les Guice, Louisiana Tech University President. “We greatly appreciate the support from policy makers and education advocates like State Representative Rob Shadoin who understands the critical role that higher education plays in developing students for success in life.”


In 2015-16, 644 first-generation students enrolled in Louisiana Tech University, with the average out-of-pocket expenses owed per student coming in at more than $9,000 annually. Funds from AT&T will help alleviate some of these costs for students in addition to providing assistance beyond their freshman year.

“Creating a culture of diversity and inclusion in the workplace is vital to understanding all of our customers’ needs and developing solutions for continued business growth and innovation in our global economy,” said AT&T Regional Director Robert Vinet. “It’s exciting for AT&T to be a part of giving first-generation college students the resources they need to receive the best education opportunities to reach their career goals.”


13 2016-07-12
Ruston

Report: La. Tech ranked no. 1 in state for value


Louisiana Tech University has been ranked No. 1 in the State of Louisiana according to MONEY’s 2016-2017 Best Colleges report.


The report, released Monday, evaluated the top public and private higher education institutions in the nation to determine those that offered students the best value and return on investment. Louisiana Tech earned the state’s highest national ranking at No. 235, followed by Louisiana State University (349), University of Louisiana-Lafayette (521), Tulane University (601) and Loyola University-New Orleans (649).


Louisiana Tech also ranked No. 14 in the nation in lowest estimated price for 2016-2017 for student without aid, and No. 15 nationally in lowest estimated price for 2016-2017 for student with average financial aid.


“Providing our students with an exceptional value and our graduates with an excellent return on their investment in their Louisiana Tech educations is a cornerstone of our commitment and contributions to the citizens of our state,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “Our faculty and staff take pride in embracing the responsibility we have to our students to prepare them for success and to position them to become leaders and innovators in their respective fields.
“National recognition such as this from MONEY is encouraging and motivating for our campus community, and shows that we are clearly ‘walking the walk’ when it comes to creating value and graduating quality people and professionals for Louisiana.”


MONEY analyzed and ranked the institutions in the 2016-2017 Best Colleges report using measurements of education quality, affordability and outcomes-based metrics such as graduates’ earnings and “job meaning” which came from PayScale.com’s survey, “Does your work make the world a better place?” MONEY also measured comparative value by assessing how well students at each school did vs. what’s expected for students with similar economic and academic backgrounds, and the institution’s mix of majors.


To compile the final group of 705 colleges and universities ranked in the 2016-2017 Best Colleges report, MONEY eliminated those institutions that had less than 500 students, graduated less than the median for its institutional category (public or private), those without sufficient data to analyze and institutions that had been identified as in financial difficulty by the U.S. Department of Education or bond ratings agencies.


Princeton University earned the top spot in this year’s Best Colleges list followed by the University of Michigan, Harvard University, Rice University and the University of California-Berkeley and Brigham Young University tying for fifth.


This is the second time in the past week that Louisiana Tech has been recognized nationally for educational quality and superior return on investment. Last Thursday, Louisiana Tech was ranked among the best higher educations in the nation according to Forbes’ list of America’s Top Colleges 2016. Forbes ranked Louisiana Tech No. 122 in the nation among all public universities and No. 161 in a list of all research universities.


The complete MONEY 2016-2017 Best Colleges report can be viewed here. MONEY has also compiled its list of “The Best Colleges in Every State” which can be viewed here.


13 2016-07-12
Ruston

CITY COMPLETES WATER TOWER LOGO


Motorists along Interstate 20 on both the east- and westbound approaches to Ruston and well as drivers southbound on U.S. 167, have a new high-in-the-sky sign that the city is home of Louisiana Tech University. The municipal water tower adjacent to the interstate has been repainted with the same joint Ruston-Louisiana Tech logo that’s seen on the downtown tank. Crews completed the work Friday.


13 2016-07-11
Monroe

Louisiana Tech mechanical engineering student awarded honor society scholarship


Luke Villermin, a Louisiana Tech University senior mechanical engineering student from New Iberia, Louisiana, has been awarded a $2,000 scholarship from the engineering honor society Tau Beta Pi for his senior year in 2016-2017 academic year.

Tau Beta Pi Scholarships are awarded to junior members on a competitive basis of scholarship, leadership and service, and promise of future contributions to the engineering profession. Along with a strong academic record, Villermin has also held a number of leadership roles and has conducted research in the Caldorera-Moore Biomedical and Nanosystems Lab at Louisiana Tech for three years.

Villermin has been a leader and an exemplary student within the College of Engineering and Science, serving as president of the Engineering and Science Association and treasurer of Tau Beta Pi, as well as participating in the American Society of Civil Engineers Concrete Canoe team, apprenticing with the University Grand Challenge Scholars program and performing research.

“Luke is one of the brightest and most industrious undergraduate researchers I’ve had the privilege to mentor. His enthusiasm, attitude, leadership, and diligent work ethic make him stand out as an undergraduate student and researcher,” said Luke’s research advisor, Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore, assistant professor of biomedical engineering.

“Luke has not only excelled academically but is also very active in research,” Dr. Heath Tims, associate dean of undergraduate studies at the College of Engineering and Science and advisor for the university chapter of the Tau Beta Pi society said. “Luke is an excellent choice for the scholarship.”

Villermin says that he is grateful for the scholarship and for the support he’s received from Louisiana Tech and the College of Engineering and Science.

“Since my first day on campus, Louisiana Tech's College of Engineering and Science has equipped me with all of the support that I need to be a nationally competitive applicant for this scholarship,” Villermin said. “Approachable faculty, on-campus research, and ample opportunities for college involvement and leadership experiences have all made my acceptance of this award possible.”

Tau Beta Pi is the world’s largest engineering society. Membership represents the highest honor to be obtained by an engineering student and is awarded on the basis of high scholarship and exemplary character.

“It is always great to have one of the best engineering honor societies recognize the achievements of our outstanding students,” Tims said.


13 2016-07-08
Monroe

Forbes ranks Louisiana Tech among top universities in nation


RUSTON, La (La Tech News Release) - Forbes’ list of America’s Top Colleges 2016 has once again ranked Louisiana Tech University among the top higher education institutions in the nation.

Only the top 660 public and private higher education institutions in the United States make the Forbes Top Colleges report. Louisiana Tech came in at No. 392 in the nation with only LSU (171) ranked higher among Louisiana’s public universities.

Louisiana Tech also ranked No. 122 in the nation among all public universities and No. 161 in a list of all research universities. Other Louisiana institutions to make the Forbes Top Colleges 2016 list included Tulane University (129), Loyola University-New Orleans (486), Centenary (490), University of Louisiana-Lafayette (531), University of New Orleans (577) and Southeastern Louisiana University (626).

“The Louisiana Tech community has committed itself to providing students with an unparalleled educational experience and building a nationally-respected research university to serve the State of Louisiana,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “I am pleased to see these efforts being recognized and would like to sincerely thank the faculty and staff of Louisiana Tech for their dedication to our institution and the positive impacts they have on our students. We will continue to focus on elevating our university and the graduates and leaders we produce.”


According to Forbes’ methodology for its America’s Top Colleges 2016 report, the list of 660 schools distinguishes itself from competitors by “our belief in ‘output’ over ‘input.’” Forbes says it is not interested in what gets a student into college, but has set their sights directly on ROI and what are students getting out of college. Specifically, the 2016 list focuses on measurements of post-graduate success, student debt, student satisfaction, graduation rate and academic success. Forbes utilizes resources such as the Center for College Affordability and Productivity, the Department of Education database (IPEDS) and PayScale.com to calculate its rankings.

“College has become one of the biggest financial decisions students and their families make,” says Forbes’ Caroline Howard in her release of the America’s Top Colleges 2016 list. “They deserve all the information they can get on the questions that directly concern them: Are current undergrads satisfied? Is it likely I’ll graduate on time or incur a ton of student debt? Will I get a good job and be a leader in my chosen profession?”

Stanford University topped the America’s Top Colleges 2016 list followed by Williams College (Massachusetts), Princeton University, Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The U.S. Military Academy at West Point ranked as the highest public institution in the nation.

Forbes’ America’s Top Colleges 2016 report is the latest in a list of recent national rankings for Louisiana Tech in measures of quality and value. In addition to a fifth consecutive Tier One National Universities ranking last September, U.S. News & World Report placed Louisiana Tech at No. 1 in the nation among pubic institutions for graduating students with the lease average amount of debt. PayScale.com also ranked Louisiana Tech No. 1 in the state and No. 70 in the nation in its 2015-2016 College Salary Report for average mid-career salaries for graduates.


13 2016-07-07
Baton Rouge

Students take part in cybersecurity program


Juniors from Ascension Christian High School and their teachers recently took part in a weeklong cybersecurity program at Louisiana Tech University.

The program, called Analysis and Investigation through Cyber-Based Scenarios, was supported by the Cyber Innovation Center and a U.S. Department of Homeland Security grant, a news release said.

Activities included mock scenarios, engineering and computer science labs, film sessions, interactive discussions on history, ethical issues and theory and a presentation by Daniel Stein, program director of the National Cybersecurity Training and Education Program for the Department of Homeland Security in Washington, D.C.

The program culminated with a realistic 24-hour simulation of a national emergency. Teams watched news briefings, searched for clues and chased down leads as new information arrived throughout the day. Afterward, the teams presented their findings and recommendations to a panel and answered questions.

Participating teachers also attended a professional development workshop prior to the program.


13 2016-07-01
Monroe

LA Tech students host candlelight vigil to honor Orlando victims


RUSTON, La. (KNOE 8 News) - Students from Louisiana Tech held a candlelight vigil Thursday night, to remember those who lost their lives in the Orlando shooting, and to show support for the Ruston LGBT community.

The ceremony was held at the Lady of the Mist on Tech's campus. It was a solemn moment for both students and faculty members.

They lit candles, and read the names of all 49 victims aloud. They also took turns speaking, sharing their emotions about the shooting, and how it's impacted them.

Even though she waited a few weeks to organize the ceremony, Mallory Garza, saw it necessary to show the LGBT community, the student body at Tech is here to support them.

"We want to make sure that our community knows that regardless of their multi-culture background that they have individuals and a community that supports them," Garza said.

Other Tech students, like Taylor Michiels, said it was great to see the that many people from the university gathered in one place.

"I think it's really reassuring that I go to a university that does care about this and they care about people like me," Michiels said.


13 2016-06-30
Baton Rouge

Louisiana Tech University announces spring quarter honors students


Louisiana Tech University announced the names of students on its spring quarter president’s and dean’s honor lists.

Students whose names are followed by an asterisk earned recognition as members of the president’s list, a distinction that signifies achievement of at least a 3.8 GPA for a minimum of nine semester hours completed with no grade lower than a B.
To be eligible for the dean’s list, a student must have a 3.5 GPA with no grade lower than a C for a minimum of nine semester hours completed.
Students earning the honors include:

East Feliciana Parish
JACKSON: Norman Frank Cook IV* and Sydney C. Womack

SLAUGHTER: Thomas Denison Arnett, Lawrence Harvey Dautel IV* and Quinton L. Townsel*
West Feliciana Parish
ST. FRANCISVILLE: Russell L. Biggs, Callie A. Bujol, Rosa Catherine Schellinger and James Maxwell Slezak*


13 2016-06-30
Shreveport

La. Tech Shreveport Center to host information session


The Department of Curriculum, Instruction and Leadership at Louisiana Tech University will hold an informational meeting at 6 p.m. July 14 for individuals interested in pursuing a Doctor of Educational Leadership Degree (Ed.D.) in either PK-12 Educational Leadership or Higher Education Administration. T

This Informational Session will be held at the Louisiana Tech – Shreveport Center Auditorium – 8028 Shreve Park Drive in Shreveport. All interested individuals are strongly encouraged to attend. Representative from Louisiana Tech University, along with 2015 Ed.D. Cohort Members and recent program completers will be available to answer questions and provide more information about this exciting educational opportunity for area educators who wish to advance their careers.


This session is part of the College of Education’s Teaching, Leading and Learning Initiative (TLLI) - a program designed to deliver advanced educational programs to individuals in the Caddo/Bossier area who wish to enhance their preparation, credentials and leadership skills to meet their career goals in local school districts and area institutions of higher education. “We are very pleased with the growth and success of this initiative as it provides enhanced service and support to current and future members of our Northwest Louisiana Tech family” said Dr. Don Schillinger, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Education. “I look forward to meeting and visiting on the evening of July 14 with anyone interested in this innovative program.”


“The TLLI program is delivered through the Louisiana Tech University Shreveport Center utilizing a combination of online, face -to-face at the Center and hybrid course meeting formats which ensure the delivery of high quality, rigorous and appropriate program content. This is an excellent opportunity for the development and preparation of a new cadre of educational leaders to help meet needs of the area school districts and higher education institutions “said Dr. Randy Parker, Director of Leadership Programs for the CIL Department.


Individuals interested in attending should RSVP to Dr. Randy Parker at doctorp@latech.edu or 257-2834 by July 11.

13 2016-06-27
Alexandria

Marcase: La. Sports Hall turns spotlight on Central Louisiana


NATCHITOCHES — The 2016 induction ceremony Saturday night at the Natchitoches Events Center may have been unlike any of the previous 56 Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame induction ceremonies.

First, a poem was recited, followed by a quote from another famous poet.

It also had to be the first Hall ceremony in which there was a slide presentation dealing with the brain.

And Winnfield Senior High School became the first public school to boast two inductees in the same class.

The class itself boasted of a Central Louisiana connection never seen before as six of the 10 men and one woman honored hail from Cenla.

“Fifty-four years ago, my parent loaded me into the back of a ’59 station wagon and drove me through the woods to be the first member of my family to go to college,” said longtime voice of LSU athletics, Jim Hawthorne, a native of Anacoco in Vernon Parish. “Through the love and support of my family, I was able to get that degree.”

That degree from Northwestern State led to radio work in Natchitoches, Shreveport and finally Baton Rouge, where Hawthorne called LSU football, men’s basketball and baseball for 36 years before retiring in March upon the conclusion of the basketball season.

Hawthorne was one of two recipients of the Louisiana Sports Writers Association’s Distingushed Service Awards, the other being longtime Town Talk sportswriter Bob Tompkins.

By Hawthorne’s count, he called more than 3,000 LSU games, and “I’m right back where I started in Natchitoches,” he said. “I am humbled to be here.”

Tompkins, who not only chronicled the careers of numerous members of the Hall of Fame — former and 2016 inductees — he also had a hand in choosing many of them as a member of the LSWA Hall of Fame selection committee for decades.

After 43 years in the business, including the last 38 at The Town Talk, Tompkins took his place in the Hall, joining two former Town Talk colleagues, the late Bill Carter and the late Al Nassif.

“In humility, I stand in the shadows of those who came before me,” Tompkins said.

Neurosurgeon Julian Bailes is one of the leaders when it comes to studying the impact of concussions on the brain. He currently serves as a medical advisor to the NFL Players Association and chairman of the Medical Advisory Board of Pop Warner Football. In last year’s movie, “Concussion,” starring Will Smith, Bailes was portrayed by Alec Baldwin.

Bailes, who attended medical school at LSU, was honored with the David Dixon Louisiana Sports Leadership Award.

“I was born in Alexandria and grew up in Natchitoches,” he said. “I always looked at the Hall of Fame in Prather Coliseum and dreamed of being in it.”

No one who saw her play doubted that one day two-time Louisiana College All-American Janice Joseph-Richard would take her place in the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame.

The debate may have been whether she would be enshrined as a coach or player. As a coach, she went 159-34 at Xavier of New Orleans before winning WAC Coach of the Year honors at San Jose State, and finally leading her alma-mater to its first NCAA Division III regional appearance.

Sadly, JJ never got a chance to witness her induction, passing in December 2010 at 46 after waging a public battle with breast cancer.

“I’m truly humbled and grateful to know her legacy lives on,” said an emotional Pam Jones, Joseph-Richard’s sister. “This would be her dream come true.”

For Anthony Thomas, his dream was to provide a better life for his mother, Helen. After a stellar high school career at Winnfield in which he set a state record with 106 touchdowns to go with more than 7,500 rushing yards, he took off for Michigan.

“Anthony was always a guy you could count on,” said former Michigan coach Loyd Carr in a video introduction before Thomas’ acceptance speech.

Thomas left Michigan with 15 school records, a national championship and something else far more valuable by the time he was named the 2001 AP Offensive Rookie of the Year for the Chicago Bears.

“I was a kid when I went to Michigan,” Thomas said. “Coach Carr and Coach (Fred) Jackson said if I stayed four years, I’d get a great college degree. That was something I promised my mother.”

The other half of the Winnfield duo was 15-year NBA veteran and Louisiana Tech standout P.J. Brown.

Brown began his acceptance speech by quoting Maya Angelou: “You are the sum total of everything you’ve ever seen, heard, eaten, smelled, been told, forgot.”

Brown gave credit to everyone who influenced him, including his high school, his large family and to fellow Hall of Famer Willis Reed. The Naismith Basketball Hall of Famer was in attendance Saturday despite it being his 74th birthday. As general manager of the Nets, Reed selected Brown in the second round of the 1992 NBA Draft.

“Willis Reed, you saw something in a long, tall drink of water that 28 other teams didn’t see,” said Brown, who would go on to be named to three NBA all-defensive teams and win a championship with the Celtics in 2008.

“I do not go into this Hall of Fame alone,” Brown said. “We all go in together.”

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13 2016-06-27
Monroe

New proposal would give Tech more options to stream sporting events


Conference USA's long-discussed television media deal announced in May could give prognosticators even more to talk about in the coming months.

But this time, it may be in a positive light depending on from which vantage point it's viewed from.

To keep up with the times in the digital age, C-USA is trending in the direction of distributing more of its content in ways other than traditional television like streaming to computers, mobile devices, tablets and digital media players.

To distribute more content first means it must be produced.

The conference has started a proposal where each school will be audited to see what on-site improvements and equipment upgrades need to be made to meet broadcast standards, in turn transforming the school into its own mini game-day production operation.

By doing so, C-USA can get access to more quality games to distribute for fees. Schools like Tech would also have new-found options when it comes to marketing their own telecasts, according to Tech athletic director Tommy McClelland, to help offset losses in revenue with C-USA's new TV deal.

McClelland said last week there's already been a conference call with ESPN3 with subsequent communication to come in regards to what technology is needed to meet the production standards.

"It would give us a report to say at Louisiana Tech, you’re 75 percent of what you need or whatever the percentage would be for what you would need to have all the equipment and software and technology to broadcast a game to where we would just take and put on ESPN3," McClelland said.

"That’s something we’ve not done before. We’ve not necessarily had to do that since we haven’t had the infrastructure or the equipment. We’re not far from there now. With the new requirements it will put us there, and once we have it in place, then the conversations needs to happen with those distributors."


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Tech athletic department facing 'one of the more fiscally challenging years'

McClelland said there's no timeline when Tech will hear back on what upgrades it needs or how much it would cost. Depending on the potential improvements, it appears Tech wouldn't be ready to produce a game on its own until basketball season.

The obvious question is where does the money to upgrade such technology that would normally be produced by staff at ESPN, CBS, Fox Sports or American Sports Network for a linear broadcast. Additional cameras would be needed to capture the action, although the in-house broadcast would eliminate bringing in a production truck to pull off a game.

"How we go about doing that is one of two ways in my opinion," McClelland said. "One would be to go out and fund raise for it to donors, or the other way is an opportunity to be with a multimedia rights partner here on our campus and say can we partner and maybe share some of the cost and in doing so now we have baseball product that is great and basketball that may or may not get picked up on certain day."

Therein lies where Tech could potentially recoup some of the deficit it will incur from the new TV deal that will drop by 60 percent to 80 percent.

As McClelland explained, national TV might not be interested in a midweek baseball game against UL Lafayette, but if Tech produces it, packages it and sells it, the revenue could be worth it in the long run.

"Is it going to be hundreds and hundreds and thousands of dollars and millions of dollars? No. But you’re not paying a truck. When you can take out the production truck and you can do it on your own and it’s quality enough that someone else can pick it up, that’s where your expense is," he said.

"Even if you’re making a few thousand dollars or a few tens of thousands of dollars a broadcast and you do that enough throughout the season, then you probably have enough to bring in a couple hundred thousand dollars for the year based on your own selling of your games."


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New C-USA TV deal includes ESPN, beIN SPORTS

Another example would be any potential televised football games like an FCS team that doesn't garner interest from national TV. Tech would have the ability to produce it and sell it to a network through its multimedia rights partner.

"I think there is an opportunity there for Louisiana Tech to carve out its own dollars and help mitigate some of the conference’s decrease," McClelland said.

Additional costs would come from increased staff to put on such a production. McClelland said it wouldn't necessarily mean an increase in full-time employees. Tech has a video coordinator for the entire department and could feasibly hire students to fill in the gaps.

McClelland noted Tech doesn't have a broadcasting school to pull workers from, but a pool of 12,000-plus students to pull from does exist.

"We’ve got great student help as it relates to game day workers, ushers, ticket takers and event staff. They obviously can’t do everything but as it relates to the human resources to get something going like this would be through students," he said. "Pay them an hourly wage. We have the human resource on our campus to do this."


13 2016-06-27
Monroe

Cyber Security camp wraps up at Louisiana Tech


RUSTON, La. (KNOE 8 News) - A cyber security camp is wrapping up at Louisiana Tech, giving students and teachers a real world perspective on protecting computers from outside threats.


Groups worked through real world, cyber scenarios with the Cyber Innovation Center- a group based out of Bossier City. Teams gave presentations to a mock panel, which included a U.S. Department of Homeland Security representative, to learn what it takes to stay secure on the internet

"Today, our nation faces a great challenge and a great defense net of of cyber based employees, cyber based workforce. Just in cyber security alone, there are 380,000 cyber security jobs available," Kevin Nolten, with the Cyber Innovation Center, said.

This was also an outreach program, encouraging others to look for cyber security jobs. Nolten says most graduates that go into a similar career can come out of college making more than $80,000 a year.


13 2016-06-27
Monroe

Green to lead Tech’s School of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry


RUSTON – William Green, professor of agricultural sciences and interim director of the School of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry at Louisiana Tech University, will assume permanent leadership of the unit as its new director, effective July 1.

Pending approval from the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors, Green will take the reins of the newly-formed School, which is part of Louisiana Tech’s College of Applied and Natural Sciences.

The School of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry was established in December 2015 through a merger of the Department of Agricultural Sciences and School of Forestry. The merger of these two units, which were closely aligned in academic areas related to natural resources and consolidation, created a number of new learning, research and collaboration opportunities for both students and faculty. It also encourages strong interdisciplinary interactions in teaching and outreach, and allows for greater efficiencies in administrative and staffing costs.

Tech news: Abraham announces nearly $1 million grant for Louisiana Tech

“I am humbled by the selection as director,” said Green. “I welcome the opportunity to serve as director of agriculture and forestry as we move forward to make both programs stronger by being combined into one unit.”

Green holds a bachelor’s degree from Louisiana Tech, his master’s degree from LSU and a doctorate in veterinary medicine from Auburn University. After graduating from Auburn, he owned and operated a veterinary hospital for 27 years in Dubach. During this time, he accumulated stories about unusual events that occurred as he worked to prevent and treat diseases in animals. These stories make up the content of his recently published book, “Doc, Did I Wake You Up?”

Since 1980, Green has served Louisiana Tech as a professor of agricultural sciences, university veterinarian and an advisor for numerous pre-veterinary medicine students. Green has served on the Board of Veterinary Medicine and is a lifetime member of the national, state, and local veterinary associations. He has been honored with numerous teaching, advising and service awards at Louisiana Tech as well as the Distinguished Service to Agriculture Award for North Louisiana.

Tech Athletics: Tech athletic department facing 'one of the more fiscally challenging years'

“The School of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry is extremely fortunate to secure Dr. William Green as Director,” said Dr. Gary Kennedy, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Applied and Natural Sciences. “With more than 20 years of experience in serving as an accomplished faculty member at Louisiana Tech, Dr. Green has been recognized for his excellence in teaching, research and service to the university and to his profession and community by being selected for numerous university faculty awards.

“His experience, combined with a career as a practicing veterinarian and a highly respected and accomplished professor, makes Dr. Green the ideal person to lead the recently combined areas of agricultural sciences and forestry.”

Green says the new School of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry is a benefit to the university and the students, and that combining the resources of these two complex units should result in more efficient use of personnel, equipment, and facilities by the university and the students.

“I believe the School of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry will become recognized for identifying, recruiting, retaining, educating and developing agriculture and forestry students so they can become positive additions to society,” Green said.


13 2016-06-27
Monroe

LA high school students investigate global problems using tech


Cars in Washington came to a stop this morning, causing crashes all over the city. At least, that's what the faculty at a weeklong cyber engineering camp taking place at Louisiana Tech University told 72 high school students and teachers from around the state.

The camp, Analysis and Investigation through Cyber-based Scenarios, is designed so students use technology to solve problems.

The scenarios are made up — cars in Washington did not come to a stop this morning. But such scenarios that take place in a realistic, global context force students to use technology, social media and other information they are provided to figure out what happened, who or what caused the problem and why it happened. Were the cars hacked? By whom? Was it an accident? Why? And what should the government do about it?

"They're like analysts trying to figure out what happened," Heath Tims, associate dean of the College of Engineering and Science, said.

Basically, the students work together to build a case for what they think happened based on the information they have. On Saturday, the students will present their solutions to the Washington traffic problem to a panel of judges, including a representative from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

Because the students are still trying to solve that scenario, The News-Star cannot give the answer.

AICS is hosted by Louisiana Tech's cyber engineering program, which is the first of its kind. The program graduated its first five graduates in 2015. It makes sense that Louisiana Tech is the home of the program, Tims said, because the school is known for having integrative curricula and trying new things. There is a need for people who understand cyber security and cyber engineering to work in Louisiana — at companies like IBM and Century Link — and nationally, including in federal jobs.

The skills the students learn and use don't apply only to technology or cyber engineering, however, Ruston High School teacher Kim Goree, who taught in the school's New Technologies program, said. She attended the workshop with a group of incoming juniors.

"Everybody's talents are utilized," Goree said.

Some of the kids were better at research, some were better at presenting their case and some were whizzes at writing and understanding computer code.


13 2016-06-27
Monroe

Tech athletic department facing 'one of the more fiscally challenging years'


Conference USA member schools are in for at least two years of budget tightening with the latest news of a drastic decrease in television revenue.

For Louisiana Tech, which already operates with the lowest budget in C-USA, the recent statewide budget crisis and the additional pricetag of this summer's implementation of cost of attendance has the athletic department about to set sail on trying times.

"The reality is next year is going to be one of the more fiscally challenging years for Louisiana Tech athletic department, not only because conference revenue is going down but because of the increase in expense as it relates to the cost of attendance, which starts July 1 for us," Tech athletic director Tommy McClelland told The News-Star during a recent interview.

"It’s going to take a lot of hard work from certainly our coaches and administration and certainly our fans and donors. We’ll be asking more for them as we continue to have success and want to continue to have success in order to get us through these tough times."

There's no positive way to spin a recent Virginian-Pilot report that indicated C-USA member schools will be faced with a decrease from $1.1 million to around $200,000 as part of the new TV deal announced last month with ESPN, CBS Sports, American Sports Network and beIN Sports.


THENEWSSTAR.COM
Tech implementing partial cost of attendance payments for 4 sports

And no member institution will be hit harder than Tech. In the latest USA TODAY Sports database released in April, Tech's athletic department remained at the bottom of Conference USA and ranked 124th nationally with a revenue stream of $22.2 million for 2014-15.

Tech privately raised money to cover cost of attendance across four sports in 2016-17 and is prepared for a 60 percent or 80 percent decrease from the $1.1 million dished out per school under the previous deal — that number didn't come strictly from the previous TV deal. It also included exit fees from departing member schools like Memphis and Houston, among others.

In other words, McClelland is expecting to receive between $220,000 and $440,000, which is at least a decrease of $660,000. And even though cost of attendance is primarily coming from private funds, it's still a new cost in the sense that the money could be used elsewhere.

The reason a total amount isn't settled yet, according to McClelland, is due to part of the new TV deal that allows C-USA to sell sponsorship's for football and basketball championships.


13 2016-06-23
Baton Rouge

Louisiana Tech announces spring quarter honor students


Louisiana Tech University announced the names of students on its spring quarter president’s and dean’s honor lists.

Students whose names are followed by an asterisk earned recognition as members of the president’s list, a distinction that signifies achievement of at least a 3.8 GPA for a minimum of nine semester hours completed with no grade lower than a B.

To be eligible for the dean’s list, a student must have a 3.5 GPA with no grade lower than a C for a minimum of nine semester hours completed.

Students earning the honors include:

BAKER: Erika Wittenburg

GREENWELL SPRINGS: Charlotte Elaine Murphy*, Cole Clint Rankin* and Kristen Nicole Shaffer

PRIDE: Garret Louis Broussard, Blanton J. Burgess and Payton David Mangham*

ZACHARY: Andrew R. Albritton, Brittany Nicole Castello, Preston T. Danielson, Matthew Michael Flanders*, Kyle David Gordon*, Kaylan Brianna Hebert*, Kaitlin Marie Maloy*, Seth A. McReynolds*, William J. Reily and Stephen T. Samuel*.


13 2016-06-23
Monroe

Louisiana Tech Receives $1 Million STEM Grant


RUSTON, La.

As Louisiana's second special session winds down, the state's education budget is still on the chopping block.

But some Louisiana Tech students can breathe a sigh of relief after the school received a major financial boost.

The National Science Foundation awarded the school's engineering department a $1 million grant to focus on retaining students in science, technology, engineering, and math.

The funds will be used to help these students complete classes the summer after their sophomore year.

This will allow them to transition smoothly into more rigorous upper-level classes during the fall semester of their junior year.

One biomedical engineering student says she moved from California to enroll in Tech's engineering program and is relieved to see the department get this boost.
"I think it's important to students to know that there are going to be additional funding that can potentially help them, whether it be potential jobs, internships, or work study, or whatever it could be., says Justyce Brown.

"It's gonna help us improve our retention and help our students be more successful, help them graduate on time and that will really, really help them save money. ", explains Dr. Hisham Hegab, who is the Dean of the College of Engineering and Science.

Sophomore engineering students who are low-income and academically talented will be some of the first to benefit from this additional funding.


13 2016-06-22
Monroe

Vitter Announces Nearly $1M in STEM Scholarship Grants for LA Tech Students


RUSTON, La. (Press Release) --

U.S. Senator David Vitter (R-La.) today announced that the National Science Foundation (NSF) will be awarding a $999,234 grant to Louisiana Tech University in Ruston, La. These funds will benefit sophomore students in the fields of mechanical, biomedical, and civil engineering.

“Louisiana’s young folks are generating some exciting, new ideas, particularly in the fields of science, technology, mathematics, and engineering,” said Vitter. “This STEM grant for students at Louisiana Tech in Ruston will go a long way toward encouraging them to continue their important work to keep Louisiana at the forefront of innovation and technology.”

This grant is awarding under the NSF’s Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM) and through Louisiana Tech University’s “Sophomore Fast-Forward: A Summer Bridge Program to Support Retention in Engineering” program, whose goal is to boost graduates entering the fields of science, technology, mathematics, and engineering (STEM). Direct beneficiaries of this grant include sophomore students majoring in the fields of mechanical, biomedical, and civil engineering, particularly low-income and academically talented students. Funds will provide for professional development, academic support, and mentoring programs.

Copyright 2016 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistrib
13 2016-06-17
Monroe

Tech's Goff leading candidate for Alabama's opening, but no deal is in place


Louisiana Tech baseball coach Greg Goff has emerged as a leading candidate for the Alabama vacancy.

On Thursday, the Goff era at Tech appeared to be over after a report by TideSports.com Thursday indicated the Bulldogs' second-year head coach is expected to be named the new coach at Alabama.

But Goff to Alabama is far from a done deal. There is mutual interest between the two sides, but no offer had been made as of late Thursday afternoon.

As of Thursday night, Tech hadn't been informed that Goff is leaving or plans to leave.

"It is not our policy to comment directly on coaching searches and it's not our place to comment on the speculation of the Alabama search," Tech associate athletic director of communications Malcolm Butler said. "At this time Greg Goff is still Louisiana Tech's baseball coach."

Early Thursday, Goff became one of Alabama's top candidates after a pair of candidates reportedly dropped out of the running to replace Mitch Gaspard, the former coach of the Crimson Tide who resigned last month.

Rick Pendley, who is the vice president of Alabama's baseball booster club, tweeted out the following Thursday about Goff being introduced Friday.

View image on Twitter
View image on Twitter
Follow
Rick Pendley ⚾ @alagrandslammer
Welcoming to Tuscaloosa new Alabama Head Baseball Coach Greg Goff
5:44 PM - 16 Jun 2016
19 19 Retweets 40 40 likes
If offered, Alabama would be a tough job to turn down for Goff despite he and his family's affinity for Ruston and the community. Goff got his head coaching career started at Division II Montevallo, which is about an hour east of Alabama's campus in Tuscaloosa. Goff led Montevallo to the Division II College World Series in 2006.

Reports surfaced Thursday afternoon that Goff, who just finished his second year at Tech and led the Bulldogs to a 42-win season and an appearance in the NCAA Regionals, is in the mix for Alabama's opening.

D1baseball's Kendall Rogers tweeted Tulane coach David Pierce and East Carolina coach Cliff Godwin were no longer in the mix at Alabama and "all signs pointed" to Goff as the latest option for the Crimson Tide's new coach.

There was word around Tech's athletic department is Goff has had conversations with Alabama this week and as recently as Thursday.

Gaspard, the former Northwestern State coach and UL Lafayette assistant went 234-193 in seven seasons, although the Crimson Tide failed to make the NCAA Tournament in each of the past two seasons.

It's unclear how much Alabama would pay for its next coach. A 2013 article by AL.com listing the salaries of Southeastern Conference baseball coaches indicated Gaspard was under contract for $300,000. Goff's salary and exact terms at Tech are unclear. He signed a five-year in 2015, but the University of Louisiana System told The News-Star in an email last week they didn't have a contract on file for Goff.

Goff is a hot name in college baseball due to his rapid turnaround at Tech. He inherited a 15-win program in 2014 and showed a 10-win improvement in 2015 (25-27) before becoming one of the biggest surprises in Conference USA this past year.


THENEWSSTAR.COM
'Miracles can happen': Greg Goff has helped make Tech baseball relevant again

Prior to his time at Tech, Goff coached at Campbell for seven seasons, logging three consecutive 40-win seasons in his final three years. The 40-win threshold in 2016 at Tech was the program's first since 1988.

He also spent fours year at Kentucky from 1999 to 2003 as the Wildcats' pitching coach. Goff was briefly linked to Kentucky for its recent vacancy — reports listed him as a name to consider — although UK ended up hiring Mississippi State assistant Nick Mingione earlier this week

Goff has been busy since Tech's season ended almost two weeks ago in a loss to Mississippi State. The entire staff ran a team camp last week, and Goff was in Ruston this week to put on a youth camp while some of his staff went out recruiting.

The one area in Tech's corner is the immediate future with the program. Tech returns a majority of the roster and will add several key pieces to make another run at the NCAA Tournament.

Former Bulldog basketball coach Mike White was faced with a similar decision in 2014 when he was courted by several teams before deciding to return with a talented roster at his disposal.

Tech ended up winning the regular season league title in 2015, the program's first outright championship since 1999. White's patience paid off when he accepted the Florida job a few months later.
13 2016-06-16
Ruston

TECH HOSTS INAUGURAL CLINICAL RESIDENCY CONFERENCE


More than 100 Lincoln, Claiborne and Ouachita parish educators, Monroe City and Caddo Parish School Board Leaders and Grambling State University faculty attended the inaugural Louisiana Tech University Clinical Residency Conference.

The purpose of the conference was to update local educators on the Teacher Educators and Mentors model, Amy Vessel, clinical residency research center director and director of professional and clinical experiences, said.

The TEAM Model transforms traditional student teaching into a mentor and intern approach.

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13 2016-06-15
Monroe

La. Tech graduates complete medical school at LSUHSC-Shreveport


RUSTON – Thirteen recent Louisiana Tech University graduates have earned their Doctor of Medicine degrees after graduating this spring from Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center School of Medicine in Shreveport.

All 13 of these students successfully gained admission to medical school upon graduation from Louisiana Tech, applying the skills and the quality educational and research experiences each of them received while at Tech. Each graduated Louisiana Tech between the winter 2011 and winter 2012 quarters.

“The Department of Biology at Louisiana Tech fosters an environment that offers key advantages to medical school applicants,” said Dr. Kevin Hebert, a 2012 graduate of Louisiana Tech who will be doing his residency at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. “Small class sizes and approachable world-class professors are two unique qualities Louisiana Tech provides. These characteristics were instrumental in learning a solid biology foundation needed to success in medical school and beyond.
13 2016-06-13
Shreveport

Could Shreveport be the future home to C-USA hoops tournament?


For the first time in three years, Louisiana Tech, in conjunction with the Shreveport-Bossier City Sports Commission, never submitted a bid for the Conference USA men's and women's basketball tournament.

That's because Tech's potential bid didn't meet the requirements of having a secondary site to accommodate both the men's and women's side. Or, as Tech athletic director Tommy McClelland put it, Tech's hands were tied.

Earlier this week, Conference USA approved a return to Birmingham, Alabama, for the third straight year. Tech threw its hat in the ring for the 2015 and 2016 tournaments. UAB and UTEP were the only two schools to bid for 2017.

If the current format continues, the C-USA Tournament won't be coming to north Louisiana, but that could soon change.

"Moving forward, there's a larger conversation that needs to take place and that's, how we're going to do this? What's our plan? What's our strategy? I think there's going to be conversations that are going to take place about a true neutral site, separating the tournament and having a women's tournament the week before and having the men's tournament the next week," McClelland told The News-Star on Friday.

"If the format changes, it certainly opens up a beautiful arena sitting right there in Bossier City with some of the greatest hospitality in the entire country to allow me to present the CenturyLink Center as a host site for the Conference USA Tournament if there's one venue involved."

Separate sites for the men and women would allow Tech to bid for either one or for both since it will only need one facility — the 14,000-seat CenturyLink Center.


THENEWSSTAR.COM
Tech loses bid to host 2016 C-USA hoops tourney

In previous years, the CenturyLink Center was proposed as the primary site with Centenary College as a secondary site for the first few rounds of the women’s tournament.

"We didn't bid on it because we didn't meet the requirements anymore," McClelland said. "It wasn't going to get off the ground.

"​Overall, the condition of the facility. The size. Being on another university's campus that is not in our league was an issue."

Presented with El Paso, Texas, or Birmingham, McClelland voted for Birmingham again since it is easier for fans to travel to.

McClelland said all 14 athletic directors plan to meet in the fall to discuss future conference tournament sites and where the league goes from here. Boosting the league's RPI via scheduling, conference scheduling and the possibility of creating divisions will be discussed.

"All 14 athletic directors are really going to roll up our sleeves. We have to," McClelland said.

But the main priority is coming up with some sort of plan to avoid having yearly last-minute meetings to determine where the tournament will be held.

"First of all, we cannot just keep waiting every year to figure out where we're going to play the tournament for the following year," said McClelland, noting it would have been difficult for Tech to host in Shreveport since the turnaround from May to March is so quick.

"We need to have a long-term plan. We need to have at least a three-year plan, whether that is at one location for three years or whether that is this location in year one, this location in year two and this location in year three. We need to know the places we're going. You can't just keep waiting every year to decide what you're going to do with your tournament. There is certainly a growing frustration to have a better plan and to be better planned out for the future."

A move to a neutral site could help prevent small crowds
A move to a neutral site could help prevent small crowds like this one back in March for the C-USA title game between Middle Tennessee and Old Dominion. (Photo: Marvin Gentry, Marvin Gentry-USA TODAY Sports)
McClelland's frustrations and concerns aren't new. He expressed the same viewpoint last year when Tech lost out to UAB as the host site. He also said last May he thought a neutral site format would be on the agenda, but that idea has yet to pick up steam.

He's all for changing the format to either a neutral or separate sites. The first option is his preference. The second would potentially benefit the school and Shreveport-Bossier City.

"My personal view on it is to try and have it at a true neutral site and then spend your energy on marketing. You can't just pick a neutral site and have it there one year. You have to try and get some traction and build some momentum," he said.

"To me, that's a true championship, a place people can anticipate going, go to New Orleans for a week or the weekend to watch basketball and it's a destination we know is there for three years. To me, that would be the number one. I know there's challenges associated with that, finances being one with the cost of those arenas. If we do these types of things then fans have to come."

McClelland then referenced how UAB was eliminated early from the tournament this past year, which made attendance suffer for the championship game between Middle Tennessee and Old Dominion. He said that scenario wouldn't be any different than having it in Nashville or New Orleans.

"I don't know if we can get there as a group, but I do think it's going to change moving forward. I don't think it will be the same format and I think it will be a different location," he said.


13 2016-06-10
Ruston

TECH HOSTS HONOR STUDENT ORIENTATION


Through a partnership between the city of Ruston, Louisiana Tech University Orientation and the Meet Me on Main Street Alliance, incoming honor students were welcomed with a concert Wednesday evening in Railroad Park. After orientation leaders led students in a few spirit chants and community leaders introduced themselves to the newest Tech undergraduates, a local band, Chief and the Hounds, took the stage.
13 2016-06-09
Shreveport

Louisiana Tech announces spring quarter graduates


Louisiana Tech University’s summer quarter commencement exercises were held May 21, with diplomas awarded to 861 graduates. Commencement marked the close of summer quarter activities at the university.
Area graduates – listed by state, city and degree – are as follows:
Alabama

Clay
Jon David Perry- Bachelor Of General Studies

Dadeville
Chase Youngblood- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering

Florence
Benjamin C. Vanveckhoven- Bachelor Of Science

Madison
Casey Wojnar- Bachelor Of Science

Muscle Shoals
Nicholas Thomason- Bachelor Of Arts

Arkansas

Arkadelphia
Dalton Daniel Champagne- Bachelor Of Science Civil Engineering

Bentonville
Jennifer L. Tubre- Master Of Arts In Teaching

Camden
Emory Brook Clayborn- Master Of Arts

Donaldson
Brett W. Chancellor- Master Of Business Administration

El Dorado
Kanedria L. Andrews- Bachelor Of Arts
Alyssa R. Dupree- Bachelor Of Arts
Savanna R. Langston- Master Of Professional Accountancy
Dylan L. Lawrence- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Kassidy Meshell- Bachelor Of Arts
Steven John Reinhardt- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology
Management
Matthew Ryan Roberts- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies
Juan Manuel Rodriguez- Bachelor Of General Studies
Micah D. Sanford- Bachelor Of Arts
Octavius D. White- Master Of Business Administration

Eldorado
Margaret Marie Burchfield- Bachelor Of Science

Emerson
Cody R. Samples- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering

Fort Smith
Maggie Elizabeth Chamberlain- Graduate Certificate

Hot Springs
Katherine Lee Lybrand- Bachelor Of Science Civil Engineering
Michelle Aurora Oliva- Master Of Arts

Junction City
Courtney Nicole Lowe- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion

Little Rock
Justin Ray Rollans- Bachelor Of Science

Mabelvale
Elizabeth Nichole Crane- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies

Magnolia
Mason Allan McCrary- Bachelor Of Science
Morgan Lee McDonald- Bachelor Of Arts

North Little Rock
Daley Lynae Johnston- Master Of Arts

Arizona
Gilbert
Tyler James Clancy- Bachelor Of General Studies

California

Beaumont
Jennifer Ann Threlkeld- Associate Of Science Nursing

Chowchilla
Katelynn B. Cook- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion

Lincoln
Margaret Aileen Macdonald- Master Of Science

Rancho Cucamonga
Michael Anthony Deceglie- Bachelor Of General Studies

Santa Monica
Sean Turrell Berman- Master Of Science

Tehachapi
Meagan Kilchrist Arflin- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion

Connecticut
New Milford
Zachary David Burger- Bachelor Of General Studies

Plantsville
Devin Nickole Van patten- Bachelor Of Arts

Florida
Cape Coral
Daniel Rivera- Bachelor Of Science Biomedical Engineering

Coral Springs
Nicole Lauren Poirier- Bachelor Of Sci Cyber Engr

Delray Beach
Chelsea Marie Ferrell- Master Of Science

Gulf Breeze
Blake J. Meredeth- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering

Palm City
Cory A. Kaplan- Master Of Science

Weston
Courtney Lynn Frank- Bachelor Of Science

Georgia

Cumming
Kelly Christine Batte- Graduate Certificate

Leesburg
Sanford Seay- Bachelor Of Arts

Mansfield
Celeste B. Rosebrock- Bachelor Of Science

Richmond Hill
Cody Shea Wyatt- Bachelor Of Science

Snellville
Kevin Octavious Gary- Bachelor Of Arts

Illinois

Chillicothe
Austin L. Youngman- Graduate Certificate

Geneva
Ashley Santos- Bachelor Of Arts

Normal
Parker W. Spears- Bachelor Of Science

Rockford
Allison Kristine White- Bachelor Of Science

Roscoe
Chad Ryan Lee- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management

Woodstock
Laura Tibbs Lefevour- Bachelor Of Arts

Indiana

Columbus
John Basile- Bachelor Of Science Biomedical Engineering

Indianapolis
Lindsay Ann Dirlam- Master Of Science

Kansas
Pratt
Merrill Abdul-jabar Holden- Bachelor Of General Studies

Kentucky
Oak Grove
Gustavo Adolfo Cabrera- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Technology

Louisiana

Abita Springs
Stephen Taylor Allison- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering

Alexandra
Olivia Nicole Loewer- Bachelor Of Science
Jacob L. Newton- Master Of Fine Arts

Alexandria
Ragan Lee Bonnette- Associate Of General Studies
Ashley E. Clarke- Master Of Arts
Elizabeth Anna Dixon- Bachelor Of Arts
Kelsie M. Field- Bachelor Of Science
Amber Nicole Jurgensen- Bachelor Of Arts
Morgan Elizabeth Kee- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Photography
Krishna K. Patel- Bachelor Of Science
Evan H. Pringle- Master Of Architecture
Lillian Dare Rozanski- Graduate Certificate
Daniel Mark Seeser- Bachelor Of Science
Margaret Elizabeth Williams- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion

Arcadia
Melanie Kate Brown- Master Of Professional Accountancy
Darrien M. Harris- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion
Whittney Lee McDonald- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance
Brooke Ellen Moore- Bachelor Of Science
Alyssa D. Patterson- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion
Ruby Johannah Richie- Bachelor Of Science

Ball
Austin Lee Engen- Bachelor Of Science Civil Engineering
Troy Hickman Prestridge- Bachelor Of General Studies

Baskin
Lane David Robertson- Bachelor Of Science

Bastrop
Taneka R. Bradshaw- Master Of Arts In Teaching
Heather Nicole Deshazo- Associate Of Science Nursing
Colton Michael Moore- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Albert Berton Sisson- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Technology
Zachary Taylor Stephenson- Bachelor Of Science
Tanner White- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering

Baton Rouge
Michael Anthony Aguillard Jr.- Bachelor Of Arts
Kelby Blaine Blalock- Bachelor Of Arts
Luke Martin Bosse- Master Of Science Engineering
Sarah Taylor Chenevert- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Communication Design
Keely S. Davis- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion
Curtis T. Ellis- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Frances Elise Ewing- Bachelor Of Science
Ryan Joseph Frick- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Keller Anthony Hanegan- Bachelor Of Arts
John T. Hitt- Bach Of Sci Hlth Informatics & Info Mgt
Lauren N. Janway- Bachelor Of Science
Maurice I. Kelly- Bachelor Of Science Computer Science
Tyre Anthony Kenney- Bachelor Of Science
Shelby A. Lewis- Bachelor Of Science
John Michael Long- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology
Megan Nicole Lowe- Bachelor Of Science
Alexander Nicholas Monistere- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Olivia F. Parsons- Master Of Arts
Kyle Edward Robichaux- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Kyle Andrew Stephens- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion
Bailey M. Thibodeaux- Bachelor Of Science

Belle Chasse
Anesu Samuel Chigumira- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering

Belle Rose
Dashia De'shell Myles- Bachelor Of Science

Benton
Darrian Shuntetric Carr- Bachelor Of Science
Thomas Peyton Cockrell- Bachelor Of Science
Lacy Breann Culver- Bachelor Of Science
Ashleigh Renae Dodds- Bachelor Of Science
Seth G. Doughty- Bachelor Of Science Nanosystems Engineering
Nicholas Ryan Fulco- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion
Tyler M. Harrell- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology
Leslie B. McKeever- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Michael Austen Murray- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Jason Lee Porter- Bach Of Sci Cyber Engr
Cody W. Sanderlin- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion
Taylor L. Smith- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion
Mason Lee Stearns- Bachelor Of Science

Bernice
Jordan Lee Pixley- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering

Bossier City
Karen G. Arbuckle- Master Of Education
Trinity Lerae' Bruno- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance
Tanya N. Corbett- Bachelor Of General Studies
Joshua Cox- Associate Of General Studies
Derrick Davenport- Bachelor Of General Studies
Anna Caroline Davis- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5
Michelle Lynn Dillon- Bachelor Of Science
Cynthia Dorfner- Bachelor Of General Studies
Kyle P. Fohrman- Bachelor Of Science
Kellie Elizabeth Frizzell- Master Of Arts In Teaching
Gabriel Cornelius Gafford- Bach Of Sci Sec Ed & Teaching Gr 6-12
Sherri Kay Harmon- Bachelor Of Science
Nicholas A. Henry- Bach Of Sci Cyber Engr
Christina Suzanne Hobart- Master Of Arts In Teaching
Darrell Wayne Johnson- Bachelor Of General Studies
Donna Johnson- Doctor Of Education Education Leadership
Amanda N. Kage- Bachelor Of Science
John Frederick Kitchens- Bachelor Of Arts
Richard Gordon Laframboise- Bach Of Sci Cyber Engr
Patrick A. Larkin- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management
Johnathon W. Marley- Bachelor Of Arts
Blaine C. Mire- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management
Meredith Eloise Nelson- Bachelor Of Science
Teresa Marie Parks- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance
Ashley Faye Penrod- Bachelor Of Science
Cori Elizabeth Prater- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Alaina Kathleen Proctor- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies
Kristen Joyce Puzio- Bachelor Of Arts
Amy Claire Rabinowitz- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5
Tabitha Renee Rawls- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance
Dorothy Ray- Bachelor Of General Studies
Lori C. Ross- Graduate Certificate
Jesus David Santillan- Bachelor Of General Studies
Hilary Joyce Sears- Bachelor Of General Studies
Sarah Elizabeth Slack- Bachelor Of Arts
Tyler Brennan Smith- Bachelor Of Arts
Hannah Marie Spence- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Studio
Sarah A. Thomson- Master Of Architecture
Raymond Chase Vallery- Bachelor Of Science
Michelle Villaflor- Bachelor Of General Studies
Peter C. Wrzesinski- Bachelor Of Science

Boyce
Cullen David Pearce- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering

Breaux Bridge
Nia B. Potier- Doctor Of Audiology

Bush
Paul Daniel Dauterive- Bachelor Of Arts

Calhoun
Dakota Charles Morgan- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering

Center Point
Steven D. Scanlan- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering

Choudrant
Rachel Lynn Abel- Bachelor Of Arts
Samantha Leeann Cone- Bachelor Of Science
Dennis E. Puckett- Bachelor Of Science
Kaitlin M. Robinson- Bachelor Of Science
Anne Dennis Summitt- Master Of Science
Courtney Fewell Wade- Master Of Arts In Teaching

Chourdrant
Brenner Alan Mabry- Bachelor Of Science
Whitney Wheelis- Bach Of Sci Sec Ed & Teaching Gr 6-12

Columbia
Matthew Cole McIlwain- Bachelor Of Science
Kimberly Jade Pilcher- Master Of Architecture
Savannah Elizabeth Steele- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion

Covington
John David Owens III- Bachelor Of Science Computer Science

Crowley
Amy Lynn Walton- Associate Of Science Nursing

Delhi
Ladarian Keron Clay- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design
Randi Erin Hammons- Bachelor Of Science
Clarrissa Lea Johnson- Bachelor Of Science

Denham Springs
Karen Marie Rispone- Bachelor Of Science Nanosystems Engineering
Melanie Maree Wascom- Bachelor Of Science

Dequincy
Jacob M. Rhodes- Master Of Architecture

Deridder
Kendra D. Britton- Master Of Professional Accountancy

Des Allemands
Erik P. Beadle- Master Of Science Molecular Science And Nanotechnology

Deville
Elliott Joseph Ayo- Bachelor Of Arts
Jannah Nicole Ayo- Bachelor Of Science
Tyler Moses- Bachelor Of Science
Jamie G. Price- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies
Emily Rose Smith- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion

Dodson
Lauren Walker Emmons- Bachelor Of General Studies

Downsville
Allison H. Hopper- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Studio
Adam Reese Taylor- Bachelor Of Arts
Kyle Michael Temple- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering

Doyline
Zachary D. Spurgin- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering

Dry Prong
Zachery Ty Hernandez- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology

Dubach
Zachary Bentley- Master Of Arts
Hyun Chul Cho- Doctor Of Business Administration
Kirby Brooks Colvin- Master Of Arts
Traci Michelle Evans- Bachelor Of Science
Benjamin Hunter Fulton- Bachelor Of Science
Keeley Carter Layfield- Doctor Of Audiology
Hannah Cooper Lee- Master Of Business Administration
Summer Roberson Miller- Associate Of Science Nursing
Lauren Marie Vann- Bachelor Of Arts

Effie
Hannah Kursten Moreau- Bachelor Of Arts

Elm Grove
Rebecca Lynn Huston- Bachelor Of Arts
Grant Bartlett Little- Bachelor Of Science

Elton
Laura Guidry- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Studio

Eunice
Morgan Mary Bollich- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Michael Dwayne Zaunbrecher- Bachelor Of Science

Extension
John Thomas Sadler- Bachelor Of Arts
Farmerville
Timothy S. Allred- Bachelor Of Science
Sarah Blazier- Bachelor Of General Studies
Melanie J. Chapman- Master Of Arts In Teaching
Tori Danae Constant- Bachelor Of Science Early/elementary Education Grades Pk-3
Brittany Gray Durr- Bachelor Of Arts
Lauren Dianne Guillot- Bachelor Of Science Early/elementary Education Grades Pk-3
Destiny Michelle Maxwell- Bachelor Of Science Early/elementary Education Grades Pk
Kasey Lauren Nance- Bachelor Of Science
Erin Danielle Nevala- Master Of Science
Daniel Martell Ouchley- Bachelor Of Arts
Kelli N. Palmertree- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion
Amy R. Royal- Bachelor Of Arts
Tyler J. Spence- Master Of Science Engineering
Morgan Lefaye Sutton- Bachelor Of Arts
Haley Savannah Temple- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion
John S. Terral- Bachelor Of Science
Thomas Michael Terral- Bachelor Of Science

Ferriday
Kaitlyn C. Fletcher- Bachelor Of Science
Benjamin Troy McDonald- Master Of Professional Accountancy
Evan M. Roberts- Bachelor Of Science Computer Science

Fort Necessity
Kody A. Beavers- Bachelor Of Science

Franklinton
Brad Alan Cooper- Bach Of Sci Sec Ed & Teaching Gr 6-12
David J. Stafford- Master Of Science
Emily Charlotte Varisco- Bachelor Of Arts

Glenmora
Jeremy Adam Rollins- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering

Gloster
German Velazquez- Bachelor Of Science Civil Engineering

Gonzales
Laticia Watson- Bachelor Of Science

Grambling
Maryann Ada-nta- Bachelor Of Science
Tyler Cherelle Hawthorne- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Studio
Aisha D. Jackson- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance

Gray
Benjamin Joseph Ford- Master Of Architecture

Greensburg
Lakeyvion Tyrell Womack- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Technology

Greenwell Springs
Alexa Noelle Salamoni- Associate Of Science Nursing

Greenwood
Warren D. Clardy- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Kylin T. Thomas- Bachelor Of Arts

Hahnville
Wesley Robert Hoggard- Bachelor Of Science

Hammond
Christopher William Boyle- Bachelor Of Science
Hanna Nicole Harris- Bachelor Of Arts
Todd Richard Tijerino- Bachelor Of Science
Spencer D. Wyld- Bachelor Of Science

Harrisonburg
Pamela Ruth Hamilton- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance

Harvey
Daniel Evan Borders- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering
Nathan E. Jordan- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies

Haughton
Darren Keith Alderman- Bachelor Of Science
Alicia Bailey- Bachelor Of Science
Brandon Michael Bonar- Associate Of General Studies
Heather Marie Casil- Bachelor Of General Studies
Lauren Feliciano- Bachelor Of Science
Stephanie Nicole Fink- Master Of Business Administration
Kiley Kathleen Gregory- Bachelor Of Science
Christopher A. Meshell- Bachelor Of Science
Dawson James Shannon- Bachelor Of Arts
Catherine A. Thomas- Bachelor Of Science

Haynesville
James Wesley Harris- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Technology

Heflin
Cristal Soto Torres- Bachelor Of Science
Maria Guadalupe Soto Torres- Bachelor Of Science

Homer
Demetra Aeisha Allen- Master Of Business Administration
Shalaina L. Jenkins- Bachelor Of General Studies
Tanner Devin Ponder- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Communication Design
James Taylor Tuggle- Bachelor Of Science Civil Engineering

Houma
Hunter Benjamin Boudreaux- Bachelor Of Science
Adrian Edgardo Guzman Jr.- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering

Jackson
Marye Elisabeth Hooker- Graduate Certificate

Jamestown
Rachel Ham Mathews- Master Of Arts In Teaching

Jefferson
Christopher Clary- Graduate Certificate

Jena
Dewey M. Amyx- Bachelor Of Science Forestry
Cartez Sawatski Jack Jr.- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Chelsea D. Juarez- Bachelor Of Arts
Trent L. Norman- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Emmalee Jill Smith- Bachelor Of Science
Cameron G. Windham- Bachelor Of Science

Jonesboro
Allison B. Gilbert- Associate Of Science Nursing
Douglas Harvey- Master Of Business Administration
Courtney Jade Paul- Bachelor Of Science
Amy Kathryn Richards- Bach Of Sci Hlth Informatics & Info Mgt
Misti Renee Wilkerson- Bachelor Of Science Early/elementary Education Grades Pk-3

Keithville
Alex Delton Green- Master Of Architecture

Kenner
Dasia Simone Canales- Bachelor Of Arts
Caroline Rose Hymel- Master Of Arts

Lafayette
Sabrittany Savannah Angelle- Bachelor Of Science Industrial Engineering
Christen Jude Boyer- Doctor Of Philosophy
Taylor J. McMahon- Bachelor Of Science
Courtney Nicole Nowosiwsky- Associate Of General Studies
Josh C. Pearce- Master Of Business Administration

Lake Charles
Madison Clare Blackwell- Bachelor Of Science Biomedical Engineering
Kaleb G. Bonvillain- Master Of Architecture
Bradley M. Burkart- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies
Garrett Jay Davis- Bachelor Of Science
Devin H. Dronett- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design
Jennifer Hammack- Bachelor Of Sci Hlth Informatics & Info Mgt
Matthew Payne Jester- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
William Harrison Lorio- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Chaz Michael Oubre- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Valaree P. Rachal- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Alexander Douglas Shows- Master Of Architecture
Theresa E. Stickney- Master Of Fine Arts
Jonathan Peter Vogel- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering

Lake Providence
Joseph Tyler Whatley##Bachelor Of Science

Leesville
David Blaine Brister- Bachelor Of Science Forestry
Adam Cole Woods- Bachelor Of Science

Lena
Robin Kathleen Parker- Master Of Arts In Teaching

Luling
Bethany C. Eppling- Master Of Arts
Alyssa Nicole Simon- Bachelor Of Science

Lutcher
Daniel Christopher Wahl- Bachelor Of Arts

Mandeville
Kyle A. Anderson- Bachelor Of Arts
Andy Bajnauth- Bachelor Of Science Civil Engineering
Justin Robert Coe- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Scott Allen Eberhart- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Abdullah Nammari- Bachelor Of Science Nanosystems Engineering
Elise Claire Van Zandt- Master Of Health Informatics

Marion
Jake Hunter Auger- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Claire Goudreau Cox- Bachelor Of Science
Jared Alan Williams- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Technology

Marksville
Colin D. Dunbar- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering

Marrero
Christopher P. Lomonaco- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Technology

Metairie
Amanda M. Abadie- Bachelor Of Interior Design
Caroline P. Bell- Bachelor Of Science Biomedical Engineering
Jessica Marie Borne- Bachelor Of Science
Ashley Anne Kettenring- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies
Nicole Marie Rusck- Bachelor Of Arts

Minden
Natalie Danielle Bullock- Bachelor Of Arts
Jake D. Landry- Bachelor Of Science Industrial Engineering
Katherine Leigh Mixon- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5
Jordan Lethommius Perry- Bachelor Of Arts
Joni L. Prince- Graduate Certificate
Maggie E. Siler- Master Of Arts
Katlyn Brooke Watson- Bachelor Of Science
Jimmy Yocom- Bachelor Of Science

Monroe
Meghan A. Austin- Master Of Arts In Teaching
Michael Wayne Blackson- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Communication Design
Almira Kathryn Bradford- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Communication Design
Braden James Bristo- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion
Erin M. Browning- Master Of Arts In Teaching
Lillie Caitlin Burroughs- Bachelor Of Arts
Whitney Trisler Causey- Master Of Fine Arts
Caleb L. Collins- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Mallory Marie Danna- Bachelor Of Science
Kiersten Leah Farlee- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Studio
Dustin Allen Hatten- Master Of Arts In Teaching
Anna L. McCarter- Bachelor Of Science
Vincent C. Moore- Bachelor Of Science
Meredith Pate- Bachelor Of Science
Margaret L. Quillman- Bachelor Of Science Early/Elementary Education Grades Pk-3
Philip A. Raeisghasem- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering
Lauren Elise Slaughter- Bachelor Of Arts
Gertie Alexis Woods- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5
Alison Nicole Wyant- Bachelor Of Arts

Moreauville
Luke Wilkes Hess- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering

Natchitoches
Catherine Jean Burke- Bachelor Of Arts
Kristen M. Chatelain- Bachelor Of Science
Kelsey K. Woodard- Bachelor Of Science

New Iberia
Kimberly Elizabeth Garb- Bachelor Of Science

New Orleans
Joseph Theodore Hagensee- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Karen Marie Lawless- Master Of Education
Bien Duc Nguyen- Bachelor Of Science
Colin Wade Rousset- Bachelor Of Science Biomedical Engineering
Abdul-rasheed Adetkunbo Sadiq- Bachelor Of Science
Brianna Michele Skinner- Bachelor Of Science

Oak Grove
Jonathan Nelson Cox- Bachelor Of Science
Lauren A. Eubanks- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Studio
James Tyler Hughes- Bachelor Of Arts
Dylan Ray Jones- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology
John Robert Warner- Master Of Arts In Teaching

Oak Ridge
Zack A. Henry- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology

Oakdale
Clayton W. Monk- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Haylee Thornhill- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Zachary Lane West- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering

Olla
Leeann Jones- Bachelor Of Arts
Hannah Elizabeth Ruddell- Bachelor Of General Studies
Macy Jean Tullos- Bachelor Of Science

Pearl River
Cady Anne Harris- Master Of Arts
Michael R. Meltz- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design

Pineville
Casey Leeann Chaudoir- Bachelor Of Arts
Logan Kyle Corley- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Adam M. Farque- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering
Felix Rhodes Moran- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Bryce Dylan Pfeiffer- Bachelor Of Science Civil Engineering
Brittany L. Pippen- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5
John R. Vercher- Bachelor Of Science Forestry
Kasia L. Washington- Bachelor Of Science

Pitkin
Seth T. Anderson- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Taylor Breann Standish- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5
Jonathan Bradley West- Master Of Professional Accountancy

Plain Dealing
Tyler C. Wallace- Bachelor Of Science

Plaquemine
Eric D. Bucholtz- Bachelor Of Science

Pollock
Billy D. Smith- Bachelor Of Science Computer Science

Ponchatoula
James G. Delatte Jr.- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Theresa Pevey Derenbecker- Master Of Science
Phillip Michael Ernst- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Dana Leanne Reno- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5

Prairieville
Dillan Michael Boudreaux- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Alex Michael Fortenberry- Bachelor Of Science
Sierra Grace McGraw- Bachelor Of Science
Jordan E. Toepfer- Master Of Health Informatics

Provencal
Emily Elizabeth Vice- Bachelor Of Science

Quitman
Larkin B. Culpepper- Master Of Arts

Rayne
Adrienne Claire Dailey- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design

Rayville
Emily Diane Douciere- Bachelor Of Science
Katie M. Miller- Master Of Arts
Orie O'briant Morris- Bachelor Of Science
Charles R. Wilkerson- Bachelor Of Science

Ruston
Kehinde Chibuzor Adedeji- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Technology
Ross H. Adelsperger- Bachelor Of Arts
Joshua Aaron Adkinson- Master Of Science
Khadeejah Mohammed Alghadeer- Doctor Of Philosophy
Amer Abdulhadi Alirq- Bachelor Of Science Industrial Engineering
Salah El-deen Alzghoul- Doctor Of Philosophy
Jeffery J. Ambrose- Doctor Of Philosophy
Christian J. Amos- Bachelor Of Arts
Shravan Rakesh Animilli- Doctor Of Philosophy
Lakisha Lashae Atkins- Master Of Business Administration
Anna Hannibal Baines- Master Of Arts In Teaching
Bikash Baraily- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies
Bibhuti Baral- Bachelor Of Science Civil Engineering
Chad Preston Barnhill- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Arun Basker- Master Of Science Engineering
Dilip Basnet- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Calyn Yvette Bennett- Associate Of Science Nursing
Ihsan Adel Benten- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management
Kirsten Elizabeth Blake- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5
Chase Parker Borden- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Communication Design
Laura Leigh Bostick- Doctor Of Education Education Leadership
Matthew Homer Brewer- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Kentrell Montez Brice- Bachelor Of General Studies
Brandon K. Bruce- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion
James K. Bruce- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Communication Design
Justin R. Bruner- Bachelor Of Science
Katelyn Marks Burkholder- Bachelor Of Science
Cassia Carmichael- Master Of Arts
Kyle Hardy Carter- Bachelor Of Science
Sarah Parker Carwile- Bachelor Of Arts
Eunice Chendjou Tchakui- Bachelor Of Science
Mahjabin Chowdhury- Master Of Arts In Teaching
Brennan Noel Confer- Bachelor Of Science
Kenneth Lane Cox- Bachelor Of Science Forestry
Alexandra Crain- Bachelor Of Arts
Ruzova Dahal- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering
Mariel A. Davenport- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Photography
Jessica Marie Davis- Master Of Arts
Mason R. Dean- Bachelor Of Science
Johnathan Trey Dees- Associate Of Science Nursing
Jigar Mahendra Dhimmar- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Jacob Duke- Bachelor Of Science
Divya Narayan Elumalai- Doctor Of Philosophy
Aaron J. Evans- Bachelor Of Science
Pamela Farell Rivero- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design
Mercedes Kathryn Fife- Bachelor Of Arts
Colton G. Franklin- Master Of Architecture
Brooke Ashley Frasier- Bachelor Of Arts
Anna Kathryn Fuller- Bachelor Of Science
Fang Gao- Master Of Science Computer Science
Fang Gao- Master Of Science Engineering
Jonathan Goertz- Bachelor Of Science
Maegan Ashlei Goss- Bachelor Of Science
Nicholas David Groden- Master Of Science Molecular Science And Nanotechnology
Chythanya Gudla- Master Of Science Computer Science
Dalane Rose Guidry- Bachelor Of Arts
Grace E. Guillot- Master Of Fine Arts
Anna Whitley Hall- Bachelor Of Arts
Jamella Saporia Hamilton- Bachelor Of Arts
Zachary Daniel Hannibal- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design
Sarah Raye Hays- Bachelor Of Science
Brandon S. Hearn- Bachelor Of Science
Breanna E. Hebert-Griffin- Bachelor Of Science
Farid Heidarnejad- Master Of Science Engineering
Elizabeth Phillips Henley- Bachelor Of Arts
Thomas J. Himel- Bachelor Of Sci Cyber Engr
Taylor Christine Hogan- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design
Joshua W. Horne- Bachelor Of Science
John Mark Howard- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology
Lauren M. Ingram- Bachelor Of Arts
Mohammad Readul Islam- Doctor Of Philosophy
Laquanda S. James- Bachelor Of Arts
Shakya D. Jayakody Arachchige- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering
Nadini Ivanthi Jayathilaka- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering
Vipasana Kansakar- Bachelor Of Science
Anish Karki- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Sonali Jayant Karnik- Doctor Of Philosophy
Shree Ram Khatri- Bachelor Of Science
Christian Kane Killen- Bachelor Of Science
Kirstie Shane Killen- Bachelor Of General Studies
Breshon Ashtin Kimbell- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion
Abbie R. King- Bachelor Of Science
Ashley L. Kober- Bachelor Of Arts
Dinuka Kuruppu Arachchilage- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering
Victor Stephen Lange- Bachelor Of Science
D. Andre Lee- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design
Zachary Tyler Levesque- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5
Bochun Liang- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management
Nicholas Logan Liberatos- Bachelor Of Science
Juan Lin- Master Of Science Engineering
Dan Liu- Bachelor Of Science
Xueqian Liu- Master Of Science Engineering
Lanadia O. Lloyd- Bachelor Of Science
Virginia Lauren Logan- Bachelor Of Arts
Morgan Elizabeth Lolley- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5
Michael Eric Lord- Master Of Business Administration
Pabitra Malla- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering
Mapa M. Mapagunarathne- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Monique Waguespack Mapes- Master Of Arts
Daniel Mark Mayer- Master Of Arts In Teaching
Joseph McAlpin- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Patricia Riley McEacharn- Bachelor Of Arts
Sean Patrick McGowan- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies
Taly Louise Merker Pinoargote- Bachelor Of Science
Breanne Adele Mertz- Bachelor Of Science
David Christopher Milam- Bachelor Of Science
Olivia Lorraine Miles- Bachelor Of Arts
Mary Margaret Morgan- Bachelor Of Science
Camille Mosley- Bachelor Of Arts
Sammy Githuku Muriithi- Doctor Of Business Administration
Aaron Lynn Napper- Bachelor Of Science
Brody Clay Neal- Bachelor Of Science
Brandon Newton- Bachelor Of Science
Lindsey Taylor Neyland- Bachelor Of Arts
Elizabeth Catherine Nguyen- Bachelor Of Science
Daniel Joseph Nichols- Bachelor Of Science
Nicole Nwoha- Bachelor Of Science Computer Science
Ngozi Ogbonnaya- Master Of Science Molecular Science And Nanotechnology
Joseph Ian Orten- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion
Jyotsaana Parajuli- Master Of Professional Accountancy
Seongjin Park- Bachelor Of Science
Lauren Olivia Pate- Bachelor Of Science
Nehalkumar Rajnikant Patel- Master Of Science Molecular Science And Nanotechnology
Samman Paudel- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology
Katie Michelle Payne- Bachelor Of Science
Sandeep Perla- Master Of Science Computer Science
Dinesh Poudel- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Shane Alexander Puckett- Doctor Of Education Leadership
Lori Null Rash- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance
Heather Hay Reeder- Master Of Arts
Shanda E. Reid- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design
Boyuan Ren- Master Of Science Engineering
Breanna Reshawn Riggins- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Communication Design
Jamie Nicole Roberie- Master Of Arts
Jeanetta Heustess Roberson- Master Of Arts In Teaching
Sheri Renee Robken- Doctor Of Education Education Leadership
Laura Catalina Rodriguez- Bachelor Of General Studies
Hillary F. Roser- Master Of Science Molecular Science And Nanotechnology
Donya Salomon-Ali- Bachelor Of Arts
Matthew Andrew Sanders- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Keshab Sapkota- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management
Ashish Sharma- Master Of Science Manufacturing Systems Engineering
Colby W. Sharp- Bachelor Of Science Forestry
Sangeet Shrestha- Master Of Science Engineering
Neesha C. Siriwardane- Bachelor Of Science Biomedical Engineering
Samuel Patrick Stocker- Bachelor Of General Studies
Amanda Leigh Stogsdill- Bachelor Of Arts
Thomas Peter Stringer- Bachelor Of Science
Taylor L. Stroud-Woods- Bachelor Of Arts
Rebecca A. Sutherland- Master Of Education
Nathan Allen Swaim- Bachelor Of Arts
Catlin E. Tatum- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Communication Design
Shannon Brashear Tatum- Master Of Education
Thomas Gray Taylor- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design
Rawieh Telfah- Bachelor Of Arts
Michael D. Thompson- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Haiding Tian- Master Of Science Engineering
Joshua Tully- Bachelor Of Science
Stephen L. Turner- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion
Akpofure Ogheneochuko Unukpo- Master Of Business Administration
Pranay Uttamchandani- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Amara Ijeoma Uyanna- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Adam Mitchell Vandenlangenberg - Bachelor Of Science
Courtney Jane Vaneaton- Bachelor Of Arts
Douglas Austin Vidrine- Bachelor Of General Studies
Miguel Angel Villarreal Jr.- Master Of Business Administration
Katerina Voziyanova- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design
Jelena Vucinic- Master Of Science
Nicholas Kyle Walker- Bachelor Of Science
Carol Pasche Ward- Master Of Arts In Teaching
Kendell Knight Webb- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies
David West- Bachelor Of General Studies
Shelby Williams- Associate Of Science Nursing
Darick Ray Williamson- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance
Ainsley E. Wilson- Bachelor Of Science
Mariah Lynn Winegeart- Bachelor Of Arts
Brandy Lynn Winfree- Graduate Certificate
Chenhao Wu- Master Of Science Computer Science
Xuanchen Yan- Master Of Science Engineering
Xuxiao Yin- Master Of Science Computer Science
Dezhi Zhang- Doctor Of Philosophy

Saint Francisville
Courtney L. Jennings- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering

Saint Gabriel
Alphonse Bienvenue Coco III- Bachelor Of Science

Sarepta
Jayde Elaine Long- Master Of Arts

Shongaloo
Hunter Cheyenne Baker- Bachelor Of Science

Shreveport
Garrett Alan Anderson- Bachelor Of Arts
Rosa C. Anderson- Graduate Certificate
Michael P. Bacon- Bachelor Of Arts
Yorel Anthony Baker- Bachelor Of Science Computer Science
Adam Thomas Barker- Bachelor Of Science
Kadavien R. Baylor- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Communication Design
Ideal Bekteshi- Bachelor Of Science
Lonnie Martin Bennett II- Master Of Architecture
Sarah Catherine Bryant- Bachelor Of Arts
Darrell K. Burgess Jr.- Master Of Architecture
Jessica Lenore Carscadden- Master Of Education
Kdarious R. Cash- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion
Nicholas Lee Collins- Bachelor Of Science
Dawn M. Cook- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management
Abbrianna M. Cooney- Bachelor Of General Studies
Stephanie C. Cromwell- Master Of Arts In Teaching
Alana Jeanete Crump- Master Of Arts
Victoria Page Culbertson- Master Of Arts
Samuel Dwayne Curtis- Master Of Business Administration
Laura Kay Davidson- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5
Kimberly Brushan Dennis- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance
Liniqua Nicole Douglas- Graduate Certificate
Rodney C. Doyal- Bachelor Of Science Industrial Engineering
Mikaela F. Fitzwater- Bach Of Sci Sec Ed & Teaching Gr 6-12
Hayden Flint- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering
Devin Lane Ford- Bachelor Of Science
Jacquelyn D. French- Bachelor Of Science Industrial Engineering
Matthew C. Gandia- Bachelor Of Science Industrial Engineering
Trineisia M. Golston- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Communication Design
Stefanie P. Gordon- Bachelor Of Science Early/elementary Education Grades Pk-3
Michael Ryan Green- Bachelor Of Arts
Kelsee Elizabeth Hall- Bachelor Of Arts
Mack Arthur Hall Jr.- Bachelor Of Science
Amy Nicole Harper- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance
Aakilah Gwenae Harris- Bachelor Of Arts
Morgan A. Harris- Bachelor Of Science Civil Engineering
John K. Hawley- Bachelor Of Science Computer Science
Amy Elizabeth Horne- Master Of Education
Catherine E. Humble- Master Of Arts In Teaching
Samuel Nathan Hussein- Bachelor Of Science
Kristin Paige James- Bachelor Of General Studies
Julie Ann Jobe- Associate Of Science Nursing
Marshall John- Bachelor Of Science
Alice Thea Johnstone- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design
Elizabeth Marie Jones- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance
Brittany Karen Kaja- Bachelor Of Science
Madison G. Kane- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Communication Design
Haley Katherine Kinder- Bachelor Of Science
Ryan Hardy Kinel- Bachelor Of Science
Reginald Renard Lars- Bachelor Of General Studies
August Lashley- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Jonathan D. Long- Master Of Arts In Teaching
Andrew Jonathan Lopez- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies
Hannah Kate Lowry- Bachelor Of Science
Amanda M. May- Bachelor Of Science
Collin Robert McDonald- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion
Ronald Ross Meikle- Master Of Arts In Teaching
Jerrod T. Miller- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology
Janequa Tramone Mitchell- Bachelor Of Science
Pearl Lee Mixon- Bachelor Of General Studies
Christopher Ferrell Morgan- Master Of Arts In Teaching
Keaira Nicole Musgrove- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion
Frederic Paul Nelson- Bachelor Of Arts
Mitchell Warren Pabst- Bachelor Of General Studies
Adam Fisher Parker- Bachelor Of Science Industrial Engineering
Jennifer Kaitlyn Paulovich- Bachelor Of Science
Jason B. Poole- Bachelor Of Science
Karie Leigh Pope- Bachelor Of Science
Emily Margaret Prestridge- Bachelor Of Arts
Tobin Brooks Pritchard- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology
Robert Lewis Rollins- Bachelor Of Science Civil Engineering
Tenitra C. Rye- Bachelor Of General Studies
Ryan A. Schuler- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion
Faith Shipley- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance
John B. Slattery- Master Of Arts In Teaching
Erin C. Smith- Master Of Arts
Jonathan Mark Soenksen- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Hunter Saxon Spillers- Bachelor Of Interior Design
Trenton M. Stevens- Master Of Architecture
Stephen Michael Stuckey- Bachelor Of Science
Anthony R. Taliaferro- Bachelor Of Interior Design
Christina Terry- Bachelor Of Science
Xavier Louis Theriot- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Michael Garrett Thomas- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Holly Marie Thurman- Bachelor Of Science
Cricket Blake Thurmon- Bachelor Of Science
Nathaniel Kenneth Tichenor- Bachelor Of Science Industrial Engineering
Lakeisha Myles Towner- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management
Madeline Frances Wafer- Master Of Arts In Teaching
Brittany Nicole Walker- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion
Jonathan J. Wall- Bachelor Of Science
Jon Cameron Watson- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Kiah S. Whitfield- Associate Of General Studies
Terris Whitlock- Master Of Arts
Sarah Elyse Williams- Master Of Professional Accountancy
Anna C. Yates- Bachelor Of Science

Sibley
Kali Rebecca Killian- Bachelor Of Arts

Simsboro
Emily D. Choate- Bachelor Of Science
James Delony- Associate Of Science Nursing

Sismboro
Jaymes Hunter Collins- Doctor Of Philosophy

Slidell
Juan Chen- Doctor Of Philosophy
Jacob Christopher Griffin- Master Of Architecture
Patrick K. McClain- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Technology
Joshua Luke Robert- Bachelor Of Sci Cyber Engr
Jean-paul Sandrock- Bachelor Of Science Civil Engineering
Chastin Dean Seeby- Bachelor Of Science
Andrew Brenden Spencer- Bachelor Of Science

Spearsville
Dana Donnette Bennett- Master Of Arts In Teaching
James Tyler Lawson- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Jeremy Russell Rockett- Bachelor Of Science Health And Physical Education

Sterlington
Richard Eric Collins- Bachelor Of Arts
Joani Allen Hodnett- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management
Jesse Milton Suggs- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Studio

Sulphur
Tylor J. Baus- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Chaseland C. Cox- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Hunter A. Patton- Master Of Science

Tallulah
Ramarius Rashoon Dockery- Bachelor Of Science
Katerri McWright- Bachelor Of Science
Sebron L. Wise- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology

Theriot
Hunter J. Breaux- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering

Trout
Logan R. Evans- Bachelor Of Science

Tullos
Macy L. Mills##Bach Of Sci Sec Ed & Teaching Gr 6-12

Vidalia
Thao Nguyen- Bachelor Of Science

Ville Platte
Rebecca N. Orlando- Graduate Certificate

Vivian
Monique Lachell Brown- Bachelor Of General Studies
Trevion Trenick Hill- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion
Dakota Scott Oxford- Bachelor Of Science

Walker
Mitchell Harrison Odom- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology

West Monroe
Taylor M. Ainsworth- Master Of Arts In Teaching
David T. Burdeaux- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Jacob Andrew Cagle- Bachelor Of Science
Nicholas Kyle Clampit- Bachelor Of Science
Tommie Ray Cooper- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Technology
Cole Shane Craighead- Bachelor Of Science
Brandi Michelle Downs- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management
Luke Owen Dulaney- Bachelor Of Science
Ahmed Emad El-Giar- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Ann Marie Faile- Master Of Business Administration
James Justin Frasier- Bachelor Of Science
Hannah Jane Gissendanner- Bachelor Of Arts
Taylor Mckenzie Guillot- Bachelor Of Science
Laken Michelle Hampton- Bachelor Of Interior Design
Claire Elise Hannah- Bachelor Of Science
Andrea Jean Harris- Bachelor Of Science
Gregory Allen Hill Jr.- Master Of Arts In Teaching
Madeline Claire Hogg- Associate Of Science Nursing
Victoria Ashlyn Johnson- Bachelor Of Sci Sec Ed & Teaching Gr 6-12
Daniel K. Johnston- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology
Madeline Rayne Kent- Bachelor Of Science
Ashley Elizabeth Linden- Bachelor Of Science
Amanda C. McFarland- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion
Brooklyn J. Morris- Bachelor Of Science
Madelyn A. Mull- Bachelor Of Science
Gary Lane Newman- Bachelor Of Science
Robert Reid Newsom- Master Of Arts In Teaching
Jessica D. Patrick- Master Of Science
Cody W. Phipps- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering
Janet Rausch Platt- Master Of Arts In Teaching
Sean M. Powell- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Mary E. Riggs- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5
Summer Celeste Risinger- Bachelor Of Sci Sec Ed & Teaching Gr 6-12
Katie L. Rountree- Bachelor Of Fine Arts Graphic Design
Dustin Thomas Savage- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering
Beverly Katherine Strode- Bachelor Of Interior Design
Jamye S. Taylor- Graduate Certificate
Madison Elizabeth Vige- Bachelor Of Sci Sec Ed & Teaching Gr 6-12
Jamie Lee Weems- Bachelor Of Science
Kacie Amanda Wilber- Associate Of Science Nursing
Shelby Leigh Yarbrough- Associate Of Science Nursing

Westlake
Devin J. Osbourn- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering

Winnfield
Michael Warren Clark- Bachelor Of General Studies
Megan Jordan Crenshaw- Bachelor Of Arts
Jason Michael Howell- Master Of Science Engineering And Technology Management
Matthew Todd Martin- Bachelor Of Science

Winnsboro
Nicholas Thomas Marchand- Bachelor Of Science

Woodworth
Christin Danielle Stehr- Bachelor Of Science
Rebecca R. Switzer- Master Of Science

Zachary
Collin Harrison Gordon- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering Technology
Mason Chandler Pace- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology
Layne T. Shelton- Master Of Science
Lindsay Mcgehee Young- Doctor Of Audiology

Zwolle
Keunta D. Epps- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Lawrence Joseph Pastureau- Bachelor Of Science Construction Engineering Technology

Maryland

Beltsville
Callie Gwinn Betman- Graduate Certificate

Columbia
Brandi Wingate- Bachelor Of Arts

Michigan

Battle Creek
Talise Vanessa Wesley- Master Of Business Administration

Commerce Township
Taylor A. Parker- Bachelor Of Arts

Muskegon
Andrea Kay Cherney- Graduate Certificate

Sault Ste. Marie
Kaylee A. Laitinen- Doctor Of Audiology

Ypsilanti
Andrew Tyler Hunt- Bachelor Of Arts

Missouri

Ozark
Gunner Smith Fritsch- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering

Mississippi

Indianola
Lauren Carol Simmons- Master Of Arts

Iuka
Sommer Nicole Thornton- Master Of Arts In Teaching

Sumrall
Hannah Lauren Cooper- Master Of Fine Arts
Zachary Gene McCauley- Master Of Fine Arts

Tillatoba
Tavasha D. Anderson- Master Of Arts In Teaching

Vicksburg
Christopher Sean Luke- Bachelor Of Science

Waynesboro
Skylar M. Dailey- Bachelor Of Arts

North Carolina

Charlotte
Chandip Maskey- Bachelor Of Science Nanosystems Engineering
Leon Jarrett Samuels- Bachelor Of General Studies

Highlands
Stephanie Marie Smart- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion

New Jersey

Franlinville
Andrew Ralph Rigley- Bachelor Of Science Nanosystems Engineering

Manahawkin
Tyler Andrew Wilk- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering

New Mexico

Albuquerque
Tara Harmon- Doctor Of Audiology

Albuqueruqe
Kiva Marie Gresham- Master Of Arts In Teaching

Nevada

Las Vegas
Clay Dante Derogatis- Bachelor Of General Studies

Ohio

Pickerington
Ani Alise Manukian- Graduate Certificate

West Chester
Leana Michelle Massimini- Master Of Arts

Oklahoma

Choctaw
Ryan D. Semple- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering
Sean M. Semple- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering

Edmond
Trenton Colston Davis- Bachelor Of Science

Oregon

Portland
Amy Erin O'Brien- Master Of Science

Puerto Rico
Juncos
Adria Surei Morales- Bachelor Of Arts

South Carolina
Catawba
Katy E. McFadden- Bachelor Of Science

North Charleston
Robert S. Westley- Bachelor Of Science Industrial Engineering

Tennessee

Cordova
Madison T. Ellison- Bachelor Of Science

Texas

Amarillo
Samuel James Helman- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering

Arlington
Ian Connor Arnot- Bachelor Of Science Biomedical Engineering

Austin
Evan Zachary Warnick- Bachelor Of Science

Beach City
Meghan Brooke McEachern- Bachelor Of Sci Cyber Engr

Burkburnett
Emily Frances Salas-Groves- Graduate Certificate

Carrollton
Haley Anne Cordray- Bachelor Of Arts

Cypress
Bryce Austin Stark- Bachelor Of Arts

Daingerfield
Matthew Lane Moore- Bachelor Of Science Electrical Engineering

Edgewood
Kyle D. Thompson- Bachelor Of Arts

Flower Mound
Taylor Douglas- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5

Fort Worth
Kaitlan Nicole Beretich- Master Of Science

Gladewater
Cory Robert Caton- Bachelor Of Science

Grandview
Hunter Garrett Tipps- Master Of Architecture

Greenville
Brenna Dee Tull- Bachelor Of Science Biomedical Engineering

Hallsville
Alayna Michelle Fritz- Master Of Architecture
Brandon Derrick Petersen- Bachelor Of Science

Heath
Abigail P. Scallan- Bachelor Of Science

Hempstead
Joshua Kaleb Trammell- Master Of Science

Hockley
Mayra Rodriguez- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering

Houston
Hilary Jean Broussard- Master Of Arts

Huffman
Erin Elizabeth Baker- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies

Hurst
Deepika Manandhar- Master Of Health Informatics

Katy
Evelyn R. Skinner- Bachelor Of Science Elementary Education Grades 1-5

Kingwood
Kyle David Hunt- Bachelor Of Science

Lindale
Samuel Robert Saunders- Bachelor Of Science

Longview
Kimberly Diane Luensmann- Master Of Arts
Evan David McDougall- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering

Marshall
Kelly A. Bullis- Bachelor Of Science
Trent Alexander Harrison- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies
Maud
Kimberly Paige Parker- Master Of Science

McKinney
Kyle Matthew Fischer- Bachelor Of Science
Jasmine Domin Hale- Bachelor Of General Studies
Ryan James Joseph- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering
Autumn Rachelle Matthews- Bachelor Of Science

Nash
Lauren Michelle Caswell- Bachelor Of Science Architectural Studies

Panola
Rachel N. Burroughs- Master Of Arts

Plano
Joshua James- Bachelor Of Science
Megan Lyn Landis- Master Of Fine Arts
Kristen Miles- Bachelor Of Science

Red Oak
Joshua Jerrell Robinson- Bachelor Of Arts

Richardson
Anna Mozelle Whitaker- Bachelor Of Science Computer Science

Roanoke
Angela Jayne Niemirowski- Master Of Arts

Rockwall
Ashley Kathleen Cunningham- Bachelor Of Science Kinesiology And Health Promotion

Spring
Kipp Peter Swannie- Bachelor Of Science

Texarkana
Anna Elizabeth Ward- Master Of Arts

Tioga
Brittany N. Beddow- Bachelor Of General Studies

Waco
Cody J. Stidham- Bachelor Of Science Mechanical Engineering

Wills Point
Terry W. Day- Bachelor Of Science Chemical Engineering

Virginia

Forest
Jamie Lyn Irwin- Master Of Science

Washington

Kenmore
Nicole Geertje Rajchel- Master Of Architecture

Redmond
Naeemah Abdus-Salam- Bachelor Of General Studies

Spokane
Jodi Kay Shipley- Master Of Arts Counseling And Guidance

Tumwater
Anne Marie Armstrong- Bachelor Of Arts

Wisconsin

Eau Claire
Tyler J. Sonsalla- Master Of Science Molecular Science And Nanotechnology

West Virginia

High View
Casey O. Orndorff- Master Of Science


13 2016-06-06
Ruston

TECH PROFESSOR SHOWS WORK


Sensation,” an exhibit featuring the works of Nicole Duet, an assistant professor of drawing and painting at Louisiana Tech University, opens today at Studio 301, located at 301 N. Trenton St.

Her work springs from inspiration around her, Duet said.

“I draw and paint out of fascination with the idea that every observable phenomenon is a reflection back onto the viewer,” she said. “The act of painting is a way to explore the question of whether circumstances and things exist because we are aware of them.”

In her artist’s statement, she explains the inspiration for her art.
13 2016-06-02
Ruston

La. Tech serves as one of five national host sites for Children’s Choices


RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University’s College of Education was recently selected as one of just five host sites in the nation for the Children's Choices Program – a joint project between the Children's Book Council and the International Literacy Association (ILA.)

Dr. Amy Massey Vessel, director of Louisiana Tech’s Clinical Residency Research Center and interim director of professional and clinical experiences, applied last year to serve as a host site and was selected to serve as a team leader on ILA's Children's Choices Committee. Lincoln Parish School district leaders Lisa Mangum and Sherry Boyd also played an integral role in supporting the establishment of the Children's Choices Program in area schools, and will continue to support this three-year program.

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“Bringing the Children's Choices Program to Lincoln Parish was a dream come true,” said Vessel. “Some things cannot be captured with a photo or put into words, like the excitement of delivering new books to the hands of a child. We look forward to watching this partnership continue to reach additional schools in the next year.”

More than 2,500 students at Hillcrest Elementary, Ruston Elementary, Glen View Elementary and Cypress Springs Elementary School submitted votes from August 2015 through January 2016 after having the opportunity to choose books to read and share their reviews. Those votes were compiled and submitted to the Children's Book Council to create the 2016 award winning reading lists that were released recently during National Children’s Book Week.

Teachers from across the country use Children’s Choices, Teachers’ Choices and Parents’ Choices recommended book lists to select new books for their classroom libraries. Lincoln Parish Schools dedicated many hours to this project and earned an entire set of almost 1,000 books for their school libraries. Teachers had the opportunity to see these published books from the many national publishing companies, sometimes even weeks before they were available in local bookstores.

Since 1974, Children’s Choices has been a trusted source of book recommendations used by teachers, booksellers, librarians, parents, caregivers – everyone who wishes to encourage young people to read for pleasure – and children themselves. Each year, over 36,000 children from different regions of the United States read newly-published children’s and young adult trade books and vote for the ones they like best. These Children’s Choices, selected from more than 900 titles, can be counted on as books children really enjoy reading.

Vessel is currently collaborating with Dr. Bryan McCoy, chair of the Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Leadership at Louisiana Tech, to establish a children's library in Woodard Hall for teacher candidates and the community. The 2016 Children's Choices winners are currently on display in the Clinical Residency Research Center in Woodard Hall 214.

13 2016-06-01
Ruston

La. Tech College of Education to offer new pathways to teacher certification


RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University’s College of Education is set to launch two new alternative teaching certification programs next month that will provide authentic classroom experience and a pathway for new educators to begin teaching in less than a year.

The first program, a Master of Arts in Teaching, will lead to teacher certification as well as a master’s degree in education. The second is a post-baccalaureate program, which will lead to teacher certification only. Both programs will be offered for middle grades and secondary concentrations, and will begin with three days of summer workshops designed as hands-on, collaborative experiences to help prepare teachers for the responsibilities they will encounter beginning with the first days of school.

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Other topics to be covered in these programs include instructional strategies, differentiation, lesson planning and types of assessment. The certification programs are designed to be completed in one year or less with modules that will combine the best of face-to-face and online teaching.

According to Louisiana Tech’s College of Education, its new alternative certification programs are grounded in authentic classroom teaching and facilitated by master teachers and university faculty. Candidates will be immersed in authentic classroom experiences from the beginning of the program with the support and assistance of mentor teachers and clinical university faculty.

Course objectives will be accomplished through a year-long internship for those already in a teaching position and in their own classroom, or a year-long student teaching for those not currently teaching. Scholarships may also be available for those who qualify.

An information meeting is scheduled for 3 p.m., June 9 in Woodard Hall, room 130 on the Louisiana Tech campus. For more information, contact Melanie Gleason, director of alternative certification in the College of Education, at melanie@latech.edu or 318-257-2849.

13 2016-05-31
Ruston

FIRST OF KIND INTERNS GRADUATE


The College of Education’s Clinical Residency Research Center had its first cohort of TEAM Model clinical interns graduate from Louisiana Tech University’s spring commencement.

This was the second year pilot of the elementary clinical residency program and the first pilot year to have full-year clinical residencies, formerly student teaching, at the secondary level.

Amy Vessel, Director of the CRRC, said the establishment of education clinical residencies is growing rapidly across our country.

“This year, we wanted to make certain our teacher candidates were acknowledged for the groundbreaking efforts they have made for the state of Louisiana, so they were honored as Clinical Residency Fellows by the CRRC in a small ceremony,” she said. “It’s quite remarkable that there are approximately 100 clinical residency interns from universities across state, and 20 of those undergraduate teacher candidates are at Louisiana Tech University.”

Eighteen spring graduates wore a distinctive fellow honor cord with their graduation cap and gown, and the remaining two will be honored at the fall commencement in November.

Lisa Mangum, former clinical residency principal and LPSB district liaison for the TEAM Model program, said hiring a graduate from a clinical residency program is hiring someone with a full-year of teaching experience.

“We are receiving a first- year teacher beginning a second year of experience,” she said.

“Ultimately, the benefits of clinical residencies for our K-12 students are endless. It will completely transform how we prepare new teachers and train teacher leaders in our schools.”

Vessel said Tech’s College of Education began research in the fall of 2014 with 11 first-year pilot interns at Cypress Springs Elementary and Glen View Elementary and continues to lead the state in clinical residency graduates.

Ruston Elementary Principal Amy Brister said she experienced four TEAM Model classrooms at her school this year.

“These clinical interns certainly sought-after hiring prospects walking into our classrooms as first year teachers with more than 1,000 clinical hours of August-May experiences,” she said.

“Our Clinical Interns have participated in staff meetings and studied our student data with their mentors.

“We’ve interacted informally during playground duty and in the teacher’s lounge. So when I’m hiring a new teacher, I’m much more comfortable hiring a teacher candidate from the TEAM Model Clinical Residency Program. Being able to experience the classroom from August to the very last day, they know what to expect when they’re in their own future classroom. It’s the most invaluable experience they could have.”

Don Schillinger, Tech College of Education Dean, said the department is proud of what these teacher candidates have accomplished in being the second cohort of the elementary education and the first cohort of secondary education graduates to complete a full-year clinical residency in teaching.

“They have demonstrated their commitment to the teaching profession and have provided considerable evidence of being highly qualified and ready for the next step in their career trajectory — full-time teaching,” he said. “This new and innovative teacher preparation process, which combines a TEAM approach of exemplary Mentor Teachers from our partner schools collaborating for a full-year with our teacher candidates, requires a greater commitment of time, increased dedication to excellence, and more personal sacrifices than the traditional method of teacher preparation.

“But the results are enhanced partnerships between K-12 schools and preparation programs, and most importantly, teachers candidates that are truly ready to instruct the students of Louisiana.”

Vessel said more than 100 mentors in Lincoln, Ouachita and Claiborne Parish were trained this spring to host future TEAM Model clinical residency interns in their classrooms through the Cohort 3 Louisiana Believe and Prepare Funded Program.

In the 2016-17 academic year, 30 teacher candidates from elementary through secondary have already committed to the clinical residency program with more signing up daily.

The majority of those candidates have already requested to be placed in Lincoln Parish Schools in for the 2016-17 academic school year.

13 2016-05-26
Monroe

Louisiana Tech computer scientist to present groundbreaking research


RUSTON — Dr. Ben Choi, associate professor of computer science at Louisiana Tech University, will present his research on a groundbreaking new technology that has the potential to revolutionize the computing industry during a keynote speech next month at the International Conference on Measurement Instrumentation and Electronics.

Choi will present on a foundational architecture for designing and building computers, which will utilize multiple values rather than binary as used by current computers. The many-valued logic computers should provide faster computation by increasing the speed of processing for microprocessors and the speed of data transfer between the processors and the memory as well as increasing the capacity of the memory.

This technology has the potential to redefine the computing industry, which is constantly trying to increase the speed of computation and, in recent years, has run short of options.

By providing a new hardware approach, the technology will push the speed limit of computing using a progressive approach which will move from two values to four values, then to eight values, then to 16 values, and so on. Future computers could be built using this many-valued approach.

“Advances in the foundational design of the computer are needed in business and research applications as well as at the foundation of cyber security efforts across the nation,” said Dr. Galen Turner, director of computer science, cyber engineering, electrical engineering and electrical engineering technology at Louisiana Tech. “Dr. Choi’s invitation to present at the upcoming conference has increased interest in this foundational architecture.”

Louisiana Tech and Choi have filed a U.S. patent application for this groundbreaking technology titled “Method and Apparatus for Designing Many-Valued Logic Computer.”

“If this is successful, computers in the future will be based on our technology,” said Choi. In addition to the keynote speech, Choi’s research will be released in a publication in the related journal.

Choi earned his Ph.D., M.S., and B.S. degrees from The Ohio State University, specializing in computer science, computer engineering and electrical engineering. His research focus areas include Humanoid Robots, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Intelligent Agents, Semantic Web, Data Mining, Fuzzy Systems, and Parallel Computing.

Prior to coming to Louisiana Tech, Choi served as a visiting research scholar at DePaul University, University of Western Australia and Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. He has also worked in the computer industry as a System Performance Engineer at Lucent Technologies (Bell Labs) and as a private computer consultant.

13 2016-05-25
Ruston

861 BECOME TECH ALUMNI


Louisiana Tech University closed out its spring quarter Saturday with keynote speaker John Hofmeister, founder and chief executive for Citizens for Affordable Energy and former president of Shell Oil Company, reminding the 861 graduates that receiving their degrees from Tech has helped shape their worldview, their flow with life and their balance.

“The world is a huge, evolving and churning set of opportunities, rife with challenges, of course, but the opportunities matter most,” Hofmeister said. “From today, use a native Louisiana gift. You cannot see the fullness of the Louisiana landscape if your eyes are open but a slit. You also can’t see the world that way. ‘Eyes wide open’ is necessary to see and value your beautiful region and state and is also practical advice to keep your worldview as real as you can. If you can somewhat see the entire world from the base of Louisiana Tech, imagine what more you can see now that you are moving beyond the periphery of this gateway to the world.”

Hofmeister said their flow was the dynamic that enabled the graduates to be whatever they wanted to be while maintaining their energy and constancy for the whole of their lives.

“You likely learned it here, even if you didn’t know what to call it,” he said. “It is the capacity to not only run the race but to enjoy running. It is the capability to read everything you need to read to complete that last research paper and to wake up tomorrow and read some more.

“Flow is the intention to earn not just this degree today, but your determination to also earn the next one, or to take on the challenge of the new job awaiting you, or finding that job, or the next promotion and the next step in life. It is the power to face the Louisiana weather, climb the next hill, walk down the aisle, get up and go to work, get out and go to vote, love your loved ones, raise your family, overcome all obstacles that come your way. Louisiana Tech is alive with flow. It’s capable of infecting you forever, and you’ll be forever grateful.”

Hofmeister said the graduates had learned how to keep balance in school, which would help them keep their balance in life.

“Keeping your balance in life is also the foundation of success in life,” he said. “But let’s take it a step deeper. You’re now on your own, not on campus. What balance do you keep?

Let’s focus on the four that matter: physical, mental, emotional and spiritual. You have but one body; take care of it. Your mind is your best friend, your judge and life-long companion. Your emotions keep you whole. Your spirit keeps you strong. Together they keep you together, for the rest of your life.”

Tara Harmon-McElheney, of Albuquerque, New Mexico, maintained her balance throughout studying for her doctorate in audiology, which she received Saturday. A week before her Ph.D. program began, she discovered she was pregnant with her first child. Her daughter is now three, and she is expecting her second child in September.

“My husband and I were like, ‘What are we going to do?’ But he said, ‘This is something you’ve always wanted,’” Harmon-McElheney said.

She said it hadn’t always been easy, but the reward was worth the effort.

“It’s been hard,” she said. “I had her on a Thursday and went back to school on a Monday. (My classmates) helped, and my professors helped tremendously.”

She said she would advise other students, undergraduate and graduate, to continue to persevere with their studies.

“If you want it badly enough, with dedication, you can do it,” she said. “It takes a lot of discipline, but it’s worth it.”

Nick Fulco, of Benton, also learned balance while at Tech. He graduated with a bachelor of science with a major in kinesiology and plans to attend physical therapy school.

“It was close to home,” he said. “My stepfather was deployed, and it was easy to drive back and forth to take care of my mom and little sister.”

Fulco’s stepfather, Major Christopher Summers, is also a Tech graduate and is currently deployed to Qatar. However, he was able to watch Fulco graduate on a live stream through www.latechtv.com.

“The hardest part was keeping a high GPA while trying to take care of family and social responsibilities,” he said. “I did it by a lot of studying and time management. It’s hard work, but it pays off in the end.”

13 2016-05-23
Monroe

Louisiana Tech spring graduates learn balance, expand worldview


RUSTON — Louisiana Tech University closed out its spring quarter Saturday with keynote speaker John Hofmeister, founder and chief executive for Citizens for Affordable Energy and former president of Shell Oil Company, reminding the 861 graduates that receiving their degrees from Louisiana Tech has helped shape their worldview, their flow with life and their balance.

“The world is a huge, evolving and churning set of opportunities, rife with challenges, of course, but the opportunities matter most,” Hofmeister said. “From today, use a native Louisiana gift. You cannot see the fullness of the Louisiana landscape if your eyes are open but a slit. You also can’t see the world that way. ‘Eyes wide open’ is necessary to see and value your beautiful region and state and is also practical advice to keep your worldview as real as you can. If you can somewhat see the entire world from the base of Louisiana Tech, imagine what more you can see now that you are moving beyond the periphery of this gateway to the world.”

Hofmeister said their flow was the dynamic that enabled the graduates to be whatever they wanted to be while maintaining their energy and constancy for the whole of their lives.

“You likely learned it here, even if you didn’t know what to call it,” he said. “It is the capacity to not only run the race but to enjoy running. It is the capability to read everything you need to read to complete that last research paper and to wake up tomorrow and read some more.

“Flow is the intention to earn not just this degree today, but your determination to also earn the next one, or to take on the challenge of the new job awaiting you, or finding that job, or the next promotion and the next step in life. It is the power to face the Louisiana weather, climb the next hill, walk down the aisle, get up and go to work, get out and go to vote, love your loved ones, raise your family, overcome all obstacles that come your way. Louisiana Tech is alive with flow. It’s capable of infecting you forever, and you’ll be forever grateful.”

Hofmeister added that the graduates had learned how to keep balance in school, which would help them keep their balance in life.

“Keeping your balance in life is also the foundation of success in life,” he said. “But let’s take it a step deeper. You’re now on your own, not on campus. What balance do you keep? Let’s focus on the four that matter: physical, mental, emotional and spiritual. You have but one body; take care of it. Your mind is your best friend, your judge and life-long companion. Your emotions keep you whole. Your spirit keeps you strong. Together they keep you together, for the rest of your life.”

Tara Harmon-McElheney, of Albuquerque, New Mexico, maintained her balance throughout studying for her doctorate in audiology, which she received Saturday. A week before her Ph.D. program began, she discovered she was pregnant with her first child. Her daughter is now three, and she is expecting her second child in September.

“My husband and I were like, ‘What are we going to do?’ But he said, ‘This is something you’ve always wanted,’” Harmon-McElheney said.

She said it hadn’t always been easy, but the reward was worth the effort.

“It’s been hard,” she said. “I had her on a Thursday and went back to school on a Monday. (My classmates) helped, and my professors helped tremendously.”

She said she would advise other students, undergraduate and graduate, to continue to persevere with their studies.

“If you want it badly enough, with dedication, you can do it,” she said. “It takes a lot of discipline, but it’s worth it.”

Nick Fulco, of Benton, also learned balance while at Louisiana Tech. He graduated with a bachelor of science with a major in kinesiology and plans to attend physical therapy school.

“It was close to home,” he said. “My stepfather was deployed, and it was easy to drive back and forth to take care of my mom and little sister.”

Fulco’s stepfather, Major Christopher Summers, is also a Louisiana Tech graduate and is currently deployed to Qatar. However, he was able to watch Fulco graduate on a live stream through www.latechtv.com.

“The hardest part was keeping a high GPA while trying to take care of family and social responsibilities,” he said. “I did it by a lot of studying and time management. It’s hard work, but it pays off in the end.”
13 2016-05-23
Ruston

EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER TO BE DEMOLISHED


The Louisiana Tech University Early Childhood Education Center is scheduled to be demolished at a later date this year to accommodate the construction of new housing and related site development.

Tech Public Relations Director Dave Guerin said the new Childhood Education Center will be located at the AROS Center.


13 2016-05-23
Shreveport

72-year-old woman graduates from Louisiana Tech


RUSTON--

72-year-old Pearl Mixon says she lived a pretty normal life.

" I was working for a credit union," says Pearl Mixon, Louisiana Tech Graduate.

That was until she put in her letter of resignation and decided to go back to school.

" I decided on Louisiana Tech because it's close to me. They have the Barksdale campus which is right across the river," says Mixon.

Mixon says the journey to graduation was not an easy one.

"It was a struggle this time last year. I had some setbacks. I had two major strokes and it left me with dimmed vision," says Mixon.

But adds it was definitely worth it.

"My source of making it was I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me. That would be in my study time, that would be in my down time time when I wasn't feeling well. I felt wonderful yesterday being able to walk across that stage to receive that degree," says Mixon.

Family members share in Mixon's excitement.

"It was so surreal to see her walk across the same stage that I walked across to receive my degree," says Angela Hannon, Mixon's Daughter.

Her next step, grad school.

"The sky is the limit. All it takes is just that determination," says Mixon.

Unlike many of us, Mixon says she is graduating debt free.

She hopes to use her general studies degree to aid veterans.
13 2016-05-19
Ruston

Tech inducts new Order of the Engineer members


RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University and its College of Engineering and Science has inducted 62 new members into its chapter, “Link” of the “Order of the Engineer” – a national organization established and dedicated to upholding devotion to the standards and dignity of the engineering profession.

During the ceremony, initiates received a stainless steel ring to wear on the fifth finger of the working hand and accepted the Obligation of the Engineer, a code of ethics that promotes honesty and integrity in engineering professions.

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Seniors who are within one year of graduation from an accredited engineering program are eligible to join the Order and make the commitment.

“The Order of the Engineer ceremony is a great milestone for many of our graduating Engineers,” Dr. Heath Tims, associate dean of undergraduate studies in the College of Engineering and Science. “It is a representation of the academic accomplishments of our students, as well as their commitment to upholding the ethical standards that are expected from the Engineering discipline.”

“We are very pleased to have a large number of our engineering seniors recognize the importance of their decisions as engineers will have on society,” Dr. Hisham Hegab, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Engineering and Science added. “Their induction into the Order of the Engineer is a statement of their commitment to honesty and integrity and is a pledge to serve humanity and make the best use of our natural resources.”

New members of the Order of the Engineer are listed below.

Seth Thomas Anderson, mechanical engineering, Pitkin, La.
Giovanni Aviles, mechanical engineering, Mandeville, La.
Andy Bajnauth, civil engineering, Mandeville, La.
Zachary Belton, mechanical engineering, Simonton, Texas
Morgan Mary Bollich, chemical engineering, Eunice, La.
Daniel Borders, electrical engineering, Harvey, La.
Dillan M. Boudreaux, mechanical engineering, Prairieville, La.
Hunter Breaux, electrical engineering, Theroit, La.
Matthew Brewer, mechanical engineering, Ruston, La.
David Tyler Burdeaux, mechanical engineering, West Monroe, La.
Dalton Champagne, civil engineering, Arkadelphia, Ark.
Anesu Samuel Chigumira, mechanical engineering, Belle Chase, La.
Warren Dante Clardy, chemical engineering, Greenwood, La.
Ishani Colombage, biomedical engineering, Batuwatta, Sri Lanka
James Gary Delatte, Jr., mechanical engineering, Ponchatoula, La.
Jigar Dhimmar, mechanical engineering, Ruston, La.
Ahmed Emad El-Giar, chemical engineering, West Monroe, La.
Matthew Charles Gandia, industrial engineering, Shreveport, La.
Joseph Theodore Hagensee, mechanical engineering, New Orleans, La.
Morgan Adam Harris, civil engineering, Shreveport, La.
Samuel James Helman, mechanical engineering, Amarillo, Texas
Cartez Sawatski Jack, Jr., mechanical engineering, Jena, La.
Nadini Ivanthi Jayathilaka, electrical engineering, Malabe, Sri Lanka
Courtney Jennings, chemical engineering, Saint Francisville, La.
LeDarious Keyun Jones, mechanical engineering, Shreveport, La.
Ryan J. Joseph, mechanical engineering, McKinney, Texas
Dylan Levi Lawrence, mechanical engineering, El Dorado, Ark.
James Tyler Lawson, mechanical engineering, Spearsville, La.
Katherine Lee Lybrand, civil engineering, Hot Springs, Ark.
Pabitra Malla, electrical engineering, Ruston, La.
Mapa M. Chethiya Mapagunarathne, mechanical engineering, Santa Cruz, Calif.,
Chandip Maskey, nanosystems engineering, Charlotte, N.C.
Evan McDougall, chemical engineering, Prairieville, La.
Leslie Buffington McKeever, mechanical engineering, Benton, La.
Alexander Nicholas Monistere, mechanical engineering, Baton Rouge, La.
Matthew Lane Moore, electrical engineering, Daingerfield, Texas
Chaz Oubre, mechanical engineering, Lake Charles, La.
Adam Fisher Parker, industrial engineering, Shreveport, La.
Cullen David Pearce, mechanical engineering, Boyce, La.
Jordan Lee Pixley, mechanical engineering, Bernice, La.
Nicole Poirier, cyber engineering, Coral Springs, Fla.
Jason Porter, cyber engineering, Benton, La.
Dinesh Poudel, mechanical engineering, Ruston, La.
Nathaniel Joseph Pruden, industrial engineering, West Monroe, La.
Valaree Rachal, mechanical engineering, Lake Charles, La.
Karen Rispone, nanosystems engineering, Denham Springs, La.
Daniel Alexander Rivera, biomedical engineering, Cape Coral, Fla.
Joshua Roberts, cyber engineering, Slidell, La.
Cody Samples, electrical engineering, Emerson, Ark.
Jean-Paul Sandrock, Jr., civil engineering, Slidell, La.
Ryan Dakota Semple, electrical engineering, Nashville, Ark.
Sean Morgan Semple, electrical engineering, Nashville, Ark.
Zachary Dakota Spurgin, mechanical engineering, Doyline, La.
Xavier Theriot, mechanical engineering, Shreveport, La.
Michael Thompson, mechanical engineering, Ruston, La.
Haylee Thornhill, mechanical engineering, Oakdale, La.
Amara Ijeoma Uyanna, chemical engineering, Amuwo-Odofin, Nigeria
German Velazquez, civil engineering, Gloster, La.
Zachary Lane West, mechanical engineering, Oakdale, La.
Robert Sims Westley, industrial engineering, North Charleston, S.C.
Tyler Wilk, Manahawkin, mechanical engineering, Manahawkin, N.J.
Victor Eduardo Zumaran Justiniano, civil engineering, Santa Cruz, Bolivia
The Louisiana Tech inductees join a dedicated and prestigious group of engineers from across the nation, which includes a number of Louisiana Tech graduates. Louisiana Tech has been a member in the organization since 2005.
13 2016-05-18
Ruston

MAN TAKES LEAP OF FAITH TO LOSE WEIGHT


When Dave Guerin took a “leap of faith,” he set out to shed around 130 pounds.

After two years, Guerin finally reached his ideal weight of 190 pounds.

“I feel great,” he said. “I feel and look a lot better than what I did two years ago and it was something I needed to do.”

Guerin, who serves as Louisiana Tech University’s director of public relations, said he began his weight loss journey after feeling tired, sluggish and kept buying clothes at big and tall stores for many years.
13 2016-05-17
Monroe

La. Tech representatives selected to attend National Security Forum


RUSTON – Dr. Stan Napper, vice president for research and development, and Dr. Jeremy Mhire, associate professor of political science and director of the Waggonner Center for Civic Engagement and Public Policy, represented Louisiana Tech University at the 63rd annual National Security Forum (NSF) held last week at the Air War College at Maxwell Air Force Base in Alabama.

Napper and Mhire received and accepted personal invitations from the Secretary of the Air Force to attend the exclusive event where approximately 160 civilian leaders in business, education and government from all over the U.S. met with senior military leaders to explore current and future national security issues facing our nation.

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The NSF, which began in 1954 as an expansion of the Civilian Outreach Seminars held from 1947 through 1949, provides opportunities for an open and candid exchange of ideas among these guests, senior military and civilian leaders, and Air War College students.

“We are meeting with members of the Air Force command structure, military leaders from our national partners around the world, civilians from large and small businesses, and community leaders from all over the United States,” said Napper during the event. “We are learning how our future military leaders are prepared to make difficult and strategic decisions.

“The theme for this year’s Forum is Competition, Conflict and Constraints, all of which were addressed candidly by Secretary of the Air Force, the Honorable Deborah James, in the opening session of the Forum.”

The Air War College (AWC) is the senior professional development school in the Air Force officer education system as a part of Air University. AWC educates selected senior officers to lead at the strategic level in the employment of air and space forces. The AWC curriculum focuses on coalition warfighting and national security issues, with emphasis on the effective employment of aerospace forces in joint and combined combat operations.

“This opportunity has proven invaluable,” said Mhire. “It is both stimulating and insightful to attend seminars in which the future leaders of the armed services discuss and debate issues of foreign policy, national security, and military strategy. The Air War College model is truly impressive.”

Local ties to the AWC include General Robin Rand, commander of the Air Force Global Strike Command at Barksdale Air Force Base. Rand had previously been the commander of the Air Education and Training Command, which oversees the Air War College.

Air University is a major component of Air Education and Training Command and the intellectual and leadership center of the Air Force. Air University’s eight colleges and schools provide the full spectrum of Air Force education, from pre-commissioning to the highest levels of professional military education, including degree granting and professional continuing education for officers, enlisted and civilian personnel throughout their careers.

For more information on Air University and Air War College, visit www.au.af.mil.
13 2016-05-16
Monroe

La. Tech students present research, prototypes at Senior Projects Conference


RUSTON – Senior class students from Louisiana Tech University’s College of Engineering and Science showcased their solutions to real-world problems at the College of Engineering and Science Senior Projects Conference held recently on the Louisiana Tech campus.

The students presented studies and designs as well as simulations illustrating solutions that could aid in international research and regional industrial applications. The nearly 100 projects presented included aerial unmanned vehicle prototypes, studies of hydronic jets at the Large Hadron Collider, plans for construction and solutions to save time and money in industry and health care.

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The Senior Projects Conference is the culmination of the College of Engineering and Science senior capstone experience – a yearlong project in which student teams work to solve problems, develop new products and perform leading edge research.

“The Senior Projects Conference is a great display of the innovative solutions that our students develop for real-world problems,” Dr. Hisham Hegab, dean of the College of Engineering and Science said. “It represents many long hours of hard work that students and faculty advisers devote during the year. We are extremely proud of their work and the impact it has on many local industries which sponsor the projects.”

Dr. Heath Tims, associate dean for undergraduate studies with the College of Engineering and Science adds that the conference is a chance for students to exhibit the work they have put in with research as well as the final product.

“The Senior Projects Conference is really a celebration of the great work that our students have done throughout the year. Most of the projects are sponsored by industry in our region, and our students are tackling these real problems that ultimately result in a major economic impact for our state’s economy,” he said.

Along with the real-world learning experiences gained by the students, the 2016 senior projects saved industrial partners a substantial amount of money.

In addition to individuals, professors and programs, Senior Projects Conference sponsors included Central Louisiana Surgical Hospital, Holy Angels Residential Facility, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the Louisiana Tech Chemistry Program, the National Science Foundation, Bar J Ranch, WestRock Paper Mill, Louisiana Purchase Council of the Boy Scouts of America, Aldea Services LLC, Anvil Attachments, Vacant Property Security LLC, Mojo Outdoors, A.J. Weller Corporation, Cameron Corporation, NASA LA-Space Program, Bill Lewis Outdoors, American Ingenuity, LLC, SWEPCO Power Plan, Con-Fab Engineering and Welding, T.L. James Cub World Lake Pedestrian Bridge, Haynes International, ConAgra Foods, Manitowoc, Frymaster, Weyerhauser and Mojo Outdoors.
13 2016-05-13
Ruston

Hofmeister to serve as Tech commencement speaker


Louisiana Tech University will hold its spring commencement ceremony at 10 a.m. May 21 at the Thomas Assembly Center with John Hofmeister, founder and chief executive for Citizens for Affordable Energy and former president of Shell Oil Company, serving as keynote speaker.

Hofmeister, who retired from Shell in 2008, works through Citizens for Affordable Energy to promote sound energy solutions for our nation. He has held executive leadership positions in General Electric, Nortel and AlliedSignal, which is now Honeywell International, and also served as the chairman of the National Urban League and chairman of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee.

Hofmeister serves on the boards of the Foreign Policy Association, Strategic Partners, LLC; the Houston Technology Center and the Gas Technology Institute, and is a Fellow of the National Academy of Human Resources. He is a past chairman and Director Emeritus of the Greater Houston Partnership and is the author of “Why We Hate the Oil Companies: Straight Talk from an Energy Insider.”

Currently, Hofmeister serves as a Wrigley Scholar/Executive in Residence in the Global Institute of Sustainability at Arizona State University and is also a lecturer at the University of Houston.

Hofmeister earned bachelors and master’s degrees in political science from Kansas State University. In May 2010, he was awarded an honorary doctorate of letters from the University of Houston and from Kansas State University in 2014.

During the commencement ceremony, graduates from each of Tech’s five academic colleges and the Graduate School will receive diplomas as well as their Tenet Medallions inscribed with the 12 Tenets of Tech and their year of graduation. The Tenets of Tech are guiding principles and personal characteristics that students and graduates are expected to embrace and uphold during and after their time at Tech.

Spring commencement will serve as the official end to Louisiana Tech’s spring quarter and the 2015-16 academic year. Summer quarter classes will begin June 1.

13 2016-05-12
Ruston

School of Design at Louisiana Tech partners with Ruston Farmers Market


May 7 was the opening day for this season’s Ruston Farmers Market, and with a new location came a new design, courtesy of Louisiana Tech University’s School of Design.

The Farmers Market partnered with the School of Design for a service-learning project that included students from a studio art class creating a mural on the outside wall of the Farmers Market’s new location, 220 E. Mississippi Ave. in Ruston.

“The mural will be part of revitalization and beautification of the space,” said Nicholas Bustamante, chair of studio art, who teaches the class. “The project began in early March when students met with the Ruston Farmers Market to talk about design ideas. It was important to showcase the items that would be available at the market.”

13 2016-05-10
Monroe

Hofmeister to serve as Louisiana Tech spring commencement speaker


RUSTON (Louisiana Tech) - Louisiana Tech University will hold its spring commencement ceremony at 10 a.m., Saturday, May 21 at the Thomas Assembly Center with John Hofmeister, founder and chief executive for Citizens for Affordable Energy and former president of Shell Oil Company, serving as keynote speaker.

Hofmeister, who retired from Shell in 2008, works through Citizens for Affordable Energy to promote sound energy solutions for our nation. He has held executive leadership positions in General Electric, Nortel and AlliedSignal, which is now Honeywell International, and also served as the chairman of the National Urban League and chairman of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee.

Hofmeister serves on the boards of the Foreign Policy Association, Strategic Partners, LLC; the Houston Technology Center and the Gas Technology Institute, and is a Fellow of the National Academy of Human Resources. He is a past chairman and Director Emeritus of the Greater Houston Partnership, and is the author of “Why We Hate the Oil Companies: Straight Talk from an Energy Insider” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010).

Currently, Hofmeister serves as a Wrigley Scholar/Executive in Residence in the Global Institute of Sustainability at Arizona State University and is also a lecturer at the University of Houston. Hofmeister earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in political science from Kansas State University. In May 2010, he was awarded an honorary doctorate of letters from the University of Houston and from Kansas State University in 2014.

During the commencement ceremony, graduates from each of Louisiana Tech’s five academic colleges and the Graduate School will receive diplomas as well as their Tenet Medallions inscribed with the 12 Tenets of Tech and their year of graduation. The Tenets of Tech are guiding principles and personal characteristics that students and graduates are expected to embrace and uphold during and after their time at Louisiana Tech.

Spring commencement will serve as the official end to Louisiana Tech’s spring quarter and the 2015-2016 academic year. Summer quarter classes will begin Wednesday, June 1.
13 2016-05-09
Monroe

La. Tech engineering team places in top 20 at regional competition


RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University’s SAE Baja team finished in the top 20 of nearly 100 collegiate teams competing in the suspension course at the Collegiate Design Series held recently at Tennessee Tech University.

The objective of the SAE Baja competition is to provide students with a challenging project that involves the design, planning and manufacturing tasks found when introducing a new product to the consumer industrial market. Teams compete against one another to have their design accepted for manufacture by a fictitious firm.

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Students must function as a team to not only design, build, test, promote, and race a vehicle within the limits of the rules, but also to generate financial support for their project and manage their educational priorities. The Louisiana Tech team had to design and build an off-road vehicle that could make laps in rough terrain using an engine bought from the organization. The overall competition is judged on commercial criteria.

In addition to their top 20 finish, the Louisiana Tech team, consisting of Josh Chopin, Austin Delaune, Blaire Eidt, Garrett Gibson, Nicholas Hayes, Kayleigh Jowers, Chris Kotar, John Kraft, Matthew Lacrouts, Cody Maricelli, Dillon Morvant, Johnny Negrete, Brice Soignier, Lucas Waldron, Tyler Walsh, Nicholas Winters and Wilson Wise, also dropped 100 pounds from the total weight of the car, doubling their sales presentation score and completing the four-hour endurance race. The team from Louisiana Tech was one of only 16 to complete the suspension course. They also received the highest score in team history for their cost report and prototype cost.

Dr. Niel Crews, director of the Institute for Micromanufacturing and associate professor of mechanical engineering and SAE team sponsor says that organizations like Baja SAE help students get real-world experience necessary for success after college.

“I am very proud of these students,” Crews said. “They have worked hard to be competitive in the Baja SAE competition, while continuing to perform well in the classroom. This really represents the best experience for college students: real hands-on engineering combined with a solid academic education.

“This makes such a big difference in the quality of the engineers that graduate from Louisiana Tech University. For this reason, we make it possible for all our mechanical engineering students to get involved in engineering clubs like Baja SAE.”

The Louisiana Tech team is an interdisciplinary organization that includes students from across the College of Engineering and Science, and even includes a student from agricultural business and one from architectural studies.

SAE International is a global association of more than 128,000 engineers and related technical experts in the aerospace, automotive and commercial-vehicle industries. The Louisiana Tech team works throughout the year to build a vehicle that is durable and cost efficient.
13 2016-05-09
Ruston

LEGAL SCHOLAR TO VISIT TECH


The international history of a contentious contemporary issue will be featured as the department of history at Louisiana Tech University continues its annual International Affairs Speaker Series at 6 p.m. Tuesday, May 10 at the Lincoln Parish Library.

The visiting speaker will be Anna Su, an assistant professor on the faculty of law at the University of Toronto. Su will speak about the subject of her recent book, “Exporting Liberty: Religious Freedom and American Power,” published earlier this year by Harvard University Press.

The event is free and open to the public.

13 2016-05-06
Monroe

ExxonMobil makes generous donation to Louisiana Tech


RUSTON – ExxonMobil has donated more than $130,000 to Louisiana Tech University as part of ExxonMobil’s Educational Matching Gift Program to support engineering and science education opportunities for faculty and staff.

Louisiana Tech College of Engineering and Science alumnae and ExxonMobil Slurry Process Technology Manager Jennifer Johnson recently presented the donation to Louisiana Tech President Les Guice and College of Engineering and Science Dean Hisham Hegab.

The donation is part of ExxonMobil’s Educational Matching Gift Program, in which the company matches the donations of employees, their spouses, retirees and surviving spouses on a three-to-one basis, for up to $22,500 to U.S. colleges and universities. In addition to the Educational Matching Gift Program, ExxonMobil provides support to the College of Engineering and Science through donations of money and time to academic programs and student organizations, such as the Society of Women Engineers and the National Society of Black Engineers.

Hisham Hegab, dean of the College of Engineering and Science, says that donations from companies like ExxonMobil help provide materials and opportunities for engineering and science faculty to engage students in real-world experiences, including hands-on activities and travel to competitions and conferences.

“We greatly appreciate ExxonMobil’s support for the College of Engineering and Science at Louisiana Tech,” Hegab said. “Support from corporate partners like ExxonMobil is essential to helping us produce graduates with the technical and leadership skills that industry demands.”
13 2016-05-06
Monroe

Details on Brooke Stoehr's salary at Tech


Louisiana Tech is investing more money and time for rebuilding with new women's basketball coach Brooke Stoehr.

Stoehr, the former Northwestern State coach who was hired last month to replace Tyler Summitt, is set to make north up $1.3 million over six years, according to a memorandum of understanding signed April 17 that was obtained by The News-Star this week through an open records request.

Stoehr will earn $206,000 in 2017 and receive annual salary increases of $10,000 until her salary maxes out at $246,000 in year six for a total of $1,376,000 over the life of the contract. Summitt, who resigned last month due to an inappropriate relationship with a player, signed a five-year deal worth $175,000 annually in 2014.

The increases for Stoehr are expected since she has four years of head coaching experience to her name. At the time, Summitt had just two years as an assistant and was 23 years old.

Stoehr made a base salary of $85,000 at Northwestern State after inking an extension last summer that ran through 2020. The base salary, coupled with money from NSU's Demons Unlimited Foundation, pushed her annual salary to around $115,000. Stoehr also had a $25,000 buyout if she left before April 30, 2016.


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According to the memorandum, Stoehr and Tech will come to a formal contractual agreement within 30 days, which would be May 18. The final contract will include buyout details and cause for termination, among other things.

In addition to the salary increase and additional year, Tech is also increasing the assistant coaches pool from $265,000 to $300,000.

The base pay from the university remained the same as Summitt's deal at $175,000, but the Louisiana Tech Athletic Foundation will fork up the additional dollars to compensate for the remainder of Stoehr's annual salary.

Additionally, the memorandum specifically states "when, and if," Stoehr hires her husband, Scott, to Tech's coaching staff, she will become co-head coach and he will become co-head coach due to Louisiana's state nepotism laws.


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By law, Stoehr became co-head coach April 21 when Tech announced the additions of Scott Stoehr and Lindsey Hicks to the staff. Tech is also expected to hire Southern Miss assistant Alaura Sharp. The News-Star requested a memorandum of understanding for Scott Stoehr, but the school doesn't have one on file and therefore his salary is unknown.

Brooke Stoehr compiled a 71-58 record during her four years and made consecutive NCAA Tournament appearances in 2014 and 2015. Northwestern State finished 19-12 in 2016 and third place in the Southland Conference with a 13-5 record.

She has roots with Tech's program, having served as a two-year captain for the Techsters as part of a 119-16 career record.
13 2016-05-06
Monroe

Outreach specialist selected as 2016 Outstanding Educator of the Year


RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech) - Sheena Manuel, an outreach specialist for Louisiana Tech University’s Professional Development and Research Institute on Blindness (PDRIB), has been selected as the 2016 Outstanding Educator of the Year by the Louisiana chapter of the National Federation of the Blind.

Manuel’s work for the PDRIB led to this honor and her immeasurable contributions to educating blind children at public schools in Webster, Lincoln, and Bienville Parishes, and helping them to develop life skills such as reading braille and personal orientation and mobility. The PDRIB, founded in 1996 and housed in Louisiana Tech’s College of Education, was originally established to create the first non-discriminatory program in equipping people interested in teaching cane travel and braille to blind students.

“This has been the most challenging year of my career so far, but this award lets me know that the people who matter the most appreciate my time, talent, and efforts to change what it means to be blind and to ensure that kids know blindness is a nuisance, but not a defining characteristic,” said Manuel during her award acceptance speech.

“I am only the educator I am with the help of my team at the Professional Development and Research Institute on Blindness, Dr. Ruby Ryles, and all the blind people I have met here and at national convention who continue to tell me their stories and dreams for blind children. It’s also with the help of my students and their families for allowing me to fight for their rights to a free and appropriate public education, and my family and friends who continue to support my dreams and believe that I can change the world.”

Manuel’s service and advocacy for blind children have included helping to coordinate monthly activities that often take place on the weekends for children and their families, which she led along with other staff members of PDRIB and the Louisiana Center for the Blind. In November 2015, she was also chosen to be a part of an exclusive cohort of teachers from around the country for training in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields specifically for blind and visually impaired children.

“Sheena is beloved by everyone who works with her,” said Dr. Edward Bell, director of the PDRIB at Louisiana Tech. “The children she teaches love her, the families depend on her, and all of us respect her tremendously. Sheena, without a doubt, is one of the best things we have going on here at PDRIB.”

Manuel has earned a bachelor’s degree in general studies from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette and a master’s degree in teaching from Louisiana Tech. She also earned an MBA from the University of Phoenix and holds a National Certification in Literary Braille, a National Orientation and Mobility Certification, and a National Certification in Unified English Braille.
13 2016-05-05
Lafayette

Louisiana Tech Admissions Wants To Be Your Lady Baby


Cajuns fans are usually looking for reasons to talk trash to programs they don’t root for. While this video wasn’t released by Louisiana Tech athletics, it’s still worth viewing.
Louisiana Tech Admissions released a short video on social media that has drawn up a simple debate among some of us at the office.
Are they attempting to be serious, or funny? When you channel INOJ’s “I Want To Be Your Lady Baby”, no one can be too sure.
Is this video to be laughed at, or laughed with? Judge for yourself.


Read More: Louisiana Tech Admissions Wants To Be Your Lady Baby [Video] | http://espn1420.com/louisiana-tech-admissions-wants-to-be-your-lady-baby-video/?trackback=tsmclip
13 2016-05-05
Ruston

Louisiana Tech farm sale to support agricultural sciences, forestry students


RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech) - Animals suitable for raising, breeding, riding and consumption will be featured during Louisiana Tech University’s 46th Annual University Farm Production Sale, scheduled for 1 p.m. Saturday at Tech Farm located on Louisiana Tech’s South Campus.

Included in the sale will be 20 Black Baldy heifers and 20 F-1 (Brahman/Angus) heifers that will be exposed to a Hereford bull. Additional cattle include a registered Polled Hereford heifer and other crossbred heifers.

Consumers can take advantage of finished market steers, hogs and even a lamb. Those market animals will be processed at the Tech Meat Science Laboratory at no additional cost to the buyer.

The sale will also offer five Quarter Horses, including riding horses, a broodmare and other prospects.

Organized by the School of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry's faculty, staff and students, the sale raises money for the program as well as offering “an excellent learning experience for the students involved," said Dr. William Green, Interim Director of the School of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry.

More information is available from Green at 318-257-3275, by email at wgreen@latech.edu or on the sale's website at www.livestocksale.latech.edu.
13 2016-05-04
Monroe

Tech to build new press box, suites at Joe Aillet Stadium


When Louisiana Tech held a ribbon cutting ceremony last September to announce its new $22 million end zone facility at Joe Aillet Stadium, athletic director Tommy McClelland viewed it as a game.

The project, or game, was over and it was time to move on to another with the focus centered on improving the current press box and adding suites.

That game was set in motion in 2015 and continued in April when Tech requested permission and received approval last Thursday from University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors to enter a ground-facility lease for an estimated $11.5 million project to expand the press box and build new suites to replace the existing Sky Box.

The estimated completion date for the privately funded project is Aug. 31, 2017, according to a letter dated March 31 from Tech president Les Guice to the board. Updated restrooms and traffic flow are "other repairs and modernization" included in the project.

On Tuesday, McClelland described last week's approval as "preliminary" and said the 2017 date is given as the earliest possibly completion date in order to start the process.


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However, the new construction project may not be finished until 2018 depending on how quickly Tech can secure the necessary funds. Construction would need to take place between seasons, so Nov. 13, 2016, the day after Tech's final home game of the season, is the earliest the project could start.

"People may read that as something different but that's part of our procedure to say we're going before the board and we're letting them know that this is a project we intend to do in the future and we'd like you to be aware of it and get your approval. That's what that was," he said.

Terms for the lease begin July 16, 2016 and run through Dec. 31, 2017, or when the "donation of improvement is executed," whichever occurs first.

Tech's new project, which includes tearing down the old press box and Sky Box and building a brand new structure, is a design-build, which means the intent is to include everything at one price. Tech's $22 million end zone facility started as an $18 million construction project but didn't include furnishings like graphic packages and furniture.

"The next step for us is to continue to put the team together and contractors and those types of things," McClelland said. "We're in a quiet phase of trying to gain support for it financially because this is going to be a fully funded private dollars. We are in the mode of trying to secure funds. Once we get to a point where we feel like we got the funds we need, the percentages we need, then we'll move forward."

McClelland declined to offer any details on the press box or suites.

Louisiana Tech added the $22 million Davison AthleticsBuy Photo
Louisiana Tech added the $22 million Davison Athletics Complex to Joe Aillet Stadium last year. (Photo: MARGARET CROFT/THE NEWS-STAR)
In the letter from March, Guice wrote the press box, which has been in use since 1969, "has little or no modernization." The space is old, outdated and in need of an upgrade.

"The space does not meet accessibility standards, nor does it meet functional requirements of the media and game production," Guice wrote.

Tech's Sky Box was constructed in 1985 above the press box to provide additional seating. Like the press box, Guice said the Sky Box doesn't meet current code or expectations.

McClelland used similiar words to describe the state of the press box and Sky Box.

"Number one, it's practical," he said.

"Number two, quite frankly is aesthetic now that we have a brand new building and it reflects the disparity between the two buildings if you will. The difference between age and structure.

"Third, and most importantly, is it's a source of revenue for us that we're currently not tapping into."


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The 2015 renovations to the south end, now called the Davison Athletics Complex, was several years in the making. The DAC houses a new locker room, weight room and meeting rooms along with new offices for coaches and a third-floor club-level for banquets and events that features 302 seats overlooking the field.

Discussions for the latest west side renovations also go back several years.

In a July 2014 interview with The News-Star, McClelland said he hoped to improve its football press box with additional funds.

Last September, McClelland reiterated there are several areas of need on campus that need to be addressed during the next three to five years including the press box and improvements to the backside of the old Joe Aillet Stadium field house.
13 2016-05-04
Ruston

La. Tech chemical engineering students win at national design competition


RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University chemical engineering students Evan McDougall, from Prairieville, La., and Dustin Savage, from West Monroe, La., won first place in the 2016 Best Senior Design Competition at the AIChE Spring Meeting and 12th Global Congress on Process Safety held recently in Houston, Texas.

McDougall notes the importance of collaboration and mastery of multiple disciplines in the success of the project.

McDougall and Savage represented Louisiana Tech’s student chapter of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) at the conference and presented their “Economic Optimization and Hazard Analysis of a Sulfuric Acid Catalyzed Alkylation Process” design to a panel of judges composed of professors and industry representatives.

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“Dustin and I received a great deal of advice on improving our presentation from Dr. (James) Palmer, our fellow chemical engineering seniors and my technical presentations teacher, Christine Strebeck,” McDougall said. “In the last four years, we have had countless presentations and team projects. I am grateful that our curriculum requires such an intense, comprehensive study of numerical techniques, which feedback from the audience suggested was one of our greatest strengths.”

Savage says that the hands-on focus of the Louisiana Tech engineering curricula helped prepare the team for performing the research and presenting it.

“Louisiana Tech’s heavy emphasis on communication and teamwork displayed throughout our curriculum also allowed Evan and me to deliver the winning presentation at the recent AIChE Conference,” Savage noted. “We have worked together on projects in the past and used our familiarity to graft our individual strengths into the alkylation design. From presenting on basic freshman engineering designs to more complex topics in our junior and senior classes, we were fully prepared to represent Tech in Houston.”

Competing teams worked on their project for most of the academic year, while the Louisiana Tech team had only three months.

Palmer, Louisiana Tech’s AIChE faculty sponsor and director of biomedical engineering and chemical engineering, said that this event highlights the success of the chemical engineering program at Louisiana Tech and the opportunities for Louisiana Tech chemical engineering students.

“Attracting outstanding students such as Evan and Dustin, and providing them an effective learning environment are critical factors that make Louisiana Tech University such a quality institution,” Palmer said. “We are pleased to have them represent the institution and are proud of what they have achieved.”

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In addition to winning the competition, Savage and McDougall are both members of Omega Chi Epsilon, and gave presentations on behalf of organization for Louisiana Tech’s 69th Engineering and Science day on April 11, before leaving to compete in the 2016 Best Senior Design Competition.

This event was AIChE’s third national design competition. Louisiana Tech also won first place two years ago.

The AIChE is the world’s leading organization for chemical engineering professionals. The AIChE Spring Meeting is the annual technical conference for practicing chemical engineers and addresses a wide range of subjects relevant to the current needs of industry.
13 2016-05-03
Monroe

Louisiana Tech TOP DAWG New Venture Championship winners announced


RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech) - A total of $12,500 in cash and prizes were awarded last week to the most innovative, student-developed product and service ideas at the 2016 TOP DAWG New Venture Championship at Louisiana Tech University.

Awards were presented to the top three finishers in the competition with the “EZ Read Monitoring System” team (mechanical engineering majors Rhodes Moran and Ryan Frick, and entrepreneurship majors Fran Ewing and Vincent Moore) earning first place honors and $3,000 for their easy-to-use devices that wirelessly transmit water level data to customers. The team also won the Innovation Enterprise Fund award of $1,000 given for entrepreneurial spirit.

Second place and a $1,500 award was presented to Bharat Karumuri (biomedical engineering graduate student) for his new venture “IntelliPace,” which is developing an embedded software module that enables programmable implantable brain stimulators to stimulate with high therapeutic efficiency and fewer side effects.

“Healing Movement” (entrepreneurship majors Sierra McGraw and Logan Evans, nanosystem/electrical engineering major Abdullah Nammari, nanosystem/chemical engineering major Dustin Savage, and nanosystem/micromanufacturing major Seth Doughty) earned third place honors for developing a self-powered device designed to be placed inside a dental implant screw to produce electric stimulation to the jaw to promote bone growth around dental implants.

The $2,000 Jones Walker Entrepreneurial Spirit Award, funded by Jones Walker and recognizing the team with the most entrepreneurial spirit, went to “Bike-n-Bright” (entrepreneurship major Andrea Harris and nanosystems engineering majors Zachary Hanson, Andrew Rigley and Karen Rispone) for their lightweight, easy-to-use, low maintenance bike light power supply system.

In addition to the cash awards, the Louisiana Tech Enterprise Center sponsors six months of business incubator space to the winning teams, valued at $4,500.

Seven multi-disciplinary teams earned a spot in the 2016 New Venture Championship final round. Teams were scored on the quality of their new venture investment deck and presentation as well as the overall viability of their business concept.

The TOP DAWG was established in 2002 and is coordinated by Debbie Inman, director of the Center for Entrepreneurship and Information Technology. Members of Bulldog Entrepreneurs, the student organization which empowers entrepreneurs and promotes innovation on the Tech campus, serve as facilitators for the event.

The New Venture Championship is held each spring quarter and provides an opportunity for students to create business investor decks based on ideas presented during the fall quarter TOP DAWG Idea Pitch. During the competition, each team is mentored by business experts and attends training sessions designed to help teams build their investor decks. The competition is an integral part of the Enterprise Campus’ focus at Louisiana Tech.

Judges for the TOP DAWG New Venture Championship include Michael Leachman, partner with Jones Walker; Blair Suire, associate with Jones Walker; Ammen Jordan, City of Ruston; and Adam O’Neal, business development/commercial portfolio manager for Origin Bank. Supporting sponsors for the TOP DAWG include the Louisiana Tech College of Business, Louisiana Tech College of Engineering and Science, the Center for Entrepreneurship and Information Technology (CEnIT), the Louisiana Tech Enterprise Center, the Innovation Enterprise Fund and the Technology Business Development Center (TBDC).
13 2016-05-02
Monroe

La Tech College of Engineering and Science honors outstanding students, faculty


Louisiana Tech University’s College of Engineering and Science is proud to announce its 2016 Outstanding Students and Faculty.

Each year, faculty and staff from the College of Engineering and Science (COES) select outstanding juniors and seniors who have excelled in academics and leadership for the College. Graduating seniors vote on the two faculty members who most influenced their educations at Louisiana Tech. These selections are announced at the annual Spring Release event.

The 2016 College of Engineering and Science Outstanding Seniors are Jake Auger (mechanical engineering), Morgan Bollich (chemical engineering), Sam Helman (mechanical engineering), Evan McDougall (chemical engineering), John Owens III (computer science) and Joshua Tully (chemistry).

Outstanding Juniors for 2016 are John Jacob Kraft IV (construction engineering technology), Grant Reddoch (chemical engineering), Arthur Hartie Spence II (biomedical engineering), Ethan Sullivan (nanosystems engineering), Caylin VanHook (electrical engineering and physics) and Luke Villermin (mechanical engineering).

Allie De Leo, student success specialist for the College of Engineering and Science, says that these students exhibit academic excellence and are active in community building activities outside the classroom.

“We are very proud of these students and their accomplishments. These outstanding juniors and seniors not only perform well academically, but they are also very involved around campus, within our college and in the community.”

“These students serve as examples to current and future students in how they perform both in the classroom and in their service,” added Dr. Heath Tims, associate dean of undergraduate studies for the College of Engineering and Science. “We are proud of their accomplishments and are excited to be able to honor their work. We look forward to how they will further represent Tech in the future.”

Outstanding Faculty in the College of Engineering and Science for 2016 are Dr. Brad Cicciarelli, senior lecturer of chemical and mechanical engineering, and Dr. Michael Swanbom, senior lecturer of mechanical engineering.

“This award is very special for faculty because it is decided by the students themselves,” Tims said. “It is very rewarding to be chosen from so many outstanding faculty in our College.”

In addition to outstanding juniors, seniors and faculty, the Engineering and Science Association awarded the COES Cup to the National Society of Black Engineers (first place), the American Society of Civil Engineers (second place) and the Society of Physics Students (third place). The ESA awarded points toward the competition to student organizations that participated in the most community outreach, attendance of national conferences and participation in special competitions hosted by the ESA Freshman Council throughout the academic year.

In addition to the trophies, each organization that placed received a monetary award to put toward future events.

13 2016-05-02
Ruston

LOUISIANA TECH HOSTS I-20 TOP 20


Louisiana Tech University showcased new technologies, innovative products and services and entrepreneurial ideas from across the Interstate 20 corridor. Pictured is the UTeachTech booth. UTeachTech pairs Tech’s engineering and science programs with it teaching preparation programs, resulting in a single, interdisciplinary degree program.
13 2016-05-02
Ruston

TECH LEADS CYBER EDUCATION PROGRAM


he Louisiana Tech University’s Science and Technology Education Center in the College of Education will lead an online Cyber Education program for K-12 educators.

In a partnership with the Cyber Innovation Center, 5013c nonprofit corporation dedicated to cyber research in Bossier City, the 100 percent online program will help teach future computer science teachers.

Twenty-seven teachers from Louisiana, Arkansas and South Carolina have enrolled in the first course offering this spring.

The courses meet computer science certification requirements and program participants will gain continuing education units as well as graduate course credits that will count toward a master of education degree, a Cyber Education Certificate or a master plus 30, a rank 1 certification.

“Computer science education is becoming more prevalent in K-12 and an increasingly integral component of a student’s educational career,” G.B. Cazes, vice president of the Cyber Innovation Center, said. “This course sequence provides teachers with the foundational knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to become certified computer science teachers in K-12 classrooms.”

Don Schillinger, dean of the College of Education at Louisiana Tech University, said this type of program will help not only the country, but Lincoln Parish itself.

“The growing need for computer science educators continues to grow everywhere,” he said.

“This certainly benefits the community and their continued efforts in (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education.”

Schillinger said Tech will be one of the nation’s leaders in computer science education when the program begins.

“With that growing need, people will recognize Tech as the ones who will be the forefront of making computer science educators,” he said. “The addition of the Cyber Education course sequence furthers our commitment to providing educators knowledge, skills and understanding needed to educate the next generation learner and leader.”
13 2016-04-29
Monroe

Vernon Butler drafted by Panthers in first round to etch name in Tech history


Vernon Butler made history for Louisiana Tech's football program, becoming the school's first defensive player to ever be selected in the first round of the NFL Draft.

Butler, a standout defensive tackle who played for the Bulldogs from 2012-15, was drafted by the Carolina Panthers with the No. 30 overall pick at the end of Thursday's NFL Draft. He's Tech's highest defensive player drafted since defensive end Fred Dean (No. 33 overall) in the 1975 draft and the highest player drafted from Tech since wide receiver Troy Edwards (No. 13 overall) in 1999.

Butler (6-foot-4, 323 pounds) was one of 25 players in Chicago for the draft. His family, most notably his parents, and members of his management team at Pro Source Sports, joined him for the trip. He became the fifth first-round pick in Tech history, joining Edwards, wide receiver Roger Carr and Hall of Famer players Terry Bradshaw and Willie Roaf.

"It feels great. I’m just honored and really blessed right now. I thank God," Butler said during a teleconference with reporters, via the team's website.

Dressed in a black suit, black bow tie and black-rimmed glasses — much like the glasses he wore four years ago when he signed with Tech — Butler walked on stage and gave commissioner Roger Goodell a hug before putting on his new cap.


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Chronicling Vernon Butler's attempt to make history at NFL Draft

The Panthers were one of several teams Butler visited during the draft process. He said last week he met with the Bills, Lions, Texans, Bucs, Seahawks, Panthers, Titans and Falcons. He also received interest from the Raiders, Bengals and Broncos.

"I couldn't help my hog molly self," Panthers general manager Dave Gettleman said, via the Associated Press. "We were really kind of shocked that he was there. I don't know why he fell (to No. 30). It was like my first draft here and watching Star (Lotulelei) fall to us. But the value was too good. He's big and powerful and athletic and has all of the stuff."

Before the draft, Butler told The News-Star he thought he would go between picks 14 to 23. However, there were several twists and turns to the draft that flipped team's draft boards, like a run on wide receivers and the falling stock of offensive tackle Laremy Tunsil.

"A tad bit, I was," Butler said when asked if he was surprised. "But I’m at a good home with the Carolina Panthers so it works out good."

Right as the draft started, the Detroit Free Press reported Butler said the Lions told him they would take him with the 16th pick if he was still available. However, Detroit went with offensive tackle Taylor Decker.

Louisiana Tech's Vernon Butler poses for a photo in
Louisiana Tech's Vernon Butler poses for a photo in the green room of Thursday's NFL Draft in Chicago. (Photo: Courtesy ProSource Sports Management)
"That’s what they said, but they say a lot of things," Butler said on the conference call.

Butler will wind up making around $8 million for going late in the first round, according to spotrac.com, a website that projects draft contract. Last year, Demarious Randall signed a four-year deal worth $7,915,734 as the 30th pick.

Earlier in the night on the red carpet, Butler was featured in a brief NFL Network interview with his parents Vernon Sr. and Beverly.

Butler's place in the first round completes a four-year journey where he morphed from a two-star defensive end prospect out of North Pike High School in Summitt, Mississippi, into one of the highest-rated defensive tackles.

"The first tape I put in was Kansas State ... and this kid got in there and ran sideline-to-sideline, made plays all day long and never came of out the game," NFL Network draft analyst Mike Mayock said on the air. "He's 6-4, 325. Think Linval Joseph, think Michael Brockers, that kind of player. Big, powerful player and Carolina Panthers love that kind of player."

Butler was a two-year starter at Tech, a stretch that helped generate buzz following his junior year when he finished with 56 tackles and 13.5 tackles for loss. He flirted with the NFL Draft, but decided to come back after receiving a fourth- or fifth-round draft grade.

The decision proved to work out just fine for Butler. He had 50 tackles, 10 tackles for loss, eight quarterback hurries and three sacks to earn First-Team All-Conference USA honors.

Butler's season led to invites at the Senior Bowl, NFL Combine and finally the NFL Draft in Chicago. Teams and scouts are intrigued with his potential and versatility. Butler won't turn 22 until June and he has the ability to play all three positions on the defensive line.

"He is explosive and powerful at the point of attack," Panthers coach Ron Rivera said, via the AP. "We most certainly do see the upside."

Louisiana Tech's Vernon Butler receives a phone call
Louisiana Tech's Vernon Butler receives a phone call Thursday from the Carolina Panthers indicating they had chosen him with the 30th pick in the 2016 NFL Draft. (Photo: Courtesy ProSource Sports Management)
The buzz surrounding Butler picked up after the season was over and gained momentum at the Senior Bowl when he was among the top defensive tackles in Mobile, Alabama.

Butler didn't test out as well as he would have liked at the combine, but improved on his numbers at Tech's Pro Day in March by running a 5.05 40-yard dash, posting a 33.5-inch vertical jump and 9-3 in the board jump.

In a deep defensive tackle draft class, Butler was the fourth player off the board. Sheldon Rankins went No. 12 to New Orleans, Kenny Clark went No. 27 to Green Bay and Robert Nkemdiche to Arizona at No. 29.

Butler went ahead of bigger-named prospects like Alabama defensive tackles A’Shawn Robinson and Jarran Reed and Baylor's Andrew Billings.

Butler walks into a situation at Carolina where the Panthers are coming off a trip to the Super Bowl as NFC champions. He'll join a loaded defense that includes linebacker Luke Kuechly and defensive tackles Star Lotulelei and Kawann Short and defensive end Kony Ealy.

"This is a guy, honestly, you could put a film together and this is the best defensive tackle in the draft," Stanford coach Davis Shaw said on the NFL Network broadcast. "I'm impressed by this kid. I like him."
13 2016-04-28
Monroe

Louisiana Tech Golf Claims Conference USA Championship


TEXARKANA -- The Bulldogs upset the No. 38 ranked team in the country, UAB, and won their first ever Conference USA golf title on Wednesday afternoon in Texarkana, Arkansas.

The only other time Louisiana Tech won a conference title is when they were a member of the Southland Conference in 1980.

Tech's Ben Robinson sunk the 15 footer on the final hole to secure the 3-2 upset over the Blazers.

With the win, the Bulldogs have an automatic bid to the NCAA Regionals on May 16-18.
13 2016-04-27
Monroe

Local students win top prizes at Shell Eco-marathon Americas 2016


DETROIT (Edelman News Release) - After months of building an ultra-energy efficient vehicle and a weekend of intense competition in Detroit, students from Ruston High School and Louisiana Tech exceeded expectations at Shell Eco-marathon Americas 2016, a global energy efficiency competition that was held this past weekend, April 22-24, in Detroit. Please see the full competition press release below.

Ruston High School took home second place prize in the UrbanConcept, Alternative Fuel category for recording 98 mpg – their first time building an UrbanConcept vehicle. The team also came in 10th place in the Prototype, Gasoline category with 681 mpg – an incredible achievement given that they were one of the few teams that made 90 percent of every part in their supermileage vehicle. By comparison, today’s most fuel efficient vehicle achieves 37 mpg, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.

Louisiana Tech were one of the two teams to make it past technical inspections for the UrbanConcept, CNG category, and one of six to pass technical inspections in the UrbanConcept, Diesel category. Although the team did not achieve their hopes for a trophy finish, the students – most of whom are non-traditional students pursuing second degrees or changing careers – gained technical skills, such as designing and manufacturing, as well as valuable experience in leadership, teamwork and networking.

More than 1,000 high school and college students from a record 124 teams representing seven countries – Brazil, Canada, Ecuador, Guatemala, Mexico, Puerto Rico and the United States – competed at Shell Eco-marathon Americas 2016 after designing, building and testing their most energy-efficient vehicles.
13 2016-04-27
Ruston

Louisiana Tech engineering student awarded prestigious internship, scholarship


Blaine Rutland, a junior physics major in Louisiana Tech University’s College of Engineering and Science, has been awarded a Blue Waters Internship Scholarship (BWIS) to participate in a two-week intensive high-performance computing workshop.

Blue Waters Scholars receive a stipend of $5,000 to participate in a High-Performance Computing (HPC) summer training program at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications and complete an HPC research project at their home institution.

Rutland’s research project, performed in the Theoretical Molecular Biology Lab at Louisiana Tech and mentored by Dr. Thomas C. Bishop, associate professor of chemistry and physics, uses HPC to investigate how the material properties of DNA on the atomic scale affect genomic function on coarse-grained scales, see images. Characterizing relationships between DNA’s atomic structure and DNA sequence is an essential step to advancing our understanding of personalized genomics and epigenetics.


Bishop notes that the internship provides students with training and networking opportunities important for students working in genetics.

“The computational modeling of genetic mechanisms in my Theoretical Molecular Biology Lab requires tremendous computing resources,” Bishop said. “Members of my lab routinely utilize world-class high-performance computing resources available from the Louisiana Optical Network Initiative (LONI), the National Center for Supercomputing Applications and the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment.

“The Blue Waters Internship Program provides my students unique opportunities for training on the worlds’ fastest academic supercomputer and for networking with renowned computational scientists and engineers. It’s an incredible experience for Louisiana Tech students.”

Blue Waters sponsors 20 undergraduate research interns each year. The interns engage in petascale computing research and development projects, and travel to The Blue Waters Symposium at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications.

STUDENT AWARDS: Louisiana Tech history students honored for research

This award marks the second year in a row that a student from Louisiana Tech has been awarded the scholarship. Last year two students, Anik Karan, graduate student in biomedical engineering, and Ran Sun, graduate student in chemical engineering, received BWIS.
13 2016-04-26
Monroe

Student art exhibit, auction at Tech showcases interdisciplinary creativity


RUSTON -- Faculty from Louisiana Tech University’s biological sciences and biomedical engineering programs teamed up with art faculty from the School of Design to provide students with a unique opportunity to use their talents to promote Louisiana Tech’s New Frontiers in Biomedical Research lecture series.

The apex of this interdisciplinary experience was the April 14 opening of an art exhibit at the Louisiana Tech Enterprise Center to showcase creative works of the 14 students taking part in the collaboration through Associate Art Professor Nick Bustamante’s ART 320 Digital Painting class. The opening of the exhibit was followed by an action of the top student-created works that will help to support next year’s New Frontiers in Biomedical Research lecture series and the continuation of this unique opportunity for students. The final project for the students in Bustamante’s course was to design the cover of next year’s lecture series promotional materials.


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La. Tech history students honored for research

“The digital painting and illustration project resulted from the interdisciplinary collaboration of faculty from three different colleges,” said Dr. Gary Kennedy, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Applied and Natural Sciences. “This collaboration gave students a unique opportunity that goes well beyond the typical classroom. I found it highly rewarding to hear the students describe their work and to see their faces as the top four projects were auctioned off, averaging more than $1,000 each. The exhibition showcases the efforts of both the students and the faculty.”

Throughout the course, Bustamante worked with Dr. Jamie Newman, the Scott Weathersby Endowed Professor in Zoology and Premedicine and an assistant professor in biological sciences, and Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, to help students create original cover art and imagery to be used in program advertising and gift presentations to the guest speakers. Newman and Caldorera-Moore are the co-organizers of the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research lecture series that has grown into one of Louisiana Tech’s premier interdisciplinary programs.

The art exhibit at the Enterprise Center featured not just the final pieces, but also showcased the learning process as many students in the class had never used some of the digital design programs needed to create the art, prior to the course. In just a few weeks and in working with Bustamante, the students became proficient and mastered many of the digital design techniques. In the last half of the quarter, Newman and Caldorera-Moore worked with the students to illustrate four biomedical concepts: antibody-antigen interaction, cell signaling, circulation, and nanoparticle-based drug delivery. Each of the students illustrated one of these concepts and the final pieces were judged by a multidisciplinary panel from around Louisiana Tech.

The top four images were auctioned to raise money to continue this program and aid students in the purchase of equipment that will help them pursue their career goals in digital painting and scientific illustration. As a result of the class experience, Almira Bradford, who was the winner of the competition, plans to pursue a career where digital painting is her main medium. The auction raised over $5,000 which will help maintain and grow the collaboration between the arts and sciences at Louisiana Tech.


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“The digital design class was an excellent opportunity for the students and faculty from three distinct colleges to work collaboratively together,” said Dr. Don Kaczvinsky, dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Louisiana Tech. “Our art students gained a greater appreciation of the science that went into their paintings and the new possibilities for art in the digital age.

“The students also learned to work with clients, meet deadlines and work across disciplines in a team effort. I believe the class exemplifies the quality and interdisciplinary nature of the educational experience at the university. I really enjoyed the exhibition and I look forward to developing similar classes in the future.”

The New Frontiers in Biomedical Research lecture series is a year-long seminar series that brings internationally recognized biomedical researchers to Louisiana Tech to interact with students, faculty and administrators. These interactions with world-class scientists have led to admission of Louisiana Tech students into competitive summer programs and graduate programs, created new collaborations for faculty, generated an expanding network of contacts for all of those who participate, and introduced Louisiana Tech to a number of research faculty across the country.
13 2016-04-26
Ruston

WINNERS ANNOUNCED IN TOP DAWG COMPETITION


The winner of Louisiana Tech University’s TOP DAWG New Venture Championship and $4,000 funding was EZ Read Monitoring.

EZ Read Monitors are easy-to-use devices that can wirelessly transmit water level data to customers.

The EZ Read Monitoring team includes Tech students Ryan Frick, Rhodes Moran, Fran Ewing and Vincent Moore.

Moran said the idea came from the work of all four team members.

“We were so relieved to win,” he said. “We worked long nights to get this idea going.”

Frick said the EZ Read Monitors work through sonar.
13 2016-04-25
Monroe

LA Tech Celebrates 400 Years of Shakespearean Comedy


With Spring in the air, Louisiana Tech University bring to life "Love's Labours Lost." The ageless comic tale penned by Shakespeare over 400 years ago has delighted audiences for centuries.

In the play, the King of Navarre and the men of his court swear off all women for three years in an effort to dedicated themselves to studying. All goes well until the Princess of France arrives with all of her ladies-in-waiting. Hilarious hijinks ensue as the men are forced to rearrange their priorities.

This performance will not be your typical Shakespeare play, as LA Tech has chosen to portray a "steampunk" interpretation. Even in this modernized version, the actors had to take the preparation seriously.

"Shakespeare is just a whole different monster in itself. It's all about research. If the actor understands what they are saying, then the audience will understand as well," says actress Ashley Davis.

Although Shakespeare can have a reputation for being hard to understand, cast members have worked hard to capture the essence of the lines.

"I think it would be a lie to say you don't struggle a little at first-- just because the language is so rich. So, as an actor, you have to really dig in, and have a full understanding of what you're saying," explains cast member Courtney VanEaton Theodos

The play runs from Tuesday April 26 to April 30 with perfor.mances at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday May 1 at 2 p.m. For more information or tickets, visit Louisiana Tech University Theatre.
13 2016-04-25
Shreveport

Dr. B: He’s just what the patient ordered


If you’re a friend of Dr. Billy Bundrick’s, you always feel better after seeing him than before seeing him. But that’s got nothing to do with whether or not you need an orthopedic surgeon, although the man everybody calls “Dr. B” has been one of the best of those for nearly a half century.

Dr. B was honored recently by his alma mater, Louisiana Tech, with a “Dr. William S. Bundrick Day,” organized by one of his biggest fans, NBA Hall of Famer Karl Malone. Malone reminded the packed house at Davison Athletics Complex on that April Saturday that it’s been 46 years since former Tech football assistant coach (and like Malone, a Louisiana Sports Hall of Famer) Pat Collins asked Bundrick to fill in when the previous team doctor could no longer serve.

“Like he would do tens of thousands of time in his life, Dr. B said “Yes, I will,’” Malone said.

Let’s see if we can stitch the decades together here in just a couple of minutes, and at least attempt to sew up some of the forever reasons why Dr. B means so much to the heart not only of Louisiana Tech — not to mention her knees, wrists, ankles, shoulders, backs, collarbones, ligaments and tendons — but also of all north Louisiana athletics.

Much of his best work has been done behind a mask, either a football helmet facemask or a surgeon’s mask. Still, he gets noticed.

Bundrick was a two-sport all-state athlete at C.E. Byrd High School; he’s in the school’s Hall of Fame.

He was captain of the 1959 Bulldog football team that went 9-1. He’s received — he’s earned — every honor the University can give him; he’s been the speaker at graduation, alum of the year, a Tech Sports Hall of Famer.

Professionally, he’s received — and earned — the highest honor possible from the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine.

He’s a Founders Award recipient, given by the North Louisiana Fellowship of Christian Athletes. Again, an organization’s highest honor goes to Dr. B.

He wasn’t 35 yet when he began quietly pushing his vision of what orthopedic medicine should be, and there’s no way to measure the size of positive effect that’s had on the sports we’ve so enjoyed watching and playing in north Louisiana these past four-plus decades. Every athlete of every age has heard of — and thousands have been helped by — The Bone and Joint Clinic, now with Willis-Knight Health System.

Those who know him well agree that there’s no way to measure how much money he’s left on the table, how far beyond the call of duty he’s gone, just for Tech athletes alone.

There’s no telling how many times, in the two athletic training rooms named for him at Tech — training rooms he for the most part equipped — somebody has said, “We’re gonna need to get him to Dr. B,” or “Let’s see what Dr. B says,” or “Which one of you can drive her over to Dr. B’s?”

He went through a helicopter phase back in the day. For those of us who were around then and were lucky enough to work with him, just to see what looked like a giant grasshopper landing on the practice field to deliver Dr B. each week was nothing short of joy.

From all the thousands who’ve been seen and sewn by this compassionate man, we really need to say thank you, Dr. B, for your example of always showing up, of being quietly efficient, of seeing things through to the end. Thank you for the stitches and the shots, but also for the encouragement, for the feeling you radiated that Everything Would Be All Right.

Fitting that he’s always been Dr B, which could stand for Best or for Bulldog. We’ve always felt better after seeing you than before, and that’s whether we had an appointment or were all mended up. Just to see you Dr. B, just to know you are our friend, and to know that what an apple a day couldn’t prevent, you could fix.

Thank you for always doing your best to give us the chance to do our best.

Contact teddy at teddy@latech.edu
13 2016-04-22
Monroe

ouisiana Tech to support enrollment growth, student life with new Greek organizations


RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech) - As a result of the significant enrollment growth at Louisiana Tech University, four new Greek organizations have been approved to create chapters on the school’s campus.

The four new organizations that were invited are Delta Delta Delta sorority, Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority, Zeta Phi Beta sorority and Phi Beta Sigma fraternity. The National Panhellenic Conference, which oversees 26 national groups, invited Delta Delta Delta to create a chapter this fall and for Kappa Kappa Gamma to do so no earlier than 2019 and no later than 2020.

Jason Gomez, public relations manager for Tri Delta, said the organization is honored to be invited to join Louisiana Tech’s campus.

“We truly see this as a partnership between our organization and the university,” Gomez said. “It’s an opportunity for Tri Delta to engage with the amazing students at Tech and provide another strong sorority experience within the thriving fraternity and sorority community. With the support of our staff and dedicated area alumnae, we are eager for Tri Delta to be a contributor to Tech and allow a new chapter of Tri Deltas live, learn and lead with purpose.”

Ashley Allen, Panhellenic adviser for Louisiana Tech, said she felt this fall’s colonization of Tri Delta would be beneficial for students and for the community.

“We are confident that their strong national brand, their eager local alumnae and experienced national leadership will allow for a strong colonization this fall,” Allen said. “We believe that they will bring strength to our already growing community and each of our current groups is thrilled to welcome them to the Louisiana Tech Greek life family.”

Zeta Phi Beta and Phi Beta Sigma are part of the “Divine Nine” groups; the National Pan-Hellenic Council oversees their organizations.

Sam Speed, assistant dean of student life, said the benefits of having these two groups on campus would be a continuation of their rich history.

“Being an alumnus of Louisiana Tech and an administrator for the past 25 years with friends, associates and former students who were members of these organizations, I was reminded at the reunion they held a few weeks back of how impactful these individuals have been to the Louisiana Tech campus community,” Speed said. “As it relates to the African-American student population, these are groups that can provide greater support for the overall mission of the institution. After talking with their alumni, I believe they are on board to assist us in enhancing the diversity on Louisiana Tech’s campus, which is a goal of (Tech President) Dr. Guice.”

13 2016-04-21
Monroe

Louisiana Tech’s department of music honors students, alumnus


RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech) - Louisiana Tech University’sDepartment of Music has announced the selection of its Alumnus of the Year and honor recital soloists.

For the Alumnus of the Year, the department has chosen Sean Carrier, who earned a bachelor of music education degree in 1994 and completed his master’s in educational leadership at Harding University.

A native of Cabot, Arkansas, Carrier now lives in Fort Smith, Arkansas, and is in his 14th year as the band director at Southside High School. For the 2014-2015 academic year, the Southside band was honored as the National Band Association National Blue Ribbon Band of the Year.

Carrier was also recently selected as a Laureate in the John Philip Sousa Foundation Legion of Honor and was appointed to the Midwest Clinic Board of Advisers.

The department will honor Carrier at its annual Honors and AwardsRecital at 7:30 p.m. May 6 in Howard Auditorium.

The Honors and Awards Recital will also highlight the 2015-2016 honor recital soloists. The Honors Recital features select students who have exceled in the area of performance throughout their time at Tech.

This year’s soloists are Brian Smith, saxophone; Emily Lancon, soprano; Mary Rudd, piano; and Cody Ford, euphonium.

The Honors and Awards Recital is free and open to the public and will also recognize associate professor of music Lawrence Gibbs, who is retiring. A reception will follow the event.
13 2016-04-21
Monroe

Louisiana Tech’s department of music honors students, alumnus


RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech) - Louisiana Tech University’sDepartment of Music has announced the selection of its Alumnus of the Year and honor recital soloists.

For the Alumnus of the Year, the department has chosen Sean Carrier, who earned a bachelor of music education degree in 1994 and completed his master’s in educational leadership at Harding University.

A native of Cabot, Arkansas, Carrier now lives in Fort Smith, Arkansas, and is in his 14th year as the band director at Southside High School. For the 2014-2015 academic year, the Southside band was honored as the National Band Association National Blue Ribbon Band of the Year.

Carrier was also recently selected as a Laureate in the John Philip Sousa Foundation Legion of Honor and was appointed to the Midwest Clinic Board of Advisers.

The department will honor Carrier at its annual Honors and AwardsRecital at 7:30 p.m. May 6 in Howard Auditorium.

The Honors and Awards Recital will also highlight the 2015-2016 honor recital soloists. The Honors Recital features select students who have exceled in the area of performance throughout their time at Tech.

This year’s soloists are Brian Smith, saxophone; Emily Lancon, soprano; Mary Rudd, piano; and Cody Ford, euphonium.

The Honors and Awards Recital is free and open to the public and will also recognize associate professor of music Lawrence Gibbs, who is retiring. A reception will follow the event.
13 2016-04-20
Monroe

Journalist, PolitiFact editor to speak at La. Tech


RUSTON – “Fact-checking the 2016 Presidential Election” will be the topic when journalist Angie Drobnic Holan addresses Louisiana Tech University students, faculty, staff and members of the general public at 10 a.m. April 26 in Wyly Tower Auditorium.

The event is free and open to the public.

A writer for the Tampa Bay Times, Holan is also editor of “PolitiFact,” a web site devoted to evaluating the accuracy of political statements. She was a member of the “PolitiFact” team that won the Pulitzer Prize for its coverage of the 2008 presidential election. Prior to joining the Times, Holan was employed at newspapers in Alabama, Florida, Louisiana and New Mexico.

According to Holan, in 2016 fact checking “has become a major part of how the media cover the presidential race, including the candidacies of Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, Ted Cruz, and Bernie Sanders.” In her presentation, she plans to discuss fact checking the presidential contest, including how fact checkers do their jobs and the reaction of voters to their findings.

A native of Patterson, Louisiana, Holan graduated from the Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts in Natchitoches. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas at Austin and holds master’s degrees in journalism from Columbia University and library science from the University of South Florida.

“Fact-checking the 2016 Presidential Election” is sponsored by the Louisiana Tech departments of history and communication and media studies, the Waggonner Center for Civic Engagement and Public Policy, and the Louisiana Tech chapters of the American Association of University Women and Phi Alpha Theta History Honor Society.
13 2016-04-19
Baton Rouge

Summit seeks to improve economic development ties in Louisiana


While Louisiana faces challenges with state budget shortfalls and low oil prices, the basic strengths of the economy remain constant, the head of Louisiana’s economic development department said Monday.

The state still has an abundance of natural resources, access to the Mississippi River and a network of ports and rail lines, said Don Pierson, LED secretary.

“These are challenging times in Louisiana,” Pierson said at the Statewide Economic Development Summit held at L’Auberge Casino Hotel. “You feel this in regions across the state, and you feel it in the Legislature, but what we do is we face those challenges together.”

Harkening back to his days as a U.S. Army paratrooper commander, Pierson said the key to success is working as a team.

“You don’t win when you cross the finish line, you win when the team crosses the finish line together,” he said.

The summit brought together about 400 people from across Louisiana, representing the state’s eight economic development partners, elected local officials, representatives from colleges and universities and private business leaders.

Adam Knapp, president and chief executive officer of the Baton Rouge Area Chamber, said similar meetings were held about 10 years ago. Regional economic development leaders decided they again needed to get together to talk about challenges, opportunities and how to make Louisiana a better place to work and live.

“It’s time for us to be stronger in our partnerships,” Pierson said.

LED’s goal is to have more Louisiana citizens than ever working — earning wages that are higher and matching skill sets that are higher than ever before to good jobs.

“The workplace of tomorrow will be dominated by talented, educated, well-trained people,” Pierson said. “We want to attract skilled people to well-paying jobs.”

To that end, local economic development leaders need to work with universities, colleges, community colleges and technical schools in their area. Those assets are a critical part of how cities lure economic development projects today.

Ruston Mayor Ronny Walker said Louisiana Tech helped attract Monster Moto, a manufacturer of minibikes and go-carts. Monster Moto announced a year ago it will move its headquarters and manufacturing facility from the Dallas area to Ruston, a transition that will create 287 jobs over the next decade, with an average annual salary of $46,800, plus benefits.

Walker said Monster Moto officials met with Tech President Les Guice and spent three hours talking to engineering students before making their decision to move their headquarters.

Chris Masingill, chairman of the Delta Regional Authority, a federal-state partnership that provides opportunities across the Mississippi River Delta, said there needs to be greater collaboration between educational institutions and economic developers to make sure there is a pipeline of skilled workers.

“It’s about K through J, kindergarten through jobs,” he said. “Not K through 12 or K through 14 or 16.”

Follow Timothy Boone on Twitter, @TCB_TheAdvocate
13 2016-04-18
Ruston

› home › TECH HISTORY DEPARTMENT TO HOST LECTURE BY NEWCASTLE UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR


At 6 p.m. this evening, Bruce Baker, a lecturer in American History at Newcastle University in the United Kingdom, will give a lecture, “How To Own All the Cotton In the World: William P. Brown and Cotton Futures Trading in New Orleans at the Turn of the Century” at the Lincoln Parish Library Events Center.

“Bruce Baker as he explains how brokers in New Orleans managed to buy all the cotton in the world and set its price far beyond what it had been,” according to an article in the “Between the Lines,” a newsletter created by the LPL staff.

“In the 1890s, the price that farmers earned for their cotton was determined by the cotton futures contracts traded on the New Orleans Cotton Exchange and the New York Cotton Exchange.”

The market didn’t work well because of bad information and deliberate manipulation, keeping prices artificially low, the article read.

“A group of cotton brokers in New Orleans led by William P. Brown — once a resident of Ruston — managed to corner the world supply of cotton in 1903, earning millions of dollars and doubling the price of cotton.”

This talk, is drawn from Baker and Barbara Hahn’s new book “The Cotton Kings: Capitalism and Corruption in Turn-of-the-Century New York and New Orleans,” said David Anderson, an associate professor in the Department of History at Louisiana Tech University.

“He partnered with Barbara Hahn to write this book on a particular segment of the cotton industry at the turn of the century,” he said.

“It is about commodity trading, and it is similar to what happened in 2008 with the Great Recession.

In 1903, William Brown tried to corner the market on cotton, Anderson said, causing the price of cotton to soar, which resulted in Brown making millions of dollars.

Brown was once a resident of Ruston, he said.

“This character lived in Ruston for a time, so he is a local in a sense, who affected world commodity markets,” he said.

Baker is on a tour for this book, and after his lecture this evening, he will make his way to Dallas to give other lectures on his work.

In the introduction of his book, Baker wrote that his work would feature “dramatic commercial confrontations where millions of dollars are made and lost in a day.

“It contains corruption intrigue and abuse of power at the highest levels of government. It is a story of men and their wives, of the social ties that link people together and the networks they create. It is also a story of conflict … It is an economic drama enacted on stages from cotton fields and country stores to the cotton exchanges of New Orleans, New York and Liverpool and the boardrooms of banks.”

For those wishing to purchase his book, it is available for purchase online.

The event is free and open to the public.

For more information about the event, or future events contact Sarah Creekmore, administrative assistant at 251-5030 or email her at screekmore@mylpl.org.
13 2016-04-15
Monroe

La. Tech, MedCamps break ground for ‘Hero’s Launch’


RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University’s School of Design, together with MedCamps of Louisiana, has partnered together to break ground on the “Hero’s Launch” – a fully-accessible canoe launch as an exciting activity for the campers that will dramatically improve canoeing and paddle boating at MedCamps.

For several years, students in Louisiana Tech’s Architecture 335 class have partnered with various organizations in Lincoln Parish to design and build structures ranging from homes for Habitat for Humanity to park pavilions around Ruston. The design build program, now in its third year of partnership with MedCamps, will design and construct the new amenity.

According to the design team’s Facebook site, the “Hero’s Launch” design is “based on the notion of the hero’s journey. The camper’s journey begins on the ‘known’ side of the camp that they are the most familiar with and takes them to the ‘unknown’ side, where they can explore the unfamiliar nature of being on the water. After their adventure, they return to the ‘known’ side having gained new knowledge and confidence. The canoe launch is the beacon that calls the campers to begin their adventure, and where they return as fearless heroes.”

This year’s Student Design and Construction Team includes the following students, listed by their hometowns:

Alexandria: Timothy Mathews
Bossier City: Daniel Dumas
Boothville: Kierilyn Smith
Ruston: Michael Davis, Jed Walpole
Shreveport: Chase Johnson
Springfield: David Hoover
St. Francisville: Rosa Schellinger
Weston: Ethan Robison
West Monroe: Emily Greene, Ashton Russell
Zachary: Delaney Baker
Columbus, Georgia: Hunter Bradshaw
Detroit, Michigan: Daniel Campbell
Lindale, Texas: Lane Walters
White Oak, Texas: Sam Crossland
Sanaa, Yemen: Sulaiman Yousef
Chengdu, China: Molang Chang
MedCamps of Louisiana is a non-profit organization that provides a series of one week, fun filled camps each summer for children in Louisiana facing the challenges of a variety of physical and mental disabilities. These camps are offered completely free of charge and provide campers with an opportunity to participate in traditional camping activities such as canoeing, fishing, swimming, horseback riding, and much more in a modified setting to meet the needs of every camper.

Each camping session is held at Camp Alabama in Sibley, which is a property of the Presbytery of the Pines. The canoe launch will accommodate all boating activities for the campers who attend MedCamps of Louisiana and guests of the Presbytery of the Pines.
13 2016-04-14
Monroe

La. Tech English instructor publishes first book of poetry


RUSTON, La. (News Release- La. Tech) - Dr. Philip Estes, an instructor of English in the School of Language and Literature at Louisiana Tech University, has just had his first full-length book of poems, “High Life,“ published by Horse Less Press.

Poet and translator Johannes Goransson, an assistant professor of English at Notre Dame, said, “’I am on dead songbird patrol…’ Phil Estes’s poems start out as slacker jokes but then they go wrong. Sometimes they go so wrong that they become frightening and politically charged or become beautiful meditations on art. Or do both at the same time. ‘Mmm-hmm’ has never sounded as prophetic and poetic as in these snippets from a scary-funny middle America. Let’s call him the Mallarme of the Strip Mall.”

Estes, an Ohio native, who received his Ph. D. in poetry from Oklahoma State University, has also been invited to read from his new work by Living Arts, a community arts center in Tulsa, and by Kansas City Art Institute in Kansas City, Missouri. A local reading is being planned for Ruston in April. Estes' poems have appeared in three chapbooks and in poetry journals including “Action Yes,” “Hayden's Ferry Review” and “Willow Springs.”
13 2016-04-13
Monroe

La. Tech hosts inaugural ‘Maker Month’ to celebrate makers, creativity


RUSTON – The Innovation Enterprise at Louisiana Tech University is proud to announce its inaugural “Maker Month” – a celebration of all things made and to showcase through exhibitions, competitions and galleries what students, faculty and regional entrepreneurs have created.

Visitors to Maker Month events, which take place April 14 through May 18, will enjoy interacting with the innovators and learning how they create as much as seeing the results of their creations. This packed calendar of events features work from a number of diverse fields including arts, sciences, architecture, engineering and business. Most innovations are interdisciplinary in nature and range from engineered products to business pitches, software and showcases of design and aesthetic sensibility.

“Some of these products will no doubt soon become part of thriving business enterprises in our region”, said Dr. Dave Norris, chief innovation officer at Louisiana Tech. “Visitors will be inspired be the work of people actually making real tangible products for artistic or commercial purposes or even just to show that they can do it.”

Louisiana Tech and its regional partners are actively engaged in creating unique products and innovations with artistic merit, technical and scientific sophistication, and potential commercial value.

“Maker Month recognizes the shared culture of creativity and making things across our campus and our region”, said Kyle Prather, director of The Thingery, Louisiana Tech’s maker space. “This type of cross-disciplinary culture helps to support a thriving innovative and creative culture on campus and throughout our region.”

The calendar of events will kick-off with the New Frontiers Digital Painting gallery opening on April 14 – a premier exhibition event in north Louisiana featuring leading-edge digital painting technology for medical illustrations. Other Maker Month events include two Engineering Design Expos with over 100 industry sponsors, the Game App Launch and the first-ever Thingery One Day Build.

Maker Month is a product of Louisiana Tech’s Innovation Enterprise – a hotbed of ideas, entrepreneurship, creativity and new business opportunities created through collaborations involving students, faculty, and our business partners with unlimited market applications from biomedical to alternative energy, consumer products, and beyond. A vibrant culture of entrepreneurship and innovation at Louisiana Tech and in the surrounding region, the Innovation Enterprise has resulted in a burst of new inventions, startup companies, and business partnerships.

A complete calendar of events for Maker Month is available at www.latechinnovation.org/makermonth. All members of the campus and local community are welcome and encouraged to attend month-long celebration. For more information, please contact Kyle Prather at kprather@latech.edu.
13 2016-04-13
Ruston

› home › PEACH FEST UNVEILS 2016 DESIGNS


Louisiana Tech University graphic design major Patrick Ferrell is the winner of the 2016 Louisiana Peach Festival poster and t-shirt design contest.

Twenty-three poster designs and 17 T-shirt designs were submitted. This year’s t-shirt design will also serve as the 2016 logo.

Ferrell will be presented two $500 prizes from the Louisiana Peach Festival.

Posters and t-shirts will be available for purchase soon at the Chamber office, online at www.louisianapeachfestival.org and various locations throughout Ruston.

The first print, autographed poster will be sold to the highest bidder at an event in early June.

The 66th Annual Louisiana Peach Festival will be held June 24-25 and is produced by the Ruston Lincoln Chamber of Commerce.
13 2016-04-13
Ruston

LOCAL STUDENT WINS AWARD


When Caroline Hymel, a graduate student in history at Louisiana Tech University, began her journey in Ruston, she never thought she would be walking away with the coveted Louisiana Historical Association’s Rankin Prize.

Completing her undergraduate work in just two years, with a bachelor’s degree in history with a minor in English, she decided to extend her time at Tech and complete the master’s program in history.

“I am from New Orleans, and this is my fourth year at Tech,” she said. “I’m a graduate student working on my thesis.”
13 2016-04-12
Alexandria

Louisiana Tech's urban concept cars take to Detroit streets in fuel-efficiency test


More than a dozen engineering students from Louisiana Tech University in Ruston have built two vehicles to compete in this year’s Shell Eco-marathon Americas competition in Detroit next week. One vehicle is a diesel. The other runs on compressed natural gas.


Louisiana Tech mechanical engineering junior Timothy Parker of Mandeville, La., helps to put the finishing touches on a compressed natural gas vehicle that will compete in the urban concept category.
CREDIT MICHAEL SWANBOM
Michael Swanbom, a senior lecturer of mechanical engineering, is advising the students in the eighth year Louisiana Tech has entered this global competition for ultra-high energy vehicles. Swanbom says Tech’s entries are getting their bodywork done now.

“We call it the character building phase at the point when a lot of the body work is being done on these vehicles. Our team wants to make really good looking vehicles. That takes a lot of elbow grease to make them look that way,” Swanbom said.

Swanbom predicts the diesel vehicle could break a Louisiana Tech record and exceed 500 miles per gallon. Timothy Parker, a junior mechanical engineering major and a team lead, says he volunteers more than 40 hours a week on this project.

“It’s a lot of fun and I like getting my hands on things and really getting to work with the concepts I learn in class, and apply them in a way that I can actually see the fruits of my labor, so to speak,” Parker said, who started working on Tech’s entries his freshman year and hopes to one day be an engine researcher for an automobile maker.

More than 1,200 high school and university students from across the Americas will compete in Detroit. Swanbom says this is a one-of-a-kind learning experience and it’s become a centerpiece of Louisiana Tech’s engineering program.


Louisiana Tech's urban concept vehicles top out at 300 pounds. Mechanical engineering student Timothy Parker works inside Louisiana Tech's compressed natural vehicle entry.
CREDIT MICHAEL SWANBOM
“We’re trying to get students to really have a feel for what it means to save energy with respect to transportation. That’s an experience that would be really hard or impossible to get any other way in an educational setting,” Swanbom said.

Last year, Tech’s team received the fuel-efficiency award for a diesel. Ruston High School is entering its fourth year of competition and the two teams will caravan to Detroit with their vehicles on Tuesday, April 19. The Shell Eco-marathon Americas is set for April 22 – 24 in downtown Detroit in the 10th year of competition.
13 2016-04-12
Ruston

LOUISIANA TECH PROGRAM NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED


An independent college review journal ranked Louisiana Tech University’s online masters in healthcare informatics degree program No. 20 in the top programs in the nation.

Best College Review based their selections on factors including scheduling, flexibility, affordability and academic reputation.

Angela Kennedy, head of and professor in the department of health informatics and information management, said the graduates and programs are successful because faculty and staff are committed to providing excellence in every education experience.
13 2016-04-11
Monroe

Louisiana Tech engineering students recognized with award for ‘green’ research


RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech) - Renata Minullina and Abhishek Panchal, biomedical engineering graduate students from Louisiana Tech University and the Institute for Micromanufacturing (IfM), have won the prestigious Poster Presentation Award at the Polymer Materials Science and Engineering Division of the 251st National American Chemical Society (ACS) Meeting held recently in San Diego, California.

Minullina and Panchal’s poster titled, “Oil spill remediation through halloysite Pickering emulsification with enhanced bacterial decomposition” was selected from more than 230 presented posters at the polymeric composites section of the meeting. The poster won out over a general field of competition with teams representing institutions from around the world including China, Japan, Germany, United Kingdom and France.

“To be recognized among hundreds of other posters at the national meeting is a big deal for us,” said Minullina. “It indicates that we work on the hot problem which requires immediate solution.” Panchal adds, “The poster award means that our research is getting appreciated on the national level and that the work we are doing is needed by this country. This motivates us to work more intensively on providing an elegant and efficientsolution to the problem of oil spill remediation.”

Minullina and Panchal’s award-winning poster, which was developed as part of a team led by Dr. Yuri Lvov, professor of chemistry and nanosystems engineering in Louisiana Tech’s College of Engineering and Science and Institute for Micromanufacturing, is devoted to the group’s research on the bio-decomposition of spill oil using nanoclay emulsifiers rather than environmentally harmful detergents.

“At Louisiana Tech, we are developing environmentally friendly alternative methods of oil emulsification based on halloysite clay nanotubes, synergistically combining better emulsification and enhanced bio-decomposition based on loading these nanotubes with ‘taste enhancers’ for bacteria,” says Lvov. “As a result of our work, we recently received funding from the Gulf of Mexico Research Program (together with Tulane University) based on our pioneering usage of the clay nanotubes as tiny containers for loading and sustained release of chemical inhibitors, and bioactive compounds including proteins, DNA and drugs.”

The explosion on the Deepwater Horizon oil well drilling platform in April 2010 resulted in the largest marine oil spill in United States history, releasing millions of barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. To prevent the spreading of the oil to coastal areas and to restrict it underwater, a surfactant called Corexit was applied from airplanes. Approximately 1.8 million gallons of this surfactant was used, however, its toxic effect on marine life and oil-degrading bacteria was later discovered.

Lvov says that halloysite was pioneered at Louisiana Tech and, contrary to the more common carbon nanotubes, is biocompatible and available in mass quantities. Since the introduction of halloysite for composite materials in 2002, Lvov’s research group has published 57 papers on the clay nanotubes making Louisiana Tech the world leader in this promising “green” natural nanomaterial.

“In the future, I hope that our efforts will lead to the employment of a unique material like halloysite clay nanotubes in an efficient, economical and most important, eco-friendly technology to combat oil spills,” Panchal said.

Minullina agrees and hopes one day the approach of using natural environmentally-friendly nanomaterials such as halloysite nanotubes she and her colleagues are developing at Louisiana Tech will be widely used in the field to fight oil spills and help microorganisms degrade oil more efficiently.
13 2016-04-11
Regional/National

Steeling the Spotlight: Engineering students compete in steel, concrete design challenges


Engineering students from Texas and Mexico met Thursday through Saturday at the Texas-Mexico Regional American Society of Civil Engineers Student Symposium and competed to see which engineering designs would withstand rigorous testing and come out on top.

Eva Schexnider, a sophomore civil engineering major from Houston, said the Texas Tech ASCE chapter has been preparing to host the symposium for a year and a half.

“I have a huge committee that helps me do everything, and it wouldn’t be possible without them,” she said.

Twenty universities from Texas and Mexico attended the symposium, Schexnider said, as well as Louisiana Tech because its competition was flooded out.

Students had the opportunity to compete in five different competitions, including steel bridge, concrete canoe, concrete bowling, concrete Frisbee and a mystery design competition.

“This is the first year we’ve ever combined steel bridge and concrete canoe into one competition and conference for networking and promoting professionalism,” she said.

Professionals who are influential in civil engineering judged the competitions, Schexnider said, and the committee tried to get alumni from all the competing universities to make the judging fair.

In the mystery design competition, teams had to make a structure out of notecards, paperclips and tape, she said, and it had to hold an eight-pound steel textbook.

The steel bridge competition took place from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Thursday in the United Supermarkets Arena, and the competing teams had to build their bridges in less than 45 minutes before it could be judged and tested.

Michael Nichols, a junior civil engineering major from El Paso and co-captain of Tech’s steel bridge team, said it took the team a month to design the bridge and five months to build it.

“The bridges are judged over several different categories, one being deflection —how much weight it can take and how much it moves — and the second being lightness, how light the bridge is,” he said. “Those two factor for structural efficiency and economic status — how much it would cost to build if you were actually building it in real life.”

The judges determined the bridge’s deflection by pulling weights on one side of the bridge as well as having the team try to load its bridge with 2,500 pounds on its base.

Many of the other schools’ bridges were simple in design, and Nichols said he was happy his team was able to set one of the fastest building times while having a more complicated bridge.

“Everyone complimented us so much on how professional (the bridge) looked,” he said. “That really says something about Texas Tech’s fabrication quality and its standards.”

The Tech team was able to load the first 1,000 pounds onto the bridge without it deflecting, Nichols said, but it started to lean to the right as the students continued to load weight on it and the upper arches eventually bent.

Many of the bridges in the competition failed under the weight of the deflection tests, and some teams did not get to fully test their bridges because the structures failed before the final deflection test.

Texas A&M placed first in the steel bridge competition and Southern Methodist University took second.

“This year was probably the best representation of Tech over the last couple of years,” he said. “We had a really strong team this year, a really strong bridge and a good design.”

The concrete bowling competition took place from 1 to 5 p.m. Friday outside the USA, and the teams had to test the bowling balls they had designed from concrete.

The concrete Frisbee competition took place from 9 to 11:30 a.m. at Buffalo Springs Lake while races for the concrete canoe competition were going on.

Elaine Hung, an environmental engineering graduate student from Austin and co-captain of the Tech concrete canoe team, said the team started thinking of canoe designs in September.

“It’s not that difficult to build a canoe out of concrete,” she said. “I think it’s the details that count. We also wanted a canoe that’s under 200 pounds, and our estimated weight is 195 pounds, so our canoe is lighter than all the other canoes here. All these little specifications that we’re making does make building a concrete canoe relatively difficult.”

The canoe teams are judged on four different categories, including a design paper, speech, product display and five races, Hung said, all of which are weighted equally.

The team had practiced paddling its canoe before the competition, she said, and the students had to compete in a men’s sprint, women’s sprint, co-ed sprint, men’s endurance and women’s endurance race.

“Everyone seemed to really love our canoe, even all the judges,” Hung said. “I feel like there’s always room for improvement, there are always ways to be more innovative. I think given the circumstances, we did the best we could’ve.”

The canoe teams chose names for their boats, and the Tech team’s boat was named Jenny to go along with a “Forrest Gump” theme.

Tech placed second in concrete canoe, trailing the University of Texas at Austin that took the top spot.

Many of the attendees enjoyed the symposium, Schexnider said, and Tech will be the standard for future competitions.

“I’ve gotten a lot of good feedback saying how much fun it is,” she said. “We get to be the trailblazer for hosting this competition.”

The symposium will be hosted at the University of Texas El Paso next year and at Texas A&M the year after, she said, and Tech plans to compete in both of those competitions.

The rules for the competitions change slightly every year, Schexnider said, and students usually start preparing for the competition as soon as the new rules are released in the fall.

Engineering competitions benefit the students, she said, because they teach valuable real-world skills.

“It helps them learn how to plan, time manage, work together as a team to meet deadlines,” she said. “Just like in the real world, you’ll have a team and if you don’t always get along you’ll have to learn how to work through that.”
13 2016-04-07
Monroe

Tech students present at national conference


RUSTON – Two graduate students and four undergraduate English majors at Louisiana Tech University represented the Tech Rho Gamma Chapter of Sigma Tau Delta and presented their scholarship for the Sigma Tau Delta International Conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Their papers were selected from many submissions from chapters of the English honorary society from across the country.

Graduate students and their presentations were Alana Crump, “Women Writers in A Room of One’s Own” and Rachel Burroughs, “Point of No Return.”

Undergraduates presenting were Hannah Gissendanner, “Sexual Perversion and the Home in McTeague;” Amber Jurgensen, “Nobility and Identity in She Stoops to Conquer;” Dawson Shannon, “Courtly Love and Marriage;” and Taylor Parker, “Do as Men Do: Women at ‘Home’ in Shakespeare.”

Parker’s paper on Shakespeare won second place in "The Bard Award," an award category for Shakespeare papers created this year to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death. She will also present her paper during the 10th Annual Shakespeare Festival hosted by the Rho Gamma Chapter of Sigma Tau Delta on Wednesday, April 20 in the George T. Madison Hall Shakespeare Garden in the courtyard.

Nicole DeFee and Scott Levin serve as co-advisers for the honor society.

"The six students who presented at the conference this year represent some of the best of what not only our English department has to offer, but also what Louisiana Tech University as a whole has to offer,” said DeFee, who accompanied them to the conference. “These papers illustrate the hard work and dedication of these students. Their presentations were professional and their work illustrates what's to come for the next generation of scholarship. While I know the students were proud and honored to be there, the honor was also mine to have been a part of this conference with them."

Jurgensen, who had served as the Southern Region Student Representative for the national fraternity, ended her tenure in the position. She also received an award for creating the Louisiana Tech chapter’s display board showing chapter activities and projects. The board competition raised funds for a library for the Ruth House, a shelter

13 2016-04-07
Ruston

Tech student enjoys Ruston, publishes books


A California native attending Louisiana Tech University said he likes living in Ruston just as much as he did living in California.

Zeppy Cheng, a sophomore at Tech, came to Ruston specifically to attend the university.

“I was enamored with their engineering program — until I hit the road block of the sophomore trio of Circuits, Statics and Thermodynamics,” he said. “Those monster classes gave me the heads-up that I was in the wrong field, and now I’m working on a psychology degree.”

Since changing majors, Cheng has realized another passion of his — writing.


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13 2016-04-06
Monroe

La. Tech physics, computer science student earns coveted NASA fellowship


RUSTON – Darrian Mills, a freshman student in physics and computer science at Louisiana Tech University, has earned a prestigious Minority Research Scholars fellowship with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

Mills, who is from Greenwood, Louisiana, earned the fellowship through the Louisiana Space Consortium for his research with Dr. Chester Wilson, associate professor of electrical engineering and nanosystems engineering at Louisiana Tech, and Dr. William Clower, post doctoral researcher at Louisiana Tech. The NASA fellowship offers an opportunity for Mills to continue his work with Wilson and Clower to develop an inexpensive new nanostructured material that is made from carbon and metal and can be used for radar imagery to monitor spaceships.

Wilson says Mills is working to characterize graphene flakes made by a proprietary process developed at Louisiana Tech. “Graphene is as conductive as copper, but is only one fifth the weight,” says Wilson. “Regular graphene is about $2,000 a gram, but ours can be made for hundreds of dollars a pound. We are developing this material that can be used as an additive in plastics to make it conductive.

“NASA and the U.S. Air Force want composite conductive plastics, for small lightweight spacecraft, to make communication systems that survive in solar flares and electromagnetic pulses made from space detonated nuclear weapons.”

Mills credits the collaborative environment available to him through Wilson’s research group with providing him with the support and resources to perform top-notch research and the opportunity to obtain the fellowship.

“Dr. Wilson has been helpful and supportive ever since I connected with his group,” Mills said. “He presented me with this opportunity, and I took it. His experience and understanding of these awards greatly facilitated the process for me.”

Wilson says that the collaborative environment at Louisiana Tech helps students earn such coveted awards.

“This award is representative of what youth from north Louisiana are able to achieve with a good education and mentoring systems like we have at Louisiana Tech, which provides them opportunities to better themselves,” Wilson said.

The NASA fellowship, which began April 1 and lasts for one year, is generally awarded to seniors. Mills, however, was able to distinguish himself as a freshman with a 3.9 grade point average in the double major of physics and computer science, and his strong work ethic as well as his research in developing the new nanostructured material.
13 2016-04-05
Monroe

Louisiana Tech fine arts, biosciences faculty join forces to highlight student creativity


Students in Nick Bustamante’s ART 320 Painting class at Louisiana Tech University are using their artistic talents in digital design to promote biological sciences and biomedical engineering through Louisiana Tech’s New Frontiers in Biomedical Research lecture series.

The interdisciplinary collaboration between faculty from Louisiana Tech’s College of Applied and Natural Sciences, College of Engineering and Science, and College of Liberal Arts is offering students real world experience in working with a client to design and illustrate brochure covers and note cards for the 2016-2017 lecture series. This unique learning experience for the students was made possible through the purchase of tablets by a generous Louisiana Tech alumnus and benefactor.

“Through this class, students are learning the value of digital art as a visual means of communication and its role in scientific research,” said Bustamante, who is an associate professor of studio art at Louisiana Tech. “Students are also developing important skill sets that can be applied to a variety of professions and gain the real world experience of working with a client.”

Bustamante worked with Dr. Jamie Newman, the Scott Weathersby Endowed Professor in Zoology and Premedicine and an assistant professor in biological sciences, and Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, to help students create original cover art and imagery to be used in program advertising and gift presentations to the guest speakers. Newman and Caldorera-Moore are the co-organizers of the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research lecture series that has grown into one of Louisiana Tech’s premier interdisciplinary programs. The collaboration between the sciences and arts began when Newman and Caldorera-Moore were looking for an artist to create some visuals for a book chapter. From there the collaboration grew with Bustamante designing the 2015-2016 New Frontiers lecture series.

“From our initial meetings on the illustrations for the book chapter, Jamie, Nick and I kept coming back to the idea of having a scientific illustration class,” said Caldorera-Moore. “It’s exciting to see our vision becoming a reality and to see how much the students are enjoying and benefiting from the class.”

“When we went to class the first day Dr. Caldorera-Moore and I were as nervous if not more nervous than the students,” added Newman. “They continue to impress us with their willingness to take on and rise to this new challenge. We can’t wait to show off what Mr. Bustamante has taught them and what they have created for the brochure cover.”

The work created by the students in the class will be displayed in a public art exhibition from 6-8 p.m. April 14 at the Louisiana Tech Enterprise Center. The exhibition is free to attend and open to the campus and local communities. There will also be an auction of the top pieces with proceeds going toward supporting the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminar series and continued interdisciplinary collaborations at Louisiana Tech.

Following the opening night of the exhibit, fifth and sixth graders from select Lincoln Parish schools will also visit the exhibition on April 18, as part of the ACDC Art Outreach Program. The students in this program come to the Louisiana Tech campus once a month throughout the academic year to see the art exhibits in the gallery and create art projects designed to complement the art work they are viewing as well as their fine art educations.

“The seminar series has grown to something I could never have imagined when I started it four years ago,” Newman said. “The interdisciplinary nature of the speakers, the faculty and students who participate and this collaboration with the art department is what a university is all about.

“Exposing faculty and students to new ways of thinking and communicating is what we are all here to do and I could not be prouder to be a part of all of this.”
13 2016-04-04
Ruston

Louisiana Tech Honors Longtime Team Physician and Notable Orthopedist Dr. Bundrick


RUSTON, La. - There was a touchdown at Joe Aillet Stadium Saturday, followed by a celebration. But it didn’t involve football and was organized by NBA Hall of Fame member Karl Malone.

Louisiana Tech University proclaimed Saturday to be Dr. William S. Bundrick Day and honored the long-time LA Tech team physician with a celebration in his honor.

The touchdown? Bundrick traveled to Ruston from his hometown Shreveport by helicopter courtesy Pafford Air One with the helicopter landing in the C Lot around Joe Aillet Stadium.

The Club Level of the Davison Athletics Complex was packed with what can only be described as a living history of Louisiana Tech Athletics as just a small fraction of the lives that Dr. Bundrick has touched were on hand to honor a living legend.

Malone, the Master of Ceremonies and main organizer for the event, said the event was years in the making and vastly overdue. He had a bust made of Dr. Bundrick that will be installed outside the Joe Aillet Field House and Dr. William Bundrick Sports Medicine Training Room.

Dr. Bundrick has been affiliated with Louisiana Tech Athletics as the team doctor for over 46 years. Former Louisiana Tech head coach Pat Collins asked him to fill in when the previous team doctor could no longer serve in that capacity.

“Like he would do tens of thousands of times in his life, Dr. B said ‘Yes I will,’” Malone said.

A Louisiana Tech graduate, Bundrick was originally recruited by legendary football coach Bear Bryant to Texas A&M and spent his freshman year in College Station.

“The great state of Texas called him away but he quickly returned to the Promise Land of Louisiana,” said Dr. Edward “Eddie” Anglin, one of three main presenters at Saturday’s ceremony.





Dr. Bundrick went on to letter in football the next three years at Louisiana Tech, serving as team captain and leading the Bulldogs to a 9-1 record in his senior year of 1959. He would eventually work his way through medical school, set up his practice in Shreveport, began serving as LA Tech’s team doctor after Coach Pat Collins’ plea and the rest is history.

Since then, he has had a positive impact on countless student-athletes, coaches, administrators and alumni of Louisiana Tech.

“Dr. B gave me the best advice I ever could have received as a young man,” Louisiana Tech assistant athletics director for character education Ed Jackson recalled. “He told me, ‘Remember this – never let your present affect your future.’ That advice has stuck with me to this very day.

Former Louisiana Tech athletics director Jim Oakes called Dr. Bundrick, “one of the most outstanding mentors in my life.”

“His loyalty to Louisiana Tech has been unparalleled. He truly is one of Tech’s greatest unsung heroes,” Oakes added.

Malone emphasized the positive influence that Dr. Bundrick has had on his life and how much of a close friend the orthopedist is.

“Every year before the start of the [NBA] season, I would come home to visit my mother,” Malone said. “But it wasn’t right unless I flew into Shreveport and spent two nights at Dr. B’s house.”

LA Tech athletics director Tommy McClelland pointed out the numerous professional athletes that Dr. Bundrick had an impact on such as former Bulldog greats Malone, Paul Millsap, Tim Rattay, Terry Bradshaw, Fred Dean, Willie Roaf and more.

Dr. Les Guice, President of Louisiana Tech University, recalled Dr. Bundrick’s work with the athletic teams when he was a student at Louisiana Tech.

Following a standing ovation after the unveiling of Dr. Bundrick’s bust, the longtime team doctor was at a loss for words.

“Now I know why I left Texas A&M,” Dr. Bundrick quipped.

He will begin his 47th year as the Bulldogs’ team physician when Louisiana Tech opens the 2016 season at Arkansas on Sept. 3 in Fayetteville, Arkansas.

For complete coverage of Bulldog Athletics, please follow Louisiana Tech on social media at @LATechSports (Twitter), /LATechAthletics (Facebook) and @LATechSports (Instagram) or visit the official home of Louisiana Tech Athletics at LATechSports.com.
13 2016-03-31
Monroe

Air Force Concert Band, Singing Sergeants April 10


Louisiana Tech University’s School of the Performing Arts and The Ruston Daily Leader present the United States Air Force Concert Band and Singing Sergeants in concert at 3 p.m. April 10 in Howard Auditorium on the Louisiana Tech campus.

Howard Auditorium is in the School of the Performing Arts on the northwest corner of Dan Reneau Drive and Arizona Boulevard in Ruston.

This is a general admission event with no reserved seating and no reserved tickets. Ticket holders will be seated on a first-come, first-served basis 30 minutes prior to performance. Non-ticket holders will be seated 15 minutes prior to performance.

Tickets are free and available at the Tech Box Office at the School of the Performing Arts, 1:30-4:45 p.m., Monday-Friday or The Ruston Daily Leader, 212 West Park Ave., 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday.

Please limit five tickets per person.
13 2016-03-31
Ruston

TECH’S WINTER QUARTER HONORS STUDENTS ANNOUNCED


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TECH’S WINTER QUARTER HONORS STUDENTS ANNOUNCED
Submitted by Ruston Leader on Wed, 03/30/2016 - 9:13am
in News
Leader News Service
Louisiana Tech University has announced the names of students who have earned a place on the president’s and dean’s honor lists for the winter quarter.

Students whose names are followed by an asterisk earned recognition as members of the president’s honor list.

That distinction signifies achievement of at least a 3.8 academic grade point average on a minimum of nine semester hours completed (100-level or higher), with no grade lower than a B.
13 2016-03-30
Monroe

Guice appreciates section on universities’ research


Research and the Innovation Enterprise at Louisiana Tech University are key components of our institution’s mission and the contributions our faculty and students are making to the state’s growth and competitiveness. Reaching far beyond the classrooms and laboratories are the innovative ideas that are born from the collaborations of people from different academic disciplines who are creating new products, services, and opportunities for citizens and communities across the state and the nation.

In highlighting the important and highly-productive work being done by researchers at Louisiana’s universities, I want to express my sincere appreciation to the News-Star for Sunday’s “Behind those laboratory walls, a fascinating world awaits” special section on research taking place at north Louisiana’s public universities. Louisiana Tech has worked for years to create a national-quality infrastructure to support research, innovation and economic development that produces new growth opportunities throughout our state.

Through engagement in research and an entrepreneurial approach to the college experience, Louisiana Tech is producing highly prepared and highly qualified graduates who are ready to serve as leaders and make positive impacts in every community in our region. We are grateful to the News-Star for showcasing our research successes and sharing the impacts of these efforts with their readers. It’s encouraging to our faculty and students to see their efforts are being recognized and supported by those in our community.

The opportunity to highlight research and innovation strengths is important to helping the citizens of Louisiana better understand the scope and depth of the contributions that higher education institutions are making to our state.

Dr. Les Guice

President

Louisiana Tech University
13 2016-03-30
Shreveport

La. Tech student wins Rankin Prize


Louisiana Tech University history graduate student Caroline Hymel was honored recently at Louisiana Historical Association's annual meeting in Baton Rouge.

Hymel is from Kenner. She earned the prestigious Rankin Prize award, which is presented each year to the author of the best research paper by a graduate student written on a Louisiana history topic. The award is named after legendary Tulane University history professor Hugh F. Rankin (1913-1989).

Titled “Summer of Purpose' Protests to the ‘Partial Birth’ Ban: Tracing the Shifting Tactics in Louisiana’s Abortion Wars, 1973-2001,” the winning paper is part of Hymel’s ongoing master’s thesis project. While at the annual meeting held in Baton Rouge, she presented another paper from her thesis research on a panel devoted to women’s issues in recent Louisiana history.

According to Jeffery Hankins, history department coordinator at Louisiana Tech, Hymel’s award is evidence of the quality of student research in Tech’s history graduate program.

“It reflects not only the quality of students enrolled, but also the rigorous training our faculty provides,” Hankins said. “We are particularly proud of Caroline’s achievement because it’s the first Rankin award for a Louisiana Tech student since the competition began in 1991.”

According to Hankins, previous winners have come not only from such major statewide centers as LSU and Tulane, but also from as far away as Harvard, the University of Michigan and the University of Paris in France.

“It takes hard work and dedication to be competitive in that kind of field,” Hankins said.

La. Tech Associate Professor of History V. Elaine Thompson agreed with Hankins on the importance of Hymel’s LHA recognition.

“We are so proud to call Caroline one of our own,” she said, remarking that winning papers are solicited for publication in the association’s quarterly journal, Louisiana History.

Thompson, who herself received the Rankin Prize while a graduate student at Rice University, emphasized that Hymel is not only an accomplished scholar, but also a campus leader and an active member of Louisiana Tech’s multiple-award winning chapter of Phi Alpha Theta history honor society. Phi Alpha Theta itself was well represented at Baton Rouge, where it conducted its own annual regional conference in conjunction with the LHA meeting.

Presenting their own work on Phi Alpha Theta-sponsored panels were three other Louisiana Tech graduate students. Kevin W. Adkins of Farmerville shared results of his continuing project on “The 31st Louisiana Infantry Regiment at Milliken’s Bend and Chickasaw Bayou during the American Civil War.”

Also presenting was William A. Butterfield of Ruston who spoke on “The Myth of Popular Support for Secession in Louisiana.” Finally, Matthew Franszczak of Slidell addressed the problem of “The Caddo Indians of Louisiana and the Treaty of 1835.”

13 2016-03-29
Monroe

Louisiana Tech theatre department announces cast for ‘Love's Labour's Lost'


RUSTON, La. (LaTech Press Release) --

Louisiana Tech University’s Department of Theatre is proud to announce the cast for its production of William Shakespeare’s “Love’s Labour’s Lost” which is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. April 26-30, and 2:00 p.m. on May 1 in Stone Theatre at Louisiana Tech’s Howard Center for the Performing Arts.

“Love’s Labour’s Lost,” a steampunk-inspired production of Shakespeare’s wittiest and most intelligent play, is directed by Paul B. Crook, associate professor of theatre in Louisiana Tech’s School of the Performing Arts, and is the theatre department’s final production of the 2015-2016 season.

The cast for “Love’s Labour’s Lost” is as follows:

- Liam McIntyre (Shreveport, Louisiana) as King Ferdinand

- Ashley Davis (Covington, Louisiana) as Princess of France

- Johnny Marley (Bossier City, Louisiana) as Berowne

- Courtney Theodos (Shreveport, Louisiana) as Rosaline

- Collin Cagle (Covington, Louisiana) as Dumaine

- Amy Maroney (Jenks, Oklahoma) as Katherine

- Nick Reeve (Ruston, Louisiana) as Longaville

- Maggie McAdams (Henderson, Texas) as Maria

- Zachary Bentley (Ruston, Louisiana) as Boyet

- Cameron Harmeyer (Covington, Louisiana) as Don Armado

- Emilia Meinert (El Dorado, Arkansas) as Moth

- Austin Harrison (Mandeville, Louisiana) as Holofernes

- Jessica Cashion (Fairview, Tennessee) as Dull

- Matthew Gieseke (Shreveport, Louisiana) as Costard

- Millie Omps (Slanesville, West Virginia) as Jaquenetta

- Emilija Gacic (Belgrade, Serbia) as Lord/Forester/Marcade

In “Love’s Labor’s Lost,” King Ferdinand of Navarre has convinced his lords to swear an oath to scholarship, and in the process, forego the company of women for three years. The Princess of France, along with her ladies, soon arrives at Ferdinand’s court on a political visit, only to be barred admittance and required to make camp outside of the court. Naturally, all of the Lords (and the King himself) immediately begin to struggle with their oaths as they fall in love with the Princess and her ladies.

For more information on the audition, this production or the Louisiana Tech Department of Theatre, please call 318-257-2930 or visit www.latechuniversitytheatre.com. You can also “Like” our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/latechtheatre or follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @LaTechTheatre.
13 2016-03-28
Monroe

Tech holds the patent for concrete on steroids


It looks and feels like any other concrete.

The same shade of gray, the same texture, the same weight.

It does the job of concrete. But this is concrete on steroids, stronger and more durable.

And Louisiana Tech University holds the patent. A Tech professor has a licensing agreement with the university to operate a business, Alchemy Geopolymer Systems, as a consultant marketing the technology.


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Carlos Montes, research assistant professor, was a graduate student working on his doctorate when he collaborated with his professor, Erez Allouche, then an associate professor of civil engineering at Tech, in creating a first-of-its-kind, pure geopolymer concrete material he says is superior in every respect to traditional high-quality concrete, particularly in extreme environments.

And the concrete’s primary substance is fly ash, the material left after burning coal at plants.

Montes got into the concrete game almost by accident. A Mexico native, he intended to pursue a master’s degree in theoretical physics. “But on the first day on campus, I learned about a scholarship for students interested in the study of concrete.”

Montes was interested in ecological materials and applied for the scholarship. After earning his master’s, he was recruited by Allouche, who now lives in Sacramento, California, to pursue his doctorate under him at Louisiana Tech.

The research team started work on developing a high-tech concrete that accomplished two goals:

• Significantly improve upon traditional Portland cement.

• Make the product more environmentally friendly.

The team worked at Tech’s Trenchless Technology Center to develop a geopolymer concrete.

Carlos Montes, a research assistant professor at LouisianaBuy Photo
Carlos Montes, a research assistant professor at Louisiana Tech University, holds a sample of the geopolymer concrete he helped develop. (Photo: Mark Henderson/The News-Star)
“It’s a revolutionary concept in concrete material. There’s not one gram of traditional Portland cement,” Montes said.

The process starts with the fly ash, a rich source of aluminum and silicon. It is, by nature, pozzolanic, which means in finely divided form and in the presence of an alkali, it reacts chemically with calcium hydroxide at ordinary temperature to form compounds possessing cementitious properties.

The end result is a concrete that contains no water. That makes the concrete extremely versatile.

In comparison to ordinary Portland cement, geopolymer concrete features greater corrosion resistance, substantially higher fire resistance (up to 2400° F), high compressive and tensile strengths, a rapid strength gain and lower shrinkage.

When Allouche presented the geopolymer concrete at the Detroit Science Center originally in 2010, his goal was to get the new technology in front of the public.

A 7-foot steel-reinforced geopolymer concrete beam
A 7-foot steel-reinforced geopolymer concrete beam undergoes structural testing. (Photo: Louisiana Tech University)
“If the public is aware that there are more sustainable ways to construct our highways and bridges, it will expect its government agencies to explore and promote these ‘greener’ technologies,” he said.

“This sort of political pressure is essential for new materials, such as geopolymer concretes, to overcome the multitude of bureaucratic barriers that exist between the laboratory and the construction site.”

“Geopolymer concrete technology is here to stay,” Allouche said. “We expect to see a growing number of commercial applications of this green and innovative technology across the construction industry, with applications in the area of transportation infrastructure leading the way.”

Montes said the first commercial use of geopolymer concrete was sewer pipes. “We went for specialty uses,” he said.

The product originally faced resistance. Montes said there was still some fear in the wake of a catastrophe in 2008.

A dike failed at the Tennessee Valley Authority’s Kingston Fossil Plant, when 5.4 million cubic yards of coal ash cascaded into the Emory and Clinch rivers and smothered about 300 acres of land.

The breach released a slow-moving wave of toxic sludge and polluted water into the river in what remains the nation’s largest coal-ash spill in history. It snapped trees as if they were twigs and knocked homes off their foundations. It destroyed three houses and damaged dozens of others. There were no injuries.

Montes said it’s also been difficult to convince engineers to build without the concrete they know. Times are changing.

• NASA is using the product at its rocket test sites. Because the concrete has no water, it holds up better to the high heat of rocket engines. Traditional concrete tends to explode under extreme heat.

• Corrosive materials don’t seap into the concrete. Paper mills are beginning to use the concrete for flooring. Caustic spills sit atop the concrete, making it easier to clean up.

• The material is being used in coastal restoration. The geopolymer concrete is laid underneath sand, and because it resists corrosion, holds up to the long exposure to salt air.

• Montes said his company is preparing to build a demonstration house using the concrete for its foundation.

But Montes is fast to point out the environmental benefits.

Louisiana is one of only five states in the U.S. that does not have an ‘in-house’ cement industry — all the cement used in Louisiana is imported from neighboring states. Meanwhile, about 8 million tons of fly ash are produced annually within an eight-hour drive of Baton Rouge.

That fly ash would wind up in landfills. Now it can have a second life. Geopolymer concrete’s greatest appeal may be its life cycle greenhouse gas reduction potential — as much as 90 percent when compared with ordinary Portland cement.

In 2014, Montes’ company was awarded the Louisiana Startup Prize in Shreveport as the state’s top startup. Montes sees a rosy future as he continues to teach at Tech while working with Alchemy Geopolymer Systems.

Is it the road to riches?

“I hope so.”
13 2016-03-28
Monroe

Comprehensive scan puts safety on table


Varun Kopparthy can only imagine how the innovative product he’s researching could help lessen cases of food contamination.

According to the Centers For Disease Control, each year one in six Americans, or 48 million people, get sick from foodborne diseases. Of those cases, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die.

Determining the number of illnesses associated with specific food sources is called foodborne illness source attribution. You hear the dreaded headlines – salmonella outbreak, listeria detected – and other pathogens that produce fear of consuming foods.


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An outbreak last spring put a freeze on production on the popular line of Blue Bell ice cream. 10 reported cases of listeria in four states were linked to Blue Bell frozen novelties. Three people sickened, all hospital patients in Kansas, later died. The company pulled its entire line of products from freezer cases across the country.

A PathoRADAR biosensor contains a tailored data chipBuy Photo
A PathoRADAR biosensor contains a tailored data chip and conductive wires to detect pathogens. (Photo: Bob Lenox/The News-Star)
Last September, a California-based company, Andrew & Williamson Fresh Produce, shipped salmonella-tainted cucumbers to 27 states, as well as the Red Lobster restaurant chain. Three cases in Louisiana were believed to have been a part of the outbreak.

Food shipments across borders is growing. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, total imports have increased 7 percent per year since 1999. In the U.S., imported food now represents 15–20 percent of all food consumed.

“Why can’t big companies be more efficient in detecting contamination?”, Kopparthy wondered. Standard testing usually looks for only those contaminants prevalent in a particular industry.

“But, there might be others as well,” he said. Kopparthy said there is no test that can identify multiple pathogens all at once.

What he and his team are developing could advance testing to diagnose a contamination culprit.

The doctoral candidate in biomedical engineering is immersed in what he describes as “lab technology used for real world application.” The detection method he’s researching might possibly one day help prevent a health crisis.

Its called PathoRADAR. The name truly defines the diagnostic tool that scans and tests a variety of foods for pathogens known to cause illness. And the concept turned to creation here in northeastern Louisiana by Kopparthy and his partner Dr. Gergana Nestorova.

In the center of the Biomedical Microfluidics Laboratory at Louisiana Tech University, there’s a large island, affixed with a row of overhead cabinets. From a small tray on the island’s counter, Kopparthy pulls a thin, plastic strip. It is a little bigger than the size of a stick of gum and encases two wires that extend out from one end.

It is a biosensor, developed over two years, to alert researchers to contaminants that cause foodborne illness.

“Our technology can be used to detect contamination. You have to see whether there’s a virus or not and we do that at a DNA level,” he said, as he held the sensor next to the machine.

The device is a medium-sized, L-shaped black box. Two small pumps with red buttons and LED display are seated on a corner of a machine. The procedure itself seems relatively simple.

A sampling of the food — even a processed food product — is mixed with an active agent. The agents used are the result of research and testing and are proprietary information.

Detection chips contained in the biosensor are tailored to look for signatures of any number of pathogens. The test takes about 40 minutes to complete.

Results can determined in two to four hours. That efficiency is something not seen by testing methods on the market.

“With the current techniques, its actually takes longer for them to detect it. With our technology, we can do it much faster,” Kopparthy said. “Their (food testing services) technology doesn’t have ability to detect multiples, in a single test run.”

Complete results from food testing services can take up to two days. The length of time could be critical in response and recall efforts if contamination is identified.

In a field where pathogen testing has grown at greater than 10 percent over the past few years, PathoRADAR’s research seeks to optimize testing procedures. A type of one-stop test for food companies.

For example, a separate test to detect e. coli must be made in addition to other pathogen tests. “The major problem is that it costs the food processing companies a lot of money to own testing equipment, so they outsource to a lab,” he said.

Testing services labs charge per sample for each organism being tested. The price depends on how labor intensive the test is for each organism as it differs from contaminant to contaminant.

Pricing for the innovative testing would be competitive to what companies already pay for testing, but of greater value in performing multiple tests at once. The tool could also be used by to reduce costs at food manufacturing companies.

The sensing matter of the product he and his team has developed has not yet been taken to commercialization. Its partly due to the difficult nature of developing the biosensor at a high level of sensitivity to detect pathogens. Kopparthy said there is only a few research groups in the U.S. pursuing this type of testing technology.

The project is presently seeking business partners in the prototype development phase, but has already landed a number of accolades.

PathoRADAR placed first in the Top DAWG New Venture Championship at Louisiana Tech in the Spring of 2014, and later that year was selected as a top five finalist in the Louisiana Startup Prize competition. Kopparthy was also among six entrepreneurs to present as part of the Delta Regional Authority’s Delta Entrepreneurship Network Fellowship program last year.

The project is in research phase and has yet to go into field testing. Kopparthy said he hopes to be able to go to places like Foster Farms Chicken Plant in Farmerville to take the work another step forward.

The technology behind PathoRadar can also take shape with other resources including water and the environment. It could also be scaled into other markets ranging from agricultural industry to medical industry and bio-defense.

Kopparthy envisions practical, portable uses for the diagnostic tool. “We are focused on making this available to someone who may have minimal technical knowledge. My goal is in the future to have a hand-held device. But, I can see right now that we can develop to that kind of thing,” he said.

Technology coming from research can be a high-risk, high-opportunity venture. “It’s a case of where you have to invest so much into research and development,” Kopparthy said. “That’s why our plan is to seek small business innovation grants and go from there.”
13 2016-03-28
Monroe

Tech team at work on device to monitor emissions


It churns and burns through motor engines of trucks and tractor-trailers on the highways. Diesel fuel can be seen as the lifeblood that keeps some modes of transportation moving

The gasoline provides a healthy dose of power and acceleration for the engine. Fumes and vapors of the spent fuel are pushed through the exhaust system and out the tail pipe.


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The emissions, or discharge of these gases, are the unhealthy end product. As technology and times have change, concern grows over how these emissions affect the environment.

One of the primary concerns is the release of nitrogen oxide gases (NOx), some known to be greenhouse gases.

The Environmental Protection Agency has tracked the volume of NOx gas emitted from diesel fuel engines for decades. More than half of industrially produced nitrogen oxide gases come from motor vehicles.

Emissions of NOx increased approximately 10 percent from 1970 to 1988.

Advances in the automotive industry like catalytic converters have helped lessen NOx, but the issue persists. The EPA continually addresses air quality standards and has adopted stringent exhaust emission regulations.

Motor companies are continually seeking new ways to reduce and monitor emissions. A very small piece of technology to address the big task is being researched at Louisiana Tech University.

Erica Murray, left, and doctoral student Ling Cui standBuy Photo
Erica Murray, left, and doctoral student Ling Cui stand beside the “furnace.” The unit analyzes how exhaust sensors perform under various temperatures. (Photo: Bob Lenox/The News-Star)
A research and development project of nitrogen oxide sensors began last year at the college’s Institute of Micromanufacturing. Ramu Ramachandran, executive dean for research, said the work is part of a partnership called the Louisiana Alliance for Simulation-Guided Materials Applications, or LA-SIGMA. The research is being led by Erica Murray.

The program consists of three major science drivers of current strength in Louisiana — electronics, energy and biomolecular materials. Ramachandran said the university’s participation has primarily been with energy materials.

The lab is housed along a deep hallway with large glass-windowed lab stations on either side. First door on the right is where the sensor studies are taking place. Three students are gathered around an island counter in the middle of the room.

One student, Ling Cui, is a doctoral student in engineering. She’s holding a petri dish with a few small white rectangular chips. The pieces are no more than about a half-inch in length and have tiny gold wires coming out of two sides of the chip.

“Erica has formed a collaboration with Ford Motor Co. to study these exhaust gas sensors. With newer standards, the detection levels keep getting lower and lower,” Ramachandran said. The sensors are used in diesel after-treatment systems.

Murray, who had worked for Ford as a motor scientist, has come up with materials and devices that appear to be more sensitive than what is commercially available.

“We found if you change the porous structure, the hole, that are in this electrolyte, that influences how the diesel gas goes into the sensor,” Murray said. That impacts how the gas is detected electrochemically.

If the chip is less porous, where it has less holes, its harder for the gas to get in and react. If the sensor is too porous, detection is less likely.

The research became a question of how do you find the optimum amount of porosity that will cause greater sensitivity and rapid response.

The mathematical approach helped deduce what structure would give the desired sensitivity. A standard fabrication method was used to develop a promising ceramic and zirconia-based sensor. Gold also was used in manufacturing the chip for testing.

On a table along the back wall of the lab is what is called the “furnace” — an ice chest-sized box. The top portion of the box opens to show a quartz tube nestled in a molded frame.

Murray explains the testing.

“The sensor is attached to wires and placed in the tube. The wires are attached to an analyzer,” she said. The analyzer takes sensitivity readings.

Once the furnace is fired up it can reach temperatures from 550 to 800 degrees Celsius. As the temperature rises, Cui monitors sensitivity of the miniature chip.

Cui kept track of how the sensors performed and found positive outcomes.

The effort was rewarded by Cui being invited to Ford headquarters to perform testing at the automaker’s research facility. Rather than a simulated model, the sensor was hooked to an exhaust line from a mounted diesel test engine.

The test results were very promising. “Our sensors were able to accurately detect NO2 (nitrogen dioxide) at lower levels than current commercialized sensors,” Murray said.

Sensors that are on the market can detect NO2 at 10 parts per million. The sensors Cui and Murray produced were able detect an even lower ratio of 5 parts per million.

The sensors did not only pick up a lower level of emission, but did so more accurately. Other sensor readings can be slightly off due to sound or vibration.

A notable find in the performance of the sensor was the precision of sensitivity and speed of which emissions were detected. “That allows us to have a good idea of what is most suitable in terms of porosity,” Murray said.

The rapid response of the sensor was seen by sharp spikes in a measurement graph. Because there was a vertical jump seen on the chart tracking emissions, the sensor proved it quickly picked up changes in NO2 being emitted.

The conclusion of the report stated in part that results with Ford generally agreed with laboratory testing which is to confirm the sensor’s stability.

A better performing sensor would enable the vehicle’s computer system to adjust fuel usage and allow for better gas mileage and overall performance. At the same time it would serving its primary purpose of monitoring emissions.

According to Murray, the only drawback of the sensor is the use of gold. The metal has a lower melting point than what is needed for possible commercial production.

“We have to look at what electrolyte could replace gold to minimize the fabrication step,” Murray said. “We know the right structure, but can we find something more suitable?”
13 2016-03-28
Monroe

3D printing opens door to drug-delivery system


It’s not exactly what the doctor ordered. But it will be soon.

A team of researchers at Louisiana Tech University has developed an innovative method for using affordable, consumer-grade 3D printers and materials to fabricate custom medical implants that can contain antibacterial and chemotherapeutic compounds for targeted drug delivery.

Let’s make that simpler.


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Imagine you have a cavity and go to the dentist. The dentist tells you he can’t work on the tooth yet because it’s abscessed. He treats it with an antibiotic.

You run to the drugstore, pick up your prescription and take it orally.

David Mills
David Mills (Photo: Courtesy)
The dosage of the antibiotic is strong enough to course throughout your body and still be able to do the job on the tooth. It’s more medicine than you need, really, but it gets the job done.

The danger, over time, is that the body grows resistant to antibiotics, or you develop an allergy.

The technology developed at Tech under the direction David K. Mills, professor of biological sciences and biomedical engineering, can deliver the antibiotic right to the area of the tooth, quickly and efficiently.

The researchers had three key concepts in the use of 3D printed material.

“We wanted to provide individually customized treatment, create applications for multiple uses and do it cheaply,” Mills said.

Jeffery Weisman, as a doctoral student at Tech as part of a unique MD/PhD program offered jointly by Tech and LSU Health Shreveport, co-led the team comprised of Tech doctoral students and research faculty in biomedical engineering and nanosystems engineering programs.

IMG_7798
This may look like a cherry LifeSaver, but it is a 3D-printed hormone-loaded pessary, a type of intrauterine device. (Photo: Courtesy David Mills)
“After identifying the usefulness of the 3D printers, we realized there was an opportunity for rapid prototyping using this fabrication method,” Weisman said. “Through the addition of nanoparticles and/or other additives, this technology becomes much more viable using a common 3D printing material that is already biocompatible.”

According to Weisman, personalized medicine and patient-specific medication regimens is a current trend in health care. He says this new method of creating medically compatible 3D printing filaments will offer hospital pharmacists and physicians a novel way to deliver drugs and treat illness.

“One of the greatest benefits of this technology is that it can be done using any consumer 3D printer and can be used anywhere in the world,” Weisman said.

The process of 3D printing makes a three-dimensional object of almost any shape by laying down successive layers of material under computer control. The process was developed in the 1980s and has largely been used to make inexpensive tools and parts for manufacturing. More recently, the technology has moved into the field of medicine.

The Tech team collaborated to create filament extruders that can make medical-quality 3D printing filaments.

Louisiana Tech holds the patent for the technology, but Mills has started a small company to license the use of it. Using computers and 3D printers that produce common biocompatible materials, the company is creating small stents, cathethers and beads that can be coated with “just enough of the drug load to treat the location,” Mills says. They are implanted in the body at the site of a severe infection or localized to target a tumor while avoiding damage to other tissues or organs.

Another aspect of the materials used can save patients pain and money.

“Let’s say you have an open wound,” Mills said. Physicians treating that wound would implant medicated beads.

“But patients face a second surgery, to have the beads removed,” Mills said.

“Our plastics are biodegradable. They disappear, avoiding the second surgery.”

The man behind the technology is just as fascinating as the material he help craft.

A native of Illinois, his office at Tech is dotted with Chicago Cub and Chicago Bears memorabilia. He has a ravenous appetite for learning, and his formal education is wide-ranging.

“There are few like me,” Mills said.

“My fourth-grade teacher wrote on my report card that David has a ‘terrible curiosity.’ ” He said the teacher told his parents that he would get involved in something in the library “and never come back.”

Mills holds a bachelor’s degree in history with a focus on ancient history. A second undergraduate degree was in a study of the classics, with an emphasis in Near East architecture.

He found himself in retail management.

“I was sitting at my office in the mall I managed after just taking back the cast of ‘All My Children’ who had appeared at the mall. I started thinking about what I have done with my life. I made money making money for others.”

There had to me more in life, he thought.

Mills went back to school and earned a master degree in evolutionary history of the New World. He had planned to be a physical paleontologist.

That led to his doctorate studies in biology and anatomy.

From managing a retail mall to teaching at one of Louisiana’s premier universities, this professor brought with him an understanding of humanity that led to this high-tech process intended to help others.

It’s a process that also is being studied for use in bone cancer treatment.

“If someone has bone cancer and if chemo cannot control it, it often leads to amputation,” Mills said.

“We have developed a prototype of a 3D print gun. With a 3D scanner, we can image a bone defect, and then using the scanned image and print gun, completely fill in the defect with resorbable drug-infused materials and bone cement. The scanned defect is filled in based on the image, and drugs are provided at the right dosage from top to bottom.”

The chemo can be delivered locally. The implant can be covered with stem cells that can prevent rejection and fill in cavities in the bone left by the cancer.

Antifungals can be delivered through interuterine implants.

Most recently Mills and his research team has developed a 3D printer blood vessel. It can redirect blood flow to areas of the body affected, for instance, by diabetes. “We can replace failing blood vessels and direct blood using a new shunt from the existing artery,” he said.

The devices created in the lab can be custom made for an individual’s need, is cheaper than existing therapies and can be manufactured in minutes. Everything created in the lab is made with U.S. Food Drug Adminstration-approved material.

Mills said science is at the advent of a new technical age. It’s work that this former mall manager is eager to pursue, work in which he is a pioneer.

“I believe 3D bioprinting for repair of cleft palate and trachea will be commonplace in five years,” he said. Usable 3D replacement of internal organs, he says, is about 10 years away.

“It is truly novel and a worldwide first to be 3D printing custom devices with antibiotics and chemotherapeutics.”
13 2016-03-28
Monroe

3D printing opens door to drug-delivery system


It’s not exactly what the doctor ordered. But it will be soon.

A team of researchers at Louisiana Tech University has developed an innovative method for using affordable, consumer-grade 3D printers and materials to fabricate custom medical implants that can contain antibacterial and chemotherapeutic compounds for targeted drug delivery.

Let’s make that simpler.


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Imagine you have a cavity and go to the dentist. The dentist tells you he can’t work on the tooth yet because it’s abscessed. He treats it with an antibiotic.

You run to the drugstore, pick up your prescription and take it orally.

David Mills
David Mills (Photo: Courtesy)
The dosage of the antibiotic is strong enough to course throughout your body and still be able to do the job on the tooth. It’s more medicine than you need, really, but it gets the job done.

The danger, over time, is that the body grows resistant to antibiotics, or you develop an allergy.

The technology developed at Tech under the direction David K. Mills, professor of biological sciences and biomedical engineering, can deliver the antibiotic right to the area of the tooth, quickly and efficiently.

The researchers had three key concepts in the use of 3D printed material.

“We wanted to provide individually customized treatment, create applications for multiple uses and do it cheaply,” Mills said.

Jeffery Weisman, as a doctoral student at Tech as part of a unique MD/PhD program offered jointly by Tech and LSU Health Shreveport, co-led the team comprised of Tech doctoral students and research faculty in biomedical engineering and nanosystems engineering programs.

IMG_7798
This may look like a cherry LifeSaver, but it is a 3D-printed hormone-loaded pessary, a type of intrauterine device. (Photo: Courtesy David Mills)
“After identifying the usefulness of the 3D printers, we realized there was an opportunity for rapid prototyping using this fabrication method,” Weisman said. “Through the addition of nanoparticles and/or other additives, this technology becomes much more viable using a common 3D printing material that is already biocompatible.”

According to Weisman, personalized medicine and patient-specific medication regimens is a current trend in health care. He says this new method of creating medically compatible 3D printing filaments will offer hospital pharmacists and physicians a novel way to deliver drugs and treat illness.

“One of the greatest benefits of this technology is that it can be done using any consumer 3D printer and can be used anywhere in the world,” Weisman said.

The process of 3D printing makes a three-dimensional object of almost any shape by laying down successive layers of material under computer control. The process was developed in the 1980s and has largely been used to make inexpensive tools and parts for manufacturing. More recently, the technology has moved into the field of medicine.

The Tech team collaborated to create filament extruders that can make medical-quality 3D printing filaments.

Louisiana Tech holds the patent for the technology, but Mills has started a small company to license the use of it. Using computers and 3D printers that produce common biocompatible materials, the company is creating small stents, cathethers and beads that can be coated with “just enough of the drug load to treat the location,” Mills says. They are implanted in the body at the site of a severe infection or localized to target a tumor while avoiding damage to other tissues or organs.

Another aspect of the materials used can save patients pain and money.

“Let’s say you have an open wound,” Mills said. Physicians treating that wound would implant medicated beads.

“But patients face a second surgery, to have the beads removed,” Mills said.

“Our plastics are biodegradable. They disappear, avoiding the second surgery.”

The man behind the technology is just as fascinating as the material he help craft.

A native of Illinois, his office at Tech is dotted with Chicago Cub and Chicago Bears memorabilia. He has a ravenous appetite for learning, and his formal education is wide-ranging.

“There are few like me,” Mills said.

“My fourth-grade teacher wrote on my report card that David has a ‘terrible curiosity.’ ” He said the teacher told his parents that he would get involved in something in the library “and never come back.”

Mills holds a bachelor’s degree in history with a focus on ancient history. A second undergraduate degree was in a study of the classics, with an emphasis in Near East architecture.

He found himself in retail management.

“I was sitting at my office in the mall I managed after just taking back the cast of ‘All My Children’ who had appeared at the mall. I started thinking about what I have done with my life. I made money making money for others.”

There had to me more in life, he thought.

Mills went back to school and earned a master degree in evolutionary history of the New World. He had planned to be a physical paleontologist.

That led to his doctorate studies in biology and anatomy.

From managing a retail mall to teaching at one of Louisiana’s premier universities, this professor brought with him an understanding of humanity that led to this high-tech process intended to help others.

It’s a process that also is being studied for use in bone cancer treatment.

“If someone has bone cancer and if chemo cannot control it, it often leads to amputation,” Mills said.

“We have developed a prototype of a 3D print gun. With a 3D scanner, we can image a bone defect, and then using the scanned image and print gun, completely fill in the defect with resorbable drug-infused materials and bone cement. The scanned defect is filled in based on the image, and drugs are provided at the right dosage from top to bottom.”

The chemo can be delivered locally. The implant can be covered with stem cells that can prevent rejection and fill in cavities in the bone left by the cancer.

Antifungals can be delivered through interuterine implants.

Most recently Mills and his research team has developed a 3D printer blood vessel. It can redirect blood flow to areas of the body affected, for instance, by diabetes. “We can replace failing blood vessels and direct blood using a new shunt from the existing artery,” he said.

The devices created in the lab can be custom made for an individual’s ne
13 2016-03-24
Monroe

Louisiana Tech professor publishes book on life, experiences as a rural veterinarian


RUSTON, LA (Louisiana Tech Release) - Dr. William Green, professor of agricultural sciences and interim director of the School of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry at Louisiana Tech University, has published a book based on his experiences as a rural veterinarian titled, “Doc, Did I Wake You Up?”

The book, published by Tate Publishing and Enterprises, is a collection of unique and entertaining stories taken from Green’s 27 years as the owner and operator of a rural veterinary hospital in the south. Green shares his memories about the animals, their owners and other colorful characters that he encountered during his veterinary practice. He talks about his recollections of treating cats, dogs and cows during the daytime and skunks, horses or elephants at night.

“I had accumulated the stories in this book over several years and decided a couple of years ago to compile them so that my grandchildren could enjoy some of my life stories and experiences that happened during my years of veterinary practice,” said Green. “I hope that people who read this book will come away with a greater appreciation of the veterinary profession in general and be able to realize the challenges and rewards of a rural veterinarian as he deals with so many different and unique people and animals.”

Dr. Gary Kennedy, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Applied and Natural Sciences, wrote the foreword for “Doc, Did I Wake You Up?” and talks about the special meaning in Green’s stories, especially for those from rural communities in the south. Kennedy challenges the reader to image that they are a student in one of Green’s animal sciences classes at Louisiana Tech and they will quickly see why he is one of the most popular and beloved professors at the university.

“Dr. Green shows that working with animals is rewarding and interesting,” says Kennedy in the book’s foreword. “But working with animals, people and the situations that they create takes it to a completely different level. I hope [the reader] enjoys these stories as much as I do.”

Green has served on the Board of Veterinary Medicine and is a lifetime member of the national, state, and local veterinary associations. He has been honored with numerous teaching, advising and service awards at Louisiana Tech as well as the Distinguished Service to Agriculture Award for North Louisiana. Green holds a bachelor’s degree from Louisiana Tech, his master’s degree from LSU and a doctorate of veterinary medicine from Auburn University.

Serving as one of the advisers for pre-veterinary medicine students at Louisiana Tech and a teacher of six different classes related to animal science and veterinary medicine, Green has played a major role in Louisiana Tech’s agricultural sciences department.

“The most important thing I want Louisiana Tech pre-vet students to gain from this book is that becoming a veterinarian is difficult but not impossible,” Green said. “Above all else, they should diligently focus on their studies, choose knowledgeable and caring mentors, and keep the Faith.”

“Doc, Did I Wake You Up?” is available from Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and other local and online bookstores. Green will be signing copies of his book from 2-5 p.m. on April 2 at the Lincoln Parish Public Library in Ruston.
13 2016-03-23
Monroe

Louisiana Tech lecture series to host expert in metabolic, molecular medicine


RUSTON, La (Louisiana Tech Release) - Dr. Joseph Bass, the Charles F. Kettering Professor of Medicine at the Feinberg School of Medicine and chief of the Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Molecular Medicine at Northwestern University, will visit Louisiana Tech University on April 4 as part of the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research lecture series.

Bass will present a lecture titled, “The Clock Gene Pathway from Behavior to Metabolism” at 3:30 p.m. in University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus. The event is free and members of the campus and local communities are cordially invited to attend.

According to his research laboratory website, Bass says that two startling health statistics have captured widespread public attention over the past decade. The first is that all children born in the year 2000 face a one-in-three chance of developing diabetes during their lifetime. The second is that nearly one-third of the U.S. population is overweight or obese.

“Although both physical activity and nutrition are tied to this epidemic, new evidence from clinical and experimental research has pinpointed a role for disruption in the circadian system and sleep in obesity and diabetes,” says Bass. “The internal circadian system can be thought of as an integrator of information that enables individuals to optimally time internal systems with the rising and setting of the sun.

“The primary research focus in our laboratory is to understand the molecular mechanisms through which the circadian clock regulates cell and organismal metabolism and the reciprocal feedback of metabolism on circadian oscillators in animals. We anticipate that a better understanding of clock processes will lead to innovative therapeutics for a spectrum of diseases including diabetes, obesity, autoimmunity, and cancer.”

Bass is a graduate of Yale University and earned his Ph.D./MD from the Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1991. He has also completed training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the University of Chicago where he was the recipient of fellowships from the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

The New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminar series is co-organized by Dr. Jamie Newman, the Scott Weathersby Endowed Professor in Zoology and Premedicine and assistant professor in biological sciences, and Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore, assistant professor of biomedical engineering. The 2015-2016 series spotlights interdisciplinary collaborations, alumni spotlights and features, and research discussions by renowned guest speakers from across the nation.

Bass’s visit is sponsored by the Lincoln Health Foundation. In addition to his research seminar at 3:30 p.m., he will be giving a second, abbreviated lecture, which is also open to the community, at 5:30 p.m. in Scotty Robinson Memorial Gymnasium. The title for this second talk is “How Do Genes Control Our Weight and Sugar Levels” and is designed for a more general audience. All in attendance at the seminar and are welcome to join Bass at a reception that will follow.

In addition to Bass’ lectures, members of Louisiana Tech’s School of Nursing, School of Human Ecology, and Department of Kinesiology will be visiting with members of the Boys and Girls Club and teaching them about living a healthy life. The goal of the series and collaboration with the Lincoln Health Foundation is to help improve the health of our community.

All lectures during the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminar series will be recorded and can be accessed through the College of Engineering and Science’s Events web page at http://coes.latech.edu/about-the-college/events.php.

Season sponsors for the 2015-2016 series include Lincoln Health Foundation, Louisiana Tech’s College of Engineering and Science, the College of Applied and Natural Sciences, the Office of the President, Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science, Sigma Xi, and generous donations from members of the community.

For more information on Bass and his presentation, or other events in this year’s New Frontiers in Biomedical Research series, visit www.biomedicalresearch.wix.com/new-frontiers.
13 2016-03-23
Shreveport

1 La. Tech lecture series to host expert in metabolic, molecular medicine


RUSTON Dr. Joseph Bass, the Charles F. Kettering Professor of Medicine at the Feinberg School of Medicine and chief of the Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Molecular Medicine at Northwestern University, will visit Louisiana Tech University on April 4 as part of the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research lecture series.

Bass will present a lecture titled, “The Clock Gene Pathway from Behavior to Metabolism” at 3:30 p.m. in University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus. The event is free and members of the campus and local communities are cordially invited to attend.

According to his research laboratory website, Bass says that two startling health statistics have captured widespread public attention over the past decade. The first is that all children born in the year 2000 face a one-in-three chance of developing diabetes during their lifetime. The second is that nearly one-third of the U.S. population is overweight or obese.

“Although both physical activity and nutrition are tied to this epidemic, new evidence from clinical and experimental research has pinpointed a role for disruption in the circadian system and sleep in obesity and diabetes,” says Bass. “The internal circadian system can be thought of as an integrator of information that enables individuals to optimally time internal systems with the rising and setting of the sun.

“The primary research focus in our laboratory is to understand the molecular mechanisms through which the circadian clock regulates cell and organismal metabolism and the reciprocal feedback of metabolism on circadian oscillators in animals. We anticipate that a better understanding of clock processes will lead to innovative therapeutics for a spectrum of diseases including diabetes, obesity, autoimmunity, and cancer.”

Bass is a graduate of Yale University and earned his Ph.D./MD from the Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1991. He has also completed training in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the University of Chicago where he was the recipient of fellowships from the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

The New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminar series is co-organized by Dr. Jamie Newman, the Scott Weathersby Endowed Professor in Zoology and Premedicine and assistant professor in biological sciences, and Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore, assistant professor of biomedical engineering. The 2015-2016 series spotlights interdisciplinary collaborations, alumni spotlights and features, and research discussions by renowned guest speakers from across the nation.

Bass’s visit is sponsored by the Lincoln Health Foundation. In addition to his research seminar at 3:30 p.m., he will be giving a second, abbreviated lecture, which is also open to the community, at 5:30 p.m. in Scotty Robinson Memorial Gymnasium. The title for this second talk is “How Do Genes Control Our Weight and Sugar Levels” and is designed for a more general audience. All in attendance at the seminar and are welcome to join Bass at a reception that will follow.

In addition to Bass’ lectures, members of Louisiana Tech’s School of Nursing, School of Human Ecology, and Department of Kinesiology will be visiting with members of the Boys and Girls Club and teaching them about living a healthy life. The goal of the series and collaboration with the Lincoln Health Foundation is to help improve the health of our community.

All lectures during the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminar series will be recorded and can be accessed through the College of Engineering and Science’s Events web page at http://coes.latech.edu/about-the-college/events.php.

Season sponsors for the 2015-2016 series include Lincoln Health Foundation, Louisiana Tech’s College of Engineering and Science, the College of Applied and Natural Sciences, the Office of the President, Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science, Sigma Xi, and generous donations from members of the community.

For more information on Bass and his presentation, or other events in this year’s New Frontiers in Biomedical Research series, visit www.biomedicalresearch.wix.com/new-frontiers.
13 2016-03-17
Monroe

Air Force Concert Band, Singing Sergeants coming to Louisiana Tech


RUSTON, La (La Tech Release) - Louisiana Tech University’s School of the Performing Arts and The Ruston Daily Leader will present the United States Air Force Concert Band and Singing Sergeants in concert at 3 p.m. April 10 in Howard Auditorium on the Louisiana Tech campus.

Howard Auditorium is located in the School of the Performing Arts on the northwest corner of Dan Reneau Drive and Arizona Boulevard in Ruston. This is a general admission event with no reserved seating and no reserved tickets. Ticket holders will be seated on a first-come, first-served basis 30 minutes prior to performance. Non-ticket holders will be seated 15 minutes prior to performance.

Tickets to this event are free to the public and can be picked up beginning March 14 at the School of the Performing Arts Box Office or at The Ruston Daily Leader, which is located at 212 West Park Avenue in Ruston and is open Monday through Friday from 8:00-5:00 p.m. The Louisiana Tech Box Office is located in the drama wing of the School of the Performing Arts and is open Monday through Friday from 1:30-4:45 p.m. Please limit five tickets per person
13 2016-03-16
Monroe

Louisiana Tech earns Nursing School of the Year honors


Louisiana Tech University’s Division of Nursing was named the 2016 Nursing School of the Year-Undergraduate Degree Program by the Louisiana Nursing Foundation during its Nightingale Awards Gala held recently in Baton Rouge.

The annual statewide event of the Louisiana Nursing Foundation recognizes quality, service, commitment and excellence for registered nurses throughout the State of Louisiana. Nominees in each category are reviewed by a select panel of out-of-state nursing leaders. The Louisiana Nursing Foundation is the research, education and charitable subsidiary of the Louisiana State Nurses Association.

Accepting the award on behalf of Louisiana Tech’s Division of Nursing were Dr. Donna Hood, director and professor of nursing; Nancy Darland, professor of nursing; Carol Owens, associate professor of nursing; Sarah McVay, assistant professor of nursing; and Norlyn Hyde, instructor of nursing and president of Louisiana State Nurses Association. In addition to Louisiana Tech’s Nursing School of the Year honor, Darland was nominated for Outstanding Community Achievement by a Registered Nurse.

John Harris, president of the Louisiana Tech Student Nurses Association, and Aouicha Zorgati, secretary of the Louisiana Tech Student Nurses Association were also in attendance at the event.

“The Nightingale Awards Gala is an evening of celebration and recognition of the most outstanding nurses, nursing programs and health care agencies from across Louisiana,” said Hood. “It was a privilege to represent Louisiana Tech University with this honor. It reflects the hard work and dedication of our nursing students, faculty and staff.”

Louisiana Tech’s nursing program recently celebrated its 40th year of educating registered nurses. The program was commended by the Louisiana State Board of Nursing in 2015 for its 100 percent licensure pass rate for nursing graduates.

“Our program was the only one in the State of Louisiana to have a 100 percent first attempt pass rate on the registered nursing licensure exam for 2015 graduates,” Hood said. “In addition to excellent students, our nursing faculty is committed to providing an education experience that challenges students to excel and supports their development in an atmosphere that models professionalism, caring, and excellence.”

Hood says the reputation of Louisiana Tech and its nursing program continue to attract a growing number of traditional and non-traditional students desiring to enter the nursing profession. “This outstanding state recognition reflects the excellence of our program and the quality of our nursing graduates,” said Hood.

Louisiana Tech’s Division of Nursing is committed to excellence in the education of students of diverse educational and cultural backgrounds preparing them to enter an ever changing health care environment as competent practitioners of nursing. The educational environment fosters critical thinking which is achieved through interaction of faculty with students, is responsive to community needs, is cognizant of regional and national trends in health care delivery, and recognizes its responsibility for research and scholarly activity, and service.
13 2016-03-15
Monroe

La. Tech ranked first in state for best college “risk-reward”


RUSTON - LendEDU, a national marketplace helping students and parents find transparency for student loans and student loan refinance, has ranked Louisiana Tech University No. 35 in the nation according to its recently released 2016 College Risk-Reward Indicator (CRRI) list.

Louisiana Tech has the highest CRRI of any public or private university in Louisiana and is one of only two schools in the state to earn a spot in the Top 100. The University of New Orleans was the other Louisiana institution, coming in at No. 81. Princeton University topped the 2016 list followed by CUNY-Baruch College, CUNY-Queens College, Eastern New Mexico University and California Institute of Technology (Caltech.)


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“Despite the challenges and uncertainty we’ve faced over the past several years, Louisiana Tech has continued to be successful in providing our students with an excellent return on investment and an outstanding educational value,” said Louisiana Tech University President Les Guice. “Good students want to attend a university where they’ll earn a diploma that is highly respected and will continue to grow in value throughout their professional careers.

“The national recognition we continue to receive for value and ROI is a credit to our faculty and staff, and will help Louisiana Tech to produce the next generation of leaders and innovators for our state and our nation.”

LendEDU defines “risk” as the average student loan debt per graduate and “reward” as the average early career pay, or the median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of professional experience. The CRRI is calculated by dividing the measure of reward by the measure of risk and establishing a numerical value. Louisiana Tech achieved a CRRI of 2.79 with average student loan debt per graduate of $16,855 and average annual early career earnings of $47,000.

LendEDU compared the CRRI of 1,004 public and private colleges in the United States in determining the 2016 rankings. The average CRRI in the 2016 rankings was 1.677 meaning that the average early career pay will be about 67 percent higher than student loan debt upon graduation. Data from PayScale.com’s College Salary Report was used to determine the measure of reward while data for the risk measure came primarily from the Institute for College Access & Success (TICAS.)


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The ranking from LendEDU is the latest national recognition for Louisiana Tech and yet another accolade for providing students and graduates with a superior value and return on their educational investment. In March 2015, PayScale.com’s College ROI Report ranked Louisiana Tech No. 1 in the State of Louisiana among all public and private institutions in overall return on investment (ROI) for both in-state and out-of-state students. It also ranked Louisiana Tech No. 13 in the nation (in-state tuition) in highest annual percent ROI for students living on-campus and receiving financial aid.

Kiplinger, the nation’s most recognized publisher of business forecasts and personal finance advice, ranked Louisiana Tech No. 1 in the state and No. 66 in the nation for in-state students at public institutions, in its Best College Values 2016 report released this past December. Louisiana Tech also ranked No. 1 in Louisiana among public universities for out-of-state students and No. 80 nationally.

LendEDU’s 2016 College Risk-Reward Indicators listing can be found at https://lendedu.com/blog/college-risk-reward-indicator.
13 2016-03-14
Monroe

La. Tech math students win regional awards


RUSTON – Several Louisiana Tech University students have won awards at the 2016 Louisiana/Mississippi Section Meeting of the Mathematical Association of America, held recently at Louisiana State University-Shreveport.

Matthew Fults, who is majoring in mathematics and electrical engineering, won second place in the 11th Annual Louisiana/Mississippi MAA Integration Bee. Fults says that he was prepared for the Bee as a result of the rigorous coursework that was provided by his professors at Louisiana Tech and its College of Engineering and Science.


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In addition to Falts’ award, a team of Louisiana Tech students which included Nicholas Collins (mathematics), Austin Knies (mathematics and business), Joshua James (mathematics) and Samuel Johnson (chemical engineering), won first place in the Student Team competition.

Collins, the team leader, says that the group prepared by divvying up topics such as calculus, differential equations, analysis, linear and abstract algebra so that each team member was prepared for problems that arose during the competition.

“Beyond a little review, there was no need to prepare. We prepare every quarter simply by taking e mathematics courses at Tech,” Collins said. “After years under tutelage of Louisiana Tech's amazing instructors such as Dr. (Jinko) Kanno and Dr. (Jonathan) Walters, it's hard not to do well at competitions like these.”

Dr. Katie Evans, director of mathematics and statistics, and industrial engineering at Louisiana Tech, says that while the awards are impressive, the students’ should also be commended for their initiative.

“I am so proud of these students,” Evans said. “They initiated participation in the competitions, and I am pleased to see them recognized for their hard work and mathematical accomplishments. They are great representatives for Louisiana Tech and the College of Engineering and Science.”

“These competitions help to bring recognition to our University and its students and help students to network with other top students around the country,” Fults said. “They also serve as motivation for students to study and learn other than just a grade in a class. We are lucky here at Tech because the university and its faculty provide and support many opportunities for students to compete and showcase their talents.”


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The Mathematical Association of America (MAA) is the largest professional society that focuses on mathematics accessible at the undergraduate level. Members include university, college and high school teachers; graduate and undergraduate students; pure and applied mathematicians; computer scientists; statisticians; and many others in academia, government, business and industry. The mission of the MAA is “to advance the mathematical sciences, especially at the collegiate level.”
13 2016-03-14
Monroe

La. Tech engineering organizations honor outstanding students


RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University chapters of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), Associated General Contractors of America (AGC), North American Society for Trenchless Technology (NASTT) and Chi Epsilon Civil Engineering Honor Society honored outstanding students in the College of Engineering and Science recently at their winter banquet.

The ASCE and AGC honored five outstanding juniors and seniors during the event for their commitment to academic excellence and dedication to the civil engineering and construction engineering technology programs. Each student received a scholarship for their achievements.


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“This banquet is a chance to show our faculty and staff, peers and organizational leaders what we have achieved over the past year, and to lay out what we plan to achieve in the next year,” said Mary Voisin, student president of ASCE. “I am truly honored to be part of ASCE and proud to be awarded the Outstanding Junior Civil Engineering Student Scholarship.”

Banquet speaker Ali Mustapha, Region 5 Governor of the ASCE, also spoke about benefits that civil engineering and construction engineering technology students can get from being part of the ASCE organization.

The outstanding juniors and seniors for the AGC and ASCE are:

Tyler Harrell, AGC, Senior, Construction Engineering Technology, AGC/NASTT Philanthropist;
Katherine “Katie” Lybrand, ASCE, Senior, Civil Engineering, ASCE Concrete Canoe Captain;
James Ethan Nugent, AGC, Senior, Construction Engineering Technology, AGC/NASTT President;
Mary Voisin, ASCE, Junior, Civil Engineering, ASCE President, Chi Epsilon President, Tau Beta Pi Corresponding Secretary; and
Mallory Walters, AGC, Senior, Construction Engineering Technology, AGC/NASTT Treasurer.
“I am proud of Katie and Mary,” said Dr. Sanjay Tewari, ASCE team advisor and assistant professor of civil engineering and construction engineering technology at Louisiana Tech. “In addition of being outstanding students of civil engineering they are excellent leaders of ASCE student chapter.”

Dr. Shaurav Alam, NASTT student chapter advisor and research assistant professor of civil and construction engineering technology, added that he is also proud of the NASTT/AGC outstanding students. “Ethan, Mallory and Tyler are excellent leaders of NASTT/AGC student chapter along with their good standing in the Construction Engineering Technology.”

Dr. Norman Pumphrey, associate professor of civil engineering and construction engineering technology, and program chair of construction engineering technology, notes that the students who won the awards have been actively involved in leadership within their organizations and have been ambassadors for Tech.

“These students have been excellent representatives of the civil engineering and construction engineering technology programs and of Louisiana Tech University, and all are deserving of these scholarships,” said Pumphrey. “They have been actively involved in the leadership of Tech’s student chapters of Associated General Contractors and the North American Association for Trenchless Technology and the American Society of Civil Engineers, attending conferences and competitions.

“The construction engineering technology students have also attended national conferences and assisted national organizers with operational needs and networking with professionals.”

The scholarships are intended to help outstanding students with tuition, books and other educational expenses.
13 2016-03-09
Monroe

La. Tech students win state design project competition


RUSTON – A team of four Louisiana Tech University civil engineering students won first place in the senior design project competition at the Louisiana Transportation Conference 2016.

Jean-Paul Sandrock, Herman Velazquez, Dalton Champagne and Morgan Harris presented their award-winning project, “T.L. James Lake Pedestrian Bridge” competing against teams from the University of New Orleans, Louisiana State University and the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. The Louisiana Tech civil engineering program received a $1,000 award for the first-place project.

The project, sponsored by the Louisiana Purchase Council, was incorporated into a senior design course taught by Henry Cardenas, associate professor of mechanical engineering; and Nazimuddin Wasiuddin, associate professor of civil engineering and construction engineering technology and advisor for the Transportation Leadership Council (TLC.) Both civil and mechanical engineering students participated in the senior design experience, with teams taking on a variety of design challenges that matched their academic background and personal interests.

Fatmir Menkulasi, assistant professor of civil engineering and construction engineering technology and team advisor for the hands-on portion of the project, said that while the College of Engineering and Science’s hands-on learning method played an important role in the success of the project, the award is also the result of the group’s hard work.

“The students in the T.L. James Pedestrian Bridge Group have been exceptional,” Menkulasi said. “They showed ownership of the project and undertook every task with great enthusiasm and confidence. Their dedication and eagerness to learn paid off at the Conference, where they were awarded the first place.”

David Hall, director of civil engineering, construction engineering technology and mechanical engineering at Louisiana Tech, also serves as the associate director of the Southern Plains Transportation Center (SPTC). The SPTC funded travel for all the Louisiana Tech students through the TLC student chapter at Louisiana Tech.

“Our senior design approach at Louisiana Tech links student teams with real-world projects provided by industrial, public and private contacts,” Hall said. “In this case, the design work completed by these senior students benefits a Boy Scout camp here in North Louisiana. We are proud that their accomplishments were recognized at the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development Conference.”

In addition to the capstone team, senior civil engineering students Taylor Tuggle, Bryce Pfeiffer, Paden Sparks and Victor Zumaran were in attendance.

The first-place team will make a final presentation of the “T.L. James Lake Pedestrian Bridge” project to the Civil Engineering Advisory Board this May.

13 2016-03-09
Ruston

Louisiana Tech closure due to flooding, dangerous travel conditions


LOUISIANA TECH UNIVERSITY, INCLUDING TECH-BARKSDALE AND SHREVEPORT CENTER, WILL BE CLOSED ON WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9 DUE TO FLOODING AND DANGEROUS TRAVEL CONDITIONS THROUGHOUT NORTH LOUISIANA.
Department heads will notify essential personnel required to work during the closure. Basic services for students remaining on-campus during the closure will be provided.
Louisiana Tech’s Emergency Response Team is STRONGLY RECOMMENDING that students, faculty and staff refrain from traveling during this weather event, unless absolutely necessary. If travel is required, please exercise extreme caution and stay alert to weather forecasts and conditions. Flash flood watches and warning remain in effect throughout the region as heavy rain and the potential for strong thunderstorms continue to occur.
Official updates will be posted at www.ert.latech.edu.
13 2016-03-08
Monroe

La. Tech to host LSUHSC physiologist


RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University’s will host a presentation by Dr. Neil Granger, the Boyd Professor and head of the Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology at LSU Health Sciences Center-Shreveport, on March 14 as part of its New Frontiers in Biomedical Research lecture series.

Granger’s presentation titled, “How Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease after the Injury Response to Ischemia and Reperfusion” is scheduled for 3:30 p.m. in the auditorium of University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus. The event is free and members of the campus and local communities are cordially invited to attend.


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In addition to his presentation at Louisiana Tech, Granger will be meeting with children and parents from the Boys and Girls Club of North Central Louisiana to talk with them about the importance of living a tobacco free life and the negative effects of tobacco on cardiovascular health.

The New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminar series is co-organized by Dr. Jamie Newman, the Scott Weathersby Endowed Professor in Zoology and Premedicine and assistant professor in biological sciences, and Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore, assistant professor of biomedical engineering. The 2015-2016 series will spotlight interdisciplinary collaborations, alumni spotlights and features, and research discussions by renowned guest speakers from across the nation.

Granger is the author of over 600 articles in peer-review journals, over 100 book chapters and the author/editor of six books. He serves on the editorial boards of the Heart and Circulation, GI and Liver, and Cell sections of the American Journal of Physiology, as well as Circulation Research, Microcirculation, Shock, Pathophysiology, Free Radical Biology and Medicine, Lymphatic Research and Biology, Nitric Oxide Biology, and Experimental and Translational Stroke Medicine.

Granger has received several awards and honors for his research, including the APS Bowditch Award, the Distinguished Research Award from the GI Section of the APS, the Landis Award from the Microcirculatory Society, the Laerdal Award from the Society for Critical Care Medicine, and the McKenna Memorial Award from the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology. He has also been honored with the Dolph Adams Award from the Society for Leukocyte Biology, the Career of Distinction Award from the Oxygen Society, the Nishimaru-Tsuchiya International Award from the Japanese Society for Microcirculation, and the Robert Berne Lecture & Award from the Cardiovascular Section of the APS.


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All lectures during the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminar series will be recorded and can be accessed through the College of Engineering and Science’s Events web page at http://coes.latech.edu/about-the-college/events.php.

Granger’s visit and meeting with the Boys and Girls Club of North Central Louisiana are sponsored by the Lincoln Health Foundation and are part of a collaboration with Dewanna Blake, assistant professor in the Division of Nursing at Louisiana Tech, and students in the nursing program.

“The nursing students will present information on living a tobacco-free lifestyle which includes bringing awareness to the health benefits of a tobacco-free environment and the benefits that smoking cessation provides to the heart and lungs,” said Blake. “They will provide information about the health risk for smoking, using smokeless tobacco and e-cigarettes. The importance of this event is to educate on ways to improve the health disparity for respiratory related diseases, and encourage health promotion for the heart and body.”

Season sponsors for the 2015-2016 series include Lincoln Health Foundation, Louisiana Tech’s College of Engineering and Science, the College of Applied and Natural Sciences, the Office of the President, Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science, Sigma Xi, and generous donations from members of the community.

For more information on Granger and his presentation, or other events in this year’s New Frontiers in Biomedical Research series, visit www.biomedicalresearch.wix.com/new-frontiers.
13 2016-03-07
Monroe

La. Tech, LSUHSC to host biomedical engineering conference


RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University is joining forces with LSU Health Sciences Center in Shreveport to bring together biomedical researchers and experts from across the nation at the 32nd Annual Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference (SBEC 2016), March 11-13 at the Shreveport Convention Center.

SBEC 2016 will draw leading experts, researchers, clinicians, students and industry leaders from as far away as Saudi Arabia and India to share interests in biomedical applications and to showcase transformative research in the emerging field of biomedical engineering. The Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, which began in Shreveport in 1982, is held annually at various locations throughout the southern United States and has grown into an international conference with participants from every part of the United States, Canada, South America, Europe and Asia.


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“SBEC 2016 provides a forum for researchers in engineering and medicine to present their findings and latest advances in biomedical research, learn from each other’s achievements, and identify potential avenues of collaboration in the near future,” said Dr. Bryant Hollins, conference chair and assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Louisiana Tech. “The conference was created by investigators at Louisiana Tech and LSUHSC primarily for biomedical researchers at institutions in the southern states of the U.S. Since then, it has evolved to an international conference and we are excited that, for the first time since its inception, it is returning to its birthplace in Shreveport.”

According to Hollins, collaborations promoted by the SBEC advance the science and lay the foundation for discoveries in engineering and medicine to the ultimate benefit of the patient and the economic development of the State of Louisiana. Both Louisiana Tech and LSUHSC possess resources that can be leveraged to advance the state’s overall scientific stature in the nation.

“Louisiana Tech has a strong engineering departments and a very strong biomedical engineering interdisciplinary center, the Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science (CBERS),” Hollins said. “LSUHSC provides valuable insights into basic science and medical challenges. Together, Louisiana Tech and LSUHSC can develop creative solutions to important biomedical problems, as has been shown repeatedly in the past, has continued over time and accelerated more recently.”

Areas of special interest for SBEC 2016 include neuromodulation, mobile medicine, big data science, bionanotechnology and bioimaging applications, bioethics and education, and will feature keynote lectures and student competitions. It also provides a venue for presentation and discussion by senior scientists and young scientists (post-doctoral fellows, graduate and undergraduate students) from around the world as well as excellent opportunities for networking.

“Louisiana Tech University has one of the oldest biomedical engineering programs in the country, and participated in the earliest Southern Biomedical Engineering Conferences,” said Dr. Stan Napper, vice president for research and development at Louisiana Tech. “With new leadership and enthusiastic young faculty in biomedical engineering, and with a strong partnership with colleagues at the LSU Health Sciences Center in Shreveport, we are proud to be hosting the 32nd Annual SBEC.”


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According to the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE), bioengineers work with cutting-edge technologies to tackle grand challenges that define the human experience. They advance human health, engineer better medicines, create the tools of innovation and scientific discovery, and harness the power of biological processes to aid our planet. From the wheelchair that helps people stay mobile to pain medicines to x-ray technologies, the products developed by bioengineers fit seamlessly into everyday life.

“Louisiana Tech’s ability to host a conference with national and international impact speaks wonderfully to the opportunities the university provides to its students and faculty,” says Hollins. “This conference will provide our students and faculty the opportunity to present research to colleagues from around the world and form new collaborations

“The proximity of the conference’s location to our campus in Ruston and our Shreveport Center will provide additional educational opportunities for students at both the undergraduate and graduate level, as they will participate in the exchange of cutting-edge biomedical research findings.”

SBEC 2016 is being hosted and organized by Louisiana Tech’s Department of Biomedical Engineering, Louisiana Tech’s Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science (CBERS), Louisiana State University’s Health Sciences Center in Shreveport and the Biomedical Research Foundation of Northwest Louisiana. Exhibitors at SEBC 2016 include the Innovation Enterprise at Louisiana Tech University, Nanogaia LLC, the Biomedical Research Foundation of North West Louisiana’s Entrepreneurial Accelerator Program, ASH Industries, Inc., OrganicNANO, and Springer.
13 2016-03-07
Monroe

La. Tech graduates celebrate new beginnings, opportunities at commencement


RUSTON, La. – “Grab the reins – and a safety helmet – and jump in.”

This was the message about life given by keynote speaker Louisiana Supreme Court Associate Justice Marcus Clark to 316 Louisiana Tech University graduates during the school’s 315th commencement exercises held Saturday at the Thomas Assembly Center.

Ninety-four students earned postgraduate degrees while 222 received their bachelor’s degree. Anna Kathryn Whitehead, of Downsville, graduated summa cum laude with a 4.0 grade point average as she earned her Bachelor of Science degree in biology.


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“Consider this campus as a doorway to the next chapter of your life,” said Clark. “The feeling of accomplishment you have is much deserved. “For the rest of your days, the status of being a Louisiana Tech graduate will serve you well.

“Remember the people who paved the way for you and the people who played an instrumental role in making what’s happening today a reality. For people like your parents, this may be a bittersweet occasion. I say that because they’ve been there for practices and recitals to high school dances – be mindful of the sacrifices they made for you along the way. Find a loved one who helped you through this. Go up to them and give them a hug, look them in the eyes and say ‘thank you.’”

Clark also reminded the graduates of the work put in by their “Tech family” to help them pursue their degrees.

“Remember the faculty, staff and administration and the time they spent in helping you,” Clark said. “They are heroes and are the backbone of the education you’ve received. Not only did they offer hours of classroom instruction, they prepared you to face the demands of real life. The tests they gave you offered you ways to find solutions and build confidence. All of it preparing you to make a difference in this world.”


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Clark offered four key things he said he’d like the graduates to remember as they move on in life.

“First, be yourself,” Clark said. “Leave your footprint, because no one who came before you or will come after will leave the same mark. View the world as your own blank canvas. Second – serve those around you.

“Third, learn from your mistakes. They do not define you. And last, be present. Take note of the little things and appreciate them. Only fear will prevent you from turning opportunity into reality.”

Clark also reminded the graduates to remember Tech.

“Please, when you leave home – Louisiana Tech – help the university,” Clark said. “Help others realize their goals as you’ve realized yours. You can do so by donating your time, money or support. Even better, do all three. That’s very important right now, especially in times of financial crisis.”

Before wrapping up his speech, Clark went off script for a brief moment.

“How ’bout those ’Dogs?” Clark asked of the crowd regarding the Tech baseball team’s recent play. “They beat two Top 25 baseball teams. You can’t ask for any better than that.”

Before introducing Clark, Louisiana Tech President Les Guice told the graduates it was a day they’ll always remember.

“Many of those who started Tech with you aren’t here today,” Guice said. “Despite the challenges you faced, it was you who set goals and worked tirelessly to achieve them. It was you who showed perseverance and dedicated countless hours to study, research and attending class.

“You have made many memories that will truly last a lifetime. Today is truly a milestone in your life’s journey.”

Louisiana Tech’s Vice President for University Advancement Brooks Hull also presented the Tower Medallion award of Hall of Distinguished Alumni induction to 1951 accounting graduate John J. Long, a Shreveport investments and insurance salesman who served three terms as president of the Louisiana Tech Alumni Association and helped establish the Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 1976.

“I am moved emotionally because I can now say that I have reached, whether or not deserved by merit, the pinnacle of my aspirations. I am deeply appreciative of this honor.”
13 2016-03-07
New Orleans

LA Tech working with NOPD to select new police officers


Louisiana Tech researchers are working with the New Orleans Police Department to help them select new officers who will best fit the NOPD's new community based approach to law enforcement.

Louisiana Tech Professor Frank Igou says NOPD is looking for a particular type of officer as the department seeks to correct civil rights and misconduct issues that have occurred in the past.

"What we're trying to do is help them come up with the means to be able to determine who is the best fit in terms of abilities, knowledge skills, abilities, and other characteristics."

Igou says believes New Orleans PD contacted Louisiana Tech because they have an intensive research and consulting group. He says researchers traveled to New Orleans to sit in on police academy sessions, ride along with on-duty officers, and to meet with officials to determine who is needed on the force.

"Our part of this, the big deliverable from us is going to be, we're going to produce a series, well a test battery to determine who gets into the academy and who doesn't."

Igou says they will formulate test questions that applicants will take to judge their aptitude and personality.

"If they pass that test then they go on to other steps, which can include a background investigation, a polygraph test, a drug screen, psychological evaluation, and then a physical evaluation."
13 2016-03-07
Ruston

TAKE A STAND FOR HIGHER ED


Over the past couple of weeks in Baton Rouge, our governor and our legislative leaders have been engaged in nonstop discussions and negotiations to bridge a gap between the resources we have and the resources we will need to move Louisiana forward. In an effort to preserve funding for higher education and to ensure that future generations of Louisianans have the same opportunities for a college education that were afforded to us, these elected representatives have already made some tough decisions and, in the face of both support and opposition, have stepped out on behalf of those who are looking to them for confidence and confirmation that strong public universities will form the foundation of their futures in the state of Louisiana.

I acknowledge and express my appreciation for the tough decisions our legislators are making in support of Louisiana Tech University and all public universities in our state.
Throughout this special session, we have asked our leaders to report to the front lines and secure our positions in the battle for higher education. And they have made significant progress and gained much ground in that mission. Higher education serves such an important role in economic and community development throughout our region, and has immeasurable impacts on the citizens and communities of our state. Our institutions of higher learning have become the epicenters for industry and innovation growth, community service and support, culture and fine arts, and the overall improvements in quality-of-life in nearly every corner of Louisiana. In this role and with this responsibility, our universities simply cannot afford to take a step backwards as we are an essential part of the solution to a strong and prosperous future for Louisiana.

The progress that has been made on behalf of higher education has been encouraging and commendable, but there is still much that needs to be done in the last few days of this special session. A revenue shortfall still exists and it will take more tough decisions by our elected leaders to bridge the gap and ensure stable funding for higher education.
I encourage all friends and advocates of higher education across the state to stand with our leaders and support their efforts to fund higher education and preserve the opportunities that have been afforded to us by those who have served in the past. Please lend your voice and communicate clearly and constructively with our leaders about the importance of a strong and productive public university infrastructure as a top priority for the state of Louisiana.

Les Guice
President
Louisiana Tech University

13 2016-03-07
Ruston

TECH’S COED RECEIVES $20K GRANT


Louisiana Tech University’s College of Education was awarded a $20,000 research grant for its effort in the state’s Believe and Prepare program.

The Believe and Prepare Educator Grant Program was started to encourage mentoring programs who work with teachers in preparing certification grow the number of teachers in full-year residencies and increase the number of special education teachers.

Amy Vessel said Tech was awarded the research grant from the success of the Clinical Residencies program, a full-year student teaching experience.
13 2016-03-04
Monroe

Louisiana Tech researchers helping NOPD find ‘best fit’ in new officers


RUSTON, La (Press Release) - AROS, a research and consulting group comprised of faculty and students within Louisiana Tech University’s industrial-organizational psychology doctoral program, is partnering with the New Orleans Police Department to develop an entry-level selection test battery and analysis tools to identify the best candidates for its police academy and future law enforcement community.

As the New Orleans Police Department is moving to a new community-based approach to law enforcement with increased neighborhood engagement, AROS is working with them to change the department’s organizational structure and hiring processes in an effort to select people who will be a “best fit” for the new culture that is being implemented.

“AROS was originally contacted by the City of New Orleans Civil Service in 2014 as they were familiar with our work with the LSUS Center for Human Services and Public Policy (CHSPP),” said Dr. Frank Igou, coordinator of the industrial-organizational psychology master’s program and associate professor of psychology at Louisiana Tech. “We had worked closely with CHSPP performing job analysis to redevelop entry-level selection and promotional procedures for Louisiana State Patrol.”

The New Orleans Police Department is currently under a consent decree to correct civil rights and misconduct issues that had occurred in the past. In partnering with the New Orleans Police Department to gather data to assist with changing their internal methodologies and personnel selection processes, AROS students traveled to New Orleans to meet with a federal judge, attended a consent decree hearing, sit in on police academy sessions, ride along with on-duty police officers and conduct numerous interviews, focus groups and meetings with law enforcement officials of all ranks.

Igou says the experience was of great benefit to the AROS faculty and students, and speaks highly of the reputation and impacts that AROS can have on an organization.

“At Louisiana Tech and in the College of Education, we often take it for granted that many of our faulty members are not just good scientist, but they are also very experienced practitioners,” Igou said. “I think this is reflected across the university in the activities of the faculty and staff, and the production of their students. We attract a high caliber of students who are able to make these projects happen. Although the faulty contribute expertise and experience from their areas, it is the student ‘ownership’ of the projects that really leads to their success.”

Through experiences like those with the New Orleans Police Department, AROS doctoral students are continuing to grow in their understanding of advanced psychological theories, sound research methods, and how to apply those fundamentals to real-world organizations. The group is managed by faculty and leverages the energy, enthusiasm and creativity of its graduate students.

AROS has executed projects for global, regional and local organizations across multiple industries in the areas of personnel selection, employee engagement, performance appraisal, and data analysis. They have worked with multinational organizations and Fortune 500 companies in the development of solutions to overcome organizational obstacles.

“AROS helps ‘jump start’ the careers of our program graduates,” says Igou. “Instead of merely reading about the theory, concepts and research, they’re able to take what is covered in classes and apply it in ‘real world’ situations and with actual clients. Students who graduate from Louisiana Tech’s industrial-organizational psychology Ph.D. program are often able to hit the ground running with their first employer.”
13 2016-03-04
Ruston

TECH ANNOUNCES NEW INITIATIVE


As the westernmost parts of Louisiana Tech University’s campus evolve into the Enterprise Campus, the lines between campus and downtown Ruston will begin to blur.

Jim King said the university and downtown Ruston aim to become unified.

Different changes to campus will come together to form the Master Plan 2020.
13 2016-03-01
Ruston

Nanotechnology leads way in natural gas conversion process


Within six months, scientists believe they may be close to completing a nanotechnology catalyst to allow affordable, marketable petroleum product using nanotechnology to convert natural gas to liquid form.

Courtesy Photo Shown above is the thermal skid, which is part of the Fischer-Tropsch reactor. Courtesy Photo
Courtesy Photo
Shown above is the thermal skid, which is part of the Fischer-Tropsch reactor. Courtesy Photo

Jupiter Fuels LLC, located at Camp Minden, in partnership with Louisiana Tech University, has been working for the last three years to develop a more affordable way to convert natural gas, thereby making it more affordable to consumers. David Madden, president of the company, says the ultimate goal is a cheaper way to convert natural gas to liquid.

“It would be a new catalyst to make Fischer-Tropsch more efficient,” he said. “There’s lots of natural gas. We have natural gas everywhere. If you convert natural gas and turn it into a stable liquid that will not evaporate at room temperature, then you can transport it anywhere you want to.”

Currently, some energy companies are using cryogenic technology that compresses natural gas into a frozen liquefied natural gas, around -120 Fahrenheit. They put it on a ship, transport it to Europe or Asia and then thaw it out for use. This process would eliminate all that, he said.

Officials with Jupiter Fuels say converting it to liquid fuels allows the use of existing fuel production infrastructure and existing transportation technologies.

“It is the goal of this project to continue the process of developing catalysts used in the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis that can be utilized on a commercial scale,” according to a description of the project from Louisiana Tech University’s Research Center. “Operational analysis will examine variables including temperature, pressure, conversion on catalyst performance, and space velocity pertaining to product distribution and catalyst lifetime. In order to increase production, efforts will focus on ultimate catalyst deposition and catalyst substrate preparation.”




The process builds on the Fischer-Tropsch (pronounced Fisher-Trope) method of conversion discovered by two German scientists – Franz Fischer and Hans Tropsch – in the 1920s. The idea is to take carbon monoxide and hydrogen and convert it to liquid fuel. The new catalyst uses nanotechnology to link together the compounds needed to convert natural gas to liquid, Madden said.

“Thus far, we’ve been pretty successful in dialing that in accurately,” he said.

The nanotechnology is inside the Fischer-Tropsch reactor, Madden explained, saying it looks like a wire brush someone would clean a barbecue grill with. But it’s small enough that a person would have to look at it through an electron microscope.

“We’re making nano-wires, and a nano is a billionth of a meter,” he said, “and we’re making wires that are about 25 atoms wide.”

Jupiter Fuels was born about three years ago when Louisiana Tech was seeking support for its athletic programs. The Maddens decided to invest in the university’s math and science program. Two scientists – Drs. Chester Wilson and John McDonald – developed a working theory using nanotechnology but needed a place to test the theory. Thus Jupiter Fuels, a pilot plant, came to be.

McDonald, a professor at Louisiana Tech, works for ASI, or American Strategic Innovations Energy and Defense Research, a sister company of Jupiter Fuels.

“As we progress in our catalyst development versions, we can start up the reactor, run it and check the results,” Madden said. “We actually think we’re pretty close to being through with a marketable nanotechnology catalyst for gas to liquid conversion.”

It will be a huge win for Louisiana Tech, the Institute of Micro manufacturing and north Louisiana, he said.
“When Louisiana Tech, Camp Minden and Jupiter Fuels and the community working together to develop new commercial products, we all win,” Madden added.

13 2016-03-01
Ruston

TECH SGA TAKES STANCE AGAINST CUTS


The Louisiana Tech University Student Government Association does not agree with Gov. John Bel Edwards’ proposed budget cuts on state public higher educational institutions.
Tech’s SGA recently passed a resolution clarifying their position regarding the proposed $131 million state higher education budget cuts in hopes that the state Legislature, governor’s office and Board of Regents will listen to their stance.

13 2016-02-29
Ruston

Local University Has 'Master Plan' For Improvements


Louisiana Tech's 'Campus Master Plan'.

"It's a long-term vision for the university in an effort to bring the academic core, residential life, student life, intramural, all aspects of the university closer together," says Dave Guerin, Louisiana Tech Communications Director.

Guerin says all of those components work together for the university in a positive way in order to provide students with a comprehensive and enriched college experience.

With this master plan, many renovations will occur on campus.

"Parking and residential halls, and student life buildings, food courts, really just about any aspect of the college experience that you can think of is encompassed in the master plan and our vision for that," says Guerin.

Along with changes on an academic level inside the classroom.

"Technology and student engagement, and the way that students communicate and collaborate are very important. They change year to year," says Guerin.

Administrators say though the campus is getting a make-over, it will not loose it's historic touch.

"We have such a rich tradition here and our alumni have a fond memory of their time here. We want to honor that and we want to incorporate that into the physical aspects of the master plan," says Guerin.

Changes to Louisiana Tech will occur over a 20-year period.

"It really doesn't have a sunset or an expiration date. it's a concept, it's a vision for the university, being able to grow," says Guerin.

Click on the following link to learn more about Louisiana Tech's master plan. http://www.latech.edu/masterplan/
13 2016-02-25
Shreveport

Airline students to benefit from Metro Aviation partnersh


Metro Aviation has partnered with the Airline High JROTC aviation program to assist students in getting their wings and helping their professional careers take flight.

Photo by Amanda Simmons/Press-Tribune
Photo by Amanda Simmons/Press-Tribune
Impressed with Airline’s one-of-a-kind high school aviation program in Louisiana, Metro Aviation has purchased a flight simulator for hands-on instruction at the school and will offer paid internship opportunities this summer to a handful of students.

“This type of paid internship can lead to a lifetime career in the aviation industry and is an opportunity that college students would love to have,” said Major Greg Kimbrough, instructor of Airline’s ground school.

Junior Lauren Martin is just one of the students utilizing this opportunity. She has seen progress and growth in her own abilities since her first simulated flight.

“It was very different at first. It’s much different seeing it virtually,” Martin said. “I got used to it though. The biggest advantage is I’ll know what to expect when I get into a cockpit.”

That’s exactly what Milton Geltz, Metro Aviation Managing Director, wants to happen.

“We strive to find local talent and teach them the ropes. We hope this partnership with Airline High School will help us cultivate young talent and introduce students to the endless possibilities available to them in their own backyard,” Geltz said.

Photo by Amanda Simmons/Press-Tribune
Photo by Amanda Simmons/Press-Tribune
Airline’s aviation program has received interest from all over the state and country. Families from out of state have shown interest in moving to Bossier specifically for their children to pursue aviation studies at Airline, then enroll after graduation in the Louisiana Tech Professional Aviation program.

“I have had students at LSU in Baton Rouge call and ask if they could get into the Airline High School program. It is garnering national attention as well,” Kimbrough said.

It was a year ago that Airline announced a partnership with Louisiana Tech for dual enrollment, enabling high school aviation students to receive college credit. Since then, the program has really taken flight, putting Bossier Parish and Airline High School ahead in the field of aviation.

Jason Rowland, Principal at Airline High School, said his school will continue to develop programs and opportunities that will give students these kinds of opportunities.

“We are going to take advantage of every chance we get to offer cutting edge programs that are demanded in today’s workforce,” Rowland said.
13 2016-02-24
Monroe

Louisiana Tech earns 10-year accreditation from SACSCOC


RUSTON, La (La Tech Release) - Louisiana Tech University has received official confirmation of its decennial accreditation from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC.)

The accreditation, which Louisiana Tech has held continuously since 1927, was approved in December 2015 during the SACSCOC annual meeting in Houston, and officially awarded to Louisiana Tech by SACSCOC’s Board of Trustees last month.

“SACSCOC accreditation is essential to Louisiana Tech’s institutional mission and our efforts to enhance academic quality and educational experiences for our students,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “I am proud of our reaccreditation with SACSCOC and sincerely thank all those who worked tirelessly to prepare for this review and present the strengths and merits of Louisiana Tech.”

For several days in March 2015, an on-site team of external peer reviewers visited Louisiana Tech for meetings and discussions with faculty, staff, students, alumni and community leaders. The SACSCOC team conducted a detailed analysis and examination of over 90 core, comprehensive and Federal standards. The entire accreditation review process, which represents approximately two years of planning and coordination, concluded with final approval at the annual SACSCOC meeting on December 5-8, 2015.

“This is a rigorous, multi-year process consisting of the completion of a self-study Compliance Certification document addressing approximately 100 standards and the development of a Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP),” said Dr. Sheryl Shoemaker, Louisiana Tech’s SACSCOC accreditation liaison and dean of Louisiana Tech’s Graduate School. “Every unit on this campus contributed to this process.”

One of the cornerstones of the SACSCOC review process was an examination of Louisiana Tech’s proposed Quality Enhancement Plan called “BLUE FIRE: Igniting Communication Experiences.” BLUE FIRE is designed to improve student effectiveness in communication skills and improve student engagement in personal development skills through a robust first-year interdisciplinary experience.

“The SACSCOC process for reaffirmation of accreditation is a rigorous, peer-driven process aimed at continuous improvement of student learning in the context of the University community,” said Dr. Terry McConathy, vice president for academic affairs at Louisiana Tech. “Every aspect of the roles and functions of the University is scrutinized by off-site, on-site, and members of the SACSCOC Board of Trustees and delegates to the annual meeting.”

Louisiana Tech is accredited by the SACSCOC to award associate, baccalaureate, master, and doctoral degrees.
13 2016-02-23
Monroe

La. Tech professor named to list of nation’s best in healthcare informatics


RUSTON – Dr. Angela Kennedy, department head and professor of health informatics and information management at Louisiana Tech University, has been recognized as one of “20 of America’s Best Healthcare Informatics Researchers, Professors and Minds” by PokitDok, a provider of cloud-based web services to integrate healthcare transactions into apps, websites or products.

According to its blog posting of the list, PokitDok says health informatics, a fast-growing field which focuses on using information technology to improve healthcare delivery, has countless professional opportunities for the future. The current generation of researchers at America's colleges and universities will have a profound impact on the field and its future as it continues to grow.

“It was a nice surprise to be recognized as one America’s top 20 professors in Health Informatics,” said Kennedy. “For me, it is work that I enjoy, and it’s an honor to be recognized by my colleagues. In Louisiana, as well as in the U.S., we have a lot of work to do. Health Informatics can change the face of healthcare and the healthcare industry. I look forward to being a part of that work and the positive change that it will bring to all consumers.”


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Kennedy, a two-time graduate of Louisiana Tech having earned a bachelor’s degree in health information administration and a master’s degree in education, is a Registered Health Information Administrator and Certified Healthcare Quality Professional with over 25 years of experience in the health information and informatics field. She has served as President of the American Health Information Management Association’s (AHIMA) Board of Directors and received their Diamond Award for Leadership in 2014.

Kennedy also served two terms as president of the Louisiana Health Information Management Association (LHIMA) and testified before the United States Senate HELP Committee in 2015.

“Dr. Angela Kennedy is most deserving of being included on a national list of the top 20 researchers and professionals in Healthcare Informatics,” said Dr. Gary Kennedy, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Applied and Natural Sciences. “In the fall of 2015, she was invited by the United States Secretary of Health and Human Services to serve on the Health IT Standards Committee for a term which will go through August 2018. This is a prestigious appointment on a national committee that makes recommendations on standards, specifications, and certification criteria for electronic exchange and use of health information.


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“We are very fortunate to have an administrator, like Dr. Kennedy, who is recognized both at the state and national levels for providing leadership in the health informatics industry.”

Kennedy has been honored professionally by the AHIMA with its Triumph Award and by the LHIMA with the organization’s Distinguished Member and Career Achievement awards. She is a member of the American Health Information Management Association, the Louisiana Health Information Management Association and the Commission on Accreditation of Health Informatics and Information Management.

To view the complete “20 of America’s Best Healthcare Informatics Researchers, Professors and Minds” list from PokitDok, visit https://blog.pokitdok.com/healthcare-informatics-researchers/.
13 2016-02-19
Monroe

Abraham announces National Science Foundation grant for Louisiana Tech


WASHINGTON (Press Release) - Congressman Ralph Abraham, M.D., R-Alto, announced Thursday that the National Science Foundation has awarded Louisiana Tech University a grant worth more than half a million dollars.

The $518,155 grant will go toward boosting Tech’s engineering program. The grant is part of a program that seeks to enhance the way students learn engineering in an effort to educate, retain and train more engineers.

“Louisiana Tech is already a premier university for studying engineering. President Les Guice and his faculty do a tremendous job of educatingthe next generation of STEM graduates. This grant will help them further their mission of meeting and filling these high-demand jobs,” said Dr. Abraham, a member of the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology.

Dr. Guice praised the work of professor Marisa Orr for her work in the engineering program and her efforts in securing the grant.

“The impacts Dr. Orr’s work in helping students to make good academic decisions, which will affect both their college and professional careers, will be felt for beyond Louisiana Tech and long after the students graduate. I am grateful for the support of the NSF and the leadership of Congressman Ralph Abraham in fostering research and innovation at Louisiana Tech and all institutions of higher education in our state,” Dr. Guice said.

13 2016-02-19
Monroe

National Science Foundation awards $518,000 grant for La. Tech


The National Science Foundation has awarded Louisiana Tech University a grant worth more than half a million dollars.

The $518,155 grant will go toward boosting Tech’s engineering program. The grant is part of a program that seeks to enhance the way students learn engineering in an effort to educate, retain and train more engineers.


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“Louisiana Tech is already a premier university for studying engineering. President Les Guice and his faculty do a tremendous job of educating the next generation of STEM graduates. This grant will help them further their mission of meeting and filling these high-demand jobs,” said Congressman Ralph Abraham, a member of the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology.

Dr. Guice praised the work of professor Marisa Orr for her work in the engineering program and her efforts in securing the grant.

“The impacts Dr. Orr’s work in helping students to make good academic decisions, which will affect both their college and professional careers, will be felt for beyond Louisiana Tech and long after the students graduate. I am grateful for the support of the NSF and the leadership of Congressman Ralph Abraham in fostering research and innovation at Louisiana Tech and all institutions of higher education in our state,” Guice said.


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13 2016-02-19
Shreveport

Louisiana Supreme Court Justice to serve as Louisiana Tech's commencement speaker


Louisiana Tech University will close its winter quarter March 5 and Louisiana Supreme Court Justice Marcus R. Clark will serve as commencement speaker at graduation.

The ceremony will be held at 10 a.m. in the Thomas Assembly Center.

Clark, who graduated with his law degree from Louisiana State University in 1985, worked as the chief felony drug prosecutor at the Ouachita Parish District Attorney’s Office before being elected district judge to the Fourth Judicial District Court in 1997.

During his tenure, he volunteered as drug court judge and served as chief judge from 2004-2006.

Clark was elected to the Louisiana Supreme Court in 2009. He serves as chairman of the Budgetary Control Board and serves on the Sheriff’s Executive Management Institute Board, the Internal Audit Committee and the Human Resources Committee.

Clark also is the Supreme Court’s liaison to the Louisiana District Judges Association.

Clark and his wife Allyson, who is a neonatal nurse at St. Francis Medical Center, live in West Monroe. They have two children, Nicole and Cooper.

Commencement will signal the end of the winter quarter for the university. Spring classes will begin Wednesday, March 9.
13 2016-02-18
Ruston

Louisiana Tech University researchers study prevalence, impact of 'serial inventors'


RUSTON, La. - Researchers from Louisiana Tech University have published a study on the prevalence and impacts of "serial inventors" - scientist and engineers within university research communities who are particularly inventive and produce patents at a high level.

The article titled, "Prevalence of Serial Inventors in Academia" has been published in a recent issue of "Technology and Innovation", a journal of the National Academy of Inventor (NAI.) Dr. Richard Kordal, director of Louisiana Tech's Office of Intellectual Property and Commercialization; Dr. Dexter Cahoy, associate professor of mathematics and statistics; Dr. Eric Sherer, assistant professor of chemical engineering; and Beatrix Koev, former Louisiana Tech graduate student, co-authored the paper which details a list of inventors on all U.S. patents issued to five major research universities over a 23-year period, and highlights the outsized contributions of serial inventors.

"We were interested in determining if like 'serial entrepreneurs' there are 'serial inventors,' and quantifying what percentage of the total inventors they make up," said Kordal. "There have been many studies published about serial entrepreneurs, but fewer about serial inventors. For the purposes of their research, we defined an 'inventor' as a person who has been granted a US patent."

The study distinguishes "inventor" from researchers who may have disclosed a discovery or a potentially patentable invention to their respective university technology licensing offices. Since not all discoveries are patentable and/or commercializable, patent protection is commonly only pursued on a fraction of all discoveries.

Kordal says the study's results support the commonly held belief that a small percentage of high performing inventors (serial inventors) are responsible for a disproportionate number of patents being generated by a research organization.

"Approximately 10 percent of faculty inventors account for about 50 percent of the patents generated at a university," Kordal said. "Particularly striking was that this percentage was identical among all five major universities studies, indicating it may be a universal fact. We also found this to be true here at Louisiana Tech as well.

"We also believe that the success of these highly creative and productive individuals is due in large part to their success in building and sustaining productive research groups. Key is their ability to obtain funding for their research projects from sponsors."

Kordal and his team also believe their findings are timely given uncertain budget times. An unintended consequence of cut backs to state support for higher education could be the loss of these top performing researchers to other well-off states that continue to invest in higher education.

"There is a competition among universities for these serial inventors and 'star' faculty, and we could be in danger of losing them to other states if we do not invest in higher education. This loss of key innovators could have long lasting negatives effects on our economic development efforts."

13 2016-02-17
Monroe

Louisiana Tech Professor Honored by Underground Construction Technology Association


RUSTON, La. (Press Release) –

Dr. Tom Iseley, professor of civil engineering and construction engineering technology and director of the Trenchless Technology Center at Louisiana Tech University, has been selected a 2016 UCTA MVP (Most Valuable Professional) by the Underground Construction Technology Association (UCTA) and Underground Construction magazine.

Iseley received the prestigious honor for his contributions to the underground infrastructure industry during the UCTA’s MVP ceremony at the annual Underground Construction Technology International Conference and Exhibition. The special luncheon was also held recently at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia.

“I am overwhelmed with gratitude that the Underground Construction Technology Association and Underground Construction magazine have shown in selecting me for UCTA’s Most Valuable Professional for my contributions to the underground infrastructure industry” Iseley said of the award. “It is such an honor to realize that my peers have recognized my contributions to have this level of significance.

“My father and grandfather were water and sewer pipeline contractors, so it is even more meaningful to know that this recognition is for contributions made to the underground construction industry.”

Dr. Hisham Hegab, dean of the College of Engineering and Science at Louisiana Tech, said that Iseley’s selection as MVP is indicative of the innovation and expertise that Iseley brings to the field of trenchless technology.

“Dr. Iseley isn’t just an MVP for underground construction technology,” Hegab said. “He is an MVP for Louisiana Tech’s College of Engineering and Science, and we are fortunate to have him on our team. With extensive experience in the industry, he has very quickly brought renewed interest and enthusiasm to our Trenchless Technology Center, and I am excited about many of the new initiatives he is developing.”

Mr. Reginald Jeter, professional in residence for the construction engineering technology program at Louisiana Tech, and Louisiana Tech civil engineering and construction engineering technology students Justin Calhoun, Madison Fulford, Tyler Harrell, Zack Hernandez, Ryan Laborde, Moath Mohammed, Ethan Nugent, Samman Paudel, LaDarrius Thomas, Mallory Walters and Ian Wymore also participated in the conference as presentation assistants and were on hand to congratulate Iseley.

During his nearly 40 year career in the planning, design and construction of underground infrastructure systems, Iseley has served on the faculty of several universities and is a founding director of the North American Society for Trenchless Technology (NASTT). Iseley also served for three years as the chairman of the National Utility Contractors Association’s (NUCA) Trenchless Technology Committee.

At Louisiana Tech, Iseley helped establish the Trenchless Technology Center, an innovative and internationally renowned research center that is at the forefront of trenchless technology research, and the Buried Asset Management Institute-International, a non-profit, international corporation that evaluates and develops buried asset management protocols for underground water infrastructure.

In April 2015, Iseley was selected as a Distinguished Member of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) for his eminence in engineering, becoming just one of only 637 Distinguished Members ever selected by the ASCE. The ASCE represents more than 146,000 members of the civil engineering profession in 174 countries.
13 2016-02-17
Monroe

Wyly Tower to be razed, replaced


Plans are in place to demolish and replace Wyly Tower and Prescott Library on the Louisiana Tech University campus, but Dave Guerin, director of marketing and public relations for the university, cautioned that the project is in very early phases of a multi-year plan.

Wyly Tower of Learning, which was built in the early '70s, is a 16-story facility and is the tallest building in Ruston. It houses an an auditorium, part of the university library, the university archives, the computer labs, multiple colleges and several administrative offices. The second, 12th and 15th floors were gutted and renovated in 2006.


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Though the building was retrofitted with an automatic fire suppression system, it was constructed with asbestos-containing fire proofing that hinders the ability to upgrade the facility. Inspections from the Office of the State Fire Marshal cited deficiencies. The university has had an emergency project submitted since 2011 to resolve the citations.

Structural problems include:

Stairwells should exit to the exterior of the building;
Elevator shafts and stairwells need to be completely sealed;
Fire alarm system does not meet current code;
Windows allow water intrusion and are not energy efficient — asbestos prevents replacing the windows;
The 16-story height means city cannot maintain adequate fire protection, makes structure difficult to maintain;
Mechanical, control systems don't meet ventilation requirements; HVAC system is no longer reliable; elevators should be updated;
Building circulation, restrooms fail to meet ADA standards.
Guerin said the determination that the building had to be torn down and could not be repaired took years of study and contemplation. The three-story Prescott Memorial Library is adjacent to Wyly Tower and will be included in the demolition. The basement of the library leaks, causing air control problems and water damage.

He said the university still has no final plans for what will replace the structure and the earliest estimate for final plans in June 2017. Wyly Tower will stand until then. The new building likely wouldn't be built until 2019 or 2020.

A task force is working on where the library, other offices and department, will be housed while the renovation is ongoing. The university plans to occupy the tower until it's time for demolition. Guerin said the building is safe to occupy.

The project will be paid for through capital outlay with assistance from the Louisiana Bond Commission, but the current budget climate in the state could have an effect, Guerin said.

13 2016-02-16
Monroe

Louisiana Tech receives gift from Hunt, Guillot & Associates


RUSTON, La.

The College of Engineering and Science (COES) at Louisiana Tech University has received a generous gift of $200,000 from Ruston engineering firm Hunt, Guillot & Associates, to support its campaign to build a new Integrated Engineering and Science Education Building.
This donation from Hunt, Gillot & Associates (HGA), its second major gift to COES project, will contribute to building the largest academic building on the Louisiana Tech campus and will provide much needed space for the project-based learning that the Louisiana Tech College of Engineering and Science is known for. The Integrated Engineering and Science Building will further cement Louisiana Tech’s reputation as a national leader in engineering and science education.
Mr. Trott Hunt, founding partner and president of HGA and member of the COES’s Engineering and Science Foundation Board, notes the impact that the College has had on the company.
“Louisiana Tech has played a valuable role in our company from the beginning, providing a readily available source of qualified, competent graduates that have come in and been key contributors to our success,” Hunt said. “We are proud to be able to support the program by donating to the new engineering building and feel this facility will be an important part of the school and the community for years to come.”
Mr. Jay Guillot, founding partner and principal at HGA, echoes Hunt’s assertion that HGA’s commitment to Louisiana Tech is beneficial for both the University and the company.
“Louisiana Tech graduates have been integral to HGA’s success and growth,” Guillot said. “HGA’s support of Louisiana Tech’s College of Engineering and Science is a way to give back and help ensure the College’s future success. The impact of that support includes graduates who can help provide HGA with a solid engineering foundation in all departments. Their well-rounded education has been a key part of HGA’s flexibility and success.”
Hunt adds that in addition to professional ties to the Louisiana Tech community, family ties to the university also drive his desire to help support engineering and science at Tech.
“My father-in-law, Dr. Jack Canterbury, was a respected mechanical engineering professor at Louisiana Tech for many years, and part of our donation is to honor his service to the school and its graduates,” Hunt continued. “It is exciting to be a part of the growth and be able to ensure a first class learning environment for engineering students for the future.”
In addition to the Dr. Jack Canterbury Sophomore Engineering Lab, HGA’s combined gifts have established the Jay Guillot Freshman Honors Lab and the Don Plummer Freshman Honors Lab.
Dr. Hisham Hegab, dean of the College of Engineering and Science, says he is appreciative of the continuing relationship between Louisiana Tech and HGA.
“We are grateful to receive this additional gift from HGA for our new integrated engineering and science building,” Hegab said. “They have been a tremendous partner and supporter for our College and our students. These additional funds will allow us to fully equip two of the freshman engineering honors class labs to provide students an immersive environment for our project-driven curricula.”
HGA is a multi-disciplined project management and engineering services firm headquartered in Ruston, Louisiana, with more than 450 employees, 13 locations in Louisiana, Texas, Pennsylvania, Alabama and New York, and services throughout more than 30 states, Canada and Mexico.
Although private gifts to the Integrated Engineering and Science Building campaign have exceeded the original goal of $7.5 million, the scope of the project has been expanded, and the building will be approximately twice as large as initially planned. Gifts to the building are still needed to ensure that classrooms and labs are equipped and maintained with the latest technology, and named spaces are still available to thank and recognize significant contributors to the project.
The new building is on schedule for groundbreaking this spring with completion expected by fall of 2017. For more information about the project and gift opportunities, contact the College of Engineering and Science at gary@latech.edu or (318) 257-4971.

13 2016-02-16
Ruston

› home › TECH DIRECTOR EARNS TOP AWARD


Lindsey Keith-Vincent, director of the Science and Technology Education Center and Office of Outreach and External Funding for Louisiana Tech University’s College of Education, has earned the Post-Secondary Educator of the Year Award for Region VIII from the Louisiana Association of Computer Using Educators.

Keith-Vincent received the honor with over 400 colleagues and educational leaders in attendance at this year’s LACUE Conference in New Orleans.

LACUE provides a forum and support for educators to share ideas and materials as well as representing the needs of educators and students as they relate to the use of technology, especially computers, within instructional environments to regional, state, and national agencies.

“I was honored and humbled when contacted about the selection by Debbie Pender,” Keith-Vincent said. “LACUE is comprised of an amazing group of educators that are making great strides in e-learning, and I am fortunate to get to work with many in LACUE through SciTEC’s Office of Professional Education Outreach. I definitely believe I learn much more from those I serve than they do from me.”

As the director of SciTEC, Keith-Vincent collaborates with colleagues across the nation and develops STEM-focused funding and outreach initiatives in the PK-20 arena. She manages the Office of Professional Education Outreach, the IDEA Place, Louisiana’s only NASA Educator Resource Center, the “Funnery” makerspace, the CenterG research collaborative, and the Louisiana Tech Planetarium.

SciTEC has been a critical contributor to the design, development, and support of recent large scale university initiatives including the UTeachTech program, which is supported through a $1.5 million grant from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the National Math and Science Initiative.

In addition to her role in SciTEC, Keith-Vincent serves in the Office of Outreach and External Funding and provides leadership on effort related to growing and enriching personal and professional connections between the College of Education and its constituents and stakeholders.

“As director for Outreach and External Funding for the College of Education, Lindsey personifies the vision and spirit of our college in that she exemplifies excellence through education,” said Don Schillinger, dean of Tech’s College of Education. “Through the multiple units she directs, including the Science and Technology Education Center and the Office for Professional Education Outreach, Mrs. Keith-Vincent provides the resources, support and collaborative environment necessary for educators to grow professionally.

“I am very pleased that she is a key member of our leadership team, and speaking for the entire College of Education family, we are very proud of her for achieving this award.”

The College of Education at Tech seeks to provide high quality educational experiences for current and prospective professionals, from baccalaureate through doctoral levels, to enhance and extend the knowledge bases under-girding professional programs through research and other scholarly activities, and to deliver professional services to the various businesses, civic and educational communities through collaborative endeavors.
13 2016-02-16
Ruston

› home › TECH DIRECTOR EARNS TOP AWARD


Lindsey Keith-Vincent, director of the Science and Technology Education Center and Office of Outreach and External Funding for Louisiana Tech University’s College of Education, has earned the Post-Secondary Educator of the Year Award for Region VIII from the Louisiana Association of Computer Using Educators.

Keith-Vincent received the honor with over 400 colleagues and educational leaders in attendance at this year’s LACUE Conference in New Orleans.

LACUE provides a forum and support for educators to share ideas and materials as well as representing the needs of educators and students as they relate to the use of technology, especially computers, within instructional environments to regional, state, and national agencies.

“I was honored and humbled when contacted about the selection by Debbie Pender,” Keith-Vincent said. “LACUE is comprised of an amazing group of educators that are making great strides in e-learning, and I am fortunate to get to work with many in LACUE through SciTEC’s Office of Professional Education Outreach. I definitely believe I learn much more from those I serve than they do from me.”

As the director of SciTEC, Keith-Vincent collaborates with colleagues across the nation and develops STEM-focused funding and outreach initiatives in the PK-20 arena. She manages the Office of Professional Education Outreach, the IDEA Place, Louisiana’s only NASA Educator Resource Center, the “Funnery” makerspace, the CenterG research collaborative, and the Louisiana Tech Planetarium.

SciTEC has been a critical contributor to the design, development, and support of recent large scale university initiatives including the UTeachTech program, which is supported through a $1.5 million grant from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the National Math and Science Initiative.

In addition to her role in SciTEC, Keith-Vincent serves in the Office of Outreach and External Funding and provides leadership on effort related to growing and enriching personal and professional connections between the College of Education and its constituents and stakeholders.

“As director for Outreach and External Funding for the College of Education, Lindsey personifies the vision and spirit of our college in that she exemplifies excellence through education,” said Don Schillinger, dean of Tech’s College of Education. “Through the multiple units she directs, including the Science and Technology Education Center and the Office for Professional Education Outreach, Mrs. Keith-Vincent provides the resources, support and collaborative environment necessary for educators to grow professionally.

“I am very pleased that she is a key member of our leadership team, and speaking for the entire College of Education family, we are very proud of her for achieving this award.”

The College of Education at Tech seeks to provide high quality educational experiences for current and prospective professionals, from baccalaureate through doctoral levels, to enhance and extend the knowledge bases under-girding professional programs through research and other scholarly activities, and to deliver professional services to the various businesses, civic and educational communities through collaborative endeavors.
13 2016-02-16
Ruston

WYLY TOWER TO BE DEMOLISHED


Louisiana Tech University’s Wyly Tower of Learning, Ruston’s tallest building, is scheduled to be demolished due to infrastructural challenges.

Named in honor of Charles Wyly Sr. the building was constructed in 1973,
Sam and Charles Wyly. Charles Wyly Sr.’s sons, were major contributors to the construction costs of the building.

Wyly Tower is divided into two sections — Prescott Memorial Library and the administration offices located on the eleventh through sixteenth floors.

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13 2016-02-12
Monroe

La. Tech director earns post-secondary award for region


RUSTON. -– Lindsey Keith-Vincent, director of the Science and Technology Education Center (SciTEC) and Office of Outreach and External Funding for Louisiana Tech University’s College of Education, has earned the Post-Secondary Educator of the Year Award for Region VIII from the Louisiana Association of Computer Using Educators (LACUE.)

Keith-Vincent received the honor with over 400 colleagues and educational leaders in attendance at this year’s LACUE Conference in New Orleans. LACUE provides a forum and support for educators to share ideas and materials as well as representing the needs of educators and students as they relate to the use of technology, especially computers, within instructional environments to regional, state, and national agencies.

“I was honored and humbled when contacted about the selection by Mrs. Debbie Pender,” Keith-Vincent said. “LACUE is comprised of an amazing group of educators that are making great strides in e-learning, and I am fortunate to get to work with many in LACUE through SciTEC’s Office of Professional Education Outreach. I definitely believe I learn much more from those I serve than they do from me.”

As the director of SciTEC, Keith-Vincent collaborates with colleagues across the nation and develops STEM-focused funding and outreach initiatives in the PK-20 arena. She manages the Office of Professional Education Outreach (OPEO), the IDEA Place, Louisiana’s only NASA Educator Resource Center, the “Funnery” makerspace, the CenterG research collaborative, and the Louisiana Tech Planetarium.

SciTEC has been a critical contributor to the design, development, and support of recent large scale university initiatives including the UTeachTech program, which is supported through a $1.5 million grant from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and the National Math and Science Initiative.

In addition to her role in SciTEC, Keith-Vincent serves in the Office of Outreach and External Funding and provides leadership on effort related to growing and enriching personal and professional connections between the College of Education and its constituents and stakeholders.

“As Director for Outreach and External Funding for the College of Education, Lindsey personifies the vision and spirit of our college in that she exemplifies excellence through education,” said Don Schillinger, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Education. “Through the multiple units she directs, including the Science and Technology Education Center and the Office for Professional Education Outreach, Mrs. Keith-Vincent provides the resources, support and collaborative environment necessary for educators to grow professionally.

“I am very pleased that she is a key member of our leadership team, and speaking for the entire College of Education family, we are very proud of her for achieving this award.”

The College of Education at Louisiana Tech seeks to provide high quality educational experiences for current and prospective professionals, from baccalaureate through doctoral levels, to enhance and extend the knowledge bases under-girding professional programs through research and other scholarly activities, and to deliver professional services to the various businesses, civic and educational communities through collaborative endeavors.
13 2016-02-12
Ruston

A Message from Louisiana Tech President Les Guice – Higher Education Budget


Over the past eight years and as a result of the efforts of our campus community, Louisiana Tech University has made significant impacts and achieved substantial growth in the face of unprecedented financial constraints and operational challenges. These accomplishments have shown what can be accomplished when working together to create opportunities for our students and our state.
Louisiana Tech President Les Guice
Louisiana Tech President Les Guice
Despite these achievements and our commitment to building a better tomorrow for all Louisianans, we find ourselves today on the threshold of a budgetary crisis that could cripple higher education in the State of Louisiana and could destroy the momentum and ability of Louisiana Tech to produce the graduates and economic impacts needed to sustain a healthy and progressive workforce. The cuts that are being considered right now would have a crippling impact on nearly every aspect of our campus life and our community.
Now more than ever, the alumni and friends of Louisiana Tech must be active advocates for our university. We cannot sit on the sidelines and hope that others will speak loud enough for our institution and the higher education community. I strongly urge you to contact your legislators and community leaders, and tell them that funding for public universities must be preserved if we are to fulfill our obligations to our students, our community and industry partners, and the citizens of our state. We must effectively communicate to them that higher education is a critical part of the solution to Louisiana’s financial challenges, and not a source of the problem.
The upcoming special legislative session represents an unequivocal turning point for Louisiana Tech and, quite possibly, one of most important chapters in the higher education story that will be told for generations to come. Make no mistake about it…the budgetary decisions that are made in the next few weeks will affect every region, every community, every business and organization, and every Louisianan.
Please stay active and engaged in this fight for Louisiana Tech and higher education. I will keep you updated as best I can and would ask that you encourage others to lend their voices and advocate on behalf of Louisiana Tech and our entire higher education community.
Dr. Les Guice
President
13 2016-02-12
Ruston

CONSTRUCTION OF IESE BUILDING SET


What students now see as a gravel parking lot will soon evolve into the largest academic building Louisiana Tech University’s campus has ever known.

This structure, known as the Integrated Engineering and Science Education building, is expected to begin its ascent in April, university President Les Guice said.

He said the 130,000-square-foot, three-story IESE building will be a structure with permanence.

“We challenged the architects to do something special in the design,” Guice said, “to create a building that, 50 years from now when people are looking back, they’ll say, ‘Wow. That’s an impressive facility.’”

Ronnie Huckaby Jr., a junior mechanical engineering student, said he thinks the IESE will create a friendlier space for students to study and interact.

“I think I would have been more inclined to stay in the building and study,” Huckaby said. “I kind of wish that I would have had that when I was coming up. Maybe it will make more of the freshmen engineers meet new people.”

Hisham Hegab, dean of the College of Engineering and Science, said the IESE is designed to better accommodate project-based learning.

“That type of activity generally takes up a lot more space than maybe a traditional lecture type scenario,” Hegab said. “We’ve renovated a few spaces in Bogard Hall to accommodate for our freshman engineering curriculum, but we needed more facilities, more space, to accommodate that type of curriculum.”

Hegab said the IESE will have versatile classrooms that can serve a variety of purposes.

“There will be good-sized rooms that have tables that can be rearranged,” he said. “A lot of the rooms have power available to them from the ceiling. The main thing we kept in mind in the design of a lot of the classrooms is trying to make sure that they are going to be flexible for the long-term.”

Huckaby said the design of the flexible classrooms will improve engineering education.

“They have done a very good job of trying to make integrated classrooms,” he said. “To where it is very easy to teach, very easy to learn.”

Hegab said the IESE building will come complete with a student help desk.

“Because we are doing all this project-based learning, there’s going to be a student help desk or achievement center,” Hegab said.

“It’s going to provide students access to parts and kits and things that they need for their courses, as well as access to some of the prototype equipment that can help supplement what they do in class.”

In addition to flexible classrooms, Hegab said the engineering building will feature a glass atrium with a spiral staircase. The atrium is expected to serve as a gathering space for up to 1,000 people.

“One of the attractions for us in particular is that we want to have a large space in the building to be able to have events in,” Hegab said.

According to the campus master plan, the upcoming IESE building will, along with existing Bogard, Nethken and Carson Taylor halls, solidify the eastern area of campus as the science and engineering district.
13 2016-02-11
Baton Rouge

Louisiana Tech announces honor roll for fall quarter


Editor’s Note: Students whose names are followed by an asterisk were named to the president’s list.

Louisiana Tech University has announced its fall quarter president’s and dean’s honors lists.

Students named to the president’s honor list must earn a 3.8 grade-point average for nine semester hours with no grade lower than a B.

To be eligible for the dean’s honor list, a student must have a 3.5 GPA with no grade lower than a C for nine semester hours completed.

Only undergraduates with no incomplete grades are eligible to make either list.
Students earning the honors include the following:
East Feliciana Parish
Jackson: Norman Frank Cook IV and Sydney C. Womack

Slaughter: Freddricka Marie Carter, Lawrence Harvey Dautel IV* and Quinton L. Townsel*
West Feliciana Parish
St. Francisville: Russell L. Biggs, Callie A. Bujol, Brandon M. Stewart* and John Hamilton Willis*
13 2016-02-10
Monroe

Backlash against Civil Rights Movement set for discussion


RUSTON – In commemoration of Black History Month, Louisiana Tech University’s history department will sponsor, “The Southern Manifesto: Massive Resistance and the Fight to Preserve Segregation,” by Dr. John Kyle Day, an associate professor of history at the University of Arkansas at Monticello.

The talk will take place at the Lincoln Parish Library at 6 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 11 and is free and open to the public.

In this discussion, Day will recount the history of the Southern Manifesto, a statement issued by white southern segregationist politicians in defiance of the U.S. Supreme Court’s historic 1954 Brown decision, which outlawed school segregation and ushered in the civil rights movement’s era of direct action protest. Day will not only narrate the story of Southern Manifesto, which he sees as modern America’s “single worst episode of racial demagoguery,” but he will also explain “the statement's impact upon both the struggle for black freedom and the larger racial dynamics of postwar America.”


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The talk is based on Day’s recent book, “The Southern Manifesto: Massive Resistance and the Fight to Preserve Segregation,” published by the University Press of Mississippi. Day’s talk is jointly sponsored by the Louisiana Tech history department, the Lincoln Parish Library and the Lambda-Rho chapter of the Phi Alpha Theta history honor society, with the support of the McGinty Trust.

For additional information, contact Dr. David M. Anderson, associate professor of history and coordinator of Black History Month events at Louisiana Tech, at 318-257-2872 or by email at history@latech.edu. Additional information on Day’s book can be found at www.upress.state.ms.us/books/1865.
13 2016-02-10
Monroe

La. Tech showcases innovative clinical residency program


RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University’s TEAM Model Clinical Residency Program had an opportunity to showcase itself this week during a visit to Lincoln Parish by Julie Stephenson and Rebecca Freeland of the Louisiana Department of Education’s (LDOE) Believe and Prepare Educator Grant Program.

The TEAM (Teacher Educators and Mentors) program at Louisiana Tech represents a transformative redefinition of the expectations and roles of teacher educators and school mentors in the clinical experiences. The program, co-directed by Drs. Dawn Basinger and Amy Vessel from Louisiana Tech’s College of Education, has been embedded in several Lincoln Parish elementary schools. Participating interns are prepared for initial certification in a co-teaching environment surrounded by a TEAM of support.


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La. Tech historians present work at national conference

“The success we are seeing in the TEAM model is a testament to every single team member of our model, from the principals to district leaders to university leadership to the interns,” said Vessel. “However, the true key to the clinical residency program success continues to be the involvement of highly qualified and motivated mentor teachers.”

Michelle Chauvin, lead mentor and teacher at Cypress Springs Elementary in Ruston, modeled the TEAM evaluation system with intern Laura Davidson. Candice Cole, mentor and teacher at Glen View Elementary in Ruston, co-taught mathematics with Louisiana Tech intern Destiny Maxwell, using a parallel co-teaching strategy. Louisiana Tech interns and Lincoln Parish mentors participated in interviews at each of the schools including Ruston Elementary where Louisiana State Superintendent John White made a surprise visit.

White praised the strength of the partnership between Louisiana Tech’s teacher preparation program and Lincoln Parish Schools which he says is exemplified by the early success of the clinical residency program and TEAM model. White also shared his perspective on the value of the clinical residencies and offered the TEAM members an opportunity to share their reflections on this innovative instructional experience.

“This new and innovative approach to teacher training replaces the traditional student teaching model that was one-quarter/semester in duration, with a full-year clinical experience guided by highly qualified mentors,” said Basinger.

Louisiana Tech’s College of Education and Lincoln Parish School Board were among the state leaders in piloting a full-year (clinical residency) student teaching program with 11 volunteers during the 2014-2015 academic year. The next phase of this transition is occurring this year with 14 interns being placed in three local elementary schools.


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Dr. Don Schillinger, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Education, says this research-based exploration of longer and richer clinical experiences is expected to result in enhanced accountability, more rigorous teacher candidate selection and placement, increased integration of proven curricula, strengthened public school-university partnerships, and improved identification of what works and how to best support continuous improvement.

“While implementing this plan is achievable and worthwhile, it will be challenging in that it requires a reallocation and increase of resources and staffing and increased commitment by teacher candidates,” Schillinger said. “Given the challenges, we are very enthusiastic about the positive outcomes resulting from the collaboration occurring between the college’s teacher preparation professionals and the education leaders in Lincoln Parish.”

Dr. Bryan McCoy, chair of the department of curriculum, instruction and leadership added, “We are indebted to the LDOE for the seed funding provided by Believe and Prepare grants that serve as the activation energy and support to enact these transformative initiatives.”

In August 2015, the Clinical Residency Research Center was established in the College of Education to conduct research on the effectiveness of instructional models associated with clinical residency and mentoring. Through additional funding provided by the LDOE Believe and Prepare grants, new school mentor teams have been identified, and training is extending beyond Lincoln Parish to our new partners in Ouachita, Claiborne and Union Parishes.
13 2016-02-10
Monroe

Louisiana Tech Lecture Series Welcomes Distinguished Chemist, Chemical Biologist


RUSTON, La (Press Release) –

Louisiana Tech University will host a presentation by Dr. Wilma K Olson, the Mary I. Bunting Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Rutgers University, on February 15 for the next installment of its 2015-2016 New Frontiers in Biomedical Engineering seminar series.

Olson’s presentation titled, “Insights into Gene Expression and Packaging from Computer Simulation” will take place at 3:30 p.m. in the auditorium of University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus. The event is free and members of the campus and local communities are cordially invited to attend.

Within the nucleus of each cell lies DNA – an unfathomably long, twisted and intricately coiled molecule – segments of which make up the genes that provide the instructions that a cell needs to operate. Olson will discuss how a cell stores the genetic information inside the nucleus and how it is complicated by the necessity of maintaining accessibility to DNA for genetic processing.

“The talk will focus on our recent treatment of the communication between proteins attached to precisely constructed stretches of DNA and chromatin,” says Olson. “Our simulations account for the enhancement in communication detected experimentally. The molecular states captured in the simulations offer insights into the ways that the DNA and various proteins contribute to long-range communication along the genome.”

Olson received her doctoral degree from Stanford University (1971), an A.P. Sloan Fellowship (1975-1977), and a J. S. Guggenheim Fellowship (1978-79). She served as vice president of the International Union of Pure and Applied Biophysics and as President of the Biophysical Society. Olson is also a Fellow of the Biophysical Society, world-renowned lecturer and researcher with numerous publications, awards and honors.

The New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminar series is co-organized by Dr. Jamie Newman, the Scott Weathersby Endowed Professor in Zoology and Premedicine and an assistant professor in biological sciences, and Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore, assistant professor of biomedical engineering. The 2015-2016 series will spotlight interdisciplinary collaborations, alumni spotlights and features, and research discussions by renowned guest speakers from across the nation.

Sponsors for the 2015-2016 series include Lincoln Health Foundation, Louisiana Tech’s College of Engineering and Science, the College of Applied and Natural Sciences, the Office of the President, Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science, Sigma Xi, and generous donations from members of the community.

Olson’s presentation is sponsored by Louisiana Tech’s College of Engineering and Science. All lectures during the series will be recorded and can be accessed through the College of Engineering and Science’s events web page at http://coes.latech.edu/about-the-college/events.php.

For more information on Olson and her presentation, or other events in this year’s New Frontiers in Biomedical Research series, visit www.biomedicalresearch.wix.com/new-frontiers.
13 2016-02-05
Ruston

ECO-CAR TEAMS GEAR UP FOR DETROIT


Two local schools will seek to continue their success at the 2016’s Shell Eco-marathon Americas in Detroit.

The Louisiana Tech University Eco-Car team and Ruston High School’s Bearcat Motorsports, formerly known as Ruston High EcoCar, have been working all school year for the event in April.

Shell Eco-marathon displays student designed and built cars, focusing on the industry’s standards of energy efficiency.

In last year’s competition, Tech’s eco-car placed second in the UrbanConcept diesel category and broke barriers with a compressed natural gas-powered vehicle.

Tech’s natural gas vehicle was also the only natural gas car to pass technical inspection and run on the course.

Both cars received praise from former late night show host and car enthusiast Jay Leno.

Senior co-captain Xavier Theriot said the Tech team has 20 active members and the teams are working on their second place finishing diesel vehicle and a new Compressed Natural Gas vehicle.

Theriot said the teams goal is to continue its success from last year’s second place finish and also pass inspection and run the track for the CNG vehicle.

“It’s a hard task, but we’re focusing on one thing at a time and we feel like we can continue on with our success,” he said.

Freshman Kyle Dupree said the outside body of the CNG car is made of carbon fiber to make it lighter and the team designed all components of the car.

“From the wheels to the body, it’s all been done by us,” he said. “We plan to finish right before the competition.”

Freshmen Riley Spillman said it will take a team effort to build the vehicle and update the diesel vehicle, but she feels they can accomplish anything together.

“We’re young, but we help each other out,” she said. “We have a lot a of freshmen, but the upperclassmen show us what to do and we are getting a lot of experience along the way.”
Ruston High School’s team placed both in the diesel prototype and gasoline prototype competitions.

Competing against high school and university teams around the world, the team place sixth in the diesel prototype and 11th in the gasoline prototype competitions.

In addition to placing in the competitions, RHS senior Madison Wooley was selected as one of the 12 students from across the country to participate in a special session with Shell executives and scientists.

This year, the team is in the process of building the newest car — Bearcat III — and updated the older vehicle Bearcat II.

The teams’ teacher and co-sponsor Randall Elliott said their goal is to rank higher in the prototype gasoline category, the Bearcat II, and rank in the UrbanConcept design, Bearcat III.

Wooley said updates to Bearcat II and the building of Bearcat III have gone smoothly.
“We’ll finish right before the competition,” she said. “We have to make sure all the nuts and bolts are working before we turn it on.”

For now, the biggest help the Ruston High School team needs, is donations, senior Caisey Baster said.

“We’ll take any donations or sponsors,” she said. “We need the funding for the construction and help getting (to Detroit for the competition).”

In order to donate, sponsor or donors can email rhsecocar@gmail.com, dustinwhitlock@gmail.com or pick up a form from NewTech @ Ruston to make a donation.
“This team works hand in hand together and we’re proud,” senior Justin Griffin said. “We could use all the help we can get.”

Elliott said this year the team went through an interview process to pick the students.

“We want to show the community how the students are taking everything they have learned in school and applied it to this program,” he said. “These are great students working together for one common goal.”
13 2016-02-05
Ruston

› home › APARTMENT EXPANSION SET FOR TECH


Editor’s Note: This is the second part in a five-part series on the new changes coming to Louisiana Tech University’s campus in the next decade.

•••

This spring, Louisiana Tech University will break ground on a new era for the university–starting with new on-campus apartments.

As outlined in Tech’s campus master plan, a document that informs changes and improvements on campus, the university will begin the construction of 14 new on-campus apartments in the spring quarter.
13 2016-02-04
Baton Rouge

La. Tech’s students honored


Louisiana Tech University has announced its fall quarter president’s and dean’s honors lists.

To be eligible for the dean’s honor list, a student must have a 3.5 GPA with no grade lower than a C for nine semester hours completed.

Students earning a 3.8 academic GPA for nine semester hours with no grade lower than a B are named to the president’s list.

Only undergraduates with no incomplete grades are eligible to make either list.
Students earning the honors include:
East Baton Rouge Parish
Baker: Erika Wittenburg

GREENWELL SPRINGS: Ashton Alan Kennedy, Charlotte Elaine Murphy*, Cole Clint Rankin* and Kristen Nicole Shaffer

Pride: Garret Louis Broussard, Blanton J. Burgess and Blaine Michael Johnson

Zachary: Andrew R. Albritton*, Brittany Nicole Castello, Mary Elizabeth Day, Collin Harrison Gordon, Kyle David Gordon, Kaylan Brianna Hebert, Deanna S. Kaufman, Kaitlin Marie Maloy*, Seth A. McReynolds, Avery R. Neal, Stephen T. Samuel, Sarah Katherine Sullivan and Michael V. Tran.

Editor’s Note: Students whose names are followed by an asterisk earned recognition as members of the president’s honor list.
13 2016-02-04
Monroe

Louisiana Tech’s College of Engineering and Science honors Distinguished Alumni


RUSTON, La (Press Release) - The College of Engineering and Science at Louisiana Tech University is pleased to announce its 2016 Distinguished Alumni. Each honoree has typified the Louisiana Tech tradition of excellence as recognized industry and community leaders and role models for future generations of engineers and scientists.

Dr. Hisham Hegab, dean of the College of Engineering and Science says that these alumni are not only leaders in their fields and communities, but have exhibited an ongoing commitment to education, Louisiana Tech and the College of Engineering and Science.

“We are proud to announce the 2016 College of Engineering and Science Distinguished Alumni,” Hegab said. “These individuals have served as examples, not only for their colleagues and communities, but for our students, as well.”

The recipients were recognized last week at a dinner reception at Squire Creek Country Club. Faculty and staff from Louisiana Tech and the College of Engineering and Science celebrated with the honorees and their families.

The honorees and their accomplishments, professional achievements and/or humanitarian service are as follows:

+ Biomedical Engineering: Mr. Scott Robey, Vice President of Marketing at Regenesis Biomedical, Inc.

+ Chemical Engineering: Mr. Jerry Hudson (posthumous), Retired Engineering Manager and Vice President/ General Manager of BE&K Mobile, AL Office

+ Chemistry: Dr. Paula Craigo, Medical Co-Director of the Mayo Clinic Multidisciplinary Medical Simulation Center and Co-Chair of the Mayo Tri-State Simulation Council

+ Civil Engineering: Mr. Mike Pearson, Retired President and CEO of Orion Marine

+ Computer Science: Mr. George W. “G.W.” Estep II, President and CEO of ZedaSoft, Inc.

+ Construction Engineering Technology: Mr. Ken Hart, Co-Owner of SSi Incorporated and Vice President and Manager of the SSi Project Management and Estimating Team

+ Electrical Engineering: Dr. Jack Wisterman (posthumous), Retired Professor of Electrical Engineering at Louisiana Tech

+ Electrical Engineering Technology: Mr. Chris Remont, Director of Program Management for Bollinger Shipyards

+ Industrial Engineering: Mr. James Lamar Joyner, Retired Chief of the Kennedy Space Center Reliability and Safety Engineering Division in the Mission Assurance Directorate

+ Mathematics and Statistics: Dr. F. Russell Richards, Consultant with F.R. Richards Operations Research

+ Mechanical Engineering: Dr. Melvin R. Corley, Retired Academic Director for Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering and Construction Engineering Technology and Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering at Louisiana Tech

+ Physics: Dr. J. Andrew Green, Applied Physicist for National Security Technologies
+ Petroleum Engineering: Mr. L. Paul Teague, Retired Texaco Executive and Director of Cimarex Energy Company
13 2016-02-04
Monroe

La. Tech’s College of Engineering and Science honors Distinguished Alumni


The College of Engineering and Science at Louisiana Tech University has announced the 2016 Distinguished Alumni. Each honoree has typified the Louisiana Tech tradition of excellence as recognized industry and community leaders and role models for future generations of engineers and scientists.
Dr. Hisham Hegab, dean of the College of Engineering and Science says that these alumni are not only leaders in their fields and communities, but have exhibited an ongoing commitment to education, Louisiana Tech and the College of Engineering and Science.
“We are proud to announce the 2016 College of Engineering and Science Distinguished Alumni,” Hegab said. “These individuals have served as examples, not only for their colleagues and communities, but for our students, as well.”
The recipients were recognized last week at a dinner reception at Squire Creek Country Club. Faculty and staff from Louisiana Tech and the College of Engineering and Science celebrated with the honorees and their families.
The honorees and their accomplishments, professional achievements and/or humanitarian service are:
• Biomedical Engineering: Scott Robey, Vice President of Marketing at Regenesis Biomedical, Inc.
• Chemical Engineering: Jerry Hudson (posthumous), Retired Engineering Manager and Vice President/ General Manager of BE&K Mobile, AL Office
• Chemistry: Dr. Paula Craigo, Medical Co-Director of the Mayo Clinic Multidisciplinary Medical Simulation Center and Co-Chair of the Mayo Tri-State Simulation Council
• Civil Engineering: Mike Pearson, Retired President and CEO of Orion Marine
• Computer Science: George W. “G.W.” Estep II, President and CEO of ZedaSoft, Inc.
• Construction Engineering Technology: Ken Hart, Co-Owner of SSi Incorporated and Vice President and Manager of the SSi Project Management and Estimating Team
• Electrical Engineering: Dr. Jack Wisterman (posthumous), Retired Professor of Electrical Engineering at Louisiana Tech
• Electrical Engineering Technology: Chris Remont, Director of Program Management for Bollinger Shipyards
• Industrial Engineering: James Lamar Joyner, Retired Chief of the Kennedy Space Center Reliability and Safety Engineering Division in the Mission Assurance Directorate
• Mathematics and Statistics: Dr. F. Russell Richards, Consultant with F.R. Richards Operations Research
• Mechanical Engineering: Dr. Melvin R. Corley, Retired Academic Director for Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering and Construction Engineering Technology and Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering at Louisiana Tech
• Physics: Dr. J. Andrew Green, Applied Physicist for National Security Technologies
• Petroleum Engineering: L. Paul Teague, Retired Texaco Executive and Director of Cimarex Energy Company
For more information about the Distinguished Alumni Awards, please contact the College of Engineering and Science’s Office of Development at 318-257-4971 or gary@latech.edu.
13 2016-02-03
Baton Rouge

Locals named to La. Tech’s honor lists


Louisiana Tech University in Ruston recently announced its fall quarter president’s and dean’s honor lists.

Students with at least a 3.8 grade-point average on a minimum of nine semester hours completed, with no grade lower than a B, are named to the president’s list.

Dean’s honor list students must earn at least a 3.5 GPA with no grade lower than a C on a minimum of nine semester hours completed.

Baton Rouge students include Michael Anthony Aguillard Jr., Jacquelyn Natalie Alfandre*, Heather Louise Bauer*, Kayla Elizabeth Bauer*, Alexis H. Bellows*, Fabian Peter Blache IV, John A. Bowman*, Kristie Lynn Braud*, Mallory Anne Breaux*, Johne Nicholas Brooks, Emily M. Caro*, Taylor Nicole Causey*, Sydney Elise Copeland*, Meghan G. Corie, Ashleigh E. Culivan*, Mazie Marie Dieterich*, Jane E. Emory, Avery B. Enete, Ammar I. Essajee, Kaleigh A. Faciane*, Amy Michelle Faucheux, Eulalie Tessier Grodner, Victor Alexander Gutierrez, Lauren Elizabeth Hart, John T. Hitt, Mary A. Iseral*, Lauren N. Janway* and Jennifer D. Jones*.

Also, Adam Karl Lala*, Susannah Lee Leblanc*, Sydney Lombardo, Andrew S. Mackay*, Mackenzie A. May*, Jacie Jo McClure*, Madelyn Nicole McKnight*, Matthew Joseph Mire, Travis J. Moore, Anna Grace Morris*, Katherine Elisabeth Morris*, Matthew Robert Mueller, Marisa Elle Noonan*, Christian Michael Norton, Nonyelum N. Oko, Samuel Whitney Parsons, Nicholas Pate*, Victoria Renee Reier, Azriel O. Richardson*, Kyle Edward Robichaux*, Bryan Anderson Saffell, Marcus D. Sandifer, Alexander D. Say, James Maxwell Slezak*, Sarah Elizabeth Sparks*, Seth Christopher Spinner, Bailey M. Thibodeaux*, Nathan Joel Turner*, Jon-Austin Volland, Joseph David Wilkerson and Andrew Lane Wilkinson*.

Editor’s Note: An asterisk marks students named to the president’s honor list.
13 2016-02-03
Ruston

EDWARDS TO VISIT RUSTON


Gov. John Bel Edwards is coming to Ruston on Thursday as part of his first visit to North Louisiana since his election.

Edwards is scheduled to tour the Louisiana Tech and Grambling State universities and the Lincoln Parish Public Safety Complex before meeting with officials from a five-parish area at 2:30 p.m. at the Ruston Civic Center.

Edwards will also attend a fundraiser at Squire Creek Country Club in Choudrant, then speak before addressing the Monroe Chamber of Commerce banquet Thursday night.
13 2016-02-02
Monroe

La. Tech historians present work at national conference


RUSTON – Two Louisiana Tech University history professors presented research findings at the annual meeting of the American Historical Association, held recently in Atlanta, Georgia.

Assistant professor of history Jovana Babovic spoke on “Josephine Baker in Belgrade and Zagreb: Opposing Receptions to European Entertainment in Interwar Yugoslavia.” Babovic’s paper was featured on a panel devoted to the legendary African American entertainer’s reception in Central and Eastern Europe in the period between the world wars.

Babovic joined the faculty of the College of Liberal Arts at Louisiana Tech in fall 2015 and holds a doctorate in history from the University of Illinois. She teaches classes in world history and modern European history.

Appearing on a panel co-sponsored by the Conference on Latin American History, professor of history Stephen Webre addressed the topic “Still Forgotten? Reflections on Central America in the 17th Century.”

A member of the Louisiana Tech faculty since 1982, Webre received his doctorate in history at Tulane University. He teaches courses in world history, United States history and Latin American history. Webre holds the Garnie W. McGinty Chair in History and currently serves as associate dean of the College of Liberal Arts.
13 2016-01-28
Ruston

PROFESSOR TO SERVE AS PANELIST


David K. Mills, professor of biological sciences and biomedical engineering at Louisiana Tech University, to serve as a panelist for the National Science Foundation Graduate Student Fellowship and the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship programs.

Mills, an internationally recognized researcher in the field of biomaterials and regenerative medicine, was selected as a reviewer and panelist for the two fellowship programs which are recognized among the premier NSF graduate research fellowship programs in the nation.
13 2016-01-27
Ruston

TECH INTRODUCES MASTER PLAN 2020


Editor’s Note: This is the first part in a five-part series on the new changes coming to Louisiana Tech University’s campus in the next decade.

•••

As Louisiana Tech University grows, students should expect to see several changes on and around the campus, including building demolitions, groundbreakings for new academic and residential buildings and improved parking.

University President Les Guice has announced the spring ground breaking for 14 new on-campus apartment buildings and an approximately 130,000–square foot integrated engineering and sciences education building.
13 2016-01-26
Monroe

La. Tech professor to serve as panelist for NSF fellowship programs


RUSTON – Dr. David K. Mills, professor of biological sciences and biomedical engineering at Louisiana Tech University, to serve as a panelist for the National Science Foundation Graduate Student Fellowship (GRSF) and the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship programs.

Mills, an internationally recognized researcher in the field of biomaterials and regenerative medicine, was selected as a reviewer and panelist for the two fellowship programs which are recognized among the premier NSF graduate research fellowship programs in the nation.

This is the second time Mills has been invited to review for the GRSF program. He has also served as a panelist for the Department of Defense’s NDSEG program on three other occasions and twice for the Department of Defense’s Science, Mathematics and Research for Transformation (SMART) Scholarship for Service Program.

“I am honored to serve and assist our nation in selecting outstanding candidates for fellowships that will support their continued study and research in STEM fields,” said Mills. “These are among our country’s most gifted scholars and their fellowship support will assist them in continuing their research, completing their advanced degrees and contributing to the progress of our nation’s research efforts.”

The NSF GRSF program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines who are pursuing research-based master’s and doctoral degrees at accredited United States institutions. The NSDEG and SMART programs were established by the Department of Defense to support undergraduate and graduate students in pursuing degrees in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines. The programs aim to increase the number of civilian scientists and engineers working at DoD laboratories.

These fellowships are awarded to outstanding students who will pursue a doctoral degree in, or closely related to, an area of interest to the Department of Defense. These national programs seek diverse review panels composed of outstanding researchers from a wide range of institutions, geographic locations, and backgrounds. The qualifications for panelists include outstanding research in an NSF-supported field, the ability to evaluate interdisciplinary proposals, knowledge of Federal Merit Review Criteria and experience in mentoring undergraduate and graduate students.
13 2016-01-26
Ruston

TECH PREPARES FOR BUDGET CUTS


Louisiana Tech University will have to chop almost $5 million more out of its budget if higher education is forced into another round of spending cuts.

“Should cuts of this scale come to fruition, it will force us to make hard decisions that will impact all areas of the campus,” university President Les Guice said.

13 2016-01-25
Monroe

Local Universities and Colleges React to Possible Budget Cuts


Governor John Bel Edwards in the spirit of transparency, met with higher education leaders from across the state to discuss the possibility of major cuts to higher ed.

"I felt good that at least we heard it from the governor as to what the plan was and what he hoped to do to solve this dilemma over the next couple of weeks," says Dr. Nick Bruno, President of the University of Louisiana at Monroe.

Bruno says the governor met in-person with educators earlier this week to discuss Louisiana's $750 million budget shortfall and the possible cuts to higher ed. Bruno says ULM would have to cut about $4.1 million.

"We've expended a significant portion of our dollars, so to try to come up with 4.1 million dollars for the remaining 4-5 months would be very difficult. There is no fat left on the bone," says Bruno.

Governor Edwards asked colleges and universities to come up with a plan of where the cuts would happen; Bruno says the impact of the cuts would be felt by the entire university.

"We may have to explore the opportunity, or the possibility rather, of one of our two summer schools, what would that save if we eliminated one of those, how many employees would have to be furloughed, how long would they have to be furloughed...," says Bruno.

Dr. Barbara Hanson, chancellor of Louisiana Delta Community College, says regardless of the proposed cuts, the college would continue its focus of preparing students to join Louisiana's workforce.

"We're going to continue providing educational services and opportunities for the citizens of North Louisiana.

We're going to focus on our mission and do what we do," says Hanson.

The $131 million cut is just a proposal and not set in stone, but one local lawmaker says if he was asked to vote on the cuts, he would vote no.

"We all understand that we've got a budget deficit, we all understand that we've got to find those dollars, but I know that I wouldn't vote for those kind of severe cuts and I don't think my colleagues would either," says Senator Mike Walsworth.

He warns against cuts to higher education, saying, "we've got to be careful with higher education, with as many cuts as we've already hit with higher education, I'd hate for us to go back down this road again."

Walsworth says even the threat of cuts is damaging to Louisiana as it could give people the wrong idea about the stability of the state.

"There planning on cutting education by 130 million dollars, I need to plan on going somewhere else, maybe I can go to Texas or Ole Miss or the University of Arkansas just to get my education because I can't count on the state government of Louisiana to be there for me," says Walsworth.

Louisiana Tech University's President, Les Guice, released the following statement regarding the cuts:

Public higher education institutions across the state are facing another significant and serious budget reduction situation. The $4.6 million cut that Louisiana Tech is being asked to potentially absorb in this fiscal year will be most challenging and will truly test our ability to fulfill our mission. Despite the financial challenges that we have faced in recent years, Louisiana Tech’s faculty and staff are second-to-none and have proven the ability to work together to move our university forward. They have also made a difference in advancing educational opportunities that are the future for economic prosperity for our state. We can’t afford to lose the momentum that has been gained. I have had many conversations with higher education and business leaders and our elected officials who have expressed the desire to navigate this situation and minimize the impacts of these cuts on our state’s public institutions. I am committed to work closely with them to find solutions that are in the best interests of our students and our citizens. Now is the time for all of us to come together to protect the future of our state.
13 2016-01-22
Monroe

A.E. Phillips Laboratory School at La Tech is a “Top 25” public school


RUSTON, La (Press Release) - A.E. Phillips Laboratory School at Louisiana Tech University is one of the 25 best public schools in the state, according to its School Performance Score released recently by the Louisiana Education Department as part of its 2015 accountability assessment of the state’s publically-funded schools.

A.E. Phillips’ School Performance Score of 123.2 earned the school an overall grade of “A” and was the highest of any school in north central Louisiana, and one of the highest in the northern region of the state. School Performance Scores are based on a variety of factors including student achievement, academic indicators and measures of career and college readiness (such Carnegie credits earned through 9th grade), and graduation rates.

“I am extremely proud of our faculty, staff and students,” said Dr. Joanne Hood, principal of A.E. Phillips. “They work hard every day to ensure that A. E. Phillips remains as one of the premier schools in the state. Our teachers spend many hours researching and preparing lessons to provide our students with the best educational opportunities possible.

“High parental involvement also contributes to our school’s success. A. E. Phillips Laboratory School is a wonderful place to work and learn and I am honored to be part of such an outstanding school.”

Known for its strong academic focus and innovative teaching strategies as well as its emphasis on the arts, A.E. Phillips is a K-8 school that serves as a model for the use of research-based instructional practices as well as the integration of technology in the classroom. Additionally, it offers a site for Louisiana Tech education majors to observe and practice effective teaching strategies in a supportive environment.

Directed by Hood and her 15 years of experience as an effective educational leader, teachers at A.E. Phillips have received numerous awards and are highly qualified with substantial amounts of experience, and advanced education. The AEP faculty are an integral part of the College of Education as many mentor teacher candidates and serve as adjunct professors.

“As a distinguished laboratory school, A.E. Phillips and the teacher preparation programs housed with the College of Education accrue mutual benefit from the research-based collaboration that occurs between the college’s faculty and teacher candidates and AEP’s highly qualified teaching professionals,” said Dr. Don Schillinger, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Education. “It is a privilege to play a role in providing excellence through education as evidenced by A.E. Phillips most recent School Performance Score.

“The score is a tribute to the entire A.E. Philips family – teachers, administrators, staff, parents, community partners, Louisiana Tech University and most importantly, the students of A.E. Phillips Laboratory School.”

According to the Louisiana Education Department’s website description of the School Performance Scores, elementary school (K-6) scores are based entirely on student achievement on annual assessments in English language arts, math, science, and social studies. Schools may also earn points for significant improvement with students who are academically behind.

Middle school (7-8) scores are based 95 percent on student achievement on annual assessments with the final 5 percent based on credits earned through the end of students’ 9th grade year. As is the case with elementary schools, middle schools may also earn points for significant improvement with students who are academically behind.
13 2016-01-22
Monroe

A.E. Phillips at La. Tech is a “Top 25” public school


RUSTON – A.E. Phillips Laboratory School at Louisiana Tech University is one of the 25 best public schools in the state, according to its School Performance Score released recently by the Louisiana Education Department as part of its 2015 accountability assessment of the state’s publically-funded schools.

A.E. Phillips’ School Performance Score of 123.2 earned the school an overall grade of “A” and was the highest of any school in north central Louisiana, and one of the highest in the northern region of the state. School Performance Scores are based on a variety of factors including student achievement, academic indicators and measures of career and college readiness (such Carnegie credits earned through 9th grade), and graduation rates.

“I am extremely proud of our faculty, staff and students,” said Dr. Joanne Hood, principal of A.E. Phillips. “They work hard every day to ensure that A. E. Phillips remains as one of the premier schools in the state. Our teachers spend many hours researching and preparing lessons to provide our students with the best educational opportunities possible.

“High parental involvement also contributes to our school’s success. A. E. Phillips Laboratory School is a wonderful place to work and learn and I am honored to be part of such an outstanding school.”

Known for its strong academic focus and innovative teaching strategies as well as its emphasis on the arts, A.E. Phillips is a K-8 school that serves as a model for the use of research-based instructional practices as well as the integration of technology in the classroom. Additionally, it offers a site for Louisiana Tech education majors to observe and practice effective teaching strategies in a supportive environment.

Directed by Hood and her 15 years of experience as an effective educational leader, teachers at A.E. Phillips have received numerous awards and are highly qualified with substantial amounts of experience, and advanced education. The AEP faculty are an integral part of the College of Education as many mentor teacher candidates and serve as adjunct professors.

“As a distinguished laboratory school, A.E. Phillips and the teacher preparation programs housed with the College of Education accrue mutual benefit from the research-based collaboration that occurs between the college’s faculty and teacher candidates and AEP’s highly qualified teaching professionals,” said Dr. Don Schillinger, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Education. “It is a privilege to play a role in providing excellence through education as evidenced by A.E. Phillips most recent School Performance Score.

“The score is a tribute to the entire A.E. Philips family – teachers, administrators, staff, parents, community partners, Louisiana Tech University and most importantly, the students of A.E. Phillips Laboratory School.”

According to the Louisiana Education Department’s website description of the School Performance Scores, elementary school (K-6) scores are based entirely on student achievement on annual assessments in English language arts, math, science, and social studies. Schools may also earn points for significant improvement with students who are academically behind.

Middle school (7-8) scores are based 95 percent on student achievement on annual assessments with the final 5 percent based on credits earned through the end of students’ 9th grade year. As is the case with elementary schools, middle schools may also earn points for significant improvement with students who are academically behind.
13 2016-01-22
Monroe

A.E. Phillips at La. Tech is a “Top 25” public school


RUSTON – A.E. Phillips Laboratory School at Louisiana Tech University is one of the 25 best public schools in the state, according to its School Performance Score released recently by the Louisiana Education Department as part of its 2015 accountability assessment of the state’s publically-funded schools.

A.E. Phillips’ School Performance Score of 123.2 earned the school an overall grade of “A” and was the highest of any school in north central Louisiana, and one of the highest in the northern region of the state. School Performance Scores are based on a variety of factors including student achievement, academic indicators and measures of career and college readiness (such Carnegie credits earned through 9th grade), and graduation rates.

“I am extremely proud of our faculty, staff and students,” said Dr. Joanne Hood, principal of A.E. Phillips. “They work hard every day to ensure that A. E. Phillips remains as one of the premier schools in the state. Our teachers spend many hours researching and preparing lessons to provide our students with the best educational opportunities possible.

“High parental involvement also contributes to our school’s success. A. E. Phillips Laboratory School is a wonderful place to work and learn and I am honored to be part of such an outstanding school.”

Known for its strong academic focus and innovative teaching strategies as well as its emphasis on the arts, A.E. Phillips is a K-8 school that serves as a model for the use of research-based instructional practices as well as the integration of technology in the classroom. Additionally, it offers a site for Louisiana Tech education majors to observe and practice effective teaching strategies in a supportive environment.

Directed by Hood and her 15 years of experience as an effective educational leader, teachers at A.E. Phillips have received numerous awards and are highly qualified with substantial amounts of experience, and advanced education. The AEP faculty are an integral part of the College of Education as many mentor teacher candidates and serve as adjunct professors.

“As a distinguished laboratory school, A.E. Phillips and the teacher preparation programs housed with the College of Education accrue mutual benefit from the research-based collaboration that occurs between the college’s faculty and teacher candidates and AEP’s highly qualified teaching professionals,” said Dr. Don Schillinger, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Education. “It is a privilege to play a role in providing excellence through education as evidenced by A.E. Phillips most recent School Performance Score.

“The score is a tribute to the entire A.E. Philips family – teachers, administrators, staff, parents, community partners, Louisiana Tech University and most importantly, the students of A.E. Phillips Laboratory School.”

According to the Louisiana Education Department’s website description of the School Performance Scores, elementary school (K-6) scores are based entirely on student achievement on annual assessments in English language arts, math, science, and social studies. Schools may also earn points for significant improvement with students who are academically behind.

Middle school (7-8) scores are based 95 percent on student achievement on annual assessments with the final 5 percent based on credits earned through the end of students’ 9th grade year. As is the case with elementary schools, middle schools may also earn points for significant improvement with students who are academically behind.
13 2016-01-21
Ruston

TECH TO PERFORM ‘SLEEPING BEAUTY’


Once upon a time, there was princess who was named “Sleeping Beauty,” and at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, the Louisiana Tech University’s Department of Theatre will retell her story — “through magic and a little bit of hair product” — at the Howard Auditorium located in Louisiana Tech’s Howard Center for the Performing Arts.

Paul B. Crook, associate professor of theatre at Tech, is directing the retell and said the play is not the usual story.

“It’s really fun,” he said. “It’s not the Disney version of Sleeping Beauty, let’s be clear about that.”



13 2016-01-19
Monroe

Louisiana Tech Department of Theatre Set for Production of "Sleeping Beauty"


Once upon a time, in a land far away, the fairy tale “Sleeping Beauty” was born. Louisiana Tech University’s Department of Theatre is bringing the story to life and to the stage, January 26-31 in Howard Auditorium on the Louisiana Tech campus.

The curtain on James Barry’s wonderful story of action, adventure, hilarity, and true love, directed by Paul B. Crook, associate professor of theatre in Louisiana Tech’s School of the Performing Arts, will go up at 7:30 p.m. January 26-30, and 2:00 p.m. January 31.

Carabosse, the wicked witch, sentences the young Princess Aurora to death by spinning wheel, but the good fairies (the slim Fairy Liquid and the plump Fairy Cakes) commute this to a long boring sleep – a sleep from which the Princess can only be woken by a kiss from her true love. Featuring a loveable cast of characters, including a madcap nanny, wacky fairies, seriously challenged henchmen and of course, Princess Aurora herself, Barry’s adaptation of this classic tale will delight the entire family.

Tickets are $20 for general admission, $10 for students with student ID, $15 for youth under 14 years old and $15 for seniors 65 years old and over. The Royal Tea ticket package, which includes the show and your exclusive invitation for the Royal Tea event, is $35 for general admission, $15 for students with a student ID, $30 for youth under 14 years old, and $30 for seniors 65 years old and over.

For ticket information and group rates, please contact the Box Office, located in the lobby of Stone Theatre in the Howard Center for the Performing Arts, at 318-257-3942, Monday-Friday from 1:30 p.m. to 4:45 p.m.

For more information on this production or the Louisiana Tech Department of Theatre, please visit us at www.latechuniversitytheatre.com, “Like” our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/latechtheatre, or follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @LaTechTheatre.
13 2016-01-19
Monroe

Louisiana Tech Department of Theatre set for production of “Sleeping Beauty”


RUSTON Once upon a time, in a land far away, the fairy tale “Sleeping Beauty” was born. Louisiana Tech University’s Department of Theatre is bringing the story to life and to the stage, Jan. 26-31 in Howard Auditorium on the Louisiana Tech campus.

The curtain on James Barry’s wonderful story of action, adventure, hilarity, and true love, directed by Paul B. Crook, associate professor of theatre in Louisiana Tech’s School of the Performing Arts, will go up at 7:30 p.m. January 26-30, and 2 p.m. Jan. 31.

Carabosse, the wicked witch, sentences the young Princess Aurora to death by spinning wheel, but the good fairies (the slim Fairy Liquid and the plump Fairy Cakes) commute this to a long boring sleep – a sleep from which the Princess can only be woken by a kiss from her true love. Featuring a loveable cast of characters, including a madcap nanny, wacky fairies, seriously challenged henchmen and of course, Princess Aurora herself, Barry’s adaptation of this classic tale will delight the entire family.

Tickets are $20 for general admission, $10 for students with student ID, $15 for youth under 14 years old and $15 for seniors 65 years old and over. The Royal Tea ticket package, which includes the show and your exclusive invitation for the Royal Tea event, is $35 for general admission, $15 for students with a student ID, $30 for youth under 14 years old, and $30 for seniors 65 years old and over.

For ticket information and group rates, please contact the Box Office, located in the lobby of Stone Theatre in the Howard Center for the Performing Arts, at 318-257-3942, Monday-Friday from 1:30 p.m. to 4:45 p.m.

For more information on this production or the Louisiana Tech Department of Theatre, please visit us at www.latechuniversitytheatre.com, “Like” our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/latechtheatre, or follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @LaTechTheatre.
13 2016-01-19
Monroe

Donating for a cause: Tech, Summitt to host 'We Back Pat' night


It's rarely a good thing when a coach needs to get out their checkbook for a basketball game.

In this case for Louisiana Tech women's hoops coach Tyler Summitt, it's the polar opposite.

To honor his mother, the legendary basketball coach Pat Summitt, Tyler Summitt plans to dish out some cash for Saturday's Conference USA game when the Lady Techsters host Florida Atlantic as part of 'We Back Pat' night.

Tyler Summitt will donate $1 for every Tech student in attendance and $50 for every offensive rebound his team pull downs. The proceeds will go to the Pat Summitt Foundation.

Pat Summitt, 63, was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's in 2011 and was forced to step down as Tennessee's coach the following year. Since then, the Pat Summitt Foundation was created and various teams across the country host 'We Back Pat' games to raise money and awareness for the disease.

"My mom has given so much to everybody in women's basketball, not just me. So, to be able to have a 'We Back Pat' game is the way to pay it back and also for a bigger cause which is Alzheimer's," Tyler Summitt said after Thursday's win over FIU.

"That's really the purpose she is taking on right now to be the face of Alzheimer's. I think it's very meaningful because we can give back in a way. She was always the one giving and giving and now we can give back."
13 2016-01-19
Ruston

› home › HOVERBOARDS BANNED AT TECH, GSU TO FOLLOW


Louisiana Tech University joins three other Louisiana universities banning the popular hands-free, battery-powered hoverboards following scores of injuries and fires related to the devices.

In an email sent to Tech students, faculty and staff, Tech announced its intentions to ban the hoverboards.
13 2016-01-19
Ruston

THANKING TECH’S GUIDANCE


I and we owe this school the highest level of appreciation and gratitude.

There were multiple times this past week that I had these thoughts. It occurred to me that there are occasions when a person or group should be thanked, and forgive me for quoting Forrest Gump, “for no particular reason.” No, this is not a special occasion or time as far as I know. There is no special anniversary date this week that might be recognized as stemming from an event in 1894, a mere 122 years ago.
13 2016-01-15
Monroe

Louisiana Tech chemistry student published in high profile, international journal


RUSTON — Joshua Tully, senior chemistry student at Louisiana Tech University, has coauthored a paper titled “Halloysite Clay Nanotubes for Enzyme Immobilization,” which has been published in “Biomacromolecules,” a highly influential, international journal of the American Chemical Society (ACS.)

Tully, along with Dr. Yuri Lvov, professor of chemistry and nanosystems engineering in Louisiana Tech’s College of Engineering and Science and Institute for Micromanufacturing, and Raghuvara Yendluri, a graduate student in Louisiana Tech’s biomedical engineering program, authored the paper which outlines their work in using halloysite clay nanotubes, a natural and promising material in biomedical technology.

The applications of the research presented in “Halloysite Clay Nanotubes for Enzyme Immobilization” could result in a cheap and environmentally safe antimicrobial coating for hospitals, which may help in the fight against superbugs.

“Biomacromolecules” focuses on interdisciplinary investigations exploring the interactions of macromolecules with biological systems and their environments as well as biological approaches to the design of polymeric materials. The journal covers sustainable chemistry, monomers and polymers based on natural and renewable resources, metabolism of polymers and polymer degradation products, polymer conjugates, in vivo and in vitro biocatalysis, biomacromolecular assembly, biomimetics, biomineralization, bioprocessing, and biorecycling.

Lvov says that Tully’s research success is indicative of his dedication and aptitude. “Joshua is a rare example of a mature undergraduate student who has shown research results at the level of a productive Ph.D. graduate student,” Lvov said.

“I am grateful for the opportunities Louisiana Tech and my advisor, Dr. Lvov, have provided for me,” Tully said. “Without support from both, I would never have dreamed of accomplishing so much.”
13 2016-01-14
Monroe

Chemistry student at La Tech published in high profile, international journal


RUSTON, La (Press Release) - Joshua Tully, senior chemistry student at Louisiana Tech University, has coauthored a paper titled “Halloysite Clay Nanotubes for Enzyme Immobilization,” which has been published in “Biomacromolecules,” a highly influential, international journal of the American Chemical Society (ACS.)

Tully, along with Dr. Yuri Lvov, professor of chemistry and nanosystems engineering in Louisiana Tech’s College of Engineering and Science and Institute for Micromanufacturing, and Raghuvara Yendluri, a graduate student in Louisiana Tech’s biomedical engineering program, authored the paper which outlines their work in using halloysite clay nanotubes, a natural and promising material in biomedical technology.

The applications of the research presented in “Halloysite Clay Nanotubes for Enzyme Immobilization” could result in a cheap and environmentally safe antimicrobial coating for hospitals, which may help in the fight against superbugs.

“Biomacromolecules” focuses on interdisciplinary investigations exploring the interactions of macromolecules with biological systems and their environments as well as biological approaches to the design of polymeric materials. The journal covers sustainable chemistry, monomers and polymers based on natural and renewable resources, metabolism of polymers and polymer degradation products, polymer conjugates, in vivo and in vitro biocatalysis, biomacromolecular assembly, biomimetics, biomineralization, bioprocessing, and biorecycling.

Lvov says that Tully’s research success is indicative of his dedication and aptitude. “Joshua is a rare example of a mature undergraduate student who has shown research results at the level of a productive Ph.D. graduate student,” Lvov said.

This article is one of many Tully has coauthored during his undergraduate studies and research activities at Louisiana Tech. In September 2015, Tully published a chapter in “Nanomaterials and Nanoarchitectures,” a NATO Science for Peace and SecuritySeries C: Environmental Security book.

Tully is one of the research leaders in Lvov’s research group. In June 2015, he was awarded a Greater Research Opportunities (GRO) Fellowship with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for his research on natural clay nanotubes for water purification. Tully also mentors a team of researchers and is the point of contact for collaboration with the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, on medicine nanoformulation.

Tully has traveled to Kazan Federal University in Russia as a National Science Foundation (NSF) Fellow for halloysite nanosafety research and recently completed a highly exclusive internship in Florida with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which is awarded to only five students nationwide.

Tully credits Lvov and Louisiana Tech for providing him with opportunities for experiences beyond those generally available to undergraduates.

“I am grateful for the opportunities Louisiana Tech and my advisor, Dr. Lvov, have provided for me,” Tully said. “Without supportfrom both, I would never have dreamed of accomplishing so much.”
13 2016-01-14
Ruston

TECH STUDENT’S PAPER PUBLISHED


Joshua Tully, senior chemistry student at Louisiana Tech University, has coauthored a paper titled “Halloysite Clay Nanotubes for Enzyme Immobilization,” which has been published in “Biomacromolecules,” a highly influential, international journal of the American Chemical Society.
13 2016-01-06
Monroe

Committee of 100: Revamp tax structure


RUSTON — Louisiana's Committee of 100, a group of the state's most influential business men and women, doesn't believe the Legislature can afford to wait to make budget reforms, and its members are in the midst of a statewide road show to offer their take on possible solutions.

"We can't leave it to the Legislature to solve this on its own," Michael Olivier, chief executive of the C100, said during a presentation here Tuesday morning at Louisiana Tech University before moving the caravan to CenturyLink in Monroe for an afternoon encore. "We have to help them."

And the help can't come fast enough. Gov.-elect John Bel Edwards estimates the state faces a $750 million mid-year deficit and a potential $1.9 billion budget hole next year.

"We're truly at a turning point for the state of Louisiana," Tech President Les Guice said.

The Committee for 100 commissioned help from the Tax Foundation to compile its "Framework for the Future" report.

Among the key suggestions:

Unify state and local sales tax collections and eliminate sales tax exemptions on services;

Eliminate the state income tax deduction for federal taxes paid;

Flatten corporate income tax brackets to a single rate of 5 percent;

Repeal the the inventory tax and inventory tax credit;

Increase the gas and diesel tax and index it to inflation.

"We have to find a way out of this structural deficit," Olivier said.

State Rep. Julie Stokes, R-Kenner, a certified public accountant, is an advocate of the Committee for 100's plan and its spokesman during the road show presentations.

"It's time for us to make some really smart decisions," Stokes said.

State Sen. Mike Walsworth, R-West Monroe, and Sen.-elect Jim Fannin, R-Jonesboro, who served three terms in the House, attended the Ruston event.

"We have to find a balance of cuts and raising revenue and common ground on where to move forward," Walsworth said.

The Committee for 100 won't have to wait long to see if any of its reforms take root. Edwards plans to call lawmakers into a special session next month to address the current and future deficits.

Follow Greg Hilburn on Twitter @GregHilburn1
13 2016-01-04
Baton Rouge

Louisiana Tech names fall quarter graduates


RUSTON — Louisiana Tech University’s fall quarter commencement exercises were held Nov. 21, with diplomas awarded to 311 graduates.

Commencement marked the close of the fall academic quarter.

Graduates from the area include Garret M. Aymond, master of business administration, of St. Francisville.
13 2016-01-04
Lafayette

La Tech merges agriculture department, school of forestry


RUSTON, La. (AP) - Louisiana Tech says it's merging its agriculture department and forestry school to create more chances for collaboration and improve efficiency.

A news release says the merger won't affect degree programs, and has been approved by the Board of Regents and the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors.

The new School of Agriculture Sciences and Forestry remains in the College of Applied and Natural Sciences.

The college's dean, Gary Kennedy, says the two divisions have hosted separate FFA events to bring high-school students to campus, and now one school will coordinate such events. He says it will also make student recruiting more efficient.

The new school's interim director is agriculture professor William Green.

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
13 2016-01-04
Monroe

Kiplinger Ranks Louisiana Tech University Among Nation's Best College Values


RUSTON, La. --

Kiplinger, the nation’s most recognized publisher of business forecasts and personal finance advice, has ranked Louisiana Tech University No. 1 in the state and No. 66 in the nation for in-state students at public institutions, in its recently released Best College Values 2016 report.

Based on quality and affordability, Kiplinger’s Best College Value analyzed over 1,200 colleges and universities across the country to determine the top 300 best values. Specifically, they looked at factors such as competitiveness, graduation rates, academic support, cost of financial aid and student indebtedness. The quality measures account for 55 percent of total points with cost measures accounting for 45 percent.

Louisiana Tech also ranked No. 1 in Louisiana among public universities for out-of-state students and No. 80 nationally. Louisiana State University was the only other public institution to make the Best College Value list, ranking No. 70 for in-state students and No. 83 for out-of-state students.

“Louisiana Tech has built a national reputation for providing our students with a high quality education and college experience, and an excellent value,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “I am pleased to see our efforts recognized by respected organizations like Kiplinger and credit the faculty and staff of Louisiana Tech for earning us these national accolades.

“We look forward to continuing to build our brand on a foundation of offering students the best quality, value and return on investment on their college educations.”

A total of four Louisiana institutions made the overall list of the best 300 public and private institutions including Tulane University (162), Louisiana Tech (249), Louisiana State (257) and Centenary College (274). Washington and Lee University (VA) topped the overall list followed by Princeton University, Harvard University, Davidson College (NC) and Swarthmore College (PA).

Kiplinger’s Best College Values report capped a strong 2015 for Louisiana Tech that included a number of national rankings. In addition to a fifth consecutive Tier One National Universities ranking, U.S. News & World Report placed Louisiana Tech at No. 1 in the nation among pubic institutions for graduating students with the lease average amount of debt. PayScale.com ranked Louisiana Tech No. 1 in the state and No. 70 in the nation in its 2015-2016 College Salary Report for average mid-career salaries for graduates.

PayScale.com also ranked Tech as the state’s top institution in its 2015 College ROI Report in both annual percent ROI and 20-year net ROI, for in-state and out-of-state students, and No. 13 in the nation (in-state tuition) in highest annual percent ROI for students living on-campus and receiving financial aid. Business Insider, the Internet’s largest business news website, ranked Louisiana Tech the nation’s sixth most underrated college, according to its annual list of the 50 Most Underrated Colleges in America.

For the complete list of Kiplinger’s Best College Values 2016, visit http://www.kiplinger.com.
13 2016-01-04
Monroe

Bouquets for the week


* Bouquets to the Louisiana Tech student chapter of the Institute of Industrial Engineering for receiving the 2015 Gold Award, the highest recognition given to a chapter for its performance.

* Bouquets to the Tech Bulldogs for their 47-28 win over Arkansas State in the New Orleans Bowl. Coach Skip Holtz and the entire team had an outstanding season, especially running back Kenneth Dixon with his record-setting 215 yards and four touchdowns in the game.
13 2016-01-04
Monroe

Louisiana Tech University among nation’s best college values


RUSTON, La (Press Release) - Kiplinger, the nation’s most recognized publisher of business forecasts and personal finance advice, has ranked Louisiana Tech University No. 1 in the state and No. 66 in the nation for in-state students at public institutions, in its recently released Best College Values 2016 report.

Based on quality and affordability, Kiplinger’s Best College Value analyzed over 1,200 colleges and universities across the country to determine the top 300 best values. Specifically, they looked at factors such as competitiveness, graduation rates, academic support, cost of financial aid and student indebtedness. The quality measures account for 55 percent of total points with cost measures accounting for 45 percent.

Louisiana Tech also ranked No. 1 in Louisiana among public universities for out-of-state students and No. 80 nationally. Louisiana State University was the only other public institution to make the Best College Value list, ranking No. 70 for in-state students and No. 83 for out-of-state students.

“Louisiana Tech has built a national reputation for providing our students with a high quality education and college experience, and an excellent value,” said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. “I am pleased to see our efforts recognized by respected organizations like Kiplinger and credit the faculty and staff of Louisiana Tech for earning us these national accolades.

“We look forward to continuing to build our brand on a foundation of offering students the best quality, value and return on investment on their college educations.”

A total of four Louisiana institutions made the overall list of the best 300 public and private institutions including Tulane University (162), Louisiana Tech (249), Louisiana State (257) and Centenary College (274). Washington and Lee University (VA) topped the overall list followed by Princeton University, Harvard University, Davidson College (NC) and Swarthmore College (PA).

Kiplinger’s Best College Values report capped a strong 2015 for Louisiana Tech that included a number of national rankings. In addition to a fifth consecutive Tier One National Universities ranking, U.S. News & World Report placed Louisiana Tech at No. 1 in the nation among pubic institutions for graduating students with the lease average amount of debt. PayScale.com ranked Louisiana Tech No. 1 in the state and No. 70 in the nation in its 2015-2016 College Salary Report for average mid-career salaries for graduates.

PayScale.com also ranked Tech as the state’s top institution in its 2015 College ROI Report in both annual percent ROI and 20-year net ROI, for in-state and out-of-state students, and No. 13 in the nation (in-state tuition) in highest annual percent ROI for students living on-campus and receiving financial aid. Business Insider, the Internet’s largest business news website, ranked Louisiana Tech the nation’s sixth most underrated college, according to its annual list of the 50 Most Underrated Colleges in America.
13 2016-01-04
Monroe

National Accolades, Institutional Growth Defined Louisiana Tech in 2015


National rankings and recognitions, growth in enrollments, and the development of new industry partnerships and programs are just some of the successes that helped to distinguish Louisiana Tech University in 2015.

In chronological order, here are ten of the most noteworthy institutional stories released this past year by Louisiana Tech’s Department of University Communications.

Louisiana Tech ranked among nation’s top public colleges by The Business Journals

Louisiana Tech University was one of only two institutions in the State of Louisiana to be ranked among the nation’s top 150 public colleges, according to The Business Journals’ 2015 Best Public Colleges in America list released in February. The Business Journals analyzed 484 four-year public colleges, using data from the National Center for Education Statistics and the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey as well as rankings by Forbes, Kiplinger, U.S. News & World Report, and Washington Monthly.

Louisiana Tech ranked No. 1 again in ROI for both in-state and out-of-state students

PayScale.com’s 2015 College ROI Report, released in March, ranked Louisiana Tech University No. 1 in the State of Louisiana among all public and private institutions in overall return on investment (ROI) for both in-state and out-of-state students. Louisiana Tech earned the state’s highest ranking in both annual percent ROI and 20-year net ROI for students living on campus and receiving financial aid, and who are paying in-state or out-of-state tuition. Louisiana Tech also ranked No. 13 in the nation (in-state tuition) in highest annual percent ROI for students living on-campus and receiving financial aid.

Louisiana Tech named a National Center of Academic Excellence for cyber education

In May, The National Security Agency (NSA) and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) designated Louisiana Tech University as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education. Louisiana Tech is one of less than 50 comprehensive research universities in the United States and the only institution in the State of Louisiana to attain these designations.

Louisiana Tech, Cyber Innovation Center partner for Louisiana Tech Research Institute

With the anticipated growth in the region over the next decade, the leadership of the Cyber Innovation Center and Louisiana Tech formalized a new partnership in July with the creation of the Louisiana Tech Research Institute (LTRI). LTRI is a not-for-profit corporation dedicated to promoting and advancing public/private partnerships, accelerating applied research and development, and the commercialization of technology in three fields: cyber, energy, and resiliency.

Louisiana Tech ranked No. 1 again in state in mid-career salaries for graduates

Graduates from Louisiana Tech University earn higher median mid-career salaries than graduates from any other university in Louisiana, according to PayScale.com’s 2015-2016 College Salary Report released in August. Louisiana Tech ranks No. 1 among Louisiana’s public and private institutions with mid-career graduates earning an average of $86,200 annually. Louisiana State University was second in the mid-career rankings with $85,600 and Southern University was third with $81,100. Tech also ranks No. 70 in the nation in median mid-career earnings among graduates from public institutions, and No. 91 in the nation among research universities.

Louisiana Tech University achieves record student enrollment

In a September announcement of its fall 2015 headcount, Louisiana Tech enrolled a record 12,414 students for the fall quarter – an increase of 1,143 or 10.1 percent over last year and eclipsing the previous record enrollment of 11,975 students set back in fall of 2003. Along with the record number of students attending Louisiana Tech, the quality of students in the freshman class was highlighted by an average ACT score of 24.5 – the third consecutive year that mark had been achieved or exceeded

Louisiana Tech is No. 1 in nation among public universities for lowest average student debt

Students that graduate from Louisiana Tech University do so with the lowest average amount of student loan debt of any public national university in the United States, according to U.S. News and World Report’s 2016 Best Colleges list. Louisiana Tech was the first public institution to appear on the list of National Universities with the least average amount of student debt at graduation and is sixth in the nation overall, joining the likes of Princeton University, California Institute of Technology, Brigham Young University, Yale University, Harvard University, Dartmouth College and the University of California-Berkley, in the top eight.

Louisiana Tech earns fifth consecutive Tier One national ranking from U.S. News & World Report

For the fifth straight year, Louisiana Tech University earned a Tier One ranking among “National Universities,” according to U.S. News & World Report’s 2016 Best Colleges list released in September. Louisiana Tech, along with Tulane University and Louisiana State University, were the only institutions in the state to achieve a Tier One National Universities designation. Louisiana Tech improved its ranking over the previous year, moving up from 201 to 199 on the 2016 US News & World Report list.

Louisiana Tech’s reputation, graduate salaries earn it another national ranking

Louisiana Tech University is the sixth most underrated college in the nation, according to a list released in November of the 50 Most Underrated Colleges in America for 2015 by Business Insider, the Internet’s largest business news website. Business Insider compared U.S. News and World Report’s rankings of the best universities in the country with PayScale.com’s 2015-2016 College Salary Report, which ranks more than 1,000 colleges and universities, to calculate their rankings.

Kiplinger ranks Louisiana Tech among nation’s best college values

Kiplinger, the nation’s most recognized publisher of business forecasts and personal finance advice, ranked Louisiana Tech University No. 1 in the state and No. 66 in the nation for in-state students at public institutions, in its Best College Values 2016 report released in December. Louisiana Tech also ranked No. 1 in Louisiana among public universities for out-of-state students and No. 80 nationally.

For more info on these and other Louisiana Tech stories from the past year, visit the News@Tech webpage at http://news.latech.edu and subscribe to the RSS feed at http://www.latech.edu/rss for future articles distributed by the university.
13 2016-01-04
Monroe

La. Tech Department of Theatre announces cast for 'Sleeping Beauty'


RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University’s Department of Theatre has announced the ensemble cast for its second production of the year, James Barry’s “Sleeping Beauty,” directed by Paul B. Crook, associate professor of theatre in Louisiana Tech’s School of the Performing Arts.

Performances of “Sleeping Beauty” are scheduled for 7:30 p.m. Jan. 26-30, and 2 p.m. Jan. 31 in Howard Auditorium located in Louisiana Tech’s Howard Center for the Performing Arts.

The cast includes the following principle performers:

Liam Mcintyre (Shreveport) as Narrator
Zach Bentley (Ruston) as King
Hannah Faith Johnson (El Dorado, Arkansas) as Nanny Biscuit
Collin Cagle (Covington) as Fester
Olivia Willcox (Bossier City) as Fairy Cakes
Emilia Meinert (El Dorado, Arkansas) as Fairy Liquid
Courtney VanEaton Theodos (Shreveport) as Carabosse
Cameron Harmeyer (Covington) as Herman
Emmie Lancon (Lake Charles) as Princess Aurora
Johnny Marley (Bossier City) as Prince Charming
Ensemble cast performers include:

The Forest Creatures – Elena Baines, Bryant Ford Crook, Sydney Gorman, Abigail Holton, Grisham Locke, Adrianna Robbins, Sylas Slaughter, Reagan Talley, Isabella Tucker, CJ Wilson and Leighann Myers as the Phantom Owl.
The Toys and Briarhedge – Chirstan Bates, Mollie Budds, Jess Cashion, Emma Montgomery, Kendra Rowell and Andrew Webb.
The Palace Residents – Mallory Austin, Nikki Crain, Austin Harrison, Grace Holmes, Miranda Howland, Ginger Johnson, Monique Mapes, Maggie McAdams, Mary Napper, Jamie Williams and Courtney Wilson.
The Village Residents – Noah Ceserta, Emmaline Grace Christian, CeCe Crook, Caleb Diebold, Kat Finney, Roxanne Holton, Leighann Myers, Millie Omps, Brenna Robinson, Claire Sanders, Rosie Shultz, Tullie Simpkins, and Tyra Washington.
In the story of Sleeping Beauty, Carabosse, the wicked witch, sentences the young Princess Aurora to death by spinning wheel, but the good fairies (the slim Fairy Liquid and the plump Fairy Cakes) commute this to a long, boring sleep – a sleep from which the Princess can only be woken by a kiss from her true love. Featuring a loveable cast of characters, including a madcap nanny, wacky fairies, seriously challenged henchmen and of course, Princess Aurora herself, Barry’s adaptation of this classic tale will delight the entire family.

For more information on this production or the Louisiana Tech Department of Theatre, visit www.latechuniversitytheatre.com, the Facebook page at www.facebook.com/latechtheatre or follow it on Twitter and Instagram at @LaTechTheatre.
13 2016-01-04
Ruston

LAP DESKS DONATED TO NEW TECH


The Hampton Inn of Ruston recently donated more than 80 lap desks to New Tech @ Ruston.

Director of Sales for Hampton Inn Brandon Sutherland said the lap desks are no longer brand standard for the hotel properties.

Sutherland said he contacted Lincoln Parish Schools ACHIEVE Coordinator Cathi Cox-Boniol with an offer to donate the lap desks to enhance student productivity.

Cox-Boniol said the lap desks will help the continually on-the-go students at New Tech.
13 2016-01-04
Shreveport

Kiplinger ranks La. Tech among nation's best college values


Kiplinger has ranked Louisiana Tech University No. 1 in the state and No. 66 in the nation for in-state students at public institutions, in its recently released Best College Values 2016 report.

Based on quality and affordability, Kiplinger's Best College Value analyzed over 1,200 colleges and universities across the country to determine the top 300 best values. Specifically, they looked at factors such as competitiveness, graduation rates, academic support, cost of financial aid and student indebtedness. The quality measures account for 55 percent of total points with cost measures accounting for 45 percent.

Louisiana Tech also ranked No. 1 in Louisiana among public universities for out-of-state students and No. 80 nationally. Louisiana State University was the only other public institution to make the Best College Value list, ranking No. 70 for in-state students and No. 83 for out-of-state students.

"Louisiana Tech has built a national reputation for providing our students with a high quality education and college experience, and an excellent value," said Louisiana Tech President Les Guice. "I am pleased to see our efforts recognized by respected organizations like Kiplinger and credit the faculty and staff of Louisiana Tech for earning us these national accolades.

"We look forward to continuing to build our brand on a foundation of offering students the best quality, value and return on investment on their college educations."

A total of four Louisiana institutions made the overall list of the best 300 public and private institutions including Tulane University (162), Louisiana Tech (249), Louisiana State (257) and Centenary College (274). Washington and Lee University (VA) topped the overall list followed by Princeton University, Harvard University, Davidson College (NC) and Swarthmore College (PA).

Kiplinger's Best College Values report capped a strong 2015 for Louisiana Tech that included a number of national rankings. In addition to a fifth consecutive Tier One National Universities ranking, U.S. News & World Report placed Louisiana Tech at No. 1 in the nation among pubic institutions for graduating students with the lease average amount of debt. PayScale.com ranked Louisiana Tech No. 1 in the state and No. 70 in the nation in its 2015-2016 College Salary Report for average mid-career salaries for graduates.

PayScale.com also ranked Tech as the state's top institution in its 2015 College ROI Report in both annual percent ROI and 20-year net ROI, for in-state and out-of-state students, and No. 13 in the nation (in-state tuition) in highest annual percent ROI for students living on-campus and receiving financial aid. Business Insider, the Internet's largest business news website, ranked Louisiana Tech the nation's sixth most underrated college, according to its annual list of the 50 Most Underrated Colleges in America.

For the complete list of Kiplinger's Best College Values 2016, visit http://www.kiplinger.com.
13 2015-12-26
Monroe

La. Tech professor named a National Academy of Inventors Fellow


RUSTON – Dr. Leon Iasemidis, the Rhodes Eminent Chair of Biomedical Engineering at Louisiana Tech University and director of the Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science (CBERS), has been named a 2015 Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).

The NAI Fellows Selection Committee chose to induct Iasemidis in recognition of his “highly prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society.” Election to NAI Fellow status is a high professional distinction accorded to academic inventors who have demonstrated a highly prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and welfare of society.

“I am really honored with this national distinction,” said Iasemidis. “I look forward to continuing along the path of translational research discoveries from biomedical engineering to medicine for the good of humanity.”

Iasemidis is an internationally recognized expert in nonlinear dynamics and the detection, prediction and control of crises in complex coupled systems. He is also one of the founders of the field of seizure prediction, is a co-founder of two companies involved in neuromodulation and control of epilepsy, and is the co-author of 10 patents in this area. His research and over 100 peer-reviewed publications, patents, interdisciplinary conference organizations, presentations and invited talks have stimulated an international interest in brain dynamics, particularly the prediction and control of epileptic seizures and understanding of the mechanisms of epileptogenesis.

Iasemidis has had nearly 5,000 scholarly citations and has an h-index of 33, and his research has been highlighted in multiple forums, including the New York Times, Discover magazine, the Teaching Company, and the American Society for the Advancement of Science.

“Our College is fortunate to have such a talented innovator working with our students to address challenges in the Presidential BRAIN initiative which is aimed at revolutionizing our understanding of the human brain,” said Dr. Hisham Hegab, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Engineering and Science.

In addition to his own research, Iasemidis has served on the editorial board of Epilepsia, the IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, the International Journal of Neural Systems and the Annals of Biomedical Engineering. He is a reviewer for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the National Science Foundation (NSF) and several international sponsoring agencies and foundations. Iasemidis is a Senior Member of IEEE and a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineers.

The NAI Fellows will be officially inducted as part of the Fifth Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors on April 15, 2016 at the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). NAI Fellows represent more than 190 prestigious research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutions. The 2015 Fellows account for more than 5,300 issued U.S. patents, bringing the collective patents held by all NAI Fellows to more than 20,000.

USPTO Commissioner for Patents Andrew Hirshfeld will provide the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, medal and rosette pin.
13 2015-12-26
Monroe

La. Tech merges Department of Agricultural Sciences, School of Forestry


RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University has received approval from the Board of Regents and the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors to merge its Department of Agricultural Sciences and School of Forestry in to a single School of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry within the College of Applied and Natural Sciences.

The merger of these two units, which are closely aligned in academic areas related to natural resources and consolidation, will create a number of new learning, research and collaboration opportunities for both students and faculty. It would also encourage strong interdisciplinary interactions in teaching and outreach, and allow for greater efficiencies in administrative and staffing costs.

“Given that all of the degree programs in agricultural sciences and forestry are natural resources related, merging the two units together is a natural fit,” said Dr. Gary Kennedy, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Applied and Natural Sciences. “The newly formed School of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry will give Louisiana Tech’s South Campus a larger and more unified presence, and will add several efficiencies.

“In the past, for example, both groups have hosted district and state FFA career development events that bring many high school students to the Louisiana Tech campus. Now, one school will coordinate those events. In addition, student recruiting will be enhanced and more efficient, with targeted recruitment strategies that will cover more geographic areas.”

Kennedy said the degree programs that are currently in place will not be affected, so current students will not see a change in curricula or courses offered due to the merger.

Dr. William Green, professor of agricultural sciences in the College of Applied and Natural Sciences, will serve as interim director of the new School of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry.

“I feel this merger is a benefit to the university and the students,” said Green. “We will now be combining resources of two very complex units and this should result in more efficient use of personnel, equipment, and facilities by the university and the students.

The consolidation of the Department of Agricultural Sciences and School of Forestry would reduce the number of academic units within the College of Applied and Natural Sciences from six to five. The proposed School of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry would be second to the School of Biological Sciences in terms of the number of undergraduate students per unit within the College of Applied and Natural Sciences.

As interim director, Green said he looks forward to leading the effort of these two very complex units being blended into one efficient unit.

“The result I am hoping to achieve is that the School of Agricultural Sciences and Forestry will become recognized for identifying, recruiting, retaining, educating, and developing agriculture and forestry students so they will become positive additions to society,” Green said.
13 2015-12-18
Ruston

Louisiana Tech University professor named a National Academy of Inventors Fellow


RUSTON, La. - Dr. Leon Iasemidis, the Rhodes Eminent Chair of Biomedical Engineering at Louisiana Tech University and director of the Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science (CBERS), has been named a 2015 Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).

The NAI Fellows Selection Committee chose to induct Iasemidis in recognition of his "highly prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society." Election to NAI Fellow status is a high professional distinction accorded to academic inventors who have demonstrated a highly prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and welfare of society.

"I am really honored with this national distinction," said Iasemidis. "I look forward to continuing along the path of translational research discoveries from biomedical engineering to medicine for the good of humanity."

Iasemidis is an internationally recognized expert in nonlinear dynamics and the detection, prediction and control of crises in complex coupled systems. He is also one of the founders of the field of seizure prediction, is a co-founder of two companies involved in neuromodulation and control of epilepsy, and is the co-author of 10 patents in this area. His research and over 100 peer-reviewed publications, patents, interdisciplinary conference organizations, presentations and invited talks have stimulated an international interest in brain dynamics, particularly the prediction and control of epileptic seizures and understanding of the mechanisms of epileptogenesis.

Iasemidis has had nearly 5,000 scholarly citations and has an h-index of 33, and his research has been highlighted in multiple forums, including the New York Times, Discover magazine, the Teaching Company, and the American Society for the Advancement of Science.

"Our College is fortunate to have such a talented innovator working with our students to address challenges in the Presidential BRAIN initiative which is aimed at revolutionizing our understanding of the human brain," said Dr. Hisham Hegab, dean of Louisiana Tech's College of Engineering and Science.

In addition to his own research, Iasemidis has served on the editorial board of Epilepsia, the IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, the International Journal of Neural Systems and the Annals of Biomedical Engineering. He is a reviewer for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the National Science Foundation (NSF) and several international sponsoring agencies and foundations. Iasemidis is a Senior Member of IEEE and a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineers.

The NAI Fellows will be officially inducted as part of the Fifth Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors on April 15, 2016 at the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). NAI Fellows represent more than 190 prestigious research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutions. The 2015 Fellows account for more than 5,300 issued U.S. patents, bringing the collective patents held by all NAI Fellows to more than 20,000.

USPTO Commissioner for Patents Andrew Hirshfeld will provide the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, medal and rosette pin.

###
13 2015-12-17
Monroe

La. Tech’s College of Business receives $500,000 gift for scholarships The News Star


RUSTON – The College of Business at Louisiana Tech University has received a gift of $500,000 for scholarships from an anonymous donor.

The “College of Business REAL Scholarships” are for incoming freshmen (high school seniors) living in Caddo and Bossier Parishes, and are received in addition to funds from Louisiana’s Taylor Opportunity Program for Students (TOPS). Although TOPS covers more than 25 percent of total annual expenses for a full-time undergraduate, many students need more assistance to be able to attend college.

The scholarship funds the College of Business received will help cover tuition, room and board, books, and fees – up to 80 percent of the total cost of a Louisiana Tech education.

“The roughly 11,000 Louisiana alumni living in the Caddo and Bossier area, including myself, are blessed to have had the opportunity to attend this outstanding University,” said the donor. “A solid education has helped enrich my life beyond my wildest dreams. In establishing this scholarship, more students in Caddo and Bossier Parishes will have the opportunity to attend the College of Business at Louisiana Tech and improve their quality of life.

“I hope other alumni will be inspired to give back to one of our states greatest assets in Louisiana Tech University.”

“We are honored and thankful to receive this support for our students,” said Dr. Chris Martin, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Business. “With the rising cost of education and declining state funding, this money will put a Tier 1 Louisiana Tech education within financial reach of many more students.”

Through market-driven academic programs and impactful scholarship and teaching, the College of Business at Louisiana Tech University produces business and academic leaders who are innovative, entrepreneurial, analytical and technologically skilled for a competitive global marketplace.

For more information on how to support Louisiana Tech's College of Business, please contact Mary Susan Britt in University Advancement/External Relations, at marysusan@latechalumni.org or (318) 257-3741. Please visit www.business.latech.edu or connect with the College of Business on Facebook (www.facebook.com/LATechBusiness), Twitter (@LATechBUSN) and Instagram (@LATechBusiness).
13 2015-12-16
Baton Rouge

311 earn degrees during Louisiana Tech ceremony


Louisiana Tech University’s fall quarter commencement exercises were Nov. 21, with diplomas awarded to 311 graduates.

Baton Rouge graduates included William Aubrey Anders, bachelor of general studies; Quinnton Maurice Anderson, bachelor of science; Taylor S. Ashton, master of science engineering; Blake T. Bolin, bachelor of arts; Jonnique Ursin Caldwell, bachelor of general studies; Angelica Marie Champagne-masden, graduate certificate; Allison Iris Falgout, master of arts; Robert Mccord Hane, bachelor of science forestry; and Sarah E. Henthorn, master of science.
13 2015-12-14
Monroe

Louisiana Tech Planning Student Housing Project


Getting onto campus and living in student housing is an exciting part of college life.

One Louisiana Tech freshman says he loves meeting and getting to know his new neighbors.

David Howson, a freshman student, says, "Dorm life, you can just walk downstairs into the lobby and make a new friend every night."

However, another student says the dorms at Tech have him looking at housing options off campus.

J'Trel Sapp, a student, says, "I was always in these dorms. They are really out dated. If they had more of the apartment style dorms, I think everyone would come here a lot more."

Louisiana Tech officials say an update is in the works. They're trying to secure around one hundred million dollars in bond money for a housing project.

Jim King, the Vice President for Student Advancement at Louisiana Tech, says, "It would be 880 new beds for Louisiana Tech University. Different types of configurations trying to address student needs and different amenities that our students are looking for. There will be some replacement housing. Some of our traditional resident halls will be removed."

Plans for the new dorms include different styles, such as apartment and suite layouts. Officials say the goal is to help students to be more successful at Tech. They hope improved dorms would allow more students to continue onto their sophomore year and even increase enrollment.

"We will bring about some brand new facilities to our campus all geared toward student success and growth in terms of student population, growth in diversity of the student body, and all geared toward students and their ability to be successful here at Louisiana Tech," says King.

Students a say having a home away from home is important for a good college experience.

"Dorm life is pretty fun just with friends and everything like that. It is not about where you live; it is about the community inside of it."

Louisiana Tech officials say the refinancing part of the project is expected to be completed next week, and the construction on the new dorms would start in march of next year to be completed around spring of 2017.
13 2015-12-11
Monroe

La. Tech to offer online option for graduate engineering degree program


RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University’s College of Engineering and Science has developed an online option for its Master of Science in Engineering degree with a concentration in Industrial Engineering that will be open for students to apply beginning with the winter 2016 academic quarter.

The newly-developed online option will be part of Louisiana Tech’s Global_Campus and will be available to students around the world. The program will be open to traditional master’s degree students, students who are currently employed full time in industry and active military who have earned a bachelor’s degree in engineering.

Through the Global_Campus, the online graduate engineering degree program will empower students from all walks of life to earn an education that can be tailored to their busy schedules and that will possess the same level of quality and cutting-edge education that Louisiana Tech’s College of Engineering and Science has become known for. The curriculum will include projects as well as theory-based assignments, and will provide off-campus students with the same educational opportunities as the students who attend classes on campus.

In addition to the Master of Science in Engineering online degree option, a Louisiana Tech University Six Sigma Black Belt certification is also available to all students at Louisiana Tech. The industrial engineering program has offered the Louisiana Tech University Six Sigma Green Belt certification since 2012. The certifications are available to both undergraduate and graduate students and can be earned as part of a degree plan or individually through the life-long learning program.

Dr. Hisham Hegab, dean of the College of Engineering and Science, says that the new opportunities offered by the new Master’s degree and Six Sigma Black Belt certification provide new avenues for additional workforce training.

“We are excited to expand our online program offerings in the College of Engineering and Science with the Master of Science in Engineering degree with the Industrial Engineering concentration,” Hegab said. “This new online option, coupled with the Six Sigma certifications that are available, provides an excellent opportunity for working professionals to continue to advance their education and their careers.”

For more information about the Master of Science in Engineering online program, the Louisiana Tech Six Sigma Green Belt certification and the Louisiana Tech Six Sigma Black Belt certification, visit http://coes.latech.edu/global-education.
13 2015-12-10
Monroe

Louisiana Tech’s DBA program ranked No. 5 in na


RUSTON, La (Press Release) - op Management Degrees, an online resource for information about business and management education and careers, has ranked Louisiana Tech University’s Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) program No. 5 in the nation in its 2016 list of the Top 50 Doctorate in Business Management Programs.

Designated as an Area of Excellence by the University of Louisiana System and residing in the College of Business, Louisiana Tech’s DBA program is designed to prepare graduates for careers as effectiveuniversity researchers and teachers or for senior research positions in business or government.

Louisiana Tech was the only institution in Louisiana to earn a spot on Top Management Degrees’ Top 50 list. Doctoral business programs at the University of South Florida’s Muma College of Business topped the list at No. 1 followed by Harvard University Business School, University of Florida’s Warrington College of Business, Creighton University’s Heider College of Business and Louisiana Tech’s College of Business.

“We are honored to be ranked among the top five doctorial business programs in the nation,” said Dr. Chris Martin, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Business. “This recognition is an affirmation of our faculty’s commitment to excellence in teaching and to producing research with significant impact on the practice of business.”

Top Management Degrees’ Top 50 list were analyzed and ranked based on factors such as accreditation, prestige, estimated cost, student satisfaction and business management curriculum. Each criterion was given equal weight in order to identify a well-rounded and high quality doctoral business management program. Data was gathered from each program’s website and external sources such as U.S. News and World Report, the Princeton Review and the National Center for Education Statistics.

According to their website, Top Management Degree says that with MBA professionals flooding the business world, an executive doctoral degree in business management helps business professionals differentiate themselves from their peers. These degrees include Doctor of Business Administration, Doctor of Management, and an Executive Doctor of Business degrees, which are seen as being equal in status and rigor to the Ph.D., but different in focus.

This latest ranking comes on the heels of several other national accolades for Louisiana Tech. In September, U.S. News & World Report ranked Louisiana Tech No. 1 in the nation among public National Universities for graduating students with the least average amount of student debt. Louisiana Tech also achieved a Tier One National Universities ranking for the fifth consecutive year.

In addition to its U.S. News & World Report rankings, Louisiana Tech was ranked No. 1 in the State of Louisiana recently for highest average mid-career earnings for graduates, according to PayScale.com’s 2015-2016 College Salary Report. Tech was also ranked among the top universities in the nation in Forbes’ list of America’s Top Colleges 2015, and in the top 2.6 percent of the world’s degree-granting institutions by the Center for World University Rankings.
13 2015-12-10
Monroe

Tech's Doctor of Business Administration ranked No. 5 in nation


Top Management Degrees, an online resource for information about business and management education and careers, has ranked Louisiana Tech University's Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) program No. 5 in the nation in its 2016 list of the Top 50 Doctorate in Business Management Programs.

Designated as an Area of Excellence by the University of Louisiana System and residing in the College of Business, Louisiana Tech's DBA program is designed to prepare graduates for careers as effective university researchers and teachers or for senior research positions in business or government.

Louisiana Tech was the only institution in Louisiana to earn a spot on Top Management Degrees' Top 50 list. Doctoral business programs at the University of South Florida's Muma College of Business topped the list at No. 1 followed by Harvard University Business School, University of Florida's Warrington College of Business, Creighton University's Heider College of Business and Louisiana Tech's College of Business.

"We are honored to be ranked among the top five doctorial business programs in the nation," said Dr. Chris Martin, dean of Louisiana Tech's College of Business. "This recognition is an affirmation of our faculty's commitment to excellence in teaching and to producing research with significant impact on the practice of business."

Top Management Degrees' Top 50 list were analyzed and ranked based on factors such as accreditation, prestige, estimated cost, student satisfaction and business management curriculum. Each criterion was given equal weight in order to identify a well-rounded and high quality doctoral business management program. Data was gathered from each program's website and external sources such as U.S. News and World Report, the Princeton Review and the National Center for Education Statistics.

According to their website, Top Management Degree says that with MBA professionals flooding the business world, an executive doctoral degree in business management helps business professionals differentiate themselves from their peers. These degrees include Doctor of Business Administration, Doctor of Management, and an Executive Doctor of Business degrees, which are seen as being equal in status and rigor to the Ph.D., but different in focus.

This latest ranking comes on the heels of several other national accolades for Louisiana Tech. In September, U.S. News & World Report ranked Louisiana Tech No. 1 in the nation among public National Universities for graduating students with the least average amount of student debt. Louisiana Tech also achieved a Tier One National Universities ranking for the fifth consecutive year.

In addition to its U.S. News & World Report rankings, Louisiana Tech was ranked No. 1 in the State of Louisiana recently for highest average mid-career earnings for graduates, according to PayScale.com's 2015-2016 College Salary Report. Tech was also ranked among the top universities in the nation in Forbes' list of America's Top Colleges 2015, and in the top 2.6 percent of the world's degree-granting institutions by the Center for World University Rankings.

For Top Management Degrees' complete Top 50 Doctorate in Business Management Programs list, visit http://www.topmanagementdegrees.com/rankings/best-doctorate-in-business-management-2016.
13 2015-12-10
Ruston

TECH’S REGIONAL ACCELERATOR BENEFITS ENTREPRENEURS


Entrepreneurs striving to develop and grow innovative business enterprises in the coming year have an opportunity to benefit from Louisiana Tech University’s Interstate 20 Corridor Regional Accelerator initiative.

Full text of this article is available to subscribers only. Login if you are already a subscriber. If you are not a subscriber, you can subscribe to the online version here.
13 2015-12-09
Baton Rouge

Louisiana Tech faculty team selected for NSF Pathways to Innovation Program


RUSTON, La – A team of Louisiana Tech University faculty and administrators has been selected by the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) National Center for Engineering Pathways to Innovation (Epicenter) as one of only 14 university teams to join the Pathways to Innovation Program in 2016.

Dr. Kelly Crittenden, associate professor of mechanical engineering and nanosystems engineering, and Kyle Prather, director of the Louisiana Tech Thingery, will lead the Louisiana Tech Pathways group.

The interdisciplinary team, a compilation of faculty and staff from Louisiana Tech’s College of Engineering and Science and the College of Business, will participate in the third cohort of Epicenter’s national Pathways to Innovation Program, which helps institutions to fully incorporate innovation and entrepreneurship into undergraduate engineering education.

Primary team members include Dr. Hisham Hegab, dean of the College of Engineering and Science; Dr. Heath Tims, associate dean of undergraduate studies for the College of Engineering and Science; Dr. David Hall, director of mechanical engineering, civil engineering and construction engineering technology; Dr. Katie Evans, director of mathematics and statistics and industrial engineering; Dr. Galen Turner, director of computer science, cyber engineering, electrical engineering and electrical engineering technology; Dr. Dave Norris, director of Louisiana Tech’s Enterprise Center and chief innovation officer; and Debbie Inman, coordinator of entrepreneurial studies for the College of Business.

The program is run by Epicenter, which is funded by the National Science Foundation and directed by Stanford University and the VentureWell. Faculty and administrators participating in the Pathways program are taking on this challenge and leading their universities into a new era of engineering education that prepares students to tackle big problems and thrive in this ever-changing economy.

“Today, engineering and computer science students are expected to enter industry with technical knowledge as well as a diverse set of mindsets, skillsets and attitudes that help them innovate, collaborate and create value,” said Tom Byers, director and co-principal investigator of Epicenter and professor at Stanford University. “As educators, we need to better prepare this generation of students for the workforce, position them for success in their careers, and give them more opportunities to bring their innovative ideas to life.”

“We already strive to instill a ‘can-do-spirit’ in our Louisiana Tech engineering students,” added Crittenden. “Through this Pathways to Innovation partnership, we are looking to expand that mindset to include innovation and entrepreneurship alongside our students’ technical knowledge. We will spend the next several months examining our existing landscape, identifying opportunities for growth, and implementing new strategies to transform our undergraduate engineering experience.”

In addition to the Louisiana Tech team, teams from Binghamton University – SUNY, California State University-Northridge, The City College of New York – CUNY, Florida A&M University/Florida State University, Grand Valley State University, Portland State University, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, South Dakota State University, University of New Hampshire, University of North Alabama, University of South Florida, Western Carolina University, and Western Kentucky University were selected for the 2016 Pathways to Innovation Program.

Participating schools assemble a team of faculty and academic leaders to assess their institution’s current offerings, design a unique strategy for change, and lead their peers in a transformation process to broaden and strengthen their campus-based innovation and entrepreneurial ecosystems. Program teams receive access to models for integrating entrepreneurship into engineering curriculum, custom online resources, networking opportunities, guidance from a community of engineering and entrepreneurship faculty, and membership in a national network of schools with similar goals.

The teams in the 2016 cohort join a community of 36 institutional teams that are currently participating in the program. The projects include innovation certificates and majors, maker and flexible learning spaces, first-year and capstone courses, faculty fellows programs, and innovation centers. Additionally, several cross-institutional collaborations have resulted from the first group of schools.

“Our two cohorts of Pathways schools have made a tremendous and lasting impact on the education of their students,” said Victoria Matthew, the Pathways program leader and senior program officer at VentureWell. “We are thrilled to welcome these 14 new teams to our national community so we can continue to work together on transforming engineering education.”
13 2015-12-09
Monroe

La. Tech announces its fall quarter graduates


RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University’s fall quarter commencement exercises were held Nov. 21, with diplomas awarded to 311 graduates. Commencement officially marked the close of the fall academic quarter.

Graduates – listed by state, parish/city and degree – are as follows:
13 2015-12-08
Monroe

La. Tech’s I-20 Corridor Regional Accelerator benefits entrepreneurs


RUSTON – Entrepreneurs striving to develop and grow innovative business enterprises in the coming year have an opportunity to benefit from Louisiana Tech University’s I-20 Corridor Regional Accelerator initiative.

The Accelerator helps entrepreneurs preparing to launch a new enterprise, individuals exploring business opportunities and existing ventures planning to introduce new products to add locations or increase market size. The program provides training, coaching and networking opportunities that facilitate strong and steady progress for new or growing ventures. Accelerator participants are able connect with experienced executives, business professionals, coaches, peers and potential customers to create a viable business model.

“The I-20 Corridor Regional Business Accelerator at Louisiana Tech is a hub of dynamic and innovative activity that provides an excellent launching pad for promising new business ventures in our region,” said Dr. Dave Norris, chief innovation officer at Louisiana Tech. “The entrepreneurs we work with are creating the high-growth economy of the future for north Louisiana.”

Each enterprise participating in the I-20 Corridor Regional Accelerator initiative is assisted with establishing and implementing the strategic actions needed to keep the venture advancing toward startup and success. Help with determining the funds required, identifying sources of funds and preparing an investor proposal is also included.

Entrepreneurs who have graduated from previous Accelerator programs have received more than $3 million in funding. Various funding sources have provided seed or pre-seed grants, competition awards, loans, lines of credit and angel investment. Past participants are achieving success and continuing to grow.

“The ventures participating in this initiative are impressive and have performed extremely well,” said Kathy Wyatt, director of Louisiana Tech’s Technology Business Development Center. “Graduates tell us the Accelerator learning environment was very productive and the ongoing coaching has proven vital in maintaining focus during the launch of their venture. We are eager to have others throughout the region join this community of innovators and entrepreneurs who are learning together, supporting one another, and achieving their dreams.”

The I-20 Corridor Regional Accelerator program is free, but space is limited. Candidates must complete and submit an application summarizing their proposed venture by December 18, to be considered for Accelerator enrollment. Meetings will be held in Ruston on every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. from Jan. 5, 2016 through April 26, 2016.

To apply for the Accelerator or obtain more information, email tbdc@latech.edu or call (318) 257-3537.
13 2015-12-08
Monroe

La. Tech announces its fall quarter graduates


RUSTON – Louisiana Tech University’s fall quarter commencement exercises were held Nov. 21, with diplomas awarded to 311 graduates. Commencement officially marked the close of the fall academic quarter.
13 2015-12-07
Monroe

La. Tech Poetry Society to present reading, release of student journal


The Louisiana Tech University Poetry Society will present a poetry reading to announce the release of its student journal, "The Quatrain," at 5 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 8 in George T. Madison Hall, Room 105.

Student authors from the society will read from their works published in the first edition of the publication. This event is open to the public, and copies of the journal will be available for sale.

"The Quatrain" is a print and electronic annual journal which publishes high quality undergraduate and graduate writing and art. According to the Poetry Society's faculty adviser, Dr. Ernie Rufleth, the compilation includes "full-dress, researched, academic essays and scholarly explorations, photography, life-writing, sculpture, cultural criticism, work that has a reflective, autobiographical style, and creative writing in all its forms."

Rufleth says the journal seeks to display samples of the interesting, original and quality work being produced by gifted students and emerging talents from Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas. "This four state region, our geographical quatrain, is our primary interest."

"I am absolutely delighted to have a public reading for the first issue of 'The Quatrain,'" said Dr. Don Kaczvinsky, dean of Louisiana Tech's College of Liberal Arts. "Dr. Rufleth and the students have worked tirelessly to see the journal in print, and I believe the publication will elevate the standing of Louisiana Tech as the premier university in the four-state region for undergraduate education in literature, culture and the arts."

The Quatrain is made possible by generous funding from the George E. Pankey Eminent Scholar Professorship in English, which is held by Kaczvinsky.
13 2015-12-07
Shreveport

Louisiana Tech Poetry Society to present reading, release of student journal


RUSTON, La. – The Louisiana Tech University Poetry Society will present a poetry reading to announce the release of its student journal, “The Quatrain,” at 5 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 8 in George T. Madison Hall, Room 105.

Student authors from the society will read from their works published in the first edition of the publication. This event is open to the public, and copies of the journal will be available for sale.

“The Quatrain” is a print and electronic annual journal which publishes high quality undergraduate and graduate writing and art. According to the Poetry Society’s faculty adviser, Dr. Ernie Rufleth, the compilation includes “full-dress, researched, academic essays and scholarly explorations, photography, life-writing, sculpture, cultural criticism, work that has a reflective, autobiographical style, and creative writing in all its forms.”

Rufleth says the journal seeks to display samples of the interesting, original and quality work being produced by gifted students and emerging talents from Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas. “This four state region, our geographical quatrain, is our primary interest.”

“I am absolutely delighted to have a public reading for the first issue of ‘The Quatrain,’” said Dr. Don Kaczvinsky, dean of Louisiana Tech’s College of Liberal Arts. “Dr. Rufleth and the students have worked tirelessly to see the journal in print, and I believe the publication will elevate the standing of Louisiana Tech as the premier university in the four-state region for undergraduate education in literature, culture and the arts.”

The Quatrain is made possible by generous funding from the George E. Pankey Eminent Scholar Professorship in English, which is held by Kaczvinsky.
13 2015-12-04
Shreveport

Sports concussion researcher to lecture at La. Tech


Dr. Li-Shan Chou, professor and chair of the Department of Human Physiology at the University of Oregon, will present a lecture titled "Tracking Functional Deficits Following Concussion Using Movement Analysis" Dec. 14 as the next installment of Louisiana Tech University's New Frontiers in Biomedical Research series.

Chou's presentation will begin at 3:30 p.m. in the auditorium of University Hall on the Louisiana Tech campus. The event is free and members of the campus and local communities are cordially invited to attend.

The New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminar series is co-organized by Dr. Jamie Newman, the Scott Weathersby Endowed Professor in Zoology and Premedicine, and Dr. Mary Caldorera-Moore, assistant professor of biomedical engineering. The 2015-2016 series will spotlight interdisciplinary collaborations, alumni spotlights and features, and research discussions by renowned guest speakers from across the nation.

"Tracking Functional Deficits Following Concussion Using Movement Analysis" will be of particular interest to sports coaches and parents of young athletes. Chou's research is on the forefront of tracking and understanding long term effects of sport-related concussions in athletes. Some of his research has shown alterations in the gait and balance of concussed individuals long after cognitive disruptions have subsided.

As Chou further develops this area of research, he hopes to identify biomechanical, cognitive and other measurements which can assist clinicians in their ability to determine whether an individual is ready to return to everyday or sport activities following concussion.

As the director of the University of Oregon Motion Analysis Laboratory, Chou investigates the biomechanical mechanisms governing gait balance control and factors contributing to mobility impairments. Combining engineering knowledge and collaboration with colleagues in neuroscience and sports medicine, his interdisciplinary research programs connects basic research to clinical applications relevant to patients with neurological or musculoskeletal disorders.

Chou received his doctoral degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Prior to arriving at the University of Oregon in 2000, he held positions as post-doctoral research associate in research fellow at the University of Chicago and the Mayo Clinic, respectively.

Chou's areas of research expertise include clinical gait analysis, assessment of dynamic stability during locomotion, and mathematical modeling of the musculoskeletal system. To further his work, he has received research grants from the National Institute of Health, the Mayo Foundation, the Medical Research Foundation of Oregon, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

All lectures during the New Frontiers in Biomedical Research seminar series will be recorded and can be accessed through the College of Engineering and Science's Events web page at http://coes.latech.edu/about-the-college/events.php.

Sponsors for the 2015-2016 series include Lincoln Health Foundation, Louisiana Tech's College of Engineering and Science, the College of Applied and Natural Sciences, the Office of the President, Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science, Sigma Xi, and generous donations from members of the community.

For more information on Chou and his presentation, or other events in this year's New Frontiers in Biomedical Research series, visit www.biomedicalresearch.wix.com/new-frontiers.
13 2015-11-30
Monroe

Winners of La. Tech’s 'Won in One' pitch competition announced


RUSTON – A diverse group of entrepreneurs from across the region highlighted the “Won in One” Idea Pitch competition, which challenges innovators to present their new ventures as part of Louisiana Tech University’s Innovation Enterprise.

Like contestants on the popular television show “Shark Tank,” the competitors pitched their ideas recently with the goal of impressing the audience and a panel of business experts who judged and selected the most appealing opportunity. The audience also participated by voting for their favorites.

The competition’s top prize of $1,000 went to West Monroe’s Dawn Hodges of “Dreamcatcher’s Enterprises” for her multipurpose sleeping sack coveted by outdoor enthusiasts and others looking for a convenient and complete bedding option for overnight stays.

Daniel Okougbo’s solution for delivering reliable power in locations plagued by inconsistent electrical service, such as Nigeria, earned him the People’s Choice award and a cash prize of $750. “Chicken Checkers,” presented by Sawyer Stone, and “BioSense Labs,” presented by Varun Kopparthy, divided the $750 award for Best Student Presentation. Each of these student teams proposed a different approach for identifying potential food contamination, with Chicken Checkers focusing on in home use by consumers and BioSense Labs emphasizing improved detection at processing facilities.

The second place award of $500 also went to Varun Kopparthy and BioSense Labs. Katherine Hall was awarded the third place prize of $250 for her product designed to assist tennis players with keeping score.

In addition to vying for cash prizes, all of the competitors received feedback from the panel of judges, discovered resources and expertise helpful for developing their products and met other innovators from across the region. “Won in One” provides the entrants an opportunity to present their concepts in a way that is exiting, informative, and financially appealing. The competition is a component of the I-20 Corridor Regional Accelerator and, despite the competitive elements of vying for prizes, contestants and spectators engaged in energetic conversations about their ideas, the commercial potential and the resources available to support their success.

Many of the “Won in One” participants will apply to and participate in the I-20 Corridor Regional Business Accelerator which begins in January 2016. Individuals selected for the Accelerator receive intensive training, coaching and interaction with experienced professionals who help guide them through the start-up process.

For more information or an application for the Accelerator, email tbdc@latech.edu or call (318) 257-3537.
13 2015-11-30
Ruston

TECH’S ‘WON IN ONE’ IDEA PITCH WINNERS ANNOUNCED


A diverse group of entrepreneurs from across the region highlighted the “Won in One” Idea Pitch competition, which challenges innovators to present their new ventures as part of Louisiana Tech University’s Innovation Enterprise.

Like contestants on the popular television show “Shark Tank,” the competitors pitched their ideas recently with the goal of impressing the audience and a panel of business experts who judged and selected the most appealing opportunity. The audience also participated by voting for their favorites.
13 2015-11-25
Ruston

NT@RUSTON ALUMNI SPEAKS TO STUDENTS


Seven New Tech at Ruston alumni recently spoke with more than 50 current New Tech students about how New Tech helps them through college.

New Tech, formed several years ago at Ruston High School, teaches students how to work in groups, critically think and effectively communicate before entering college.

English and public speaking teacher Tara Raue said she asked the alumni students to speak with her class to help them understand the challenges students will meet in college and how New Tech helped them achieve.

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13 2015-11-24
Lake Charles

Engineering Students Place in International Competition


(November 20, 2015) McNeese State University’s student engineering team took second place in the 2015 American Society of Mechanical Engineers Student Design Competition – Robots for Relief - held Nov. 15 in Houston, Texas, as part of the ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition.

Seventeen entries from universities in the United States, Mexico, Poland, Lebanon, Pakistsan, Turkey, Peru, Saudi Arabia, India and Egypt competed for the three awards in the annual international competition for college students. Two engineering teams from North Carolina State University captured first and third place.

The students – Benjamin Pearce, DeQuincy, Jeevan Rai, Nepal, Alper Unluer, Turkey, and Nabin Dhakal, Nepal – designed and built a scaled-down prototype of a robotic system that can be a model for a rescue robot working in disaster areas around the world. The McNeese team was allowed three minutes to put its model-sized battery operated robot through the paces on a planned test course to demonstrate the capability of the device to assist in humanitarian operations.

McNeese’s rescue robot performed almost flawlessly, maneuvering around obstacles, pivoting and loading and unloading bulk materials, according to Julio C. Guerrero, president of ASME.

“These students have displayed considerable technical ingenuity and skill in designing prototypes that can be the forerunners of robotic systems able to perform important humanitarian relief services in many parts of the world,” said Guerrero. “The students are indeed tomorrow’s technology innovators and problem solvers.”

The McNeese team placed first place in the ASME design competition at the regional conference hosted by Texas Tech University back in the spring to move on to the international competition in Houston.

The team's entry was created for the students’ ENGR 491 Capstone Senior Design course taught by Dr. Ning Zhang. Dr. Zhuang Li was the mentor for this project. The team used a 3D printer to design its prototype and built a practice obstacle course to simulate rough terrain that included water, inclines, sand and 90 degree steps.

“This is so great!” said Pearce - who graduated in the spring - of taking the runner-up spot in the 2015 ASME Student Design Competition. “This was assigned for our senior design project and we have been working on the robot for more than a year. This ASME award really caps a lot of work for us.”

McNeese’s College of Engineering was recently ranked third in the nation among engineering programs in terms of career return on investment for its graduates- topping all engineering programs in the state of Louisiana – by PayScale Inc.

“We are extremely proud of our students’ accomplishment at this international event where there was a high level of competition,” said Dr. Nikos Kiritsis, dean of the college of engineering. “This is a great learning experience for our students. The competition showcases the talents of our engineering students while at the same time encouraging them to develop innovative ideas that improve the quality of life.”

He added that “their hard work and commitment also reflect positively on the outstanding professors here at McNeese who are working to ensure that our graduates are well prepared and job ready on day one.”
13 2015-11-24
Monroe

Braud Offers Louisiana Tech Graduates Wisdom from the World of Social Media


RUSTON, La. –


“We are launching you. Discover your authentic self. Discover who you are really meant to be.”

That was the message from keynote speaker Gerard Braud to 311 new Louisiana Tech University graduates during the school’s 314th commencement exercises Saturday at the Thomas Assembly Center. Braud is the CEO of Braud Communications, a public relations firm that specializes in crisis communications, and Louisiana Tech alumnus.

“Many of those who started Tech with you aren’t here today,” Louisiana Tech President Les Guice said to the graduates. “Despite the challenges you faced, it was you who set goals and worked tirelessly to achieve them. It was you who showed perseverance and dedicated countless hours to study, research and attending class. You have made many memories that will truly last a lifetime. Today is truly a milestone in your life’s journey.”

Guice then turned the podium over to Braud, who started by asking the graduates to acknowledge their family and teachers.

“To begin, we’ll need to give credit where credit is due,” Braud said. “You are here because of the love of your family and the guidance of your faculty. They’re all looking down from the stands right now trying to get your attention or get a photo of you. So I’d like you each to look around for a moment, catch the eye of that special someone, wave to them and as loud as you can, say, ‘Thank you.’”

He then gave the graduates the opportunity to take pre-graduation photos.

“Next, I know each of you is dying to take a selfie, so let’s take a moment to let you take your selfie to get that out of the way. Now on to the work at hand – transitioning you from your place in your seat to your place up here on this stage and then on to your place in life.”

Braud offered some advice for the graduates from all sorts of different people.

“For 30 days, I’ve used social media to reach out to some of the brightest minds on the planet, as well as to ordinary folks who wish to share just a tiny bit of wisdom with you as you embark on the next chapter of your life.”

Some of those remarks included:

- CNN Anchor Brook Baldwin says, “Check your ego at the door.”

- Tech President Les Guice says, “Have a plan for where you are headed, pursue what you love and pursue it with passion, but prepare for change.”

- Sarah Kocian Alzamora, a corporate executive and mother of a special needs child says, “Your life might turn out differently than you planned, but that doesn’t mean you aren’t right where you are supposed to be.”

“These graduates are the MM Generation – the Mobile Millennial Generation,” Braud said prior to his address. “This graduating class has spent 50 percent of their lives on mobile devices with social media. They’ve all experienced the negative aspects of social media. My goal is to harness and share the good as we launch them into the next chapter of their lives.”

During the commencement ceremonies, Brooks Hull, Louisiana Tech’s new Vice President for University Advancement, also presented W. Ray Wallace with the university’s prestigious Tower Medallion Award. The award places Wallace in Louisiana Tech’s Hall of Distinguished Alumni which honors those who have achieved greatly in their professions, in community service, and in humanitarian activity while remaining steadfastly loyal to Louisiana Tech.

Wallace was longtime president, CEO and chairman of the board for Trinity Steel, a Dallas manufacturer of tanks used to store and transport butane and liquefied petroleum gas.

In addition to their diplomas, each graduate received their Tenet Medallions inscribed with the 12 Tenets of Tech and their year of graduation. The Tenets of Tech are guiding principles and personal characteristics that students and graduates are expected to embrace and uphold during and after their time at Louisiana Tech.

13 2015-11-24
Ruston

A CAMPUS COMMUNITY OF DART SUPPORTERS