11/14/2018
ULS NEWS ARTICLES

Today's News

University of Louisiana System

00 2018-11-14
Hammond

Southeastern’s dance company to dedicate upcoming concert to Mary Lou Champagne


Southeastern Louisiana University’s Department of Music and Performing Arts’ dance company, Dance Performance Project 2, will present “A Few of Her Favorite Things: A Dedication to Mary Lou Champagne” on Nov. 19.

The dance concert will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the Vonnie Borden Theatre.

Director of Dance Keith “Skip” Costa said Southeastern’s resident student improvisational dance company will present an exclusive dance and movement improvisation concert that will include 15 performers with four solos, one duet, and four group dances.

“Mary Lou and William Champagne are both alumni of Southeastern who fell in love while in college,” Costa explained. “Mary Lou loved dancing and continued to dance after college.”

Over time, Champagne opened her own dance studio in Pearl River, La., and found success in dance education in her area, Costa said.

The family of Champagne, who passed away in the summer of 2017 at 88, eventually established the Mary Lou Champagne Scholarship, which has been awarded each semester to a total of 13 dance majors/dance minors to help continue their dance education at Southeastern

“Mary Lou’s love for dance is the reason the Champagne family established a scholarship about 10 years ago,” Costa explained.

“Moods change from joyful, to religious, to personal, which are all based on the themes selected from the list, submitted by her husband and family, of some of Mary Lou Champagne’s favorite things she enjoyed in life,” Costa said. “Music was selected to enhance the dances from the styles of music that she loved, including Dean Martin, Perry Como, and Frank Sinatra, among others. Several scholarship recipients will perform solos and a duet.”

Dancers performing in the concert include Alaura Cervini, Metairie; Ashley Covington, Brianna Denmark, Brooke Harris, Trevor Jenkins, and Alexis May, all of Denham Springs; John Duplantier, Covington; Brooke Himel, Plaquemine; Brooklyn Jackson, Kattie Kelly, and Destiny White, all of New Orleans; Hayley Jordan, Baton Rouge; Gabrielle Levet, Mandeville; and Emma Pinion, Loranger.

Tickets to the concert are $8 for students, seniors and children and $10 general admission and will be available 30 minutes prior to the performance in the Vonnie Borden Theatre lobby.

For more information, contact Costa at Keith.Costa@southeastern.edu.
00 2018-11-14
Lafayette

UL, Southern, Northwestern team up to help spread awareness about All of Us program


Could your health information help cure or prevent major diseases?

The National Institutes of Health thinks so, and it’s enlisted the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s nursing college and eight others to convince the public.

The NIH launched its $1.5 billion All of Us Research program in May with an ambitious goal: to collect health data from 1 million Americans by 2022. It’s part of the agency’s Precision Medicine Initiative, which counters one-size-fits-all approaches to disease treatment and prevention by collecting behavioral, genomic and environmental details from demographically diverse groups of Americans.

Dr. Kelly Gebo, the All of Us research program’s chief medical and scientific officer, said in an interview with Public Health Newswire that the initiative’s mission is simple: “to accelerate health research and medical breakthroughs.”

Of particular interest to researchers are historically underrepresented communities: racial, ethnic, sexual and gender minorities; rural residents; senior citizens; people with low income or low educational attainment; people with disabilities; and individuals who don’t have regular access to health care.

“With a cohort this diverse – demographically, geographically, and medically – we can get a fuller picture of health in the U.S. and move toward more tailored prevention strategies and treatments,” Gebo said.

All of Us participants share health data through surveys and electronic health records. They may be asked to provide physical measurements, medical and prescription histories, or details culled from biosamples such as blood and urine. The information will be housed in a database, and participants’ identities will be anonymous.

About 100,000 people have signed up for the program so far, about one-tenth of the goal of 1 million participants. That’s where UL Lafayette’s College of Nursing and Allied Health Professions enters the picture.

The college collaborated with Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, La., and Southern University in Baton Rouge to secure an NIH mini-grant they will use to sponsor a promotional seminar for the All of Us program.

The event will be held from 2-4 p.m. on Jan. 23 in the UL Lafayette Student Union Ballroom, said Dr. Denise Linton, an associate professor of nursing. She and Dr. Melinda Oberleitner, dean of the College of Nursing and Allied Health Professions, helped secure the grant.

The Louisiana Office of Public Health, staff from regional clinics and hospitals, and other health professionals and educators will be invited. Information about how the public can attend will be forthcoming, Linton said.

Participants won’t be asked to divulge health details, but should they choose to do so later, they’ll be helping medical professionals and researchers find remedies for what’s ailing residents in one of the nation’s most unhealthy states.

Oberleitner said Louisiana residents typically take part in health-related research, such as clinical trials, at levels much lower than the national average. As a result, vital information is missing that could result in better outcomes for patients.

“It is especially important then that three Louisiana universities were selected for participation. This is a wonderful opportunity to raise awareness about the importance of expanding and diversifying the pool of individuals who participate in critical national health-related research,” Oberleitner said.

In addition to UL Lafayette, Southern and Northwestern, six other nursing programs received funding: California State University, San Bernardino; Duquesne University, Pennsylvania; St. Peter’s University, New Jersey; Sam Houston State University, Texas; and the universities of Maryland and Tennessee.

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing administers the NIH grant. The organization establishes education standards, and promotes undergraduate and graduate nursing education and research. It represents more than 800 nursing schools of nursing.

To learn more about the All of Us Research program, visit allofus.nih.gov.
00 2018-11-14
Lake Charles

15 to be honored for community contributions


National Philanthropy Day is Tuesday, and it's a chance for communities to recognize the extra efforts that some people make as they give of their time, talents and resources to help make life better for others.

The Association for Fundraising Professionals Southwest will honor 15 local individuals and groups for their contributions to the community.

Honorees will be recognized at a luncheon Tuesday at Reeves Uptown Catering.

Keynote speaker is DeWanna Tarver, who was recognized last year as an outstanding philanthropist for her efforts through DeWanna's Community Closet, to ensure that students attending school in Southwest Louisiana have the essentials they need to succeed.

Recipients and groups who will be honored include: Christus Ochsner Health; SWLA Foundation; Faith Scott; Courtney Storer; Lynn Hohensee; Jordan Haman; West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital; Dr. Kent Seale; West Calcasieu Cameron Hospital Foundation; Bobby LeTard; McNeese Foundation; Sheila and Ric Sanders; Sowela Foundation; Citgo Petroleaum Corporation; The Literacy Council; Dr. Neil Aspinwall; the SWLA Law Center; Timothy Crocker; ETC; Scott Stratton; St. Louis Catholic High School; Leslie and Patrick Milligan; Banners at McNeese; and Knight Media Printing.
00 2018-11-14
New Orleans

How to become a software engineer: Advice from 5 New Orleans developers


By Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune
Software engineering is one of the fastest growing jobs out there, including in Louisiana.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts the number of people working as software developers will grow by 24 percent from 2016 to 2026, far outpacing the average growth anticipated for all American occupations. Companies like GE Digital and DXC Technology have opened local offices lured, in part, by tax incentives for software developers, and plan to employ hundreds. Smaller shops like video game developer inXile and development firm Revelry are also looking for talent.

How do you break into the industry? We spoke with five local software engineers to see how they did it as part of The Career Project series.

What is The Career Project?
What is The Career Project?
This post is part of The Career Project, a long-term series we hope will link students and professionals to share valuable career advice.

Check back with NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune to read advice from a wide range of professions.

Have an idea or suggestion for a profession that you want to see featured? Know a professional who would be a good fit for this series? Contact reporter Jennifer Larino at jlarino@nola.com.

Daniel DeKerlegand
Daniel DeKerlegand, a software engineer for Torsh, stands outside the education startup's office at Dryades Market on O.C. Haley Boulevard, Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Daniel DeKerlegand
Title: Software Engineer

Workplace: Torsh

Daniel DeKerlegand, a Lafayette native, has always had an interest in computers and was "lucky enough" to take several computer science courses in high school. Still, he dreaded getting locked into a boring programming job. He studied film and writing in college and taught English at community colleges before several "twists and turns" led him to pick up coding again. He still writes poetry in his free time.


Daniel DeKerlegand, a software engineer for Torsh, at work at the education startup's office in Dryades Market on O.C. Haley Boulevard, Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Education: DeKerlegand chose to go to the University of New Orleans for undergrad because they had a solid film program and "growing up in Lafayette, everyone wants to move to New Orleans." He went on to get a master of fine arts degree in poetry at the University of Arizona, then returned to UNO in 2016 to pursue a graduate degree in computer science.

Turning point: DeKerlegand had spent two years working as an English instructor in community college classes at Nunez and Delgado when he started teaching himself to code again using online resources like Codecademy and Khan Academy. That's when he decided to go back to school for computer science.

"That was an interactive and fun way of learning a lot, while at the same time it didn't seem so serious," he said.


Daniel DeKerlegand, a software engineer for Torsh, at work at the education startup's office in Dryades Market on O.C. Haley Boulevard, Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Find your niche: Once you get past the basics, college-level computer science courses can get really niche, covering subjects ranging from theoretical computer science to security to systems architecture to game development. DeKerlegand recommends trying courses that may not appeal to you on paper. "You never know if one of those things might pique your interest in a way you didn't think it would," he said.

First job: DeKerlegand first heard Torsh CEO Courtney Williams talk at a meeting of UNO's Association for Computing Machinery chapter. Torsh has a proprietary teacher training platform that blends video, coaching and data to help improve instruction. He went on to land an internship at the startup and was hired full-time in early 2018.



Daniel DeKerlegand, a software engineer for Torsh, stands outside the education startup's office at Dryades Market on O.C. Haley Boulevard, Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Startup life: Deadlines are one of the most stressful parts of being a software engineer and the pressure can be amplified when you work for a small startup, DeKerlegand said. He encourages thinking about your work style before accepting a job offer, whether at a startup or large corporation. "At a small company, you wear a lot of hats. You do a lot of different work, which can be stressful, but I thrive in an environment like that," he said.

Myth: Programmers are doing math all the time. "I'm not the worst at math, but I'm definitely not the best," DeKerlegand joked.


Daniel DeKerlegand, a software engineer for Torsh, at work at the education startup's office in Dryades Market on O.C. Haley Boulevard, Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Watch: "Indie Game: The Movie," a 2012 documentary by Canadian filmmakers James Swirsky and Lisanne Pajot. DeKerlegand admits he's not much of a gamer, but the doc does a good job capturing the "ups and downs" that come with being a software developer for small company.

Advice: "There's something you have to accept about software: It's never going to be perfect. You'll always be perfecting it," DeKerlegand said.


Electronics, cords and branded swag on DeKerlegand's desk, Thursday, Sept. 6, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


Eddie Smith Jr., a software engineer for GE Digital in New Orleans, sits in the tech center's game room, Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Eddie Smith Jr.
Title: Software Engineer

Workplace: GE Digital

Eddie Smith Jr., one of five children growing up in Gentilly, often watched his father, a postal worker and real estate developer, fix up the buildings he owned. Smith liked seeing how things were built, an interest he says translates into his work today. Smith was a mail carrier developing websites for friends and family and tutoring aspiring coders when he decided to pursue a career as software engineer.




Eddie Smith Jr., a software engineer for GE Digital in New Orleans, works at his desk Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Education: Smith studied information systems management at Southern University at New Orleans but entered the workforce before graduating. However, Smith was largely self-taught when it came to coding.

He returned to the classroom when he enrolled in Operation Spark, which runs an intensive 6-month coding school for adults. At that point, Smith was working for the U.S. Postal Service, but already very familiar with coding boot camps. He had been tutoring a friend enrolled in a similar program, and went on to work as a part-time tutor for Workforce Opportunity Services, which ran a training program funded by GE Digital and the University of New Orleans.


Eddie Smith Jr., a software engineer for GE Digital in New Orleans, in the tech center's game room, Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Boot camp: Smith graduated Operation Spark in February 2018. He highly recommends their immersion program, which cost him about $10,000 total, far lower, he pointed out, than many four-year degree programs. Operation Spark, which teaches full-stack JavaScript development, developed its program with San Francisco's Hack Reactor, often billed as the "Harvard of coding boot camps."

Students in New Orleans learn to code by building things five days a week, including YouTube replicas, functional websites, databases and apps. The deadlines are grueling and "you basically live there," but "if you can stick to it, you will be over-prepared for the market," Smith said, noting more employers are actively seeking coding school grads.


Stickers decorate Eddie Smith Jr.'s laptop, Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Challenge: Working on a large team. Smith works on a 60-person team at the GE Digital Technology Center to develop apps and other tools for various units in the company. The advantage is having enough people to each tackle very specific problems. "There's also a lot that can get lost in translation," he said.

Misconception: Software engineers stare at numbers all day. A lot of code is actually English words and abbreviations that most people would be able to read, if not fully understand immediately, he said. "People think I'm just looking at 0s and 1s all day," he joked.

Mentor: John Fraboni, founder and CEO of Operation Spark. "I pick his brain about plenty of things," Smith said.


Software engineer Eddie Smith Jr. at GE Digital's New Orleans office. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
New Orleans: Software development jobs are growing in New Orleans, but Smith worries African-American kids in the city's low-income neighborhoods don't know about and can't see themselves doing this work. "Many grow up thinking that their only option, at best, is to work in hospitality," Smith said. "There are other options."

Read: "Elegant JavaScript: A Modern Introduction to Programming," by Marijn Haverbeke; and "The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference," by Malcolm Gladwell

Advice: Take advantage of tech meetups like FrontEndParty and free coding instruction online like Codecademy. "Roll up your sleeves and do some online research and show up. Make your presence felt and see if you like it," Smith said.





Matt Findley, president of inXile, in his office at the video game developer's New Orleans office on Oak Street, Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Matt Findley
Title: President

Workplace: inXile Entertainment

Matt Findley was in 7th grade in Eugene, Oregon when his dad, an IBM worker, showed up at home with a computer for him. Findley was smitten, and quickly became "obsessed" with learning how to program it. When he wasn't doing that, he was filming home movies with his friends. Years later he would merge the two interests to develop video games.


Matt Findley, president of inXile, in his office at the video game developer's New Orleans office on Oak Street, Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2018. The sign on the door reads "Skara Brae," the name of a mythical land in The Bard's Tale, one of inXile's titles, as well as the historical site in Scotland that inspired it. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Education: Findley studied computer science at the University of California, Irvine from 1986 to 1990. It was one of the only universities with a formal computer science program at the time.

First job: Making 8-bit Nintendo games under developer Brian Fargo, who later founded inXile and now leads the company. Findley said he heard about the work through a friend of a friend, went in for a 20-minute interview and was hired at $8 an hour. In the early, "wild west" days of game development, nearly "every single person who wanted to be in the game industry could be," he said. It's far more competitive today.

"It was a different beast back then," he said.


Workers at inXile's New Orleans office on Oak Street, Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Good day: inXile kicked off its first crowdsourcing campaign in April 2012 to raise money for a re-boot of popular 1988 role-playing game Wasteland. They had no luck selling the idea to big video game publishers, so they turned to the gaming community to raise $900,000, Findley said. Roughly 61,000 people gave $3 million total, and Wasteland 2 was released in 2014.

Tough day: Hours are long and deadlines tight in the video game industry. Findley recalls working a few 80-hour weeks starting out.

"You work so hard, work so many hours, put a product out and then as soon as it's out, you're rallying around another product," Findley said. "It's always a crunch, always an emergency."


Workers at inXile's New Orleans office on Oak Street, Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Make things: Anyone who wants a career developing video games needs to start creating their own games now. Get on free game engines like Unity and Unreal Engine, use YouTube tutorials as a guide, and "start making some things," he said.

"If you haven't made at least five games as a hobby, you're probably not serious enough to get an interview," he said.

Misconception: Game developers play video games all day. "Even on the days I am playing games, they are games that are substantially broken," Findley said. "It's not as fun as it sounds."


Matt Findley, president of inXile, in his office at the video game developer's New Orleans office on Oak Street, Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Read: "Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration" by Ed Catmull, current president of Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios

Advice: Findley said the best software developers in video games don't get hung up on planning out the game, known as the game design document, or GDD. Understand the vision, then start creating after a few days; you'll fix bugs along the way, he said. "It's always cheaper to fix a problem than to try to prevent a problem," he added.



Bric-a-brac and necessities in Matt Findley's office at inXile, Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)

A boar's head with Mardi Gras beads decorates Matt Findley's office at inXile, Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


Software engineer Jessie White at Operation Spark headquarters on Columbus Street, Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Jessie White
Jessie White, a Lake Charles native, always wanted to be a writer growing up. She studied print journalism then English in college, though she never landed on a clear career path. Then a friend encouraged her to try a coding boot camp.


Software engineer Jessie White at Operation Spark headquarters on Columbus Street, Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Education: White studied print journalism at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette and, later, English at the University of New Orleans, both state schools that provided affordable, quality education. Tired of "slinging coffee" as a barista, White considered coding as an option at the encouragement of a close friend. She graduated from Operation Spark's six-month immersion program in early 2018. Operation Spark runs an intensive coding school for adults as well as coding programs for low-income youth.

"I think there's a big shroud of mystery surrounding software development," White said, adding it took her months of intense studying before she started feeling comfortable in the space.

Boot camp: White noted coding schools are a relatively new concept, so there's still a bit of skepticism about them, especially among graduates of traditional computer science programs. She highly recommends Operation Spark, which developed its program with Hack Reactor, a highly-regarded coding school in San Francisco. The six-month immersion program costs about $11,500 total, though White noted they do offer assistance, including a deferred payment program, to make it more manageable.

White noted not all coding schools are equal. Make sure to thoroughly vet the program and get recommendations before deciding where to spend your money, she said.




Software engineer Jessie White at Operation Spark headquarters on Columbus Street, Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
First gig: White landed a job as a software specialist at GE Digital shortly after graduating from Operation Spark. She noted there is a strong pipeline between the two, and much of the work she did in school followed her to her first desk job.

"You have one project where you're looking at legacy code written by someone else and you have to parse it and add features to it," White said. "That is what I did every day."

Tough day: Not being able to figure out how to solve a problem. Imagine sifting through hundreds of digital folders, filled with hundreds of digital files and trying to find the one letter or string of letters that's not quite right, she said. "It's about figuring out where to start to get to the tiny, tiny problem you have to solve."


Software engineer Jessie White at Operation Spark headquarters on Columbus Street, Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Good day: "Just banging your head against a wall for some amount of time and finally cracking something," White said.

Read: "Head First: Java," by Kathy Sierra and Bert Bates, part of the Head First instructional series, is a great into into Java coding, White said.

Advice: White noted less-experienced software engineers often suffer from imposter syndrome, that creeping feeling you are inadequate. That's especially true for women or people of color working in an industry that is still dominated by white men.

Keep pressing forward, seek input and "you can feel that dissipate day-to-day," White said.


Desk decor at Operation Spark headquarters on Columbus Street, Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)


Gerard Ramos, software engineer and founder of Revelry, at the company's office in Mid-City, Friday, Oct. 19, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Gerard Ramos
Title: Founder and CEO

Workplace: Revelry

Ramos was always entrepreneurial, starting when he was a kid from Metairie selling candy to fellow students in grade school. He began teaching himself to program at age 13 using a database system called dBase to track sports statistics. In high school, he created a graphing calculator program that spit out answers for a test, much to the chagrin of his math teacher.

Still, it was awhile before he began thinking about a career in software development. "I was just having fun," Ramos said.




Gerard Ramos, software engineer and founder of Revelry, sits in on a company-wide meeting, Friday, Oct. 19, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Education: Ramos readily admits he "was never good in classroom settings" and was distracted early into college. He attended Andrew College in Georgia for a short time on a soccer scholarship, but dropped out. He went on to work in construction and did well, starting his own venture. Ramos continued to build websites and code, for computer classes and for money. He later built a website for real estate leads and earned ad income.

Ramos said his story isn't perfect, but it's proof that a traditional four-year college degree isn't the only pathway to a career, including in tech. Adopt a "doer mentality," learn to teach yourself, "identify a problem and then go build solutions for that problem," he said.

Teach yourself: Ramos said online learning was limited to "terrible web forums" when he was coming up. Now there's a whole world of instruction on programming available online through YouTube, Coursera, One Month, Treehouse and others. Aspiring developers can also take part in open source projects through sites like GitHub, an online community of developers. Open source refers to when a software owner opens up a software's source code for anyone to study and make changes.

"It's worth more to me that you've made 50 contributions to open source than if you have a degree from Harvard," Ramos said.


Gerard Ramos, founder of Revelry, works at the company's Mid-City office. The fish on the wall is one his grandmother caught years ago while on a fishing trip in Florida, Ramos said. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
First job: Ramos' "first real job" in tech was at online shoe retailer Zappos in 2006, where he worked as a software developer. He got the job after they asked him to try to solve a software bug they were having trouble with. He fixed it in less than minute.

Money: If he did go back to college, Ramos said he might study finance, investing and "how money works." A basic financial understanding can go a long way, he said. "I just blew through so much money and stupidity in my 20s," he said.

Apprenticeship: Ramos founded Revelry, which does web development for a range of customers and employs 36 full-time workers and four contractors. The company also takes on between four and eight apprentices a year, finding candidates through tech meetups, at local universities and through job postings on WorkNOLA.

Apprentices who complete the three-month program are offered a job with Revelry or one of the startups in the company's investment portfolio, Ramos said.


Gerard Ramos, software engineer and founder of Revelry, works at the company's office in Mid-City, Friday, Oct. 19, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Read: "Let My People Go Surfing: The Education of a Reluctant Businessman," by Yvon Chouinard, the found of Patagonia Inc. Ramos said the book helped him develop the culture he wanted his own company to have.

Misconception: Software developers can recreate Facebook at the drop of a hat. Ramos said people want flawless, glitch-free web design, but have no idea what it costs or takes to get there. "People take a lot of the technology for granted," he said.


Gerard Ramos, software engineer and founder of Revelry, works at the company's office in Mid-City, Friday, Oct. 19, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)

Software engineer Jessie White at Operation Spark headquarters on Columbus Street, Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018. (Photo by Jennifer Larino, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Read more career advice from New Orleans professionals.
The Career Project is an ongoing series. Keep an eye out for future articles talking with professionals in the New Orleans area.

Here are links to other profiles in the series.

-- Nurses

-- Architects

-- Veterinarians

Know someone who we should profile? Contact reporter Jennifer Larino at jlarino@nola.com.
00 2018-11-14
Regional/National

Colleges Are Taking Adult Students’ Needs More Seriously. What’s the Next Step?


I’m Goldie Blumenstyk, a senior writer at The Chronicle of Higher Education covering innovation in and around academe. Here’s what I’m thinking about this week:

Grading progress on the climate for adult students.

The needs of adult students are becoming more top-of-mind throughout higher education. While many colleges still have a long way to go before they could honestly call themselves adult-friendly, I’ve noticed a marked uptick in interest and activity over the past year — and that isn’t just because I became more attuned to the topic after reporting and writing my report on ”The Adult Student.”

I’ve also just become more optimistic about a possible solution to one of the most intractable obstacles lower-income adults face when they’re trying to return to college to complete a degree: getting transcripts and credit for their prior college work if they owe money to that institution. (More on that below.)

I’m reflecting on this now because this week I’ll be speaking at the annual conference for the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning, in Cleveland. Since attending CAEL’s 2017 meeting, I’ve learned a ton about the financial, logistical, and academic challenges adults face. I also developed an appreciation for the important role that communities and employers can play in smoothing the pathway to college. I call that “building networks,” and in Cleveland on Wednesday, I’ll be joined by some experts to talk about ways to tap into and nurture that ecosystem.

Over the past year, I also learned a lot about what employers can do on their own to improve educational options for their employees. The most notable approach: covering tuition upfront rather than as a reimbursement after the fact, which can be a financial barrier for lower-wage workers. It’s been edifying to see that practice carried out in several education partnerships announced over the past year by big employers like Walmart, Disney, and FedEx. Uber’s recently announced program with Arizona State University offers tuition upfront too.

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As for that obstacle concerning past-due bills and transcripts ... well, honestly, that’s not solved yet. But a conversation that began at a SXSW EDU conference session in March gives me hope. At SXSW I was interviewing Hadass Sheffer of the Graduate! Network, an organization that counsels adults and helps to connect them with appropriate colleges in more than 20 cities. Sheffer described the transcript barrier. Everyone in the room could see her frustration that college leaders hadn’t yet figured out a way to fix this.

Minutes later, Catharine Bond Hill, managing director of Ithaka S+R, a higher-ed consulting and research organization, politely stood up and suggested a solution. Just encouraging students to negotiate to get their bills reduced doesn’t seem sustainable, especially for students who have little leverage because they aren’t looking to return to their former college. But what if there were some sort of intermediary organization that would lend students the money they need to pay off their debts and get their transcripts? It sounded like a creative solution to me.

It still does. So last week, I checked back with Hill and Sheffer to find out the status of that idea. It hadn’t moved much, but the question got their gears going. In a series of email exchanges, Sheffer noted that recent attention on the new Warrior Way Back program at Wayne State University, which forgives past-due bills up to $1,500 for students who qualify, was a sign that the problem is getting recognized. She also noted that other colleges have tried versions of this, but few seemed to have methodically evaluated their efficacy.

Hill then outlined her idea. In a nutshell: An intermediary could pay the college for a student’s debt, hopefully at a very discounted rate. Then the student would have a loan with that intermediary, one that wouldn’t have to be repaid until they got their degree. If they failed to do so, the intermediary would lose money on that loan. Hopefully, enough loans would get paid to make the risk worthwhile.

Under this scenario, everyone wins. The students’ former colleges wouldn’t get all they were owed, but they’d get something rather than nothing. The students would get their transcripts and wouldn’t end up wasting their credits, and then could finish college more quickly. The intermediary could make enough money to keep the program going. As Hill put it, “it is kind of like buying up distressed debt.”

What would it take to get this idea off the ground? I don’t know. Obviously it’s not simple to create or execute. And as she noted, no one really knows the extent of the problem. The bad-debt issue is much discussed anecdotally, yet in policy-making circles, there’s precious little actual data on the size of a typical student’s past-due bill to their college, the overall amounts colleges are owed, or whether finding a way to pay off these debts would really make a difference in getting students back to college.

Yet Hill, who was previously president of Vassar College and still moves comfortably amid the education-philanthropy world, seemed to suggest that this lack of knowledge might also be the ticket to getting beyond the talk. One way to move the needle, she said, might be to set up a formal evaluation — perhaps even a randomized controlled trial, or RCT — that would test the effectiveness of such a program on a broader scale. “There ought to be a way to figure out the financing,” Hill said. “I know there are a couple of foundations that like to fund RCTs, to help make better policy decisions.”

The email conversation ended there. But Sheffer and Hill plan to continue to talk. And maybe some policy shop or foundation will take up the cause.

Election update.

Of the candidates with higher-ed ties whom I was watching last week, two out of three lost: Richard Cordray, the former head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, in his race to be governor of Ohio, and Tracy Mitrano, formerly director of internet culture, policy, and law at Cornell University, who was seeking a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. The winner, in another congressional race, was Donna Shalala, the former secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and leader of the Universities of Miami and Wisconsin at Madison.

Quote of the Week.

“Still, it was impossible to be a black kid at a mostly while school and not feel the shadow of affirmative action. You could almost read the scrutiny in the gaze of certain students and even some professors, as if they wanted to say, ‘I know why you’re here.’ … It planted a seed of doubt. Was I here merely as part of a social experiment? Slowly, though, I began to understand that there were many versions of quotas being being filled at the school.”

From Michelle Obama’s Becoming, her newly published biography.
00 2018-11-14
Shreveport

Louisiana Tech Alumnus of the Year Award through the years


This letter to the editor reflects the opinions of its author, John J. Long.

• • •

Never in my wildest dreams would I expect to see the recognition of the Louisiana Tech Alumnus of the Year appear on the front page of The Times ("Bossier Mayor Lo Walker named Louisiana Tech Alumnus of the Year," Nov. 6.)

The Alumnus of the Year honor for Tech has a lengthy history. In the long-ago days of F. Jay Taylor as president of Louisiana Tech, the honor was announced during the homecoming meeting of the Tech Alumni Association in the Marbury Alumni Center. The presentation of the Alumnus of the Year was made by the president of Tech, not by the president of the alumni association, in an offhand manner.

Since then, the Alumnus of the Year recognition has grown to become a highlight of Tech's homecoming weekend. The event has grown into a major event. There was no one in attendance in the years leading up to the 1970s.

To see Bossier City Mayor Lo Walker appear on the front page of The Times is a testament to the current-day recognition of this significant Tech honor. Mayor Walker is an example of the quality Tech alumni to be so honored.

The roster of those chosen for this award through the years is a classic example of the product that Tech produces.

Congratulations, Mayor Walker, and congratulations to the Tech Alumni Association for its long history of honoring Tech alumni for their lifetime achievement.

John J. Long (Class of 1951)

Shreveport
00 2018-11-13
Associated Press

UL-Lafayette debuts program to retain low-income students


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette is adapting a program designed to keep athletes in school to ensure that academically accomplished lower-income students don’t drop out.

The university's Louisiana Educate pilot program began this semester with 43 freshmen from New Orleans.

The original goal was to start with 24, but more than 100 applied, Dr. DeWayne Bowie, the university's vice president for enrollment management, said in a news release. "The hope going forward is to enroll between 80 and 100 students in the program each fall," he said. He also hopes to expand it at some point to other parts of the state.

Students get work-study jobs on campus and must attend at least six hours of study hall each week. They also all live in one residence hall and must complete internships, join two student organizations, and attend four on-campus or university-related events each semester.

Civil engineering major Anthony Jupiter, 19, said he likes many aspects of the program, and finds the study hall requirement is a big help.

"I might not attend as often if it wasn't mandatory," he said.

From dorms to study abroad, here's how 6 Louisiana universities were ranked by Princeton Review
From dorms to study abroad, here's how 6 Louisiana universities were ranked by Princeton Review

See if your university made the cut in the test-prep company's annual "best colleges" list.


Academic coach and Louisiana Educate coordinator Rachel Sam meets weekly with students to gauge their progress and provide guidance, from tips about time management to information about campus services.

"We want to do as much as we can to put them in a position to succeed," she said.


Bowie said students having a hard time meeting requirements are counseled. "Those who can't get back on track ultimately won't be able to stay in the program. They will, however, be able to remain enrolled at the University provided they meet continuation requirements."

Bowie said planning began last November, when donors from New Orleans proposed a partnership. They were motivated in part by Louisiana-Lafayette's "reputation for promoting social mobility," he said.

Last year, the Brookings Institution ranked Louisiana-Lafayette among the 10 public research universities with the most low-income students out of 342 public universities with selective admissions. Brookings used information from Stanford University's Equality of Opportunity Project to gauge whether schools boosted social mobility, and factored in research rankings by the Carnegie Foundation.

Private gifts, institutional grants and federal and state financial aid are combined in the Louisiana Education Program. Students must qualify for Louisiana's college tuition program, which covers $2,700 to $3,100 a semester, and for federal Pell Grants. They also must take out the highest student loans for which they qualify.

Students cannot take off-campus jobs. “We want to make sure they’re fully engaged. They are monitored closely with, for lack of a better word, intrusive attention,” Bowie said.
00 2018-11-13
Hammond

Southeastern’s ‘Let’s Talk: Art’ continues with November lecture


The third lecture in the “Let’s Talk: Art” series, sponsored jointly by Southeastern Louisiana University’s Department of Visual Art + Design and the Friends of Sims Library, will be held Wednesday, Nov. 14.

Free and open to the public, the lecture will begin at 5 p.m. inside the Contemporary Art Gallery on Southeastern’s campus, located at 411 Ned McGehee Drive.

Southeastern senior Melissa Miller, an art history major, will present “Titian’s Venus of Urbino: New Interpretations,” which will center around “The Venus of Urbino,“ a 16th century oil painting by the Italian painter Titian.

The painting, which depicts a nude woman reclining on a couch or bed in a luxurious Renaissance palace, currently hangs in Florence’s Uffizi Gallery.

“This talk is an in-depth analysis of Titian’s masterpiece,” said Sims Library Director Eric Johnson, “and based on his symbolism and other portraits, it reveals a new idea about Titian’s women in the sixteenth century.”

For more information, contact Johnson at 549-3962.
00 2018-11-13
Lafayette

USDA grant to allow UL-Lafayette researchers to find ways to boost local seafood industry


Across south Louisiana, those involved in the seafood industry have struggled and fought through worsening seafood seasons.

From the fishermen on the boats to the people on the docks to the families and businesses who process and sell shrimp, crabs and seafood, all have continued to fight to keep their livelihoods and ways of life alive in Cajun country and across the Gulf region.

The owners at Granger Seafood in Maurice can attest. The family-owned business started out 31 years ago selling seafood out of ice chests have grown to include a small storage and processing facility.

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Some years are much tougher than others, owner Cheryl Granger admitted, and the current trend may mean more difficult seasons ahead.

"The industry of shrimping is not what it used to be a long time ago," she said. "Some years are OK and some aren't. There just seems to be less seafood out there."

The Grangers and others in the seafood industry in south Louisiana are hopeful following a federal grant awarded to the University of Louisiana at Lafayette's B.I. Moody III College of Business Administration.

The $249,678 U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Business Development grant will allow the university to study the seafood supply chain in Vermilion, St. Mary and Iberia parishes.

UL-Lafayette is teaming up with the Meridian Institute, of Washington, D.C., and Thomas Hymel with Louisiana Sea Grant.

The Grangers are among those who are working with UL-Lafayette in this study. With Chinese competition, proposed Gulf fish farms, and last year's inshore shrimping season being one of the worst seasons many veteran fishermen had ever seen, the work will help.

"When you go to the stores, a lot of people focus on price and that price may be half what we can sell local — fresh caught seafood — but what customers don't realize is the quality's not there," said Brittany Granger, Cheryl's daughter. "We focus on local seafood and great quality. If you go see what's going on in these local packing rooms, it's amazing what these people do and how fresh the seafood really is. It's hard for us to compete with imports and their prices, but you don't know what's going on with their seafood."

The one-year study will first map the entire seafood supply chain so researchers and officials will have a visual understanding of the moving parts from the Gulf of Mexico — to the docks, to the processing facilities and into the markets locally and across the country.

It will take researchers to open waters and also into communities where they will hold meetings with fishermen, processors, storage companies and markets and restaurants.

"The focus here is to identify the businesses that are active in this three-parish area and active in the seafood industry from everything that goes on the boat to get it out there, to what comes back in, processing plants, icehouses, whatever," said Geoffrey Stewart, Moody-endowed chair of regional business development at UL-Lafayette.

"We want to know all the moving parts associated with the seafood industry and the markets. We're trying to engage the practitioners that make the seafood industry work," he said.

Deborah Atwood will lead the institute’s contributions to the project. Co-principal investigators are Ramesh Kolluru, vice president for Research, Innovation, and Economic Development at UL-Lafayette, and Roy Holleman, former director of the Enterprise Center of Louisiana and the University's current economic and community development liaison.

"We would like to thank the University of (Louisiana at) Lafayette and Dr. Stewart for this," said Acy Cooper, president of the Louisiana Shrimp Association. "Anything that helps our shrimp harvesters and the industry as a whole is greatly appreciated. Our dock prices are at an all-time low. So, we need to find long-term solutions to protect our way of life, our culture and our heritage."

The research will also be applicable in Texas, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida as many of the issues affecting Louisiana fishing communities are also impacting them as well.

Stewart said they are coming into this study without any preconceived notions on how to help fix the industry's woes. One idea could be the return of gas subsidies, which fishermen have said wasn't a major boon but still greatly helped them even though it usually didn't even cover an entire fill-up for a fishing boat.

"We want to identify where there is space for them to grow, where there are things holding them back and in the end, we're looking to develop a strategy for local, state and federal agencies where they can put programming around the needs of the industry," Stewart said. "Our objective here is to come in and give economic developers in the state something to build off of. There are needs that need to be addressed. This is all about their voice. This is about preserving not just our local economies but our culture and our way of life."

Said Cheryl Granger: "We're so thankful they're doing this. Any help we can get, even if it's just research to find some way to help us, would be amazing."
00 2018-11-13
Lafayette

U of Louisiana-Lafayette works to retain low-income students


LAFAYETTE, La. (AP) - The University of Louisiana at Lafayette is adapting a program designed to keep athletes in school to ensure that academically accomplished lower-income students don't drop out.

The university says in a news release that its Louisiana Educate pilot program began this semester with 43 freshmen from New Orleans.

Students get work-study jobs on campus and must attend at least six hours of study hall each week. They also all live in one residence hall. They must complete internships, join two student organizations, and attend four on-campus or university-related events each semester.

The university's vice president for enrollment management says planning began last November when donors from New Orleans proposed a partnership. Dr. DeWayne Bowie says the donors were motivated in part by Louisiana-Lafayette's "reputation for promoting social mobility."
00 2018-11-13
Lake Charles

Shop small, support your neighbors


Shopping is a popular pastime on the weekend after Thanksgiving. This year, save some of your buying for Small Business Saturday, Nov. 24.

Buying from your local small business offers an opportunity to get fabulous gifts and support your neighbors at the same time. Find products tailored to Southwest Louisiana instead of things suited to cold climates or urban environments. Think of a nice all-season cotton sweater instead of a heavy wool version or a long spoon suitable for stirring your big pot of gumbo.

Many shops will participate in Small Business Saturday. In 2017, about 108 million individuals across the country took advantage of this special day, according to American Express, the founder of the celebration. Retailers, restaurants and service providers of all kinds (from your favorite crafts to cafes to car washes) will be happy to have you as their customer on Nov. 24 and every other day of the holiday shopping season.

When you shop locally, you support your neighbors, friends and relatives. These small businesses employ our friends and family, pay local taxes and buy products and services right here at home. The owners sponsor youth soccer and softball teams, host car wash fundraisers and display flyers for plays at the local school. They support our community with as much passion as they show for their business.

Before you click “buy” on that website for an out-of-state seller, check with the store down the street. See if you can buy the product here in Southwest Louisiana. You’ll get personalized service, prompt answers to your questions about the purchase and the satisfaction of knowing that you’re helping to keep the local business alive.

Mark “Shop Small Saturday” on your calendar. Enjoy a day that proudly celebrates the backbone of America. Visit the small locally-owned shops and restaurants in your community and tell the owners you appreciate their hard work and dedication to our community.

Let the consultants at the Louisiana Small Business Development Center at McNeese State University work with you to plan your holiday marketing push. For over 30 years, the LSBDC at McNeese has worked with entrepreneurs and business owners who are looking to start or grow their small business. Visit www.lsbdc.org/msu to learn more about us. For no-cost assistance with your business, call 337-475-5529.

l

Donna Little is the director of the Louisiana Small Business Development Center at McNeese State University. Contact her at 475-5945 or dlittle@lsbdc.org.

l

Funded in part through a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration and La. Dept. of Economic Development. All opinionsex pressed are those of the author.

SMALL BUSINESS SATURDAY IS NOV. 24.
Before you click “buy” on that website for an out-ofstate seller, check with the store down the street.
00 2018-11-13
Lake Charles

Fall 2018 McNeese Sage Series: Final Lecture



LAKE CHARLES, LA (KPLC) -McNeese State University’s 2018 Fall Sage Series ends today. Dr. Lowell Urbatsch, a professor of botany and herbarium at Louisiana State University, will focus on the life and work of botanical artist Margaret Stones, and her illustrations of Louisiana’s native flora.

Cherished by gardeners and art collectors in and out of Louisiana, Stones' works emphasizes the variety of native plant species along the Gulf Coast.

The lecture will be held at the S.E.E.D. center at McNeese, starting at 3 p.m.

For more information visit www.mcneese.edu/leisure.

Copyright 2018 KPLC. All rights reserved.
00 2018-11-13
Monroe

Temple Grandin to lecture at ENRICH Center at La. Tech


Temple Grandin, professor of animal science at Colorado State University, consultant to the livestock industry on animal behavior, and autism spokesperson, will speak at 7 p.m. Dec. 6 in Howard Auditorium on the Louisiana Tech University campus.

Grandin’s talk will be presented as a part of the kick-off celebration for the ENRICH (Education and Research in Children’s Health) Center, which works to enrich environmental, psychosocial, and physical health outcomes for children through research, education, and outreach.

Throughout her life, Grandin has used her first-hand experience as a person with autism to color her interaction with animals and her research into their behavior. Her story connects the two disciplines and allows those who work with animals to learn from those who work with special-needs children and adults – and vice versa.

In 2010, HBO made a film about Grandin. Her knack for “thinking in pictures” – a phrase made popular in the HBO film and in one of her many books – has allowed her to connect with animals in ways most people never could. Her unique ability has completely altered the way we view livestock and the way we treat them.

This is a free, ticketed event. Tickets will be available via links that will go live on Nov. 6 on the ENRICH Center, College of Applied and Natural Sciences, and School of Human Ecology websites and social media.

This lecture is sponsored in part by Louisiana Farm Bureau Federation.
00 2018-11-13
Monroe

Costs of living is lower in NELA than the rest of the country


MONROE, La. (KNOE) - The Center for Business and Economic Research at ULM says the cost of living is much lower here in Northeast Louisiana, specifically Ouachita and Union parishes than it is nationwide. "It's production costs, transportation costs, but it's also competitive pricing,” says Robert Eisenstadt, Director of ULM’s Center for Business and Economic Research.


They measure the cost of living based on six categories: transportation, housing, miscellaneous goods and services, healthcare, utilities, and groceries. Healthcare used to be more than the national average, but now it costs 17% less says Eisenstadt. “Mostly, I think that has something to do with the number of physicians in the area, and we're starting to see lower, for example, office visit prices, the basic office visit,” says Eisenstadt. With ULM’s proposed medical school, Eisenstadt says that could bring health care costs even lower. “I would expect there to have some downward pressure on prices, but of course if the students who graduate from here disperse and go into other areas, then not so much."

As for transportation locally, Eisenstadt says that’s also 17% lower. “We've got low gas prices because we tend to have low gas taxes, and also because transportation costs are bringing, transporting, refined fuels from the gulf coast.”

He says apartment rentals and home costs are lower here than other areas in the country. “Part of the reason is that land costs are very low here and when you have low land costs then you don't have quite the upward pressure on home prices,” says Eisenstadt.

Over the past few years, experts have seen a drop in prices for groceries too. “Some additional grocery stores that moved in from a very large, national competitor, and it started to put pricing pressures on existing grocery stores,” says Eisenstadt.

To get the measurements that the cost of living is based on, Eisenstadt says they go out and measure a list of items used by almost everyone. They do this three times a year, on the same goods and services at the same location to see what changes occur.

00 2018-11-13
Monroe

LSBDC plans Nov. 13 workshop on healthy, productive workplaces


The Louisiana Small Business Development Center at the University of Louisiana Monroe invites the community to a seminar that will address how to cultivate a healthy and productive workplace. The workshop, which will take place at 3:30 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 13, in room 117 at ULM’s Stubbs Hall, is free of charge.

Jennifer Zimmerman, owner of Delta Benefit Consulting, will teach attendees how to: build a healthy work environment, recruit and retain employees, craft appealing and affordable health benefit packages, and navigate the 2019 healthcare landscape.

Visit www.lsbdc.org/ulm, click “trainings,” and register for the event.

For more details, contact: cdavis@ulm.edu or call 342-1224.

The LSBDC is funded in part through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. SBA, LED and participating universities and community colleges. Reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities and or limited English proficiency will be made if requested two weeks in advance. All opinions, conclusions or recommendations expressed are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the SBA.
00 2018-11-13
Natchitoches

Inferno Pitch finals Nov. 13


Natchitoches, LA – Northwestern State University (NSU) and BRF’s Entrepreneurial Accelerator Program (EAP), which specializes in stimulating entrepreneurship opportunities in Northwest Louisiana, have partnered to bring the Inferno Pitch competition to the NSU campus. The competition is designed to support student innovation and will conclude at the Inferno Pitch event, which will take place on November 13, 2018 at 3:00 pm in Russell Hall, Room 107. This event is free and open to the public.



“One of EAP’s objectives is to foster entrepreneurial education at the university level,” said Dave Smith, Executive Director of EAP. “We think the best way to grow an entrepreneurial-minded ecosystem is to expose students to an environment that celebrates their innovation. Through EAP’s Grand Prix college business plan competitions, we are guiding students and young entrepreneurs in growing their businesses, taking them from concept to reality.”



The Inferno Pitch, one of three university business plan competitions that make up the Grand Prix program, is open to all NSU College of Business and Technology – School of Business students. Forty students or teams with a business idea submitted an application. Students participated in a workshop with EAP team members and other advisors who provided the student competitors with expertise, mentorship and key connections needed to fuel their success.

The top five participants, individuals or teams, have been selected and will pitch in the final event to a panel of judges comprised of business professionals from the Northwest Louisiana region. The top five are: (1) Alba Maloff Johnson and Matthew Broekman, (2) Brooke Smith, Kamamalu Nishihira-Asuncion, Kennedy Cullen, and Kortney Greer, (3) Michael Phelps and Victoria Miller, (4) Hayden Robertson, and (5) Joshua Johnson. The winner will receive a cash prize, scholarships to the Louisiana Startup Prize 2019 and the Patent Academy, plus professional services from EAP.



“This competition is a real motivator for students who think they may have a good idea but just don’t know how to take it to the next level,” said Dr. Margaret Kilcoyne, Dean of the College of Business & Technology. “We give them the mentoring and confidence to push forward and dream big.”





ABOUT EAP:

The Entrepreneurial Accelerator Program, an initiative of BRF, is a public/private partnership between BRF, the Caddo Parish Commission and the City of Shreveport to diversify the regional economy, create jobs and expand the area’s tax base by providing services to innovative startups that have high growth potential.

Since EAP began in July 2014, the program has screened more than 690 startups and provided services to more than 220 companies.
00 2018-11-13
Natchitoches

NSU Department of New Media, Journalism & Communication Arts Hosts Annual J-Day


Natchitoches, La. (Nov. 2, 2018) – Northwestern State University’s Department of New Media, Journalism & Communication Arts hosted its 45th annual J-Day this past Friday. The half-day event in NSU’s Student Union included 10 communications-based competitions, seven panels with communications professionals and facility tours.

Just under 400 participants, advisers, NSU students and faculty attended this year’s event.

Students had the opportunity to choose two panels out of the seven offered. The panels included Student Media, Radio Industry, TV Broadcast, Public Relations, News Writing, Internships and “How to Get Your Dream Job.”

Competitions included pre-submissions and on-site events.

The pre-submission categories were Photojournalism, Short Film, Sports Writing and Media Writing.

The on-site competitions were for Yearbook, Newspaper, TV, Radio, Media Writing and Sports Reporting.

The winners of each competition are as follows:

Pre-submissions competitions

Photojournalism – Carly Barras of Elysian Fields High School, first; Kelsie Marcantel of Elysian Fields High School, second; Morgan Durett of Elysian Fields High School, third
Short Film – Summer Driggers of Bossier Parish School of Technology and Innovative Learning, first; Nand Patel of Bossier Parish School of Technology and Innovative Learning, second; Amanda Sifuentes of Bossier Parish School of Technology and Innovative Learning, third
Sports Writing – Sam Cooley of Vidalia High School, first; Aden Woodard of C. E. Byrd High School, second; Zachary Schleter of the Louisiana School for Math, Science and the Arts, third
Media Writing – Kelsie Marcantel of Elysian Fields High School, first; Harleigh Whitehead of Elysian Fields High School, second; Jessica Collins of Elysian Fields High School, third
On-site Competitions

Yearbook – Elysian Fields High School, first; Pineville High School, second; Louisiana School for Science, Math and the Arts, third
Newspaper – Neville High School, first; Airline High School, second; Louisiana School for Science, Math and the Arts, third
TV Broadcast, heat one – Brianna Roblow-Law of Parkway High School, first; Acacia Coker of the Louisiana School for Science, Math and the Arts, second; Bailey May of Parkway High School, third
TV Broadcast, heat two – Allison Darty of C. E. Byrd High School, first; Kayla Olson of the Louisiana School for Science, Math and the Arts, second; Salem Johnson of Lakeview High School, third
Radio – Brayden Kimbrough of the Louisiana School for Science, Math and the Arts, first; Audrey Livigni of Neville High School, second; Brooke Copeland of Elysian Fields High School, third
Media Writing – Zachary Schleter of the Louisiana School for Science, Math and the Arts, first; Chance McLane of Airline High School, second; Kelsie Marcantel of Elysian Fields High School, third
Sports Reporting – Allison Darty of C. E. Byrd High School, first; Annie Pryor of Parkway High School, second; Summer Driggers of B Bossier Parish School of Technology and Innovative Learning


The overall competition winner was Alison Darty, a senior at C.E. Byrd High. She is involved in many extracurricular activities, most notably as the executive producer of YBYRD, a school-based television program at C. E. Byrd.



“She is the hardest working student that I know,” says Sarah Skiles, teacher at C. E. Byrd and J-Day chaperone.



Darty says that she wants to study sports broadcasting. Her current goal is to work for the Dallas Cowboys.



The NSU Department of New Media, Journalism and Communication Arts thanks each school for participating as well as the panelists, judges and volunteers. J-Day 2018 would not have been possible without your support.



The NSU Department of New Media, Journalism & Communication Arts is dedicated to investing in the future of the communication field through awareness and education. For more information about J-Day visit https://www.nsulajday.com, or call us at 1-318-357-5360.


Bob Condor, assistant professor of sports media at Northwestern State University, spoke to prospective students who attended Journalism Day at NSU, an event to showcase programs in the Department of New Media, Journalism and Communication Arts. Condor, former vice president at Yahoo Sports Media, has had a long career as a writer, editor and content producer for the National Hockey League, MSN.com and the Chicago Tribune.
00 2018-11-13
Natchitoches

NSU recognizes Honorary Captain, pays tribute to veterans on Military Appreciation Day


NATCHITOCHES – CPL (Ret). Jacob Schick, U.S. Marine Corps, was Honorary Captain for Northwestern State University’s double overtime win over McNeese State University Nov. 10, which the university observed as Military Appreciation Day. Schick performed the pregame coin toss and was congratulated by Louisiana’s Lt. Governor Billy Nungesser and State Treasurer John Schroder.



Schick is a native of Bossier City who served from 2000-2004 when a life-threatening and career-ending improvised explosive device blew through a vehicle he was driving while deployed in Iraq. He has undergone 50 operations and 20 blood transfusions and was diagnosed with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury.



While struggling through convalescence, Schick realized warriors need not suffer alone. He now serves as the Chief Executive Officer of 22Kill, an organization that honors those who serve and promotes awareness of suicide prevention and empowers veterans globally by supporting the readily available programs and services local to them.



Joining Schick for the coin toss were his brothers, Jason and Cody; mother, Dianne, and father, Woody, an NSU alumnus and 1993 inductee in NSU’s N-Club Hall of Fame for baseball.



Schick’s participation in Saturday’s game is part of the Department of Military Science’s on-going tradition of honoring veterans during home athletic events.


CPL (Ret.) Jacob Schick of Bossier City was the Honorary Captain at Northwestern State University’s final home football game of the season Nov. 10. Congratulating Schick were, from left, Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Smalley, U.S. Army (Ret.), Northwestern Demon Regiment Chief of Staff; NSU President Dr. Chris Maggio, Schick, Louisiana’s Lt. Governor Billy Nungesser, State Treasurer John Schroder and Master Sergeant Christopher Upp, ROTC Senior Military Instructor.
00 2018-11-13
Regional/National

Employers Want Liberal Arts Grads


A report being released today says higher education is not keeping pace with the ever-changing job market. The report examines the “translation chasm” between the skills graduates of liberal arts programs have and the skills employers say they’re looking for in an applicant. Turns out, they’re not all that different, but “liberal arts graduates are too often left to stumble upon the valuable mixture of layered skills” required for any specific career, according to the report.

While many reports suggest that students should focus on studying marketable skills, the new report identifies career value in liberal arts education, albeit with some tweaks.

Put together by Emsi, a labor market analytics firm, and the Strada Institute for the Future of Work, the report is based on more than 100 million social and professional profiles and applicant résumés and more than 36 million job postings to determine how to bridge the gap between what liberal arts students learn and what employers want. (Note: Strada Education Network is a sponsor of Inside Higher Ed events, but Inside Higher Ed did not participate in the creation of this report.)

The report examines liberal arts programs, not liberal arts colleges, although many liberal arts programs are found at liberal arts colleges. "Liberal arts” is broadly defined as bachelor's degree programs in the humanities, social sciences and interdisciplinary programs. Arts, business, health care and STEM majors were not included in this analysis.

“There are those who believe that the ‘hard’ skills of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) are most critical to the future, and those who believe the uniquely ‘human’ skills of the liberal arts are the ones that will endure in the face of automation,” the report says. “We say, ‘both, and’: It is the integration of human and technical skills that will provide the best preparation for the future of work.”

Liberal arts graduates have successful careers. While their earnings never catch up to those of STEM graduates, liberal arts graduates earn more than workers with less education. “Among workers with liberal arts B.A.s, 82 percent are working (70 percent full-time), and the average full-time worker earns $55,000 annually, $20,000 more than high school graduates, but $5,000 less than the average college graduate,” the report says. “Two out of five liberal arts graduates, however, go on to earn graduate degrees, which further boosts their earnings to $76,000 annually, on average.”

In the past, such outcomes have not been translated for a wider audience of employers and students, and “as a result, depending on who you ask, these graduates are either headed for a lifetime as a barista or are capable of doing absolutely anything,” the report says.

Rob Sentz, chief innovation officer at Emsi and co-author of the report, hopes that students, employers and colleges will use the data to help clarify this discrepancy.

He thinks about the data as three overlapping circles: students can use the data to determine how their “human” skills -- communication, leadership and problem solving -- apply to different jobs, employers can use the data to advertise job openings to qualified applicants, and colleges can use the data to connect what students learn into the classroom to real-world job scenarios.

From their first career to the third, liberal arts graduates often transition into high-skill, high-demand careers in marketing, advertising, public relations, management and human resources.

A graph that shows the movement over time of liberal arts graduates into high-level jobs such as marketing, human relations, management and education

Employers could be more specific in job postings about what they’re looking for, but matching up jobs to applicants is a “two-way street,” Sentz said.

“Employers are going to signal, ‘We want communication skills because we want you working on a social media campaign,’ and the student needs to look and say, ‘OK, how do I translate what I learned to this?’” he said.

Take communication, for example. Hundreds of thousands of job postings list “communication” as a desired skill, but how that skill is utilized varies greatly from job to job. A listing for a behavioral health position could require good communication skills for suicide intervention, grief counseling or crisis management. In a marketing position, employees will communicate via press releases, brand management or social media marketing. In human resources positions, communication is required for onboarding, performance appraisal or management training.

“The college itself can help fill a gap between student and employer,” Sentz said. “Break down some of things that employers are asking for, and don’t necessarily just teach and certify those things, but say, ‘Now we’re learning rhetoric, or we’re writing an essay, and in the world of employment this is [how you could use this skill].’”

The report utilizes national data, but Sentz would like to see colleges collect this data locally.

“If you’re in Chicago, what are liberal arts students from different colleges in the Chicago area doing, and are [you] building relationships with those employers?” he said.

Deans, administrators working in program development, institutional research departments and faculty advisers should all be focused on helping students "translate what they are learning into skills that the labor market needs and wants," Sentz said. "Once the college has researched the needs of the local or regional economy, has collected the data on what their students actually do in that economy, and developed curriculum that makes connections to the labor market, career services should take advantage of that."

Students should also be doing their own research about how their skills and interests could translate into a career.

“The blessing of it is that [liberal arts graduates] are very mobile, but the curse is that they could end up mobile into bad spots,” Sentz said. “You really do have a very diverse array of things you could do, and you need to be very smart about how you begin to think about how you apply it in the market, versus a STEM student whose path might be already paved.”
00 2018-11-13
Ruston

Ruston brings traveling Vietnam Memorial Wall to LA Tech's campus to honor veterans


RUSTON, La. - A special tribute to those that paid the ultimate price.
More than 50-thousand names on the Vietnam Memorial Wall.

This year the City of Ruston brought the traveling wall to the area -- to honor veterans.

"[The] memory of them. That's what that wall is for nothing else. The memory of those guys who have fought in the many many wars in our country and to honor them for their death," said J.D. Harper.

Korea vet J.D. Harper was able to find one of his childhood friends on the wall.
He said his buddy was able to live out his lifelong dream.

"He always said... Ivan Smith said when he was going through school. As long as I knew him that he was going to join the army," said veteran JD Harper.

Others also able to find their loved ones on the wall.

"My dad's older brother passed away before I was born. He is on wall 8, row 116 Billy Johntson. He's the reason why I joined the military," said retired Army Veteran Beth Johnston.

The memorial sitting on Louisiana Tech's campus drawing in students who are eager to learn the country's history.

"It's kind of chilling because i have always wanted to go see all the monuments in the northeast, but I never get the chance to leave here often so it's great to see this replica," said Louisiana Tech University student Michael Lasuzzo.

"It's a great honor for this wall just not to be on Louisiana Tech University campus, but in Lincoln Parish," said Chief Randal Hermes.

A symbol of honor that has captured the city of Ruston on this patriotic weekend.

"It's a very monumental piece. And we just glad we could bring something of a replica back into this community," said James Austin.
00 2018-11-09
Lafayette

Don't miss these events in the Acadiana and outlying areas of south Louisiana for Nov. 9-15


FRIDAY-SUNDAY
"SHREK THE MUSICAL": 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday, University of Louisiana at Lafayette Fletcher Hall, 150 Girard Park Drive, Lafayette. Featuring a full cast and production from the Music Academy of Acadiana theater students. $15.

SATURDAY
FESTIVAL DE SUCCESS 2018: 10 a.m., Parc International, 200 Garfield St., Lafayette. A free event for people with special needs and their families. There will be free food, crafts, music and inspiring success stories.

2ND SATURDAY ARTWALK: 6 p.m., Downtown Lafayette. Take a tour of the galleries during 2nd Saturday ArtWalk as the Downtown comes alive with more than a dozen galleries, museums restaurants and shops offering live music, food, drink and ,of course, art for purchase.

6TH ANNUAL COLLARNARY COOK-OFF: 6 p.m., Vermilionville, 300 Fisher Road, Lafayette. Acadiana area priests will show off their culinary expertise and prepare their own authentic Cajun Gumbo for you to taste and vote. collarnarycookoff.com.

VETERANS DAY CELEBRATION: 7 p.m., Cajundome, 444 Cajundome Blvd., Lafayette. All proceeds will benefit the Veterans' Memorial at Moncus Park. Music by On Call. $20, Veterans free with ID. Food and drink available for purchase.

SUNDAY
CHILI/GUMBO COOK-OFF: 3 p.m., The Bayou Church, 2234 Kaliste Saloom Road, Lafayette. Along with great chili and gumbo to taste at each tent, there will be live music from Johnny Chauvin and the Mojo Band, fun jumps and more for the whole family to enjoy.

ONGOING
ACADIANA CENTER FOR THE ARTS: 101 W. Vermilion St., Lafayette. Featuring the exhibits "Shelf Life," through Nov. 10; and Quilters Guild Acadienne. acadianacenterforthearts.org.

CHILDREN'S MUSEUM OF ACADIANA: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, 201 E. Congress St., Lafayette. $7. Free for children a year old and younger. childrensmuseumofacadiana.com.

HILLIARD UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM: 710 E. St. Mary Blvd., Lafayette. Featuring "A. Hays Town and the Architectural Image of Louisiana" through Dec. 29; and "Salvador Dali's Stairway to Heaven" through Jan. 18. Yoga in the Galleries at 11 a.m. on the second Saturday of the month; guided tour at 2 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. hilliardmuseum.org.

HUB CITY FARMERS MARKET: 8 a.m. to noon Saturdays, Oil Center, 427 Heymann St., Lafayette. First and third Saturdays include an arts weekend. lafayettehubcitymarket.com.

LAFAYETTE FARMERS AND ARTISAN MARKET: 8 a.m. to noon Saturdays, Moncus Park, 2913 Johnston St., Lafayette. Includes a Cajun jam at 9 a.m. marketatmoncuspark.com.

LAFAYETTE SCIENCE MUSEUM: 433 Jefferson St., Lafayette. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday; and 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. lafayettesciencemuseum.org.

LOUISIANA RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL: 9 a.m., 46468 River Road, Hammond. A Renaissance-era English village is populated with performers and staff in period costumes. There's entertainment, shows, educational demonstrations, arts and crafts and more. Each week has a theme, such as heroes and pirates and Celtic weekend. Camping is available. Weekends through Dec. 9 and also Friday, Nov. 23. larf.org.

ROSEDOWN PLANTATION STATE HISTORIC SITE: La. 10, St. Francisville. Daily tours (tours are hourly, final tour starts at 4 p.m.), museum/historic buildings, historic and/or nature programs, concessions and gift shop, picnic areas. Open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. lastateparks.com.

Compiled by Marchaund Jones
00 2018-11-09
Lake Charles

McNeese students weigh in on Bayou Bikeshare Plan


LAKE CHARLES, LA (KPLC) - A few months ago we told you about a group working to bring a bike share program to Calcasieu parish.

After taking a look at area roads the team is now focusing on people on-the-go, who better to talk to than college students.


The conversation to make Calcasieu parish more bike friendly has been going on for quite some time.

In July, the Bayou Bikeshare Plan was first introduced in Sulphur, fast forward to today, officials are now studying how the program could benefit students at McNeese.

“I definitely think it would work here because there’s just so much happening,” said freshman, Connor Way.

For students like Connor, who venture off campus during free time..the program is a big deal.

There’s lots of pros behind bike sharing, some studies even show it’s safer than riding a personal bike.

But what about the cons... yes, the city is seeing rapid growth but is it enough to peddle this new philosophy.

“So we’re evaluating can it work? That’s really what we want to get down to the bottom of," said Lindsey West, CEO of the Bayou BikeShare Plan.

"We feel like y’all have some great bones..there is a grid system downtown where it could really work and McNeese is a really connected campus,” she said.

“There are constraints here, there isn’t a lot of bike infrastructure so that is difficult," said Project planner, Rae-leigh Starc.

"There is a need for sidewalks as we’ve seen on some of these main roads..just trying to make sure there are areas where people can bike safely and comfortably.”

The bikeshare study is going to address alternative transportation services, equity, and healthier lifestyles. The voices of the citizens are imperative for the project.

View the interactive map:


7News spoke to a number of students and got their take on the overall project.

“As far as bike sharing goes, you really need some kind of way to police that..as far as that goes, I’d rather just have my own," said a student.

“I think it’s a great idea because if I don’t want to walk to class one day, I’ll just ride my bike...it’s a good form of exercise too,” said Patrick Juneau.

“I think it would benefit McNeese students.. however, I would set some safety regulations beforehand," said freshman, Abigail Crater.

Several entities have put up a total of 40, dollars to fund the bikeshare study.

Results are expected to be available in Spring of 2019.

Learn more about the Bayou Bikeshare Project HERE. You can also let your voice be heard and take the community survey HERE.

Copyright 2018 KPLC. All rights reserved.
00 2018-11-09
Monroe

ULM to expand Health Sciences, CAES with new programs


The University of Louisiana Monroe is expanding, and will soon add impressive new programs to its already unrivaled Health Sciences offerings. In addition to the sciences, the arts have a unique program on the horizon, and ULM has reached an agreement with the anticipated Edward Via School of Osteopathic Medicine to utilize its state-of-the-art laboratory.

The UL System Board of Supervisors approved four proposals submitted by ULM, giving the university permission for continued growth. The proposals were: to offer a Doctor of Occupational Therapy, to develop a new academic program leading to a Bachelor of Arts in Music, to offer a Post Baccalaureate Certificate in Autism Spectrum Disorder and a Cooperative Agreement with the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine.

“ULM’s Health Sciences program will be second to none in the state, even the region, with these innovative courses,” said ULM President Nick J. Bruno. “People from all over the country will be coming to ULM to study. Our music program will offer a degree that gives people the flexibility to study other subjects along with music. We are thrilled to be adding these programs to ULM and the community.”

More: Proposed medical school breaks ground at ULM

Doctor of Occupational Therapy

Approval was granted for a Doctor of Occupational Therapy (DOT) in the College of Health Sciences. According to Patti Calk, Director of the Occupational Therapy Program, it will be 2021 when the first class begins.

“It does take a while to develop all coursework for a doctoral level occupational therapy program that meets ACOTE’s new standards; but the other reason for the 2021 start date is because we want to give students who have planned for the Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) Bridge Program an opportunity to be able to complete that program as many students have and are obtaining an Occupational Therapy Assistant degree in order to then bridge through our MOT program,” Calk said.

Currently, ULM offers the Occupational Therapy Assistant program and the Master of Occupational Therapy. Calk said the master’s program will end when the doctor’s begins.

The Doctor of Occupational Therapy has garnered strong support in the community, with several physicians and professionals writing letters endorsing the program.

Kevin Goldman, CEO, of North Louisiana Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Clinic in Monroe, wrote: Developing an OT program at ULM is not only critical to addressing the growing demand for OT services in our community and throughout Louisiana, but will also help confront OT supply/demand gaps we are certain to face in the future, especially since board certification and licensure to practice as an OT will require doctoral-level training in 2027.”

Dr. Marshall A. Cain of Monroe wrote, “As part of the medical community that specializes in neurological surgery which offers occupational therapy to the community in the privacy of their home, I firmly believe that occupational therapy is a great asset to the medical community. I strongly support the Occupational Therapy Program at the University of Louisiana Monroe and the desire to transition to a doctorate program.”

Certificate in Autism Spectrum Disorder

The board wholeheartedly approved the proposal to offer a Post Baccalaureate Certificate in Autism Spectrum Disorder. It will be the only program in the state and region. Graduates of this program will be able to help more people in Northeast Louisiana with autism diagnosis and treatment.

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, “Autism Spectrum Disorder is a developmental disorder that affects communication and behavior. Although autism can be diagnosed at any age, it is said to be a ‘developmental disorder’ because symptoms generally appear in the first two years of life.”

Dr. David Irwin, Professor and Director of the Autism Center at ULM, said the 15-hour course will be for people who have a degree, but are interested in Autism Spectrum Disorder and helping families and their children.

“The critical need for services to children and adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder and their families in northern Louisiana has been the driving force for the AC-ULM. Our goals are to provide high quality evaluations, direct and indirect treatment services, and continuing and professional education to meet the needs of the community and beyond,” said Irwin.

“The Post Baccalaureate Certificate in Autism Spectrum Disorder will help meet the need for many people who want to learn to support individuals with ASD across the life span,” Irwin said. “Currently, one in 58 children are diagnosed with ASD in the U.S. and ULM is taking a major step in meeting this increased demand in many ways.”

The program is planned to start in Fall 2019.

Bachelor of Arts in Music

The Board of Supervisors also approved a Letter of Intent to develop a Bachelor of Arts in Music.

Derle Long, Director of the School of Visual and Performing Arts, said this program is for people who love music and who are also interested in other liberal arts or sciences.

“BA majors will serve as important contributors for ULM and regional music performances, recitals and productions. The strength of the Visual and Performing Arts faculty at ULM makes this degree extremely relevant for the growth and continued development of the arts culture in Northeast Louisiana,” Long said. “ULM serves as the cultural hub for the northeast part of the state, hosting over 350 arts events and drawing over 45,000-plus individuals to the campus.”

“Louisiana is revered throughout the world for its food, politics, people and music,” states the program proposal. “A strong musical culture helps draw new citizens to the state, retains those citizens and enhances the overall cultural environment of Louisiana.”

There is another aspect to the program, the move from music to medicine.

As stated in the proposal, the music program will benefit the proposed medical school, “This degree will contribute to ULM’s effort to offer programs that are innovative and contribute to an emphasis on the health sciences by preparing students to continue pursuit of a degree in music therapy, counseling and a concentration designed to prepare a student for the MCAT and subsequent medical school.”

Cooperative Endeavor Agreement

The board approved a Cooperative Endeavor Agreement between ULM and the proposed Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine. The agreement calls for ULM to lease the VCOM anatomy lab and contract with the anatomy instructor to teach classes for ULM physical therapy and occupational therapy students.

Eric Pani, Vice President of Academic Affairs, called it a “win-win” for both ULM and VCOM.

“It will be a good situation for us and VCOM. Our students can use their facilities and VCOM will be reimbursed by the university,” he said.

There was a groundbreaking at ULM in September for the anticipated medical school, which is expected to open in 2021.
00 2018-11-09
Natchitoches

Chamber Choir invited to competition in Austria


Northwestern State University’s Chamber Choir has been invited to participate in the Ave Verum International Choral Competition in Baden, Austria on May 31-June 2, 2019.

NSU’s Chamber Choir was one of 10 choirs chosen from around the world along with ensembles from countries including Russia, Slovakia, Czechia, Ukraine, Hungary and Italy. Northwestern State was the only choir from the U.S. selected for the competition.

“It shows that people are beginning to notice that we are doing great things at NSU,” said Director of Choral Activities Dr. Nicholaus Cummins. “We are premiering a new major work by internationally renowned composer Richard Burchard. We placed second in a competition against choirs from 20 nations last year. I have received lots of offers for other competitions and festivals.”

The competition is in honor of the location of Mozart’s “Ave Verum Corpus,” which premiered in 1791 in Baden. This competition only occurs in odd years. The opening round features the 10 selected choirs which all sing in a night concert in the town square called the Long Night of Choral Music. The next day, four choirs are selected for the Grand Prix de Ave Verum. The winners receive a trophy and cash prize for the competition. The last American choir to win was the University of Georgia in 2013.

“I did not expect to be invited so quickly to another international competition. It says a lot about our choral program at Northwestern State University,” said Amanda Charles, a graduate student in vocal music performance from Houston. “I arrived at NSU the same semester that Dr. Cummins took his position so I’ve seen the transitions that we have had to go through as a choir together. These competitions have pushed us as a group in the direction that we needed to go. We now have stronger work ethics, can take constructive criticism well, work well with each other and are more independent learners.”

Last summer, the Northwestern State Lyric Choir won a Gold Medal in the Female Choirs category at the 3rd Budapest International Choral Celebration and Laurea Mundi International Open Competition and Grand Prix of Choral Music. The Chamber Choir received a Laurea Summa Cum Laude diploma in the Mixed Choir category and a Laurea Cum Laude diploma in the Musica Sacra (Sacred Music) category.

“We were invited to Singapore Orientale Festival as well, but we cannot go because we are already going to Austria,” said Cummins. “Many conductors and composers have emailed and messaged me based on how we did last summer. It really was a completely life altering experience for our choral program.”

The international competition has led to a new sense of confidence among choir members.

“I knew that our choir was one of the best in the world, but I’m so happy to see us finally getting to prove that on the world stage,” said Michael Martin, a junior vocal music education major from Pineville

Baden is near Vienna and is well-known for its spas. Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert and many other well-known composers wrote music or lived there. Because of Baden’s rich history, composer and choral director Wolfgang Ziegler founded the Ave Verum International Choral Competition in the city. An international jury will judge the competition. Ziegler asked Cummins to submit recordings of NSU’s choir after the Laurea Mundi competition. More than 40 choirs were considered for the event.

Martin said last year’s competition in Hungary has had a positive impact on the Chamber Choir.

“The main aspect that it has changed is the overall work ethic. The students, including myself, truly want to rise to the occasion and show the world what NSU is capable of doing,” said Martin. “The competition in Hungary taught me that the world has limitless talent out there. We spent plenty of time having sectionals while we were there and cleaning up every little detail of our songs. It taught me to always be on my game because no one wants to mess up on an international stage. It taught the choir to work as a cohesive unit. We really came together as a group, and I was so proud of our work.”

Charles said the NSU choir will go into the Austrian competition much better known.

“It does change things for me and for the group. We all want to make sure we are doing our part as a member of this program,” said Charles. “We want to make sure we are representing not only our university well, but Louisiana and our country as well. I am so proud of each and every person in the Chamber Choir. We have really became a little family because of these past experiences and I am so grateful for them.”

Members of the Chamber Choir are raising funds to cover their travel costs for the event. For more information, contact Cummins at (318) 357-5755 or at cumminsn@nsula.edu.
00 2018-11-09
Natchitoches

NSU to host robotics competition on November 28


NATCHITOCHES, La. (NSU) - Northwestern State University’s Department of Engineering Technology will host its annual Robotics Competition and Smart Structures Show from 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Wednesday, November 28 in the Student Union Ballroom.

The competition is open to all middle schools within a 200-mile radius of Natchitoches.

Participants will be able to test their computer programming skills and compete with other Louisiana students for prizes during a fun environment with educational experiences and social activities. The top three teams will receive cash prizes to be used to purchase technology for the classroom. Snacks will be provided.

This year, ET faculty are also organizing a smart structures show to provide opportunities for high schools and other organizations that are involved in robotics related projects to show their creativity at the event.

There is no registration fee for the competition or show, however, those interested in participating in the competition must register by submitting a letter of intent and a press/photo release form (for each team member) no later than November 16. Documents should be sent to Erin Bates at batese@nsula.edu.

For more information and links to registration documents, check "Related Links".
00 2018-11-09
Ruston

La. Tech hosts bone marrow drive


RUSTON, La. (KNOE) - Louisiana Tech is looking for bone marrow matches to that could save lives.


The Department of Health Informatics and Information Management partnered with DKMS to host a bone marrow drive. The goal is to find potential bone marrow or blood stem cell donors for patients with blood cancer and other blood diseases.

Qualified donors swabbed the inside of their mouths to collect DNA. The DNA will then be sent off for testing and will enter a national database to see if someone is a match.

Experts say finding a match is rare, but it can be a lifesaving treatment for blood cancer and 70 other diseases.

"I think a lot of people rely on family members to be the match and only about 30 percent of those are able to get family member matches. About 70 percent have to rely on donors," says HIIM department head Jan Fuller.

They say the pool to find a match is relatively small, so they’re encouraging people to get swabbed.

"There are about 14,000 people at any given point in time that needs a bone marrow transplant and unless there is a match within the system, they cannot have someone help to save their lives," explains HIIM professor Lauren Colvin.

"There are so many people out there who need so much help. Why not give just a little bit of your time?” Says La. Tech student Hannah Ward. Ward swabbed her mouth, hoping she can be a match for someone in need. “You might not get picked, but if you do, I mean, saving a life, what better thing to do in the world than to do that?"

One Louisiana Tech student was a match and donated bone marrow because of last year's drive, and the university says it hopes to find more matches this year. They say 150 students registered this year.
00 2018-11-09
Ruston

TECH ONLINE MBA GETS TOP RANKINGS


Louisiana Tech University’s College of Business recently received top accolades from “Online MBA Today,” a comprehensive guide to the top online master of business administration programs.

Tech’s Master of Business Administration program is ranked No. 1 on the list of Top Online MBA Programs in Louisiana and No. 2 on the list of Top 50 Best Value Online MBA Programs.

The graduate program also received a rank of No. 9 on the site’s list of Top 100 Most Affordable Online MBA Programs and No. 30 on the list of Top 50 Online MBA Programs.
00 2018-11-09
Ruston

BUILDING A WALL OF REMEMBRANCE


Pictured above, Spc. Keaton Hightower (left) and Pfc. Brandi Powers (right) carry a section of the wall for assembly. The wall is an 80 percent replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall in Washington, D. C. The traveling wall stands 8 feet high and is 360 feet long. Pictured below, The truck and trailer carrying the portable wall emerges from beneath the Kanas City Southern Railroad overpass on its way to the Louisiana Tech University greenway at the corner of Tech Drive and West Railroad Avenue where the wall now stands.
00 2018-11-08
Lafayette

Social mobility aim of UL Lafayette’s Louisiana Educate Program


By CHARLIE BIER

UL Lafayette



Anthony Jupiter and Akiem Martin have a lot in common.

Both are 19-year-old freshmen at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Both live in Baker Hall and have a work-study job in DeClouet Hall. Both are on track to earn bachelor’s degrees in engineering. Jupiter is a civil engineering major. Martin is a mechanical engineering major.

The pair also played against each other as members of their respective high school basketball teams in New Orleans, although they didn’t make the connection until meeting at UL Lafayette.

The competition, however, is over. Jupiter and Martin are close friends.

“We relate to each other since we have similar goals and belong to the same program,” Martin said.

Jupiter and Martin are among the first group of students taking part in UL Lafayette’s new Louisiana Educate Program. The pilot program began this semester. It’s in place to help academically accomplished, lower-income students remain in college, said Dr. DeWayne Bowie, the University’s vice president for Enrollment Management.

“It’s geared toward a demographic typically susceptible to dropping out due to a range of factors, including low-income backgrounds that require many to seek financial support from parents who often aren’t in a position to provide it,” Bowie explained.

“Some find it hard to stay in school. That’s unfortunate, because education is the gateway to opportunity and success.”

Forty-three first-time freshmen from New Orleans were accepted into the Louisiana Educate Program. Bowie is optimistic the program can be expanded to other parts of the state. “We set a goal for an initial cohort of 24 students, but received more than 100 applications. So, the hope going forward is to enroll between 80 and 100 students in the program each fall.”

The Louisiana Educate Program is funded by a blend of private gifts, institutional grants and federal and state financial aid. Students must take out the maximum amount of student loans for which they qualify. They must also qualify for federal Pell Grants and for TOPS, the Taylor Opportunity Program for Students.

Students participating in the Louisiana Educate Program are placed in a work-study job on campus. They can’t, however, hold jobs off campus. “We want to make sure they’re fully engaged. They are monitored closely with, for lack of a better word, intrusive attention,” Bowie said.

Students must attend at least six hours of study hall each week. They are required to live in the same residence hall during their freshman year, join two student organizations, attend four on-campus or University-related events per semester and complete internships.

Jupiter said he likes many aspects of the program, but finds the weekly requirement to hit the books in study hall has “really helped me.”

“I might not attend as often if it wasn’t mandatory,” he explained.

Rachel Sam, an academic success coach at the University, coordinates the Louisiana Educate Program. She meets weekly with students to gauge their progress and provide guidance, from tips about time management to information about campus services.

“We want to do as much as we can to put them in a position to succeed,” she said.

Students having difficulty meeting requirements are counseled, Bowie said. “Those who can’t get back on track ultimately won’t be able to stay in the program. They will, however, be able to remain enrolled at the University provided they meet continuation requirements.”

The Louisiana Educate Program is modeled on a similar program for Louisiana Ragin’ Cajuns student-athletes. “They graduate at the highest rate among schools in Louisiana and the Sun Belt Conference, according to the most recent Federal Graduation Rates statistics,” Bowie said.

Planning for the Louisiana Educate Program began last November. Donors from New Orleans approached the University about creating a partnership due, in part, “to its reputation for promoting social mobility,” Bowie said.

A report issued last year by the Brookings Institution ranked UL Lafayette the ninth-best four-year, public university in the United States for managing to “simultaneously produce important research while extending social opportunity to students from underprivileged backgrounds.”

The nonprofit public policy organization based in Washington, D.C., evaluated 342 schools with selective admissions.

The Brookings Institution isn’t alone in praising UL Lafayette’s focus on social mobility.

The commitment was backed up recently by Richard Barth, chief executive officer of the KIPP Foundation. The Knowledge is Power Program is a network of free, open-enrollment college preparatory schools across the nation with a high percentage of lower-income students.

Barth wrote an op-ed piece published at Forbes.com that singled out several colleges and universities – including UL Lafayette – for their efforts to help students from low-income backgrounds thrive.

“The recognition underscores the University’s ongoing dedication to making a difference in the lives of all of our students,” Bowie said.
00 2018-11-08
Monroe

Kitty Degree scholars, professors honor her ULM legacy


Over her lifetime Kitty DeGree, one of Northeast Louisiana’s most generous philanthropists with donations exceeding $9 million at the time of her death in 2012, distinguished herself as the University of Louisiana Monroe’s largest donor.

Her gifts span the university’s affiliate organizations: the ULM Foundation, the ULM Alumni Association, and the ULM Athletic Foundation. She literally supported every aspect of the university’s mission of providing academic excellence and life leadership skills to its students. Her donations represent giving from annual renewable gifts to major capital and planned estate gifts.

One of her last major gifts before her death was a $1 million donation. Honoring that gift, the university named one of its premier schools, the Kitty DeGree School of Nursing. Although she died before the formal naming, the university presented her with an architectural drawing which remained on an easel in her home.

Cindy Rogers, President of the Kitty DeGree Foundation, often remarked of the special joy that rendering brought her.

“Kitty believed in this university. She understood the value it brings to this community and the opportunity it affords many and although her generosity served many organizations this school remained a priority for her throughout her lifetime,” Rogers said.

Rogers said, “Community benefit of her resources was important to Kitty and the development of the Kitty DeGree Foundation was her assurance that the community support she loved would perpetuate beyond her lifetime.”

Faculty shares stories

DeGree’s high regard for ULM’s excellent faculty is evidenced through her establishment of a $1 million Eminent Scholars Chair and five $100,000 Endowed Professorships.

Recently Rogers had the opportunity to visit with the endowed chair and professorships holders over a lunch to talk about Kitty, her lifetime of philanthropy and her interest and devotion to ULM.

Faculty present were Dr. Susan Lacy, Kitty DeGree Chair in Nursing, Dr. William Barnett, Kitty DeGree Professorship in Computer Science, Dr. Jose Cordova, Kitty DeGree Professorship in Computer Information Systems, Dr. Kioh Kim, Kitty DeGree Professorship in Education, Dr. Anne Marie Sisk, Kitty DeGree Professorship in Speech and Hearing Clinic, and Dr. Ann Findley, Kitty DeGree Professorship in Biology.

Faculty individually talked about their role as holders of the endowed chair and professorships and shared the value-added benefits of this special funding. They discussed opportunities from research to student recruitment they would not have accomplished without this funding.

Rogers thanked each for sharing their stories and how much it meant to witness firsthand the continued stewardship of this legacy.

“Kitty was often referred to as a Louisiana treasure, a title well deserved, and I thank each of you for your creativity in maximizing her gifts. She would be both honored and happy to know the good work you continue in her name,” Rogers said.

ULM gives Degree

honorary doctorate

Her exceptional gifts included endowed scholarships, a charitable gift annuity, and a charitable remainder unitrust, all of which benefit students for generations to come.

Kitty’s generous capital gifts include: The Kitty DeGree Computer Center, the Kitty DeGree Pharmacy Student Resource Center/Library; and the Kitty DeGree Speech and Hearing Center. She funded the refurbishment of the University House, which has accommodated dignitaries from all over the world. She provided the funding for the focal part of the University Library and Conference Center, which is the front tower which houses the massive clock and bells whose majestic chimes are heard campus-wide.

In May 1989, the University conferred an Honorary Doctor of Laws degree to DeGree. She also received the inaugural Hall of Distinction Award in 2004, which is the University’s most prestigious award that recognizes those who have honored ULM through a lifetime of distinction and exemplary service to, support for, or promotion of the University.

Befitting her exceptional generosity, the ULM Foundation Board of Trustees voted to name the University’s major gifts recognition society, the Kitty DeGree Bell Tower Society.
00 2018-11-08
Natchitoches

Music educators earn recognition


NATCHITOCHES – Graduates of Northwestern State University’s music education program are being recognized for excellence in their professions. Christopher Williams, director of bands at Destrehan High School, was named recipient of the 2018 Outstanding Young Educator by the Louisiana Music Educators Association (LMEA) and Karl Carpenter, principal at Pineville High School, was named LMEA’s Outstanding Administrator. Jessica Fain, director of bands at Tioga Junior High, was featured in “The Instrumentalist” magazine after being named 2018 Louisiana Bandmaster of the Year.



Williams graduated from Northwestern State in 2015 with a bachelor’s of music education with certification in instrumental music (K-12) and vocal music (K-12). He is in his third year of teaching at Destrehan and in his second as director of bands. He teaches band classes, visits the middle school feeders to help teach and recruit for the future and teaches AP music theory. At NSU, Williams was involved with Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia. He has taught drum corps for the last five summers and is currently teaching brass at the Phantom Regiment based in Rockford, Illinois.



To qualify for LMEA’s Outstanding Young Educator, educators must have taught no more than five years and have served their students, communities and profession in an exemplary manner. The nominees must have enthusiasm for teaching, love for music and a desire to further the musical education of his or her students.



Carpenter earned a bachelor’s degree in music education in 1979 and a master’s degree in music at Northwestern in 1987 before completing his doctorate at the University of Southern Mississippi in 2001. He began his career in 1979 as a band director serving at Oberlin High School, Winnfield Senior High and Tioga High School before becoming assistant principal at Tioga. He later assumed leadership as principal at Carter C. Raymond Middle School and is currently principal at Pineville High School, where he has served since 2007.



The Outstanding Administrator honor recognizes outstanding school principals, assistant principals, superintendents and/or assistant or associate superintendents who demonstrate support for and commitment to high-quality arts education programs in their schools. Carpenter became part of the Louisiana Music Educators Association Hall of Fame in 2012. He is also a member of the NSU’s Hall of Distinguished Educators. He is a former LMEA president and member of the LMEA Hall of Fame.



The honors will be presented during the LMEA annual state music conference in Baton Rouge later this month.



Fain was profiled in “The Instrumentalist” in a feature titled “How the 2018 Louisiana Bandmaster of the Year keeps her seventh and eighth graders working hard and playing well.” “The Instrumentalist” is an American monthly magazine for music educators — focusing on scholastic band and orchestra — and performing artists and composers.



Now in her 10th year of teaching, the 2018 Bandmaster of the Year for the Louisiana Bandmasters Association, shared tips on how she keeps her seventh and eighth grade students motivated. She also team teaches with the Tioga High School band director Ty Lege, primarily as a percussion instructor, and assists with after-school marching band rehearsals, football games, and competitions. Lege is also a 2009 graduate of NSU.



Fain earned a bachelor’s degree in music education in 2009. As a student, she was involved with Sigma Alpha Iota, Kappa Delta Pi, Spirit of Northwestern Demon Marching Band.
00 2018-11-08
Natchitoches

School of Business will host CLE classes Nov. 16


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s School of Business will host School of Business will host a Continuing Legal Education (CLE) event on Friday, Nov. 16 at NSU’s main campus in Natchitoches. Classes will take place from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. in Russell Hall, 125 Central Avenue.



“The School of Business will host another CLE event in Natchitoches. This outreach effort was started to assist attorneys in the local and regional areas to obtain their CLE hours in various content areas without having to travel so far to get them,” said Dr. Carmella Parker, event organizer.



The event will feature six different speakers who donated their time for the event. Attendees can earn up to six credit hours, including two for Ethics, one for Professionalism and one for Law Office Management for attorneys. Additionally, the School of Business welcomes accountants who can select which course or courses they may need for their certification.



The cost for the entire event is $250, which will include a light lunch. The cost for a single credit hour is $75. The funds raised from this event will benefit Northwestern State University’s School of Business’ Director’s Fund.



Visit the following link to make reservations and view a complete agenda: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/cle-tickets-51226892013.
00 2018-11-08
New Orleans

St. Tammany Faith Notes for Nov. 7


ORGAN CONCERT: Derrick Ian Meador, organist and choirmaster at St. John's Episcopal Church in Laurel, Mississippi, will give a recital at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8, at St. Joseph Abbey church, 75376 River Road, Covington.

SACRED CONCERT: Bella Voce, a women's vocal ensemble from Southeastern Louisiana University, will present "Meditationes Sacrae," an evening of sacred motets at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 14, at St. Joseph Abbey Church, 75376 River Road, Covington. The 16-member choir will begin the program with two meditations set to chant with tuned water glasses and finger cymbals by Slovenia composer Andrej Makor. Other pieces include numerous Latin texts including Lauda Sion, Jubilate Deo, Laudate Dominum, and the Sanctus and Gloria texts from the Mass by contemporary composers. The concert is free.
00 2018-11-07
Hammond

Southeastern’s University Jazz Ensemble, Jazz Lab Band to present concert


The Southeastern Louisiana University Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Lab Band will present its final concert of the fall 2018 semester Monday, Nov. 12, at 7:30 p.m., in Pottle Music Building Recital Hall.

Under the direction of Michael Brothers, instructor of percussion, and John Madere, lecturer of double bass, the University Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Lab Band concert will be free and open to the public.

The Jazz Lab Band program will include “Au Privave” by Charlie Parker and “Impressions” by John Coltrane.

The Jazz Ensemble program will include “Boogie Stop Shuffle” by Charles Mingus, arranged by Sy Johnson; “Time After Time” by Sammy Cahn and Jule Styne, arranged by Don Schamber; “America the Beautiful” by Katharine Lee Bates and Samuel A. Ward, arranged by Tom Kubis; “Georgia on My Mind” by Stuart Gorrell and Hoagy Carmichael, arranged by Tommy Newsom; “But Beautiful” by Johnny Burke and Jimmy Van Heusen, arranged by David Metzger; and “Bill’s Blues,” composed and arranged by Bill Stapleton.

Joining the Jazz Ensemble will be guest artist Joe Scannella on trumpet. Scannella has played lead trumpet in Atlantic City showrooms for more than 30 years, backing numerous well-known musicians such as Frank Sinatra, Jr., Tony Bennett, Rosemary Clooney, Harry Connick, Jr., The Temptations, and Donna Summer.

Scannella has also played lead trumpet on television specials with Johnny Mathis, Shirley Bassey, and the Jerry Lewis MDA Telethon. Additionally, he travels with Grammy Award-winning composer Victor Vanacore, as well as Las Vegas vocalist Steve Lippia, playing symphony concerts throughout the United States.

For more information, contact the Department of Music and Performing Arts at 549-2184.
00 2018-11-07
Houma/Thibodaux

Nicholls art students take on a grim subject


The Nicholls State University Department of Art invites you to view student artwork depicting dystopia -- a society faced with a cataclysmic decline, a tyrannical government or collapse.

The annual Kappa Pi Themed Exhibition will run through Dec. 7 at the Chauvin Sculpture Garden Art Studio. Admission is free.

The theme “Dystopia” was selected by a vote of the Kappa Pi chapter members. Artworks submitted to the exhibition must in some way address the theme to be eligible for inclusion. A total of 44 students, some not art majors, submitted work to the exhibition. Famous examples of dystopian novels are George Orwell’s “1984″ and Aldous Huxley’s “Brave New World.”

“I would encourage people to attend the exhibition to see how students interpret the word ‘dystopia’ and all of the meanings it has in contemporary culture,” said Ross Jahnke, art professor and exhibitions coordinator. “Some art is a very literal interpretation of the word, while other pieces take a more tangential approach. Unlike the Annual Student Exhibition in the spring, which is for art majors only, and for art produced in art classes, this is a chance to see what students will do on their own.”

Kappa Pi is an International Art Honor Society founded in 1911, with chapters throughout the world. Zeta Alpha Zeta is the Nicholls Chapter of Kappa Pi, and has been active for over 15 years. Zeta Alpha Zeta members sponsor this annual themed exhibition as well as participate in numerous extracurricular activities each year, such as Nicholls Can, Shark after Dark, Artworks, Welcome Back Day and High School Day.

For information, contact Jahnke at ross.jahnke@nicholls.edu or 493-2501.
00 2018-11-07
Lake Charles

1,000 Trees in 1,000 Days, Volunteers Needed



00 2018-11-07
Monroe

Tech student helps save a life through bone marrow donation


As Christian Brown did, you can make a life-saving difference by donating just a few moments and a mouth swab in Wednesday’s on-campus drive to help those fighting blood cancer diseases.

Wednesday in the Louisiana Tech Plaza, Tech’s Department of Health Infomatics and Information Management (HIM) is sponsoring a bone marrow registry drive from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Registering is quick and more simple than you might imagine — but also more important that you might have considered.

Christian, a Tech B.S. in management graduate from DeRidder pursuing his MBA in the College of Business, was walking across campus last spring just a few days before his undergraduate commencement when he was asked to donate a simple mouth swab, the first step in a test that he was told could potentially save the life of someone with blood cancer.

“I’ve grown up giving back to the community with the amount of organizations I have been a part of, like Boy Scouts and MedCamps,” he said. “I wanted to support this cause, because I would want someone to do the same for me.”

Christian proved to be a match for someone with blood cancer. Since then, he’s donated—and grateful he did.

“I feel awesome that I have a chance to potentially save someone’s life,” he said. “It’s a very eye-opening experience to potentially save someone that you don’t even know.”

His girlfriend, Tech HIM junior Elizabeth “Liz” Booth, “supported me through every step of the process,” he said. “It didn’t take too much convincing to do this. The process went super smooth with the amount of people that helped along the way, especially with the support of Liz.”

More: Family seeks 'double miracle,' saves lives while they wait

Due to medical privacy laws, he can’t say where he traveled to make the donation, but it was paid for and took five hours “to complete the whole process,” Christian said. “For the stem cell donation, you get stem cell boosters (shots) for the process leading up to the donation. This is only because at the time of donation, you must have stem cells whenever the donation is completed.

“Donating stem cells is the same process as donating blood,” said Christian, 22. “It’s a very simple process. You have one tube where they draw the blood out to filter it and then another tube going into the other arm and back into your body.”

The drive is through DKMS, an international non-profit bone marrow and blood stem cell registry dedicated to the fight against blood cancer and blood disorders by creating awareness, recruiting bone marrow donors to provide a second chance at life, raising funds to match donor registration costs, supporting the improvement of therapies through research, and supporting patients from Day One of their diagnoses.

“People sign up by swabbing the inside of their cheeks, then we send the swabs to DKMS,” said associate professor Jan Fuller, HIM department head at Tech. “They take the samples, analyze them, and put the results into a registry, which doctors can use to determine if there is a match for their patient. The transplants can be used to treat leukemia, lymphoma, and other types of blood diseases.”

“It all starts off with doing the mouth swab,” Christian said. “You then have to be matched with a patient. Most people never get matched or get matched years down the road; in my case, it took only a few months.

“Once matched,” he said, “people will reach out to you to explain the process of donating and how it works. You have to make the decision if you want to donate or not. When you are ready to donate, you will donate either bone marrow or stem cells; the chance is 90 percent you’ll donate stem cells. It’s a super simple process to donate, and it could potentially save someone’s life.”
00 2018-11-07
Monroe

ULM Veterans Day Service speaker is mother of fallen Navy SEAL


Faculty, staff and retirees of the University of Louisiana Monroe who are U.S. veterans or on active duty will be honored at the Veterans Day Service at 3:30 p.m. Monday. The service will be in the Conference Center on the seventh floor of the library.

Guest speaker will be Karen Vaughn, the mother of U.S. Navy SEAL Aaron Carson Vaughn, who was a member of SEAL Team 6.

On Aug. 6, 2011, Vaughn and 29 others were killed when their helicopter, Extortion 6, was shot down in Afghanistan by the Taliban. It is the largest loss of life in Navy SEAL history. Aaron Vaughn was 30 and is survived by his wife Kimberly, a son and a daughter.

Karen Vaughn is the national and international spokesperson for the American Warrior Initiative. She is a Gold Star Mother and speaks across the country. She was the keynote speaker on the opening night of the 2016 Republican National Convention. She’s been on CNN, Fox Business, Fox News, NBC and more than 100 radio programs.

Vaughn and her husband of 37 years, Billy, also have two daughters, Tara and Ana.

Each veteran will be recognized by ULM President Nick J. Bruno; Nell Calloway, CEO of Chennault Aviation and Military Museum and granddaughter of Gen. Claire L. Chennault, will speak; Treina Landry will read the names; and the ULM Talons for Taps unit will perform Taps.

The event is sponsored by Plunk's Wrecker Service, American Warrior Initiative and Fairway Independent Mortgage.

Want to go?

WHAT: ULM Veterans Day Service
WHEN: 3:30 p.m. Monday
WHERE: seventh floor library conference center
00 2018-11-07
Natchitoches

NSU student wins state violin competition


Emily Owens, a graduate student in music performance at Northwestern State University, was the winner of the violin competition at the Louisiana Music Teachers National Association competition recently hosted by NSU. Owens is from Benton and is a student of Professor of Violin Dr. Andrej Kurti. She advances to regional competition and must submit a performance recording by Dec. 5.

Owens performed Bach’s “Sonata No. 1 in G Minor, Adagio” Ysaye’s “Sonata No. 4, Finale” and the first movement of Tchaikovsky’s “Violin Concerto.”

“I love the work by Bach because it shows the spiritual side of music. Bach dedicated his work to the God, and this movement is prayerful,” said Owens. “The Ysaye movement is fast, energetic, and requires a lot of control, so it really helps practice stamina and bow technique.”

Owens calls the piece by Tchaikovsky “probably my favorite violin concerto.”

“I have always enjoyed overcoming challenges, and this piece definitely qualifies as one. It’s full of passion and emotion, and it’s a joy to perform,” she said.

Owens is assistant concertmaster for the Natchitoches-Northwestern Symphony Orchestra. She was a finalist in the 2013 Rapides Symphony Orchestra Concerto competition and performed with the Rapides Symphony. Owens earned her undergraduate degree at Baylor University. She plans to receive her master’s next May and hopes to be an orchestral violinist and teach.

“Taking part in competitions definitely helps me as an artist,” said Owens. “I’ve found that when I have a goal, I have a purpose. While counting down the days to a competition can be stressful at times, it inspires me to practice and do my very best.”

Two students of Associate Professor of Piano Dr. Francis Yang, Ramon Barralaga (Young Artist Piano) and Jiaqi Yi (Junior Piano) received honorable mentions in their category.
00 2018-11-07
Regional/National

What the Midterm Elections Mean for Higher Ed


Was it a wave? Maybe not. But for Democrats, it was a win.

They weathered disappointments in some high-profile races that had appeared winnable Tuesday night, and they lost three U.S. Senate seats in the face of a challenging map. But Democrats seized control of the U.S. House of Representatives, tipping at least 26 seats to emerge with a clear majority. In doing so, they earned the opportunity to step up oversight of the polarizing presidency of Donald J. Trump.

That oversight could extend to higher-education policy through immediate scrutiny of what the Education Department is doing under Secretary Betsy DeVos.

DeVos has remained a lightning rod since her nomination last year, but her record of impact on higher education thus far is spotty. She has moved to undo several Obama-era regulations meant to hold colleges accountable for the federal-loan debt of their students, and has begun writing new regulations on how colleges handle cases of sexual misconduct under Title IX, the federal law meant to ensure gender equity on campus. In January she will start the process of rewriting a host of regulations that deal with accreditation, among other things.

But the regulatory rollbacks have been waylaid in the courts. And the department, understaffed after heavy attrition, has not laid out an aggressive agenda. Now, Democrats in the House could further complicate the agency’s efforts. For example, they could threaten to curtail the department’s actions with budget language intended to eliminate the money for regulatory efforts they oppose.

More likely, the House’s Committee on Education and the Workforce could schedule a number of oversight hearings to press department officials on potential conflicts of interest and defend the Obama-era regulations that DeVos has put in the crosshairs. Rep. Bobby Scott of Virginia, a former civil-rights lawyer, appears in line to become the committee’s chairman. DeVos, meanwhile, has tried — and failed — to trim the budget of the department’s Office for Civil Rights. That could be an early point of contention.

Will the Republicans’ loss of the House alter the state of play in the Senate? Senate Democrats, like Patty Murray, of Washington, have released a torrent of criticism against the secretary, but the effect of that criticism has been diminished because the minority party does not control the agenda of the Senate’s Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions.

Murray will now have allies with agenda-setting power in the House, where Democrats have released a broad blueprint for a new higher-education law (and could very likely pass a favorable bill on the floor, since they will need only a bare majority to approve legislation.)

But the prospect that the new Congress will consider a bill to reauthorize the Higher Education Act remains remote. The Senate HELP committee would first have to craft and pass its own bill. In the past, the committee’s chairman, Sen. Lamar Alexander, Republican of Tennessee, has managed to bring bipartisan legislation through that process. But tensions between Alexander and Murray have, so far, prevented any sort of progress.

Besides, Democrats may not want DeVos’s department in charge of writing any new regulations required under a reauthorized Higher Education Act. They may feel that their odds of retaking the Senate and the White House in 2020 would put them in a better place to control the process. Expect things to stay stuck in the mud.

Weighing the impact of — and threats to — the student vote.

Every election year, it seems, the refrain is the same: This could all come down to young voters, including college students.

If students played a decisive role during the previous midterms, in 2014, they did so by not showing up to the polls: Youth voting and registration fell to a historic low, with turnout among all 18- to 29-year-olds at 19.9 percent.

This year hopes for a rebound were high. The enthusiasm reflected not just a charged political environment, but also years’ worth of work targeting younger voters on college campuses, experts say.

Before Tuesday’s election, 40 percent of young Americans told Harvard researchers they would “definitely vote,” with likely voters favoring a Democratic Congress by 34 percentage points. According to early exit polls taken Tuesday, young voters opted for Democrats by 37 percentage points, far wider than the 21-point margin for Hillary Clinton in 2016.

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Full numbers won’t emerge for some time, but in early voting and returns, student voters appear to have turned out. If they didn’t create a wave, that’s because virtually everyone else turned out too.

New campus polling places, organizing strategies, and anti-Trump energy helped drive vote totals in college towns and counties with large student populations.

In Florida, the site of hotly contested races for governor and Congress, tens of thousands voted early on college campuses after students successfully sued the state this year to drop its ban on campus early voting.


W. Kent Fuchs

@PresidentFuchs
So proud of those who made UF the #1 early voting site in the State University System! Tomorrow is election day, so Go Gators and Vote

Stephen Phillips
@scvphillips
With scheduled #EarlyVoting completed, 40,979 voters cast ballots at new on-campus polling places at eight #Florida universities.@UF: 7,908@FIU: 7,704@FloridaState/@FAMU_1887: 6,113@UCF: 5,117@USouthFlorida: 4,640@FloridaAtlantic: 4,410@UofNorthFlorida: 3,416@UWF: 1,671

12:59 PM - Nov 5, 2018
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Turnout in Alachua County, the site of the University of Florida, jumped from half of registered voters in 2014 to 63.6 percent in 2018, according to unofficial results — an increase of more than 35,000 voters.

Monroe County, home of Indiana University at Bloomington, ran out of pre-printed ballots and had to rush more to the polls after “unprecedented” turnout. Heading into Election Day, the county had tripled the almost 7,400 absentee votes cast in 2014.

More than 79,000 people — 64 percent of registered voters — turned out in Champaign County, Illinois, the site of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, according to unofficial results. That topped the turnout rate for the county’s 2014 midterms by 15 percentage points.

And about 7,000 more voters in Charlottesville, home of the University of Virginia, cast ballots in that state’s U.S. Senate race in 2018 compared with 2014, according to data gathered by the Associated Press.

Election Day brought notable scenes on and around campuses: Shuttles bused students to their local polling places. Walkouts across the country brought droves of registered voters to their county centers. Perhaps most strikingly, sign-wielding students at Prairie View A&M University chanted “Go vote!” and “My choice!” as they walked out of class and to the polls. In a high-profile federal lawsuit last month, students at the historically black institution accused the university’s majority-white home county — Waller County, in Texas — of violating their civil rights by not operating early voting locations that are easily accessible to the campus.

Meanwhile, precincts for two historically black colleges in Georgia were opened for extended hours after complaints were filed about students missing from the voter rolls. Archer Hall at Morehouse College — also near Spelman College — was ordered to stay open until 10 p.m., along with another precinct at a nearby high school, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. Multiple voting-rights watchdog groups, including the Georgia chapter of the NAACP, had raised concerns.

A civil-rights lawyer told the news outlet that students who had registered to vote weren’t found on the rolls. At other precincts, the Constitution reported, voters faced long lines, too few machines, and a shortage of provisional ballots.

The issues at the historically black colleges came in the context of a gubernatorial campaign marred by complaints about voter disenfranchisement. The Republican candidate, Secretary of State Brian Kemp, was accused of suppressing black voters in advance of this year’s election. Earlier in November, the Associated Press reported that more than 50,000 voter registrations were placed on hold with Kemp’s office because the names didn’t precisely align with information on file with other state and federal departments. Most of the potential voters on that list are black, according to the news outlet’s analysis.

With 99 percent of precincts reporting, Kemp was leading by 2.5 percentage points in the race against his Democratic challenger, Stacey Abrams, a Spelman graduate. Abrams did not concede, saying every vote in the state should first be counted.

Mixed results in gubernatorial races.

Over all, Democrats gained governorships, but they may rue some close defeats. One such loss: In Ohio, Richard Cordray was defeated by the Republican, Mike DeWine. Cordray ran on his record as former chief of the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which left a mark during the Obama administration as a higher-ed watchdog, highlighting abusive student-loan companies, suing for-profit colleges, and questioning colleges’ deals with banks for student debit cards.

In Illinois, meanwhile, Bruce V. Rauner is out. The Republican governor saw his approval tank amid a lengthy budget standoff with state lawmakers that resulted in painful cuts to public colleges. His Democratic opponent, J.B. Pritzker, assailed Rauner for contributing to a mass exodus of students from the state. Pritzker won handily.

And in Wisconsin, Scott Walker, the Republican incumbent, lost to his Democratic challenger, Tony Evers. The two cut remarkably different profiles on higher ed: Walker, who left college before graduating, questioned the value of four-year degrees and applied austerity measures to the state’s public universities. Evers, a Ph.D. holder, serves on the governing boards of both the university and technical-college systems. Still, Walker attempted to rebrand himself as the “pro-education governor” during the campaign.

Academics in and out of the House.

Four years ago, the race for Virginia’s 7th Congressional district captivated Randolph-Macon College, and with good reason: Both candidates were professors. David A. Brat, a professor of economics and business, won the conservative-leaning district. But now he might be headed back to campus. His Democratic challenger, Abigail Spanberger, eked out a narrow victory over the incumbent. (Brat might face opposition if he returns to life as a scholar, too: The Washington Post recently reported that one of his academic papers “borrowed heavily” from one co-written by Ben Bernanke, the former chairman of the Federal Reserve.)

As president of the University of Miami (and before that, chancellor of the University of Wisconsin at Madison), Donna Shalala, the former Clinton administration official, earned a reputation for meeting critics head-on. Still, she was viewed by some pundits as a weak candidate in Florida’s 27th Congressional District. But the Democrat comfortably turned that district from red to blue with a victory on Tuesday.

One byproduct of resurgent Democratic enthusiasm was more closely contested races in traditionally Republican strongholds. In many districts, scholars played the role of insurgents; most weren’t able to make it over red walls. Paul Walker, an associate professor of English at Murray State, was the loser in one the first House races to be called, Kentucky’s 1st Congressional District. Tracy Mitrano, the longtime director of information technology policy at Cornell University, mounted an unexpectedly strong campaign in New York’s 23rd, but was beaten by the Republican incumbent, Tom Reed. Lisa J. Brown, former chancellor of Washington State University at Spokane, lost to the Republican incumbent Cathy McMorris Rodgers in the contest for Washington’s 5th Congressional District.

In Nebraska’s 1st District, the Republican incumbent, Jeff Fortenberry, sailed to an easy victory. Last week Fortenberry’s campaign drew attention after his chief of staff placed a call to Ari Kohen, a professor at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln who had liked a photo on Facebook. The photo captured a defaced Fortenberry campaign banner in which the candidate’s last name was altered to “Fartenberry.” The chief of staff accused Kohen of supporting “political violence” and “vandalism”; Kohen said he found the call “threatening.”

Ballot measures of consequence.

In Florida, a sprawling constitutional amendment that touched upon death benefits for the families of first responders and veterans, student fees, and governing boards of state colleges won the 60 percent support it needed to become law. In Massachusetts, voters rejected an opportunity to repeal discrimination protections for transgender people in public places, including university and college locker rooms and bathrooms. In Montana, voters again agreed to continue taxing real estate and personal property to support the state university system for another 10 years, as they have done every decade since 1948.
00 2018-11-07
Ruston

LA Tech starts new Parkinson's Resource Center


RUSTON, La. (KNOE) - Barbara Hogg is fighting for a healthier life. She's among the million people in the United States with Parkinson's Disease. She's had it for 26 years.


"So I go to a movement disorder doctor,” Hogg said. “My feet cramp a lot."

She comes all the way from El Dorado to Louisiana Tech with her husband David for rock steady boxing. Hogg says it's good therapy for her movement disorder.

"We just learn how to box and how to fight and make our Parkinson's not better. It doesn't make it better. It just makes you more able to cope with it."

Luckily for Hogg, more resources are on the way for people with Parkinson's. The chair of Louisiana Tech's nursing division just got a $7,500 grant from the Parkinson's foundation for a new center to help connect people with resources.

"We do have a physical location, but the majority of our work is going to be outreach,” Donna Hood said.” “Making connections with people who contact us, doing outreach the people who are in the parishes around north Louisiana and south Arkansas."

Hood says the center will promote a healthy Parkinson's community. Students are involved too.

"It really affects these people everyday lives,” said Shelby Strong. “The freezing, sometimes they can't walk through doors. Sometimes they can't finish their sentences. Their handwriting becomes smaller. It affects maybe driving. Everyday tasks become more difficult for these people."

The program teaches them ways to improve the lives of people with Parkinson's Disease. And for that, Hogg says she's grateful.

"It's just wonderful to be able to go in a room where there's nothing but Parkinson's patients and you know you're with somebody else,” Hogg said. “You're not the only one.

About 60,000 Americans are diagnosed with Parkinson's every year and there is no cure.

For more information contact Donna Hood at parkinsonresourcecenter@latech.edu or 318-257-2514.
00 2018-11-07
Ruston

La. Tech doctoral candidate one of 40 worldwide selected for consortium


RUSTON — Md. Shariful Islam, doctoral candidate in the College of Business at Louisiana Tech University, has been accepted as a fellow of the 2018 Doctoral Consortium of the prestigious International Conference for Information Systems (ICIS) sponsored by the Association for Information Systems, the leading professional association for technology management scholars.

Each year, the consortium invites 40 candidates to the conference to present their research, 20 of which are from the U.S.

Islam will present his dissertation proposal titled “Essays on the Role of Internal Audit and Information Technology: Implications for Information Assurance and Cybersecurity” to the assembled group of global scholars in Pacific Grove, Calif., in December.

Islam’s current research focuses on cybersecurity assurance with an emphasis on the corporate governance structure of organizations and its relationship with cybersecurity assurance. His research also covers the role of Internal Audit Function (IAF) in conducting cybersecurity assurance in organizations. He recently published an article on cybersecurity audit—the very first work on cybersecurity assurance in the United States. Research that he has conducted on Big Data Analytics (BDA) usage by auditors in their work process has been published in conference proceedings for Americas Conference on Information Systems in both 2017 and 2018.

Before beginning the Doctor of Business Administration program at Louisiana Tech, Islam earned his MBA from Eastern Illinois University. He is a licensed certified public account and has three years teaching experience at universities in Bangladesh.

For more information about the Association for Information Systems or the International Conference on Information Systems, visit aisnet.org.
00 2018-11-07
Shreveport

Bossier Mayor Lo Walker named Louisiana Tech Alumnus of the Year


In March of 2007, Bossier City Mayor Lo Walker gave the commencement address to 352 students graduating from Louisiana Tech University following the winter quarter.

I was one of those students sitting in the Thomas Assembly Center that afternoon, set to obtain my journalism degree. I have always remembered that Walker’s speech was what all his speeches, to this day, usually are — short and to the point, with humor in the mix.

I joined Walker that day in becoming a proud Tech alumnus. Now, Walker has been named the 2018 Louisiana Tech University Alumnus of the Year by the Louisiana Tech Alumni Association.

A native of Shreveport, Walker attended Fair Park High School before graduating from Louisiana Tech in 1956.

Bossier City Mayor Lorenz "Lo" Walker" poses on theBuy Photo
Bossier City Mayor Lorenz "Lo" Walker" poses on the red carpet before the Miss USA finals in Shreveport-Bossier. (Photo: Tiana Kennell/The Times)

He then joined the U.S. Air Force, in which he served for 30 years. Walker’s service included seven years with the Air Commando units. He earned a Master Parachutist rating, making 66 jumps in various countries. He also served two tours in Vietnam.

“That first day I got there, I got off the plane, a little base called Bien Hoa, and they said they needed somebody to fly some folks into Saigon,” Walker told me in 2016. “After the flight we were walking around the aircraft to see if there was any damage, and there was a bullet hole. I thought, my goodness, I’ve only been in the country one day and I got hit.”

After 30 years, he retired in 1986 with the rank of colonel.

“I’m not good at retiring, so when I retired from the Air Force, one week later I went to work for the City of Bossier City to get the Civic Center built, open and operating,” Walker told me last year.

More: Once shunned, Vietnam War veterans now honored

He decided to run for Bossier City mayor in 1989, but he lost “thoroughly” to George Dement, he said.

“I decided, 'well, I’m an Air Force colonel, I’m a native of Shreveport, I’m a local guy, I might could just do that,' so I decided to toss my hat in the ring,” Walker said. “I did not know much about politics in those days, and I was thoroughly defeated.”

Bossier City Mayor Lo Walker, second from left, was honored as the Louisiana Tech 2018 Alumnus of the Year.
Bossier City Mayor Lo Walker, second from left, was honored as the Louisiana Tech 2018 Alumnus of the Year. (Photo: Courtesy photo)

This was an anecdote he also relayed to us Tech graduates in 2007, using it as an example of how to respond to adversity.

Mayor Dement picked Walker to be his chief administrative officer, which was a role Walker held for 16 years.

“I ran (for mayor) again in 2005 and went on to win by a significant margin,” Walker told the graduates in his 2007 commencement speech, according to a news report. “Go for it! Don’t give up!”

More: Bossier mayor prepares for 4th consecutive term

Walker is now in his fourth term as Bossier City mayor after being elected unopposed 2017.

“I am truly humbled and honored and thank the Louisiana Tech Alumni Association for selecting me,” Walker said.
00 2018-11-06
Lake Charles

1,000 Trees in 1,000 Days, Volunteers Needed


Sasol and McNeese are partnering together to plant 1,000 trees in 1,000 days around Calcasieu Parish. It's an effort to restore, preserve and enhance ecosystems around the Lake Area. Volunteers are needed to help out for the next planting day scheduled for Saturday, November 10 at 8:30 a.m. until 11 a.m. There are multiple meeting places: Sulphur Library at 1160 Cypress St. in Sulphur, or Goos Boulevard at 1735 Moeling St. in Lake Charles. To volunteer or to receive more information, call (337) 475-5690 or visit www.sasolnorthamerica.com.

00 2018-11-06
Shreveport

Bossier Mayor Lo Walker named Louisiana Tech Alumnus of the Year


In March of 2007, Bossier City Mayor Lo Walker gave the commencement address to 352 students graduating from Louisiana Tech University following the winter quarter.

I was one of those students sitting in the Thomas Assembly Center that afternoon, set to obtain my journalism degree. I have always remembered that Walker’s speech was what all his speeches, to this day, usually are — short and to the point, with humor in the mix.

I joined Walker that day in becoming a proud Tech alumnus. Now, Walker has been named the 2018 Louisiana Tech University Alumnus of the Year by the Louisiana Tech Alumni Association.

A native of Shreveport, Walker attended Fair Park High School before graduating from Louisiana Tech in 1956.

Bossier City Mayor Lorenz "Lo" Walker" poses on theBuy Photo
Bossier City Mayor Lorenz "Lo" Walker" poses on the red carpet before the Miss USA finals in Shreveport-Bossier. (Photo: Tiana Kennell/The Times)

He then joined the U.S. Air Force, in which he served for 30 years. Walker’s service included seven years with the Air Commando units. He earned a Master Parachutist rating, making 66 jumps in various countries. He also served two tours in Vietnam.

“That first day I got there, I got off the plane, a little base called Bien Hoa, and they said they needed somebody to fly some folks into Saigon,” Walker told me in 2016. “After the flight we were walking around the aircraft to see if there was any damage, and there was a bullet hole. I thought, my goodness, I’ve only been in the country one day and I got hit.”

After 30 years, he retired in 1986 with the rank of colonel.

“I’m not good at retiring, so when I retired from the Air Force, one week later I went to work for the City of Bossier City to get the Civic Center built, open and operating,” Walker told me last year.

More: Once shunned, Vietnam War veterans now honored

He decided to run for Bossier City mayor in 1989, but he lost “thoroughly” to George Dement, he said.

“I decided, 'well, I’m an Air Force colonel, I’m a native of Shreveport, I’m a local guy, I might could just do that,' so I decided to toss my hat in the ring,” Walker said. “I did not know much about politics in those days, and I was thoroughly defeated.”

Bossier City Mayor Lo Walker, second from left, was honored as the Louisiana Tech 2018 Alumnus of the Year.
Bossier City Mayor Lo Walker, second from left, was honored as the Louisiana Tech 2018 Alumnus of the Year. (Photo: Courtesy photo)

This was an anecdote he also relayed to us Tech graduates in 2007, using it as an example of how to respond to adversity.

Mayor Dement picked Walker to be his chief administrative officer, which was a role Walker held for 16 years.

“I ran (for mayor) again in 2005 and went on to win by a significant margin,” Walker told the graduates in his 2007 commencement speech, according to a news report. “Go for it! Don’t give up!”

More: Bossier mayor prepares for 4th consecutive term

Walker is now in his fourth term as Bossier City mayor after being elected unopposed 2017.

“I am truly humbled and honored and thank the Louisiana Tech Alumni Association for selecting me,” Walker said.
00 2018-11-05
Alexandria

NSU Students Write Thank-You Cards to Donors


Several hundred Northwestern State University students, faculty, and staff took time out of their day on Thursday to thank those who provide financial support to the university.
00 2018-11-05
Baton Rouge

Baton Rouge, New Orleans area Business Honors for Nov. 4, 2018


BATON ROUGE AREA
Twelve top developments built over the past two years were recognized by the Baton Rouge Growth Coalition for "raising the bar" on development in Baton Rouge through smart growth principles and interesting ways of reusing properties. Winners are the 200 Laurel Street mixed-use development downtown; the Belvedere Townhomes at Main and Lafayette streets; the Center for Coastal & Deltaic Solutions in the Water Campus; the City Farm office development on Jefferson Highway; the Central Green at City Hall Plaza; the renovation and addition of Istrouma High School; the Knock Knock Children’s Museum; the renovation and addition of the LSU University Recreation Center; the Preservation Garden in the Preserve at Harveston development; St. George Catholic Church; The Palms at Juban Lakes apartment complex in Denham Springs; and the Watermark Baton Rouge hotel on Third Street.

Four other awards were presented: the Knock Knock Children's Museum won the People's Choice Award; Hardy Swyers, a developer who helped found the Growth Coalition and served as executive director of the organization, won the Quality of Life Award for enhancing the quality of life for residents; Russell Mosely, a developer and former president of the Growth Coalition, received the Distinguished Service Award; and the late Jeff Cook, a former Growth Coalition board member and founder of Louisiana Land Engineering, was honored with the Heritage Award.

Bobby Soileau, who directs the Agricultural Leadership Development Program for the LSU AgCenter, received the 2018 Outstanding International Leadership Program Director Award from the International Association of Programs for Agricultural Leaders, a consortium of leadership programs in the United States, Canada and several other countries

He was recognized for his commitment to programming excellence, communication skills and dedication to training emerging rural leaders in Louisiana. Ag Leadership is a two-year program for individuals in agriculture.

Fran Castille, of Amite, has been inducted into the National 4-H Hall of Fame in Chevy Chase, Maryland, recognizing her service as an adult volunteer.

Castille’s first venture into 4-H was in 1964 when she joined a 4-H club in rural St. Helena Parish. She began showing Guernsey cows but later focused on leadership opportunities within the youth organization. By the time she graduated from high school, she had been elected to every officer position. As an adult, she was asked to lead her niece’s local community club. Since then, she has spent 32 years serving as a volunteer leader and role model for 4-H youth. She has raised more than $75,000 in donations and in-kind contributions for 4-H causes such as scholarships, 4-H training and club grants for supplies and awards.

LAFAYETTE AREA
David S. Baker, an associate professor of international business and marketing with the B.I. Moody III College of Business Administration at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, has been selected for the Fulbright Specialist Program, an international educational exchange sponsored by the U.S. government that is designed to build connections between the United States and other nations.

The U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs manages the program. It matches specialists to service projects designed by host institutions and nonprofit organizations in more than 150 countries. Baker has a résumé in international channel management and marketing, which encompasses the promotion techniques and sales strategies companies use to convince as many customers as possible to buy their products. Doing so on a global scale requires an understanding of cultural differences. Specialists serve three-year tenures.

NEW ORLEANS AREA
The Ochsner Cancer Institute of New Orleans received a 2018 Innovator Award at Association of Community Cancer Centers national oncology conference.

The institute is helping cancer patients access early phase clinical trials close to home. A little more than one year ago, the institute, in partnership with the Translational Genomics Research Institute of Phoenix, Arizona, launched the Ochsner Precision Cancer Therapies Program. It is the only program between Houston and Birmingham, Alabama, dedicated to providing access to early phase clinical trials for patients with cancer.
00 2018-11-05
Lafayette

UL Gospel Choir performs at Northgate brunch


The sounds of gospel music filled Northgate Mall this morning.

The UL Gospel Choir performed at a Gospel Brunch at the mall today.

The event was presented by Upper Lafayette Economic Development Foundation, Inc. and Raise Your Hands, Inc., with help from the Designing Women of Acadiana and Rotary Satellite Club| Lafayette After Hours as well as help from sponsors, including Companion Sponsor, Home Furniture and Bedding.
00 2018-11-05
Lake Charles

McNeese new H&HP Complex will not be ready for women’s home opener


LAKE CHARLES, LA (KPLC) - The new Health and Human Performance Complex at McNeese State University will not be open for the first home women’s basketball game on November 11. That game will be played in Burton Coliseum.

Specific items in the final construction phase must be completed before the building can be opened to the public. McNeese officials are closely monitoring the daily progress of the contractor on these projects. A decision regarding the men’s home opener on November 16 will be made sometime late next week.

When McNeese accepts the building from the contractor, McNeese staff will also need several days to test the technology, supply the restrooms and concession stand before the building opens to the public.

Copyright 2018 KPLC. All rights reserved.
00 2018-11-05
New Orleans

Some UNO students fear for their safety after armed robbery in broad daylight


NEW ORLEANS, LA (WVUE) - Some residents at a University of New Orleans student housing complex worry about their safety after an armed robbery took place at one of the apartments in broad daylight. It happened in the 2000 block of Lakeshore Drive.

“I texted my mom and was like, ‘You’ll never guess what happened,’” said Iman Smith, a resident of the complex.

Smith got an email from the university Wednesday night about the armed robbery earlier that day.

“It was terrifying for me because, like I said, I have a small child, and there’s an armed robbery happening like a block away from here where I’m supposed to feel safe coming in with my child every day,” Smith said.

The NOPD said the victim was in his apartment when he heard a knock at the door. When he answered, police say a man and a woman asked if he was “selling.” The victim said no and closed the door.

They knocked a second time, and the victim answered again.

Police say the two pointed a gun at the victim’s head, forced their way in and demanded money. The man and the woman then walked the victim to his vehicle and forced him drive to two ATMs to withdraw cash.

After returning to the apartment, police say the the two drove off in a black Chevy Malibu.

“It’s raised a question of, am I living in a safe place or not? So, it’s really a life-threatening thing going on here on campus, and it feels like really shocking to me, during the day, armed robbery,” Harihar Ojah said.

Some students said they were surprised this happened around 1:00 in the afternoon.

“It kind of freaks me out a bit, you know, cause it’s just me and my roommate there, so like, you know, I’ve been locking the doors, you know. Making sure it’s ok,” Zion Marable said.

Police say the victim did not know the armed robbers.

UNO President John Nicklow sent out a statement saying, “Any criminal act on our campus is one too many. We believe that the University of New Orleans remains an overwhelmingly safe place to live, learn and work. We remain committed to continually improving the safety and security of our campus community.”

While residents of the complex say the gates are usually open and unsupervised, Levee Police guarded the gates Thursday afternoon.

“I don’t get home until around 9:30, 9:45 at night, and I don’t really see like police patrolling specifically in the complex. They’re more like driving along the campus, but not in the complex,” said Smith. “And now I go, after the event’s already happened, and I see police parked outside.”

The NOPD said officers are working with UNO Police and have several leads in the investigation. They’re urging anyone with information to contact the Third District or Crimestoppers at 504-822-1111.

Copyright 2018 WVUE. All rights reserved.
00 2018-11-05
Ruston

GSU’S FISCAL HEALTH IMPROVES


GRAMBLING — A report issued by the University of Louisiana System last week indicates Grambling State University has doubled its fiscal health score since the 2016 financial year.
Developed by the Louisiana Board of Regents, a university fiscal health score measures overall organizational health by factoring in important components such as debt, revenue and ability to operate.

A 2015 Louisiana Legislative Auditor’s report suggested that Grambling’s leadership at the time had spent more money than it brought into the university.
00 2018-11-05
Shreveport

Bossier celebrates opening of new educational center for military


Bossier celebrated the opening of a center Thursday designed to serve the educational needs of the military and their families.

Bossier Parish Community College (BPCC) and Louisiana Tech University opened the new Veterans Resource Center with a ribbon cutting/dedication program on Thursday.

“For many consecutive years Louisiana Tech and BPCC have been recognized nationally and within our state as a military friendly institution. The (resource center) is a reflection of our combined commitment to provide world class services to our veterans and our active duty military,” said BPCC Chancellor Dr. Rick Bateman.

The Veterans Resource Center (VRC), located in a space shared between BPCC and Louisiana Tech, is the first center in north Louisiana established to serve the educational needs of the military and their families.


BPCC Chancellor Dr. Rick Bateman.
“Our’s is the first campus based veteran’s resource center in north Louisiana. It is our hope that this space will serve as a connection point in our community which ensures that services and resources reach these heroes,” Dr. Bateman added.

The VRC will serve students who are active duty, veterans, Reservist or National Guard, spouses and dependent children of using education benefits.

“What you are seeing is a partnership between Louisiana Tech, Bossier Parish Community College and this community. This facility will be particularly beneficial to the non-traditional students, adult learners, and others who need to continue their education in a non traditional way. With classes that are offered in ways that will empower them to achieve there career goals,” said Dr. Les Guice, Louisiana Tech University president.

A Veterans Resource Coordinator will answer questions about programs and services offered to veterans, including the education benefits programs offered by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. The VRC will also provide a community connection of resources for veteran students from veteran services that will be scheduled on a rotating calendar to visit the center.

The VRC was created to provide the College’s military and veteran students a central, one-stop location for obtaining essential support services such as VA certification and advising for VA benefits. The 1,600-square-foot center also features dedicated computers and a lounge area where students can connect with peers and participate in veteran-specific activities.

Currently, BPCC Veterans Service Office serves on average 400-500 students per semester using military benefits and connects with over 1,300 applicants that are military affiliated a school calendar year.

Prior to the ribbon cutting, Dr. Bateman, Jr. and Dr. Guice signed new memorandums of understanding between the schools that will continue their institutions’ commitment for developing transfer pathways.

“This is about two institutions that are partnering in this pursuit of improving the human condition. We know that the foundation of the workforce development, economic development, and community development is human development. And that’s what joins these families — Louisiana Tech and Bossier Parish Community College — in this pursuit,” said Dr. Jim Henderson, president of University of Louisiana System.
00 2018-11-02
Baton Rouge

Truck drivers, nurses top 2019 list of most sought-after workers in Baton Rouge


Truck drivers and registered nurses will see the largest number of job openings in the Baton Rouge region over the next year of any occupation, the Baton Rouge Area Chamber projects in its annual workforce report.

A busy construction sector in the region will drive the demand for heavy and tractor trailer truck drivers to move materials and equipment, and BRAC projects 690 openings for those drivers.

“Workforce is one of the most challenging issues for businesses both regionally and nationwide and ensuring that our talent pipeline is robust and aligned with actual jobs is key,” said Stephen Toups, a Turner Industries executive and chair of BRAC’s business development advisory committee.

Last year’s report pegged electricians, nurses and carpenters as the region’s most sought-after workers.

Topgolf adding 350 jobs in Baton Rouge location ahead of 'early 2019' opening
Topgolf adding 350 jobs in Baton Rouge location ahead of 'early 2019' opening
Topgolf has started hiring for 350 positions at its long-awaited Baton Rouge location near Interstate 10 Siegen Lane, ahead of an expected ear…

Several relatively high-paying occupations, including carpenters, pipe fitters and machinists, are in high demand but the number of people completing training are down or stagnant. Those three occupations combined will have nearly 1,000 openings next year, the report said. Welding has a high number completing training.

Manufacturing and construction jobs account for one-fifth of the region’s total employment, BRAC said.

BRAC projects 580 openings for registered nurses next year, making it the second-highest source of job openings in the region. Some of the Capital Region’s rural parishes might have trouble meeting demand for nurses and other medical professionals because of their preference to work in urban areas, according to the report.

BRAC aggregated several data sources, including those from the Louisiana Workforce Commission, Emsi and BRAC’s internal analysis, to compile the report. The chamber analyzed five industries that are expected to experience high growth next year: construction, manufacturing, health care, professional and business services, and technology.

Tara High students learning 'a whole 'nother language' thanks to IBM computer science program
Tara High students learning 'a whole 'nother language' thanks to IBM computer science program
Jahi Ayala learned about the computer skill of binary coding the other day and he’s eager to talk about it.

Technology job growth has fully rebounded from the Great Recession, BRAC said, with total employment hitting a 10-year high. The sector accounted for 2.5 percent of all job growth in Baton Rouge from 2010 to 2017.

Computer programmers and network and computer systems administrators will have the highest number of openings in the sector, at 60 each. Computer system analysts and software developers will have 50 openings each.

The highest median wages of any occupation analyzed in the report was for chemical engineers at $53.30 an hour. BRAC projects 100 jobs openings for chemical engineers.
00 2018-11-02
Lafayette

UL's cardiovascular nursing certification up for approval next month


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette may soon be offering a new cardiovascular nursing certification program that would make students and the hospitals that hire them even more desirable.

The new graduate certificate in cardiovascular nursing was approved by the University of Louisiana System on Oct. 25 and will be considered by the Louisiana Board of Regents on Dec. 12. If approved, it will be the first program of its kind in Louisiana and one of a few in the country.

It will start in the Spring 2019 semester but already has a dozen students projected to enroll.

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"There are very few opportunities to pursue coursework in graduate cardiovascular nursing," said Melinda Oberleitner, dean of the College of Nursing and Allied Health Professions. “An aging population – coupled with the fact that heart disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S. – has increased demand for cardiovascular medical care.”

Similar programs can only be found at Duke University, the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona and the University of South Alabama.

Not only will the students benefit from having this certification when job hunting, but local hospitals would also benefit from having them as employees. Renee Delahoussaye, the assistant chief nursing officer at Lafayette General Medical Center, having these accredited nurses on staff would enhance their cardiology program and help set them apart from other hospitals.

"Their advanced cardiovascular knowledge will enhance our cardiology program," Delahoussaye said. "As we collaborate with our local cardiologists, nurse practitioners with a focus on cardiovascular nursing services will definitely set these local nurse practitioner students apart as cardiovascular disease is very prevalent in the patient population we serve."

Delahoussaye said the certification will help students, hospitals and, most importantly, the patients. It will allow these nurses to help identify potential life-threatening cardiovascular disease so treatment can begin sooner rather than later.

The program will be geared toward nurse practitioners who are APRNs, advanced practice registered nurse, or those who have earned a master’s degree.

The program will require completion of 12 credit hours in three consecutive accelerated sessions during the spring, summer intercession and summer semesters. Eight of the 12 credit hours will be online courses, and the college will collaborate with medical professions in other states to provide outlets for clinical experience for online, out-of-state students.
00 2018-11-02
Lafayette

UL student, team win top honors at ninth annual Sales Competition


A team and student from The University of Louisiana at Lafayette took top honors at the school's Moody College of Business' ninth annual Sales Competition on Friday.

Marketing major Christopher Reggie won first place, and UL university sales team also won first in the competition held in the college's Northwestern Mutual Sales and Research Lab. Marketing major Austin Wade won third place.

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Students were given a sales scenario and had to present themselves and a software product to representatives from local companies who posed as potential customers. The students had to listen to the customer’s needs, address questions, overcome objections and complete the sale within 20 minutes.

More than 45 local sales professionals were judges for over two dozen sales technique factors including effective communication and use of visual aids. Presentations were watched by judges and the general audience via live video feed.

“Hosting the annual sales competition provides a valuable opportunity for students to showcase their talents,” said Brent Baker, assistant professor of marketing and coordinator of the Northwestern Mutual Sales and Research Lab. “Professional selling programs at the collegiate level are a community, and we look forward to continued collaboration with other universities.”

Students LSU, Nicholls State and Southeastern Louisiana also participated. LSU marketing major Lauren Olivier won second place.
00 2018-11-02
Monroe

$350K grant funds more ULM olive oil research


Research into the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease using a component of virgin olive oil, which the process of extracting was developed by researchers at the University of Louisiana Monroe, will continue thanks to a $350,000 grant. The grant was announced Monday at a press conference at ULM.

The funding is from the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute on Aging.

“Research is very important. ULM is positioned to do some significant research in every college. So the call has gone out and the response has been very positive – 73 new awards this year, 65 last year,” said ULM President Nick J. Bruno.

“Patenting research that has economic value, that is a priority here at ULM. But also the research that improves the standard of living for the citizens of this region and the state. We are very well positioned to help in so many areas of need. Not only here in north Louisiana, but throughout the Delta Region.”

The grant went to the company Oleolive, which licensed the ULM technology of extracting oleocanthal from virgin olive oil. The process was discovered by Dr. Khalid El Sayed of the ULM School of Pharmacy and his former research partner Dr. Amal Kaddoumi.

Kaddoumi is now at Auburn University and will conduct the continuing research.

Revenue from Oleolive and future licensed technologies returns to ULM as royalties.

Director of the Office of Sponsored Programs and Research Dr. John Sutherlin said, “One of the things that we wanted to do was make sure that we were investing the precious dollars that we had, whether in the forms of grants or matching funds, whatever it was, into programs that could make money for the university. That is the purpose of a licensing agreement, to get our products out there. Certainly to impact the quality of life and also to provide a steady revenue stream over time.

“Nothing is developed overnight. We all wish it would happen immediately and that’s not the way success becomes sustainable. We’re committed to the long term.”

Sutherlin continued, commenting on other profitable possibilities for the university saying, ‘“We had meetings last week for everything from nursing to radiotechnology and other pharmacy applications. So there are lots of things going on and very exciting times for us.”

Coincidentally, the press conference was held on the one year anniversary of ULM signing an agreement with Segue Science Management, the company which negotiated the licensing of the olive oil research with ULM.

Attending from Oleolive were CTO Dr. Jim Cardelli, COO Dr. Alana Gray and CEO Kylie Grant.

Cardelli and Gray are co-founders and facilitators of Segue Science Management and Grant is financial consultant.

Both companies are located in Shreveport.
00 2018-11-02
Natchitoches

Students turn out to thank donors to Northwestern State


Several hundred Northwestern State University students, faculty and staff took time out of their day on Thursday to thank those who provide financial support to the university.

The participants in NSU’s annual Thank a Donor Day held in the Orville Hanchey Art Gallery wrote personalized thank you notes to those who have made contributions to support student scholarships, academic programs and Demon athletics.

During the past academic year, alumni and friends of Northwestern State have contributed more than $4.3 million to support the university. Those gifts created 25 new scholarships and renewed 12 additional scholarships, helped provide new uniforms for the Spirit of Northwestern Marching Band, provided assistance to all academic areas of the university and supported Northwestern’s athletic program.

“I took part in this event because it’s a great way for me to personally thank the donors who are allowing me to go to this great university,” said Dylan Bennett, a freshman nursing major from Natchitoches. “I also feel it is also very important that donors can directly see the results in the formation of other people’s careers and lives.”

Bennett is a recipient of the NSU Award Scholarship and NSU Opportunity Scholarship.

“I feel that it is very important to thank those who donate to Northwestern,” said Bennett.


Northwestern State students addressed personalized thank you notes to donors at the university’s annual Thank a Donor Day.
“If it was not for them and their generous donations we would not be able to enjoy many of the amazing opportunities and advantages that are offered at Northwestern.

Senior Jacqueline Manza just completed a four-year career as a member of the NSU soccer team. Manza, a senior psychology major from Toms River, New Jersey, received an athletic and academic scholarship from NSU. The soccer program also benefitted for the support of the Demons Unlimited Foundation.

“I took part in this event because it’s always good to give back. Something so simple like writing a thank you card is the least we can do to thank our donors,” said Manza. “It is extremely important that we thank our donors. Many activities and groups on campus would not be possible without them. Our donors are a huge part of the reason why my experience at NSU was an unforgettable one. I am truly thankful for their generosity and out pouring support for NSU.”

Manza is a member of the NSU Athletic Council and the Athletic Department Ambassadors program.

For more information on the NSU Foundation, go to northwesternstatealumni.com or contact Director of Development Jill Bankston at (318) 357-4241 or at bankstonj@nsula.edu. For more information on the Demons Unlimited Foundation, go to nsudemons.com or contact Director of Development and Engagement Mike Jaworski at (318) 357-4295 or at jaworskim@nsula.edu.
00 2018-11-02
Natchitoches

NSU presents Outstanding Business Awards


Northwestern State University’s College of Business and Technology recognized Beta Industries of Pineville with an Outstanding Business Award during Homecoming festivities. Beta Industries is an EPC and high voltage power systems company that has long been an industry partner for students in NSU’s Department of Engineering Technology. From left are Dr. Vickie Gentry, provost and vice president for Academic Affairs; Dr. Margaret Kilcoyne, dean of the College of Business and Technology; Beta Engineering representatives Ross Twidwell and Chris Wilson, Dr. Jafar Al-Sharab, head of NSU’s ET Department, and NSU President Dr. Chris Maggio.

Northwestern State University’s Computer Information Systems faculty recognized General Dynamics Information Technology with an Outstanding Business Award in thanks for providing students with internship and networking opportunities. From left are Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Vickie Gentry, Dr. Margaret Kilcoyne, dean of the College of Business and Technology; Dr. Niesha McCoy, GDIT University Relations Recruiter, Talent Acquisitions; CIS faculty Lilly Pharris and Don Rider and NSU President Dr. Chris Maggio.

Sharpco Hotels Group was among the industry partners honored with Outstanding Business Awards presented by Northwestern State University’s College of Business and Technology. The company has mentored students pursuing degrees in hospitality management and tourism program by providing internships and professional work experience. From left are Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Vickie Gentry, Sharpco owners Jay Sharplin, Lauryn Sharplin and Jerry Sharplin, HMT program coordinator Landon Amberg, Dr. Margaret Kilcoyne, dean of the College of Business and Technology, and NSU President Dr. Chris Maggio.

Southern Scripts, LLC, a pharmacy benefit manager, was among the businesses recognized by Northwestern State University’s College of Business and Technology with 2018 Outstanding Business Award in thanks for their partnership in assisting students pursuing degrees in business administration and accounting and providing post-graduate employment. A program to honor industry partners took place during Homecoming festivities Oct. 27. From left are NSU President Dr. Chris Maggio, Southern Scripts owners Dr. Steven T. Boyd and Dr. LeAnn Causey Boyd, Dr. Margaret Kilcoyne, dean of the College of Business and Technology, and Dr. Vickie Gentry, NSU provost and vice president for Academic Affairs.
00 2018-11-02
Ruston

ADAMS TO SPEAK AT TECH


Jamie Adams, a March, 2004 graduate of Louisiana Tech University’s College of Business and currently chief revenue officer at Scorpion, a privately owned digital marketing company with more than 5,000 clients, will serve as the keynote speaker for Tech’s fall commencement ceremony at 10 a.m. Nov. 17, in the Thomas Assembly Center on the Tech campus.

Those family and friends who are unable to attend commencement can watch the event via Facebook Live at facebook.com/LATech.
00 2018-11-02
Shreveport

BPCC and LA Tech unveil new Veterans Resource Center


Bossier City, LA - Bossier Parish Community College and Louisiana Tech unveiled their brand new Veterans Resource Center on Thursday.

It's in the fourth floor of their new shared building.

The new center has classroom space, a counseling room, a lounge, computers, and more personnel to lend a hand to veterans.

BPCC Chancellor, Dr. Rick Bateman, Jr. said the center is much bigger than what was once just one desk with for the veterans services coordinator.

"The more that we understand about our heroes that come home and continue their studies the more we learn that they benefit from being around each other," Bateman said. "They understand one another's experiences They're the greatest support for one another. They help one another to be successful in the classroom. This is gonna provide them the training they need to get them to their next career so they can make a great wage, they can stay in our community and we can continue to support them."

Bateman said, other than Louisiana Tech University in Baton Rouge, BPCC serves more veteran and military affiliated folks than any other higher education institution in the state.

BPCC spokesperson Traci McGill said the college's Veterans Service Office serves on average 400-500 students per semester using military benefits and connects with over 1300 applicants that are military affiliated each school calendar year.
00 2018-11-01
Alexandria

Orchard Foundation receives $4.5 million grant for Cenla middle schools


It's a big day for middle schools across Central Louisiana that will soon see an answer to the critical shortage of highly qualified math and science teachers.


Wednesday the Orchard Foundation announced a $4.5 Million grant they received from the U.S. Department of Education to start the Central Louisiana Instructional Partnership Project, or 'CLIP'.

The Orchard Foundation and Clip partner have helped to increase funding to about 13 million dollars in direct grant funding and in-kind match. It will aim to improve student achievement in the nine Cenla parishes by preparing up to 44 new qualified educators.

"We are just excited to be able to actually now have some resources to address a critical shortage that we have in our region," said Orchard Foundation Executive Director Dr. Marjorie Taylor. "But, we have such huge support from our school districts and they were here today to show that support."

Accepted applicants will attend a 15-month accelerated graduate program at Northwestern State University. They will complete school-based residencies in the high need schools, alongside a mentor teacher.

"Not only just helping equip those schools, but also building some stability, because they will be asked to serve a three-year commitment," said NSU Dean of the Gallaspy College of Education Dr. Kimberly McAlister. "So, in many cases, I think we will find that we are growing our own. So, in other words with folks from that area investing in schools and returning to schools to teach and continue that legacy forward."

Upon graduation, new teachers won't be on their own. The grant will also provide them with two years of support and coaching. They will also commit to teaching for three years in a Cenla middle school.

Registration will open in the spring and the first class will begin their studies at NSU in the summer of 2019.
00 2018-11-01
Alexandria

Orchard Foundation receives $4.5 million grant for Cenla middle schools


It's a big day for middle schools across Central Louisiana that will soon see an answer to the critical shortage of highly qualified math and science teachers.


Wednesday the Orchard Foundation announced a $4.5 Million grant they received from the U.S. Department of Education to start the Central Louisiana Instructional Partnership Project, or 'CLIP'.

The Orchard Foundation and Clip partner have helped to increase funding to about 13 million dollars in direct grant funding and in-kind match. It will aim to improve student achievement in the nine Cenla parishes by preparing up to 44 new qualified educators.

"We are just excited to be able to actually now have some resources to address a critical shortage that we have in our region," said Orchard Foundation Executive Director Dr. Marjorie Taylor. "But, we have such huge support from our school districts and they were here today to show that support."

Accepted applicants will attend a 15-month accelerated graduate program at Northwestern State University. They will complete school-based residencies in the high need schools, alongside a mentor teacher.

"Not only just helping equip those schools, but also building some stability, because they will be asked to serve a three-year commitment," said NSU Dean of the Gallaspy College of Education Dr. Kimberly McAlister. "So, in many cases, I think we will find that we are growing our own. So, in other words with folks from that area investing in schools and returning to schools to teach and continue that legacy forward."

Upon graduation, new teachers won't be on their own. The grant will also provide them with two years of support and coaching. They will also commit to teaching for three years in a Cenla middle school.

Registration will open in the spring and the first class will begin their studies at NSU in the summer of 2019.
00 2018-11-01
Baton Rouge

Mr., Miss NSU honored at Homecoming


NATCHITOCHES – Antavious Roberson’s college career at Northwestern State didn’t get off to a good start, but his time at NSU couldn’t finish much better. Roberson, a senior elementary education major from Arcadia, has been selected as Mr. Northwestern State University. Mallory McConathy of Stonewall has been named Miss Northwestern State University.

“This honor is something that is still hard to grasp,” said Roberson. “It is an amazing feeling to know that the student body thinks enough of me to choose me as their Mr. Northwestern State University. Nothing makes me more proud than to represent the university that has offered me so many amazing opportunities.”



McConathy was also humbled by the honor.



“I cannot express my gratitude and appreciation to the students who chose Antavious and myself to represent the student body and the University,” said McConathy. “Becoming Miss NSU was something I never thought would happen when first coming to this campus. I am beyond honored to join the past recipients that I have looked up to and admired while being a student, and to think that students look at me the same is such an awe-inspiring feeling.”



Roberson is the son of Anthony Roberson and Suzette Cato. Roberson was the 2017 Homecoming Honor Court King. A Dean’s List student, he served as secretary and student affairs commissioner of the Student Government Association. Roberson was a freshman orientation leader. He participated in the Capstone Leadership Program and was a member of the Demon Days Welcome Week Committee and Demon Volunteers in Progress.

“Getting involved on campus completely changed the trajectory of my undergraduate career and possibly my life,” said Roberson. “What led me to get involved on campus was how horrible my college experience had become. Toward the end of my freshman year, I had decided that I was going to transfer because I was not enjoying my experience. However, the First Year Experience office was hosting a leadership seminar a few weeks before the school year ended, and I decided to go. I met so many amazing students, faculty and staff at this event,”



McConathy is the daughter of Brent and Julie McConathy. She is a senior biology major. McConathy is a member of Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority, Purple Jackets, Alpha Lambda Delta, Beta Beta Beta and Blue Key honor societies, the Demon Days Welcome Committee and was a freshman orientation leader. She was the 2017 Homecoming Honor Court Queen. McConathy is a Dean’s List student.

“By being involved throughout the campus and community, it allows you to grow in so many aspects,” said McConathy. “You gain invaluable life experiences, opening of new doors, and you meet some really great people along the way. I would encourage each student to find at least one organization they can devote themselves to and in turn I believe they will be thankful for the experiences they will have gained.”



McConathy credits Director of Student Services Reatha Cox with encouraging her to get involved on campus.



“Mrs. Cox has been such an influence on my life and has pushed me to become an active student,” said McConathy. “And in doing so, I found that I could make an impact and be an influence in organizations and to the members. My first eye opening experience happened my freshman year when our President’s Leadership Program impact project group started back the Red River Special Olympics in 2016. Once I saw that it only takes a driven individual and a little bit of guidance, anything can happen.”



Roberson agrees that involvement in campus organizations adds a great deal to the college experience.



“I feel that it is important to be involved on campus because allows you to meet different people from diverse backgrounds,” said Roberson. “It also connects you to the faculty and staff at the university, who, in turn, become some of your biggest supporters and work diligently to shape you into a leader.”


Antavoius Roberson of Arcadia and Mallory McConathy of Stonewall were honored as Mr. and Miss Northwestern State University. They were congratulated by Dean of Students Frances Conine, left, and NSU President Dr. Chris Maggio, right.
00 2018-11-01
Lafayette

UL Lafayette Moody College of Business hosts 9th annual sales competition


Lafayette, LA – B.I. Moody III College of Business Administration hosted its 9th Annual Sales Competition. Undergraduate students from the business colleges at UL Lafayette, Louisiana State University, Nicholls State University, and Southeastern Louisiana participated in the professional selling role-play competition held in the Moody College of Business Northwestern Mutual Sales and Research Lab.

Christopher Reggie, a marketing major from UL Lafayette, placed first. Lauren Olivier, a marketing major from Louisiana State University, placed second. Austin Wade, a marketing major from UL Lafayette, placed third. First place university sales team was UL Lafayette.

Students were given a sales scenario and had to present themselves and a software product to representatives from local companies who posed as potential customers. The students had to listen to the customer’s needs, address questions, overcome objections, and ultimately complete the sale within a 20 minute time limit. More than 45 local sales professionals observed and judged participants on over two dozen sales technique factors including effective communication and use of visual aids. The sales presentations were watched by judges and the general audience via live video feed.

“Hosting the annual sales competition provides a valuable opportunity for students to showcase their talents,” said Dr. Brent Baker, Assistant Professor of Marketing and coordinator of the Northwestern Mutual Sales and Research Lab. “Professional selling programs at the collegiate level are a community and we look forward to continued collaboration with other universities.”
00 2018-11-01
Lafayette

UPDATE: UL hazing investigation


We have new information involving the suspension of a UL sorority and fraternity.

KATC Investigates uncovered Sigma Chi fraternity and Tri-Delta sorority are being investigated by UL Police.

The organizations are facing allegations of hazing and in some cases misuse of alcohol and mistreatment of a new member.

Last week, after we filed our public records request with UL, we noticed the UL System, which oversees nine Universities, has an email address setup where tipsters can report hazing allegations anonymously.

We filed a public records request with the UL System to see how many tips were emailed in and which Universities alleged hazing took place.

Since January of this year, five tips were reported via the email hotline. Three tips concerning fraternities at UL Monroe and two from UL Lafayette. In each instance the tips were forwarded from the UL System to administrators on each campus who then forwarded the allegations to police.

In one instance at UL and ULM administrators said they did not believe the fraternities in question were hazing. They called the reports isolated incidents, not fraternity hazing events. UL Monroe Police did close one case with a fraternity until further evidence or information becomes available.

The UL System encourages people to report hazing if they witness or experience it. Their website has links to each University’s hazing policy and the State’s hazing law.

We did reach out to UL Lafayette for an on camera interview, but we were told the Dean of Students is out of town. We also have a pending public records request with UL and we were told an employee is working to fulfill our request.


00 2018-11-01
Monroe

Vines honored for ULM service


Dwight Delbert Vines, PhD., reflected earlier this week on his accomplishments as the former president of the University of Louisiana-Monroe after learning he would be designated president emeritus.

“It’s always nice to be remembered for your accomplishments,” the 87-year-old said Monday at his residence in the Calhoun community. “It was a lot of fun and we worked with a lot of good people.”

When Vines referred to “we,” he meant his wife, Jean. They have been married 63 years.

Vines was informed Friday that the University of Louisiana System’s board of supervisors had approved a move to designate him ULM President Emeritus. ULM President Nick Bruno and his staff prepared the application for the designation.

Vines was notified through text message by system president Jim Henderson: “It gave me great pride when our board bestowed the emeritus title on you today. It was long overdue and richly deserved.”

Henderson is Vines’ nephew, which made it that much more rewarding, Vines said.

According to Vines, he was contacted recently by a member of Bruno’s staff, Julia Letlow, that ULM was preparing the paperwork for the designation.

“Dr. Vines has been retired now for some 27 years and he definitely deserves the recognition bestowed upon him by the board,” Bruno said Tuesday. “He’s the only one of my predecessors who still lives here and he’s still very much involved in the university. He attends sports events and other activities when he can get a ride.”

Bruno said Vines was president during a period of significant growth for the university and was responsible for new construction and renovations.

“He was president for 15 years,” Bruno said. “That doesn’t happen that much today, somebody being president for that long.”

“He did so much for this university,” Bruno added.

Vines was president of then-Northeast Louisiana University from 1976 to 1991 and was responsible for initiating 40 new degree programs including agriculture aviation, airway science, community health, marriage and family counseling, mild to moderate special education, music theatre, school psychology, specialist in school psychology, technical communications and toxicology.

The Masters of Business Administration program was the first accredited in north Louisiana as well as the school’s accounting program.

Vines began his career at the university in 1958 as a professor in the College of Business and in 1964 became its dean, a position he served in until being named president in 1976.

He and his wife Jean talk extensively about the time Vines was part of establishing an MBA program at the privately owned Shue Yan College in Hong Kong operated by Henry H.L. Hu, its president, and his wife, Dr. Chung.

The college paid all expenses for business professors at NLU to travel to Hong Kong to teach the MBA students, who Vines described as the top students and business people throughout that country.

“We set admissions standards very high because we could just take so many students,” he said.

Vines said the program was set up to teach the courses very quickly because the professors did not want to be gone for extended periods.

“Everything was just crammed into a very few weeks,” he said. “It required a lot of work for those students but they were the best in the country. We (he and Jean) made the trip two or three times. It was interesting.”

Vines also loves to tell the story about the university’s MBA program, along with the University of New Orleans’ MBA program, receiving Commendation of Excellence recognition.

“We even beat out LSU and that’s really saying something,” Vines said. “We really have a good MBA program.”

The Vines were also supporters of athletic programs. He said in his 15 years as president, he only missed one football game and it was in West Texas. He had been to a conference in Colorado and caught a flight to Dallas but the plane could not land because of ice. Vines said Jean was at the game but he never made it because of the weather.

Vines also was responsible for forming the first tennis teams and was president when the NLU Indians won the 1987 National 1-AA championship in football. The waterski team also won 10 national championships during his tenure as president.

Vines chuckles when he tells the story about the late Louisiana Tech President F. Jay Taylor announcing at a state Board of Regent meeting that Tech would no longer play NLU in football.

“We had beaten them seven out of 10 years and when he made that statement, I commented, ‘Well, that’s too bad. That’s the one game I was confident that we could win,’” Vines recalled.

Jean Vines added, “Yeah, but I remember the time we were sitting in the rain at Louisiana Tech and getting beat 63 to nothing. That wasn’t much fun.”

New construction on the campus during Vines’ administration included the School of Nursing building, School of Construction building, Chemistry and Natural Sciences building, Oxford Natatorium, Heard Tennis Stadium, Malone Stadium, Baseball Stadium, Band building, Indian Bank, Agriculture shop, Book Store, Sandel Library (third floor addition), University Police building and Spyker Theater.

Also during Vines’ tenure, student enrollment increased from 9,143 in the fall of 1976 and peaked at 11,586 in the fall of 1983. Student enrollment continued at 10,000-plus each year beginning in 1980. Vines said he also was proud that the pharmacy and nursing graduates scored highest in the nation on professional examinations.

Vines’ greatest pastime is playing his steel guitar. He’s still playing the Fender steel guitar that he purchased for $300 in 1949 from J&S Music Store on Texas Avenue in Shreveport.

“I paid it out by the week,” Vines said.

He put together a band and its members played “honky tonks” in Shreveport and Bossier City. He later joined the Air Force during the Korean War and during basic training auditioned for a position in Entertainment and Recreation.

“I never had to finish basic training before they sent me to Elgin Air Force Base in Pensacola, Florida,” he said.

Vines said he put his own band together and they played music throughout the Florida Panhandle and Alabama. He was on his way to Korea but was stopped in Japan and sent to Iwo Jima because of a morale problem with the troops there.

“The Air Force gave me an unlimited budget that I could spend in any way I wanted just so it increased morale,” Vines said.

Not only did he have a band but was able to construct some tennis courts, another one of his greatest pastimes, and outdoor basketball courts. There also was a hobby shop.

“Prior to that these men had absolutely nothing to do and they were having suicides and lots of fights but most of that all stopped once they had something to do,” Vines said.

Vines said he saved enough money from band engagements during his service time that he was able to buy a new car when he left the Air Force.

Vines said that God brought him from humble beginnings in Winn and Jackson parishes where his family lived in poverty. He said his mother was determined that he would get an education and she always managed to get him the things he needed to get through Jonesboro-Hodge High School.

He then worked for a year and made enough money to get into business school in Shreveport where he learned he liked accounting. He then joined the Air Force correspondent courses. He had 46 semester hours when he enrolled at Northwestern State University. He then started to enroll at LSU to get his MBA but in a round-about way ended up with Dr. George Walker at Northeast Louisiana State College as a business teacher while working on his MBA.

Vines continued to teach for Walker but started working on his doctorate degree during the summers at University of Colorado.

“Dr. Walker wanted all his professors to have doctorates,” he said. “I owe so much to him and the people at Colorado.”
00 2018-11-01
Monroe

Randy Morris: VCOM school at ULM a direct answer to region’s problems


Editor:

The anticipated Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine, or VCOM, proposed to be located on the campus of the University of Louisiana Monroe and is poised to change the face of health care for north Louisiana.

It is no secret that we have faced insurmountable challenges related to health care in our region, and the reason is multi-faceted.

Most of the parishes in north Louisiana are designated as Health Professional Shortage Areas, or HPSA. It is difficult to recruit physicians to this northern, mostly rural part of the state, and the Delta and Appalachian regions of the 21st century. To add to the crisis, primary care physicians are among the greatest needs. These shortages affect the health of the citizens of Louisiana.

In VCOM’s needs assessment for the state, VCOM reported that Louisiana ranked 50th overall among the 50 states in the United Health Care Foundation’s (UHCF) report “America’s Health Rankings 2015.”

The Commonwealth Fund 2015 report ranked Louisiana’s health system performance 48th among 51 states (includes DC). The CDC reports a higher rate of heart disease, HIV, drug-related deaths, and teen pregnancy rates than the rest of the country.

Importantly, Louisiana ranked fourth in the country for cancer death rates, with 190 deaths per 100,000 people.

Disparities in health and healthcare access exist throughout Louisiana but are worse in the Northern region of the state. According to the Louisiana health website, there are over 118 primary care Health Professional Shortage Areas and over 109 mental health HPSAs.

Louisiana has 40 percent less primary care providers than needed to serve the population and 42 percent less mental health care providers than needed to serve the population.

It should be noted that 39 of the 55 individual HPSA points are in the Northern region and Lake Charles region of the state, where VCOM plans to provide clinical training, as well as to build graduate medical education.

While Louisiana ranks 20th among states for medical students per 100,000 population, many of those students are not from Louisiana and only 47 percent of the current graduates remain in the state to practice. VCOM plans to change this ratio by recruiting students from rural and medically underserved areas of Louisiana, students who are from minority populations under-represented in medicine and by building a new graduate medical education continuum in hospitals within the state.

So we have two major problems: a sick population, and fewer doctors to treat patients and offer preventative care.

Plus, we are facing a growing crisis as the Baby Boomers age and their health care needs increase. The math is simple, provide more doctors, and more Louisianans will receive much-needed health care. A school of osteopathic medicine in our community is a direct answer to these problems.

When VCOM receives approval to enroll its first anticipated class, currently proposed for 2020, many will be local students who grew up in this region who want to live and practice in north Louisiana. Many others will be students from outside this region who will also want to stay and practice here. Educating medical students locally is critical to keeping them in the region when they become physicians.

Why is ULM’s campus in an ideal location for VCOM?

The proven strength of the Colleges of Pharmacy and Health Sciences is a critical factor in the future success of a medical school. Many of the vigorous foundation courses that these programs demand will be the same ones preparing future medical students.

The benefits of a medical school are many, and one of the largest is economic impact. A medical school will bring significant “fresh dollars” to the region.

It is likely to inspire additional economic development through the potential expansion of other health science education programs, clinical and research partnerships with nearby community hospitals and private business expansions.

VCOM’s feasibility study includes the direct and indirect economic impact of the school during the two-year start up period is expected to exceed $60 million.

By 2025, the economic impact of the campus will grow to $78.9 million as graduates of the campus locate in the region and state.

VCOM will most importantly expand health care access for underserved populations. As a result, the healthier our people are, the healthier our community becomes, and it will be a higher quality of life for us all.

Randy Morris

Administrator/Owner

West Carroll Health Systems

Chairman of the Board of Rural Hospital Coalition
00 2018-11-01
Natchitoches

Scholars’ College alumna presented with Jimmy Long Award


NATCHITOCHES – Dr. Heather Honore Goltz was recognized as this 2018 recipient of the Jimmy D. Long, Sr., Louisiana Scholars’ College Distinguished Alumni Award. The award is presented annually to a graduate of the Louisiana Scholars’ College at Northwestern State University who has been extraordinarily successful in their career and also exemplified the life of public service and commitment exhibited by the late Louisiana Senator Jimmy Long.



Dr. Goltz, an Associate Professor of Social Work at the University of Houston, has a long list of accomplishments. Beyond her teaching experience and honors, she has an extensive research background particularly in support of patients with cancer and genitourinary conditions. Dr. Goltz has also been very involved in advocacy groups, not only for cancer patients but for health issues for minority groups.



Goltz earned a degree in biology with a concentration in scientific inquiry at NSU in 1997. She earned an M.Ed. in curriculum and instruction-teaching with emphasis in the health sciences and M.S.W. with a mental health concentration at the University of Houston. She earned her Ph.D. in health education at Texas A & M University.


Dr. Heather Honore Goltz, center, a 1997 graduate of the Louisiana Scholars’ College at Northwestern State University, is the 2018 recipient of the Jimmy D. Long Sr. Distinguished Alumni Award. She was recognized during Homecoming festivities at NSU Oct. 27 and congratulated by Dr. Kirsten Bartels, director of the Louisiana Scholars’ College, and LSC student Aron Stephens.
00 2018-11-01
New Orleans

Throw Me Somethin': UNO to honor two distinguished alums


University of New Orleans alumni Bill Chauvin and Bivian “Sonny” Lee will be honored at the UNO Distinguished Alumni Gala from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 1, at the National World War II Museum’s U.S. Freedom Pavillion, 945 Magazine St.

Chauvin, a retired insurance executive, will receive the Homer L. Hitt Distinguished Alumni Award, and Lee was named 2018 Homer Hitt Young Alumnus of the Year.

“Both men exemplify determination and selflessness in the professional and community work,” said UNO President John Nicklow. “They have made a mark on their city and their alma mater through their positive influence and career accomplishments.”

Chauvin retired in 2016 as senior vice president of finance and treasurer for XL Catlin Inc, a global insurance company. A 1974 UNO graduate, he is a board member of the UNO Foundation and was president of the UNO Alumni Association from 1999 to 2000.

Lee, a 2006 UNO graduate, is president and executive director of Son of a Saint, a nonprofit that offers mentorship for fatherless boys. Lee founded the organization in 2011 in honor of his father, former Saints player Bivian Lee Jr., who died of a heart attack at 36.

Proceeds from the gala will provide student scholarships and support the UNO Alumni Association’s student programs. Advanced tickets are $125 per person. For more information, click here. Click here for tickets.

All Saints' Mass
Archbishop Gregory Aymond will be the principal celebrant of the All Saints’ Day Mass at 10 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 1, at St. Louis Cemetery No. 3, 3421 Esplanade Ave.

St. Michael Special School’s Bell Choir will perform after Mass, and there will be a blessing of graves and light refreshments.

Grow Dat
Grow Dat Youth Farm will present its Fall Harvest Dinner from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 4, at the farm, 150 Zachary Taylor Drive, in City Park.

Enjoy hors d’oeurves, cocktails, wine and a three-course meal and a tour of the farm and information about its mission to nurture a diverse group of young leaders through the meaningful work of growing food. For information, visit growdatyouthfarm.org.

Recycled fashion show
The 10th annual Recycled Fashion Show to benefit Bridge House/Grace House is set for Feb. 10, but now is the time to sign up as a designer who will create two outfits for the runway and auction.

Sponsorships also are available, and volunteers are welcome. For information, visit bridgehouse.org and search “our events.”

City jobs
The city of New Orleans recently announced job openings in the Health and Recreation, Public Safety and Trades departments.

Positions include public health nutritionist, recreation manager and site facilitator, police recruit, code enforcement inspector, emergency medical technician, juvenile detention counselor and supervisor, automotive mechanic, carpenter, plumber and welder.
00 2018-11-01
New Orleans

Student held at gunpoint in on-campus apartment, forced to withdraw cash at 2 ATMs: UNO police


Two strangers held a student at gunpoint in his on-campus apartment before forcing him to drive to two ATMs and withdraw money Wednesday afternoon, UNO police said in an email.

Around 1 p.m., an armed man and woman forced a student to leave his Privateer Place apartment (map) and go to his car, according to UNO police. The unidentified man and woman made the student drive to two separate ATMs, give them cash and drive back to campus, police said. The amount of cash the student was forced to withdraw from the ATMs was not available in an initial report from UNO police.

After arriving on campus, the man and woman got out of the man’s car and ran to another car which police describe as a black sedan, “possibly a Chevrolet Impala,” with a Mississippi license place.

The man – who UNO police describe as 5 feet, 11 inches tall, about 160 pounds and with a slim build – was wearing jeans and a hooded, gray sweatshirt at the time of the armed robbery. Police described the woman as approximately 5 feet, 4 inches tall with a heavyset build and wearing a gray, zippered hoodie.

The NOPD is currently investigating the incident. No additional information was available as of Wednesday evening.

If you have any information that can assist with this investigation, please contact the UNO Police Department at (504) 280-6666 or 280-6371.
00 2018-11-01
Regional/National

New Data Brings Daylight To The Graduation Gap In Higher Education


It’s no secret that college graduation rates in this country aren’t what they should be, particularly for students from low-income backgrounds. But until recently, we had limited information about how colleges rank in terms of graduating students from limited economic means. Thanks to a push for greater data transparency, colleges’ graduation rates for students from low and moderate-income families are now out in the open.

This data comes from new reporting requirements for colleges and universities that enroll students who qualify for Federal Pell Grants. The Pell Grant program awards funding to more than five million students a year with demonstrated financial need to help pay for undergraduate tuition at more than 5,400 colleges and universities across the country. More than three-quarters of Pell Grant recipients come from families that earn $40,000 or less a year.

The Pell Grant program began in 1972, but colleges and universities did not have to publicly report the graduation rates for their students who receive this federal tuition assistance until 2017.


Using Pell Grant data, The Third Way published a recent report that offers insights about colleges where students from low-income backgrounds are succeeding and where they are most often exiting without a degree.

As head of a network of schools that has partnered with over 90 colleges and universities committed to increasing graduation rates for first-generation students, I wanted to offer three key observations from this Pell Grant data.

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1. For Pell Grant recipients, where you go to college matters. A lot. Nationally, Pell Grant recipients have lower graduation rates than non-Pell Grant recipients. After six years, just 49 percent of all first-time, full-time Pell Grant recipients had earned a bachelor’s degree at the college where they began, compared to 67 percent for non-Pell Grant recipients.

But there are some success stories. Of the schools listed in the Third Way report, 246 were identified as “high-quality Pell-Serving Institutions (PSIs),” where Pell Grant recipients make up 37 percent or more of the student population and have a graduation rate that is over 50 percent. Some stand out in particular: 48 schools graduate two-thirds or more of their Pell Grant recipients, which is well above the national average.

For example, at Howard University, an HBCU (Historically Black College and University), 91 percent of its students receive Pell Grants and 79 percent graduate within six years. According to Howard University President Wayne Frederick, Howard achieved this result because of an institutional commitment to need-based financial aid and focused tutoring programs.

Rowan University, a KIPP College Partner in New Jersey, enrolls 37 percent Pell Grant recipients, and 66 percent graduate on time. As part of an institutional commitment to supporting students from low-income families, Rowan created an on-campus food bank in response to student surveys that identified food insecurity as a problem among the student body.

2. Some states have few colleges where Pell Grant-eligible students thrive. According to the data, some regions of the country are essentially “deserts” when it comes to finding a college that graduates a high percentage of Pell Grant recipients. Seven states (Louisiana, Alabama, Colorado, Wyoming, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Connecticut) have no “high-quality PSIs” and Texas has only four in the entire state of 28 million people. This is important because the majority of students end up attending college in the state where they grow up.

KIPP operates public high schools in Louisiana, Colorado, and Texas, where we see first-hand the impact of this state geographic disadvantage. Fortunately, there are public schools in these states that are defying the odds. For example, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, with a Pell Grant graduation rate of 62 percent, provides both financial and logistical support to help low-income students persevere. CSU covers all tuition and fees for students who are eligible for Pell Grants. CSU students receive academic, socio-emotional, and housing support from a “Scholar Contact,” who helps provide interventions when students seem to be falling behind.

In Louisiana, the University of Louisiana at Lafayette (ULL) is piloting some new approaches to increase graduation rates. In partnership with the new nonprofit Belltower New Orleans, ULL provides students from low-income backgrounds with an academic advisor, financial advisor, coordinated residential experience, work study, study hall, and a success coach on campus through their Louisiana Promise Program. Critically, ULL and Belltower also provide a scholarship for these students to cover the gap in cost after their federal financial aid, Pell Grant, and TOPS scholarships. As it is just a semester old, the program is still too new to see results, but the approach is very promising.

3. California public universities are setting the standard. On the other end of the spectrum, California has particularly strong public university options for students receiving Pell Grants.

Seven of the top-ten high-quality public PSIs in the country are in the Golden State. At the University of California, Irvine (UCI), a KIPP College Partner, 38 percent of its students receive Pell Grants, and they graduate Pell Grant-eligible students at a rate of 85 percent. The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) is the number one public, high-quality PSI in the country, with 39 percent of students receiving Pell Grants, and 88 percent of Pell Grant-eligible students graduating on time. This is not far from UCLA’s graduation rate for students overall, which is over 90 percent.

What are these UC schools doing to help students from low-income families increase their chance of earning a degree? Through ideas generated by its first-generation students, UCLA has developed a dedicated dorm floor, shared dinners and social gatherings for young people so they feel support from others who understand their unique challenges and struggles.


Angel Aguilar, a KIPP LA Public Schools alumnus, and current UCLA sophomoreJOSE LUIS HERRERA

The sense of belonging is tangible for students like Angel Aguilar, a KIPP LA Public Schools alumnus, and current UCLA sophomore, who explains, “The Community Programs Office has been my home here at UCLA. I intern there and it is my favorite place to be on campus. The office has connected me with upperclassmen and university staff who grew up in neighborhoods similar to mine, and they serve as mentors to me. This support helped to ease my transition to college.”

Starting a Conversation

As the saying goes: What gets measured gets done. With that thought in mind, I hope to start a conversation about the implications of measuring and reporting degree outcomes for students who receive Pell Grants.

To start: This new Pell Grant data is a critical resource for KIPP’s college advising program, as it will help us better guide students to apply to colleges and universities where they are likely to succeed. It will also allow us to look for ways to build stronger cohesion between KIPP’s work in K-12 and higher education, so KIPP alumni can enter college prepared.

Now to you…If you are a college professor or administrator, how has this data sparked ideas about how to support all students to graduate?

If you are a high school student, what does this information on graduation rates make you think about what college you want to attend?

And if you are an interested citizen, how can we use data like this to help increase the efficacy of important federal programs like Pell Grants?

I encourage you to weigh in with your ideas and continue the conversation on Twitter!

I strongly believe that education has a transformative impact on the lives of children and that the nearly 100,000 students in our schools today and 27,000 alumni of our program will be the change agents of the future. Prior to KIPP, I was with Edison Schools and Teach For A... MORE
00 2018-10-31
Hammond

Southeastern Channel to air new episode documenting WWI impact in Florida Parishes


The little-known impact of World War I on the Florida Parishes will be explored in a new episode of the Southeastern Channel’s award-winning history series “The Florida Parish Chronicles.”

“Southeast Louisiana and the Horror of World War I” will debut on the channel at 8 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 3.

The Southeastern Channel, Southeastern Louisiana University’s educational access station, airs on Spectrum Cable 199 in Tangipahoa, St. Tammany, Livingston and St. Helena parishes. The 24-7 simulcast also streams live on the channel’s website at www.thesoutheasternchannel.com.

Southeastern Channel General Manager Rick Settoon said the episode is a partnership between the channel and Southeastern’s Center for Southeast Louisiana Studies that is currently displaying a new exhibit to commemorate the centennial of World War I.

Sporting a mock trench, battlefield diorama and a number of war-related items and artifacts, including letters home from local soldiers, the exhibit focuses on the wide range of implications of the war at home and in Europe. The display is located on the third floor of Southeastern’s Sims Memorial Library.

“Since it is the centennial of World War I and, relative to other wars, the actual impacts and horrors have received little attention, we wanted to preserve for our viewers the memory and appreciation of those long-deceased soldiers and the great price they paid for our country,” Settoon said.

“We feel that our show not only complements, but also highlights the outstanding World War I exhibit currently on display at the Center for Southeast Louisiana Studies.”

The episode was written by show host Samuel Hyde, Southeastern’s Leon Ford Endowed Chair, history professor, and director of the Center for Southeast Louisiana Studies.

“Alternately known as the Great War and the War to End All Wars at the time, in many senses World War I ushered in the era of modern industrial warfare,” Hyde said. “Yet the implications of the transforming event are far less visible than the attention-grabbing details of World War II. Everyone is familiar with the major events of World War II.”

Hyde said that the two main reasons for the limited attention focused on World War I are the close proximity in time of the Great Depression and outbreak of World War II and the incredible suffering the soldiers endured during the Great War.

“Service in World War I was a horrifying experience,” Hyde said. “Not only were the soldiers subjected to unprecedented slaughter and misery in the trenches, but in the end it solved few of the problems that challenged the world before its outbreak, and it created conditions that led to the next great conflict.”

The episode reflects extensive research by Hyde and the Center for Southeast Louisiana Studies staff, along with additional visual research by Steve Zaffuto, Southeastern Channel operations manager, who directed, shot, edited and created animations for program.

The show includes period footage of war era film, along with scores of images from the front lines and on the home front. Action sequences use Southeastern graduate students and faculty, along with other actors.

The program also spotlights an interview with Southeastern history professor Samantha Cavell, a World War I expert and descendant of Australian soldiers who fought in the famed ANZACS division during World War I.

Settoon said the episode will air multiple times on the Southeastern Channel through Armistice Day, which is Nov. 11, the day World War I ended in 1918.

The Southeastern Channel has won more than 400 national, international and regional awards in its 15 years of existence, including 17 awards from the Emmys with 62 nominations. Video on Demand is available at thesoutheasternchannel.com.

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00 2018-10-31
Hammond

Southeastern Channel to air new episode documenting WWI impact in Florida Parishes


The little-known impact of World War I on the Florida Parishes will be explored in a new episode of the Southeastern Channel’s award-winning history series “The Florida Parish Chronicles.”

“Southeast Louisiana and the Horror of World War I” will debut on the channel at 8 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 3.

The Southeastern Channel, Southeastern Louisiana University’s educational access station, airs on Spectrum Cable 199 in Tangipahoa, St. Tammany, Livingston and St. Helena parishes. The 24-7 simulcast also streams live on the channel’s website at www.thesoutheasternchannel.com.

Southeastern Channel General Manager Rick Settoon said the episode is a partnership between the channel and Southeastern’s Center for Southeast Louisiana Studies that is currently displaying a new exhibit to commemorate the centennial of World War I.

Sporting a mock trench, battlefield diorama and a number of war-related items and artifacts, including letters home from local soldiers, the exhibit focuses on the wide range of implications of the war at home and in Europe. The display is located on the third floor of Southeastern’s Sims Memorial Library.

“Since it is the centennial of World War I and, relative to other wars, the actual impacts and horrors have received little attention, we wanted to preserve for our viewers the memory and appreciation of those long-deceased soldiers and the great price they paid for our country,” Settoon said.

“We feel that our show not only complements, but also highlights the outstanding World War I exhibit currently on display at the Center for Southeast Louisiana Studies.”

The episode was written by show host Samuel Hyde, Southeastern’s Leon Ford Endowed Chair, history professor, and director of the Center for Southeast Louisiana Studies.

“Alternately known as the Great War and the War to End All Wars at the time, in many senses World War I ushered in the era of modern industrial warfare,” Hyde said. “Yet the implications of the transforming event are far less visible than the attention-grabbing details of World War II. Everyone is familiar with the major events of World War II.”

Hyde said that the two main reasons for the limited attention focused on World War I are the close proximity in time of the Great Depression and outbreak of World War II and the incredible suffering the soldiers endured during the Great War.

“Service in World War I was a horrifying experience,” Hyde said. “Not only were the soldiers subjected to unprecedented slaughter and misery in the trenches, but in the end it solved few of the problems that challenged the world before its outbreak, and it created conditions that led to the next great conflict.”

The episode reflects extensive research by Hyde and the Center for Southeast Louisiana Studies staff, along with additional visual research by Steve Zaffuto, Southeastern Channel operations manager, who directed, shot, edited and created animations for program.

The show includes period footage of war era film, along with scores of images from the front lines and on the home front. Action sequences use Southeastern graduate students and faculty, along with other actors.

The program also spotlights an interview with Southeastern history professor Samantha Cavell, a World War I expert and descendant of Australian soldiers who fought in the famed ANZACS division during World War I.

Settoon said the episode will air multiple times on the Southeastern Channel through Armistice Day, which is Nov. 11, the day World War I ended in 1918.

The Southeastern Channel has won more than 400 national, international and regional awards in its 15 years of existence, including 17 awards from the Emmys with 62 nominations. Video on Demand is available at thesoutheasternchannel.com.
00 2018-10-31
Lake Charles

McNeese students hope to ‘change the world’


McNeese State University is seeking teams to participate in the Hult Prize, an international competition where students develop business ideas that are designed to create jobs in the future.

The university will host its competition Nov. 17. Three team spots are left, and the registration deadline is Nov.

9.

Billed as the “Nobel Prize for Students,” the Hult Prize partners with the United Nations to give college students the opportunity to solve some of the world’s greatest challenges with a $1 million reward.

The winning team from McNeese’s competition will advance to the regional competition in Chicago.

“This is a great opportunity for McNeese to compete globally and to represent Southwest Louisiana all around the world,” said Nischal Aryal, campus student director.

Aryal said the Hult Prize is unlike other entrepreneurial competitions because teams only need a strong idea, not a prototype or plan, to win. The Hult Foundation will provide the winning team with the training, incubation and financing to launch their product.

“McNeese is a part of this campaign to change the world and is participating globally to transform the entrepreneur’s idea of making a product,” Aryal said. “Yes, you’re earning profit, but you’re also creating jobs and making something beautiful out of it. That’s the notion of social entrepreneurship — leading a generation to change the world.”

Jeffery Stevens, assistant professor of management and Hult Prize program coordinator, said students from every college are encouraged to participate in the competition.

“Social entrepreneurship should be a part of every organization,” he said. “Just make an impact in the work, and everything else will follow.”

To register, email Aryal, msu-naryall1@student.mcneese.edu.

Online: hultprize .org/on-campus
00 2018-10-31
Monroe

Grambling State promotes highway safety with new commercial


GRAMBLING, La, (KNOE) - Grambling State University is spreading a statewide message.
They're promoting highway safety with a public service announcement that's airing across the state.


"The fact that we get to promote something so important, I think, you know highway safety and maintenance of ourselves, taking care of ourselves on the road, no texting and driving bigotry, those things are very important," said student director Raven Catholic.

The university and the Louisiana Highway Safety Commission produced a 30-second "Click It or Ticket" commercial.

It came about after interim band director Edwin Thomas received a grant.

"The focus was to use the band to get that attention or get that message out to the community and the students to make sure that they are aware of wearing seat belts to cut down on fatalities and injuries," Thomas said.

The commercial not only features the band, but also other organizations and some professors.

The ad may be only thirty seconds, but Catholic says it took a lot of time and effort to complete.

"They were like 'awe, we got to keep doing this?' But I think once they saw 'click it' and then going into the formation and then seeing 'ticket', they were like 'okay that's actually a really cool idea.' They were on board from the beginning because, like I said it's something so important."

"The fact that safety around the state is part of something we wanted to be a part of, we wanted to make sure we got that message out," said Thomas.
00 2018-10-31
Natchitoches

Roberson, McConathy named Mr. and Miss NSU


NATCHITOCHES, La. (NSU News Bureau) - Antavious Roberson’s college career at Northwestern State didn’t get off to a good start, but his time at NSU couldn’t finish much better. Roberson, a senior elementary education major from Arcadia, has been selected as Mr. Northwestern State University. Mallory McConathy of Stonewall has been named Miss Northwestern State University.

“This honor is something that is still hard to grasp,” said Roberson. “It is an amazing feeling to know that the student body thinks enough of me to choose me as their Mr. Northwestern State University. Nothing makes me more proud than to represent the university that has offered me so many amazing opportunities.”

McConathy was also humbled by the honor.

“I cannot express my gratitude and appreciation to the students who chose Antavious and myself to represent the student body and the University,” said McConathy. “Becoming Miss NSU was something I never thought would happen when first coming to this campus. I am beyond honored to join the past recipients that I have looked up to and admired while being a student, and to think that students look at me the same is such an awe-inspiring feeling.”

Roberson is the son of Anthony Roberson and Suzette Cato. Roberson was the 2017 Homecoming Honor Court King. A Dean’s List student, he served as secretary and student affairs commissioner of the Student Government Association. Roberson was a freshman orientation leader. He participated in the Capstone Leadership Program and was a member of the Demon Days Welcome Week Committee and Demon Volunteers in Progress.

“Getting involved on campus completely changed the trajectory of my undergraduate career and possibly my life,” said Roberson. “What led me to get involved on campus was how horrible my college experience had become. Toward the end of my freshman year, I had decided that I was going to transfer because I was not enjoying my experience. However, the First Year Experience office was hosting a leadership seminar a few weeks before the school year ended, and I decided to go. I met so many amazing students, faculty and staff at this event,”

McConathy is the daughter of Brent and Julie McConathy. She is a senior biology major. McConathy is a member of Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority, Purple Jackets, Alpha Lambda Delta, Beta Beta Beta, and Blue Key honor societies, the Demon Days Welcome Committee and was a freshman orientation leader. She was the 2017 Homecoming Honor Court Queen. McConathy is a Dean’s List student.

“By being involved throughout the campus and community, it allows you to grow in so many aspects,” said McConathy. “You gain invaluable life experiences, an opening of new doors, and you meet some really great people along the way. I would encourage each student to find at least one organization they can devote themselves to and in turn, I believe they will be thankful for the experiences they will have gained.”

McConathy credits Director of Student Services Reatha Cox with encouraging her to get involved on campus.

“Mrs. Cox has been such an influence on my life and has pushed me to become an active student,” said McConathy. “And in doing so, I found that I could make an impact and be an influence in organizations and to the members. My first eye-opening experience happened during my freshman year when our President’s Leadership Program impact project group started back the Red River Special Olympics in 2016. Once I saw that it only takes a driven individual and a little bit of guidance, anything can happen.”

Roberson agrees that involvement in campus organizations adds a great deal to the college experience.

“I feel that it is important to be involved on campus because allows you to meet different people from diverse backgrounds,” said Roberson. “It also connects you to the faculty and staff at the university, who, in turn, become some of your biggest supporters and work diligently to shape you into a leader.”
00 2018-10-30
Baton Rouge

Margaret Spellings Is Stepping Down at UNC. Will Anyone Want to Replace Her?


When Margaret Spellings was named president of the University of North Carolina system, there was widespread concern among faculty members that she would be a pawn of the Republican-controlled state legislature and a rubber stamp for the Board of Governors, whose members are appointed by those lawmakers.
Spellings may not have fully won over her faculty critics, but some of them came to respect her policy views and tough-minded independence. “The worst fears were not realized,” said Michael C. Behrent, an associate professor of history at Appalachian State University. “Margaret Spellings, while conservative, has a serious vision for higher education.”

Critics on the board were a different story. Spellings expended a good deal of her time and energy pushing back against a board that she and others criticized for micromanaging issues on campuses and at the system office. She also has been seen as a strong advocate for the system at the Statehouse, where she helped push through a major college-affordability measure, called NC Promise, that sharply reduced tuition on three of the system’s 17 campuses.

That kind of fighting and advocacy can take a toll, and Spellings has decided that she’s had enough. On Friday she announced that she would step down on March 1, just three years into her five-year contract. The board will appoint an interim leader to replace her before starting a search for a permanent successor.

“All leaders are for a time,” Spellings said on Friday. “I came into this position knowing that the most lasting contribution I could make was to help create a culture of higher expectations for the citizens of this state — and we have done just that.”

Many students and faculty members have remained critical of Spellings’s leadership, most recently for not taking a stronger stand on issues like removing the statue of a Confederate soldier from the flagship campus, in Chapel Hill.

Now, however, with Spellings on the way out, Behrent said, there is a new worry: whether the governing board will find a candidate who is more willing to go along and get along with its agenda.

And another question arises as well: Who would possibly want the job?

‘Times Change’

With Spellings’s resignation, taking a job as the system’s president may be seen by other higher-education leaders as a road to nowhere.

She is the second consecutive UNC president to leave under less-than-ideal conditions and with a tenure of less than five years. Her predecessor, Thomas W. Ross, was forced out of the position in what appeared to be a politically motivated power grab by the board.

When she was named to the job, Spellings, who was U.S. secretary of education under President George W. Bush, was seen as an ideal candidate to smooth relations with the board and the legislature because of her conservative credentials. In her remarks on Friday, Spellings seemed to acknowledge that the board’s priorities were no longer the same as her own.

“I came into this position intent on creating a culture of higher expectations, and that shift is underway,” she said in prepared remarks at a Friday news conference. “But times change, and those changes demand new leaders and new approaches.”

She wouldn’t say whether the board’s divisiveness had played a role in her decision to step down. But she has spent her career in the political realm, and she knows how politics works. Despite the political turmoil that has marked her three years at UNC, she repeated on Friday a comment she made when she was hired: “That’s the fun of it.” In public higher education, she said, “governance is always being calibrated and recalibrated, over and over.”

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About her reasons for leaving, she said only that it was “the right time.” Not long ago, she had said publicly that she loved the job and was looking forward to the future. “I’ve given it my all,” she said.

Spellings, not the board, initiated the conversation about her exit. That discussion started “a few weeks ago,” she said. Harry Smith, chair of the Board of Governors, said she and the board had reached a “mutual agreement that it is now the right time for a new leader for our next chapter.”

Both Spellings and Smith alluded to how tough the job of UNC president is — and how the tenures of college presidents nationwide are getting shorter. “Higher education is under some pressure anyway,” he said, “and from a trend perspective, I don’t think Margaret is far off the trend.”

“Three years is a good run,” Spellings said.

On average, college presidents surveyed by the American Council on Education in 2016 had served in their current positions for 6.5 years, down from 8.5 years a decade before.

The system office has been mired in a deeply partisan battle with the board, on which a faction of former legislators and lobbyists has led an effort to bypass Spellings, overstepping the traditional boundaries of governance.

Last year, for example, the board voted to bar the UNC Law School’s Center for Civil Rights from litigating. While governing boards are typically responsible for the broad outlines of a system’s operations, without the recommendation of the system’s president they rarely make decisions about how a single academic program should operate.

The board last year also considered measures to hire separate staffs for its members and move the system’s staff members out of their offices in Chapel Hill, proposals Spellings saw as unnecessary and intruding on her authority. And this year a board member undermined Spellings by derailing her recommendation for whom to hire as chancellor of Western Carolina University.

The top candidate in that search dropped out after the board member questioned his academic credentials and hired a firm to probe his background, without consulting Spellings or the board.

In a letter to the board’s chair, a longtime faculty leader said the debacle had created “a historically unprecedented crisis of governance in the UNC system, and one that has the potential for turning the university more sharply down the course of authoritarian capture and partisan manipulation.”

‘Hurricanes of All Kinds’

Spellings has openly sparred with board members over their actions, arguing that their role is to look at the big picture and leave the details to her and campus leaders.

"Let me manage the enterprise, and let them set policy," Spellings told WRAL News in September of last year. "Let them see, understand, and defer to the chancellors and me, who have a lot of experience."

Several hours after announcing that she would step down, Spellings led a conversation on the Chapel Hill campus with John B. King Jr., U.S. education secretary under President Barack Obama, about the future of education. Pressed on how higher-education governance in North Carolina had affected her ability to do her job, she largely demurred.

Idea Lab: Leadership

“The people who are appointed to governing boards in any state, including North Carolina, care deeply about the enterprise,” she said. “Have we created the kind of structure that allows them to move the needle in the most productive way? Are we organized for success?”

Spellings also discussed what she’d like to see in North Carolina. She cited changes that she has set in motion and seemed wistful about goals that hadn’t been reached yet, among them a “college-going culture” and better teacher-preparation programs. At one point, she became emotional when talking about how committed people are in the state to improving public higher education.

Her time at UNC may not have unfolded as she planned. And she’s leaving before the results of many of her efforts to improve accountability and affordability are fully realized. Still, she said, “I think we’ve done a lot of good, notwithstanding the hurricanes of all kinds.”

Sarah Brown writes about a range of higher-education topics, including sexual assault, race on campus, and Greek life. Follow her on Twitter @Brown_e_Points, or email her at sarah.brown@chronicle.com.

Eric Kelderman writes about money and accountability in higher education, including such areas as state policy, accreditation, and legal affairs. You can find him on Twitter @etkeld, or email him at eric.kelderman@chronicle.com.
00 2018-10-30
Hammond

Southeastern Channel students snag Emmys for sixth straight year


For the sixth straight year, students at the Southeastern Channel were honored with college division Student Production Awards given by the Emmy Awards’ Suncoast Region of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

The Southeastern Channel is Southeastern Louisiana University’s educational access station. To date, it has now won more than 400 national, international and regional awards in the past 15 years.

John Sartori of Mandeville was a winner in the “Talent” category, while Justin Redman of Slidell, Ben Delbert of Covington and Jonathan Calhoun of Baton Rouge were winners for their production in the “Commercial” category.

Sartori won for his on-camera composite of Southeastern Channel work that included anchoring and reporting for the national award-winning “Big Game” sportscast, hosting and producing the “Lion Tracks” coaches’ talk show, and play-by-play announcing of live Southeastern game broadcasts.

“If you are a student interested in broadcast journalism, there is no better place for you in this country than in Hammond, Louisiana, at the Southeastern Channel,” Sartori said. “I have been given opportunities that I could have only dreamed of before entering college.”

Redman, Delbert and Calhoun won for their 15-second, stop-motion animation commercial “The Cajun Spoon: Two Meals, One Spoon,” produced for the Cajun Spoon seasoning brand and dry dinner mix company of Baton Rouge.

Delbert edited the spot, while it was produced and directed by Calhoun with Redman providing camera work and voiceover narration.

“This award is extremely prestigious because it belongs to a division of arguably the biggest and most esteemed award ceremonies for television productions,” Delbert said. “To win such an award essentially places your own work in the same field as many other professional productions.”

The commercial was produced in the Communication 424: Television Advertising Production course in the electronic media concentration of the Department of Languages and Communication.

In the class production, students at the Southeastern Channel produced 15-, 30- and 60-second television commercials for a real-world business client, like the Cajun Spoon, through collaboration with advanced marketing class students who developed the advertising campaign under marketing professor Teri Root.

In recent years, the collaborative course has also produced commercials and marketing campaigns for Hammond businesses North Cypress Fitness and Gnarly Barley Brewing Company.

The Cajun Spoon wanted its commercial to emphasize themes of community involvement and engagement to position the product as more than a simple dinner option, Settoon said. The company wanted to illustrate its “two meals, one spoon” initiative, where one box of mix is donated to a food pantry per each box purchased.

“The thought was to make sure the audience would gravitate to the general idea that the product brought the family together, as well as the community,” Calhoun said. “So it’s a blessing to receive the award and know that the main message was well received.”

According to Communication 424 course instructor and Southeastern Channel Operations Manager Steve Zaffuto, the award-winning 15-second commercial utilized a more stylized approach of stop-motion animation of closeups of hands passing around bowls of prepared meals in contrast to the 30-and-60 second versions that featured live action scenes of a family eating a meal together.

“The decision to utilize a ‘stop-motion’ approach via a series of still frames, rather than full-motion footage, draws attention to both the product and general concept of ‘sharing’ that is vital to the campaign’s central message,” Zaffuto said.

The Southeastern Channel also won four Honorable Mentions in the Emmy competition.

Sartori, as play-by-play announcer, along with color analyst Wesley Boone of Alexandria and director Freddie Rosario of Hahnville, won honorable mention recognition in the “Sports-Live Event” category for the Southeastern Channel’s live basketball broadcast of the Dec. 14, 2017 Lions game with Southern University of New Orleans.

In addition, Rosario won honorable mention for “Director” of the Lions-SUNO basketball broadcast, while Boone was honored as “Director” of his short film, “Intersect.” Amanda Kitch of Covington won honorable mention in the “Photographer” category for her news videography composite.

The students and their productions were honored in the Emmy Suncoast Region comprised of television stations and production companies in Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana and Puerto Rico. Students at the Southeastern Channel have now been named Emmy winners 17 times with 62 nominations.

“Being recognized by the Emmys is the highest honor you can receive in television,” said Southeastern Channel General Manager Rick Settoon. “Since so few are given, we’re absolutely thrilled that John, Justin, Ben and Jonathan are deservedly joining such elite company with this highest reward for their talent, creativity and hard work.”

The Southeastern Channel can be seen on Charter Spectrum Cable Channel 199 in Tangipahoa, Livingston, St. Helena and St. Tammany parishes. The live 24/7 webcast and video on demand can be seen at www.thesoutheasternchannel.com.
00 2018-10-30
Monroe

College student fees set to increase this spring across Louisiana


Student fee increases have been approved and will go up at many Louisiana colleges.


ULM, Louisiana Tech, and Grambling State University are among that group.

The University of Louisiana System gave the green light for the increase at eight of nine of its universities. This also comes after the LSU and Southern University Systems already increased their student fees earlier this year.

UL System President Dr. Jim Henderson says the schools were asked to explain their need for it.

"We asked our colleges and universities to come to us with a strategic reinvestment if they were going to propose fee increases," said Henderson.

He also says, "Each university took a different approach based on their student mix and their program mix."

The hike will raise an extra $9 million across the UL System schools.

It's designed to help with faculty pay raises, expanded student services, technology upgrades, and more course offerings.

The changes include adding $10 per every credit hour for each ULM student.

"$10 doesn't seem like a bunch to me and if it's going to a good cause like raises and other fundings in the school. I think it would be worth it," said Taylor Hughes, a ULM student.

Meanwhile, Louisiana Tech students will also have to pay an extra $90 more for every credit hour, about eight hours.

Grambling will charge another $100 for per semester, per student, for a technology fee.

Henderson knows they're trying to put students first.

He says, "It's important that we work to keep costs as low as possible for students. We know educational attainment in Louisiana is the future for Louisiana and because we had some stability, we were able to keep tuition fee increases to the lowest amount in a decade and we hope to maintain stability for students."

It's anticipated $500,000 out of that $9 million will also go toward needed-based aid for students.
00 2018-10-30
Monroe

DRA grants to fund projects at ULM, SFMC


The Delta Regional Authority recently announced an investment of $2.6 million in projects across the state, including three projects in Monroe.

Many of the projects announced by DRA Chairman Chris Caldwell and state Gov. John Bel Edwards are expected to enhance workforce training, help create and retain jobs and improve water and sewer service for rural families.

“This $2.6 million in strategic investments from the DRA, will bring $34.6 million to support infrastructure, healthcare and workforce in Louisiana, which is especially important for the continued development of our rural communities” said Edwards. “This is critical to moving our state and our people forward, and I am thankful to everyone involved for their commitment to helping Louisiana’s most distressed communities.”

The economic development projects include:

• A new manufacturing business in Monroe, representing an investment of $300,000 by the DRA and a total investment of $1.7 million. DRA funds will be used to build an access road to serve the Millhaven Industrial Park and a new manufacturing facility that will create 40 jobs. The 1.25 million-square-foot plant will manufacture and distribute cartons. The road also will serve the entire industrial park.

• A project improving health care services in Monroe, representing an investment of $150,000 by the DRA and a total investment of $356,565. St. Francis Medical Center plans to use DRA funds to build a new helipad to improve emergency response times and better position the facility to respond during health crises. The helipad will be built adjacent to the emergency department.

• A workforce development and training project in Monroe, representing an investment of $90,000 by the DRA and a total investment of $135,530. The University of Louisiana at Monroe will use DRA funds to train 125 individuals on unmanned aerial systems (UAS). In this “train the trainer” project, the individuals trained will spread across the community to train companies in northeast Louisiana how to use UAS in their operations. Farmers, firefighters, law enforcement officials, public utility companies and insurance companies all could benefit from the use of UAS, which uses GPS and drones to improve operations.

The investments are made through DRA’s States’ Economic Development Assistance Program, the agency’s main federal funding program that invests in basic public infrastructure, transportation infrastructure, workforce development, and small business and entrepreneurship projects.
00 2018-10-30
Natchitoches

TRiO Student Support Services marks 50th anniversary


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s TRiO Student Support Services hosted a celebration to mark 50 years of creating graduates that are transformational individuals, passionate citizens and global leaders. The celebration took place in the NSU Ballroom Oct. 25 with current students, current and former staff and alumni speakers.



TRiO Student Support Services is a federal program that bridges the connection between high school and college for low income first generation college students and/or students with disabilities. The program offers academic and career advising, instruction in academic skills and financial education, financial aid enrollment assistance, peer tutoring, fitness support programs, and other assistance systems designed to maximize students’ chance at success in college.



Shanteria Montgomery of Homer was a student and student worker and now graduate assistant in NSU’s SSS office. She provided a brief history of TRiO, which was established in 1968 with the combining of three programs, Upward Bound, Talent Search and Student Support Services. Since the program has been offered at NSU since 1979, it has provided support to thousands of students by focusing on persistence, good academic standing and graduation. Northwestern State University students that participated in the SSS program have consistently graduated at a higher rate than their peers within the University.



“Student Support Services helps students grow and become productive citizens,” said Frances Welch, program director. NSU students that participate have increased retention and graduation rates, she added.



Raquel Wheeler, a 2009 graduate and former SSS student spoke about her own experiences with the program.



“Advisors took time with me beyond their office hours and showed us the importance of service,” she said. Through SSS, Wheeler became involved with Helping Hands and assisted with several local service projects. She is now a math and science teacher in Caddo Parish.



“We were able to use our time and talents to help others, even if we couldn’t contribute financially,” she said. “This now plays a role in my life professionally. Having had support from my advisors drives me in supporting my students. I am motivated to support my students outside the classroom.”



NSU’s Student Support Services Office is located in Kyser Hall Suite 243B. Users can follow SSS on Facebook at nsulastudentsupportservices. For more information, call (318) 357-5901.




Raquel Wheeler, a 2009 graduate and former SSS student spoke about her own experiences with the program.
00 2018-10-30
Natchitoches

Honorary Homecoming Game Captains


Northwestern State University recognized two individuals by naming them Honorary Captains for the Oct. 27 Homecoming football game.



Colonel Eric Sweeney, U.S. Army Retired, served 26 years in the Army Corps of Engineers. In 2000, he completed a peacekeeping mission to Bosnia just before deploying to Afghanistan as part of the U.S. initial entry forces in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Colonel Sweeney immediately deployed again with initial entry forces in 2002 – 2003, this time to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.



Colonel Sweeney is a 1986 NSU alumnus. He commanded the ROTC Black Knights Drill Team, was a Distinguished Military Graduate, the President of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity and selected for Who’s Who among College Students.



Colonel Sweeney’s hometown is Bossier City, and he now serves as the JROTC Director of Army Instruction for Caddo Parish Schools.



Captain Justin Thompson holds a Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts, and Master of Science degrees from Northwestern. He was the Kappa Alpha Psi Theta Lambda Chapter President, vice president of the National Pan-Hellenic Council and African American Caucus, Class Senator for the Student Government Association and treasurer for NAACP.



In 2010, he commissioned in the Military Intelligence Corps through NSU’s ROTC program and has served 12 years in the Army, including a deployment to Afghanistan.



Captain Thompson’s hometown is Shreveport. He is currently assigned as a Sustainment Observer Coach with JROTC Operations Group at Fort Polk.



Northwestern State has a tradition of honoring those who served in the military prior to all home football and basketball games.


Honorary Captains for NSU’s Oct 27 football game were NSU alumni Colonel Eric Sweeney and Captain Justin Thompson. Congratulating the honorary captains were, from left, Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Smalley, U.S. Army Retired, Northwestern Demon Regiment Chief of Staff; Sweeney, Thompson, NSU President Dr. Chris Maggio and Lieutenant Colonel Wendell Bender, professor of Military Science.
00 2018-10-30
New Orleans

UNO institute gets $150,000 grant to study Louisiana’s rail systems


The University of New Orleans plans to play a major role in the future of Louisiana’s rail transportation system thanks to a $150,000 grant from the Louisiana Transportation Research Center.

Bethany Stich, the director of UNO’s Transportation Institute, was awarded the grant to conduct an analysis of passenger and freight rail systems that will be used to guide future investments, according to a UNO news release. The study will inform the work of state transportation planners by exploring economic development opportunities and identifying key corridors for investment, according to Stich in a released statement Monday (Oct. 29).

UNO said Louisiana’s rail system covers a total of 2,730 route miles that are operated by six large railroads and 14 smaller local, switching, and terminal railroads. The state’s passenger rail service includes three long-distance Amtrak trains. Stich stated these systems are facing challenges such as a lack of connectedness to other modes of transportation, which makes rails less attractive than they could be. Even so, Louisiana’s freight rail transportation services generate a total economic output of $13 billion by providing “essential support” for the petrochemical industry and others, UNO said.


Stich stated the institute’s study will show officials where authorities should focus on mitigating safety concerns and rail traffic congestion. More rail transport availability can provide cost and logistical advantages to Louisiana firms and enable the state to increase its competitiveness in the global marketplace, Stich said. She also said connecting railroads rural areas to major urban areas can lead to “potential growth” in manufacturing, agriculture and local industries.

“Understanding how to best incorporate rail infrastructure into the state’s multimodal transportation system requires a unified vision with common goals. This research will ascertain the current state of rail in Louisiana and offer benefit/cost analyses of system expansion,” Stich said in the statement.

UNO’s Transportation Institute offers research, professional outreach and education programs, including master’s degrees in transportation, urban and regional planning, and urban studies. Louisiana’s Transportation Research Center plans to use the institute’s analysis to develop a plan to expand transportation efficiency, cost effectiveness, accessibility and capacity. UNO said the ultimate goal is a safer, more reliable and balanced transportation system for Louisiana that contributes to improved mobility for people and goods, economic growth and resource conservation.
00 2018-10-30
New Orleans

Blakeview: 35-year-old UNO Lakefront Arena has hosted KISS, Cyndi Lauper, more


This week marks the 35th anniversary of the opening of the University of New Orleans (UNO) Lakefront Arena, the 10,000-seat venue that has hosted concerts, athletic events, circuses, school commencement ceremonies and more.

Located on 90 acres of land on the eastern end of the UNO campus, at Franklin Avenue and Leon C. Simon Drive, the multi-purpose facility was built at a cost of $38 million and designed by architect Arthur Q. Davis. Lionel Richie and The Pointer Sisters were the opening act, performing at the arena on Nov. 1, 1983. Other performers during that first year included KISS, Cyndi Lauper, Twisted Sister, Willie Nelson, Smokey Robinson and Jimmy Buffett.

KISS will visit New Orleans for 'End of the Road' tour
KISS will visit New Orleans for 'End of the Road' tour
KISS will perform at Smoothie King Center Feb. 22, 2019.

The facility was dedicated on Nov. 26, 1983, the same day as an UNO-LSU basketball game — one of hundreds of UNO men’s and women’s basketball games to be played at the arena over the years.

Also in its first year, the facility hosted a rodeo, a swim meet and a tennis match between Martina Navratilova and Chris Evert Lloyd. During his Sept. 1987 visit to New Orleans, Pope John Paul II celebrated an outdoor mass on the arena grounds. That same year, the name of the arena was officially changed to the Senator Nat G. Kiefer University of New Orleans Lakefront Arena to honor the state legislator who led the effort to finance and build the facility. It was a process that took more than 20 years.

“When I ride past it, I get a good feeling,” Kiefer said in a 1983 interview with The Times-Picayune, two years before his death. “I look at it and think it was worth all the time and effort a great number of people put into it.”
00 2018-10-30
Regional/National

Maryland chancellor postpones calls to Wallace D. Loh, Damon Evans, DJ Durkin


University of Maryland president Wallace D. Loh has postponed a call with University System of Maryland Chancellor Robert L. Caret on Monday, according to sources.

EDITOR'S PICKS

MD regents meet Durkin, Loh, Evans; no decision
Maryland president Wallace D. Loh, athletic director Damon Evans and football coach DJ Durkin each met with the USM board of regents, but no decisions about their job status were announced after the five-hour-long meeting.

Caret was also scheduled to speak with Maryland athletic director Damon Evans between 10:30 and 11:30 a.m., followed by a call to Maryland coach DJ Durkin, who has been on paid administrative leave since August.

The USM board of regents can make recommendations, but the only person it can actually fire is Loh. The board hired him, and according to Loh's employment agreement, "your service as president is at the pleasure of the Board of Regents."

A different source close to the situation told ESPN that if the board were to remove all three university officials, "it would be unprecedented."

"In higher education in the United States, as well as in Maryland, it would be unprecedented for a governing board to reach down into one of its constituent campuses and say we don't like so and so," the source told ESPN Sunday night. "We're going to fire this person or hire that person. The problem is, if they can do it to Damon Evans today, they can do it to a faculty member they don't like tomorrow. It runs contrary to every good practice and norm as well as the law and their own bylaws. It's never been done in the 30-year history of the board of regents. If they try to do that tomorrow or Tuesday, it's going to be very controversial, not just in the sports world, but in higher education generally. The problem is, nobody in their right mind is going to go to work on a campus they think the governing board is going to start reaching down and hiring and firing individual staff members like that. That's crazy. You'll have no trouble finding higher education experts all over the country to say how horrible that is."
00 2018-10-29
Associated Press

American tourist tackled hammer-wielding thief trying to steal Magna Carta


LONDON — An American tourist from Louisiana reportedly tackled a hammer-wielding thief who unsuccessfully tried to steal the Magna Carta at Salisbury Cathedral, holding him on the ground until help could arrive.

Matt Delcambre, of Little Iberia, Louisiana, told The Sun newspaper in an interview published Saturday that he and his wife Alexis were sightseeing in the southwestern English city when a man tried to shatter the glass encasing the precious manuscript after a fire alarm was set off in the Chapter House of the building. Amid the confusion, Delcambre grabbed the suspect as he fled.

SEE ALSO
Hammer holes in the glass case that housed the Magna Carta, at Salisbury Cathedral.
Man busted for trying to steal the Magna Carta with a hammer
“I just had to stop him,” the 56-year-old was quoted by The Sun as saying.

Delcambre, the director for the Center for Business & Information Technologies at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, said he held him on the ground until security could arrive.

“Back home he would have been hog-tied on the ground,” his wife Alexis told The Sun.

The document was protected by two layers of thick glass, and the thief gave up and tried to escape.

Wiltshire police said Saturday that a 45-year-old man was freed on bail until Nov. 20 as officers continue their investigation.

Salisbury Cathedral’s Magna Carta is one of four existing specimens of the 1215 charter that established the principle that the king is subject to the law. It is considered the founding document of English law and civil liberties and influenced the creation of the U.S. Constitution.

The document, Latin for “Great Charter” was short-lived. Despotic King John, who met disgruntled barons and agreed to a list of basic rights, almost immediately went back on his word and asked the pope to annul it, plunging England into civil war. It was re-issued after the king’s death.

Even so, its importance cannot be underestimated, as it has inspired everyone from Mahatma Gandhi to Nelson Mandela.

“I couldn’t let him get away with it,” Delcambre said. “The Magna Carta is one of the most important documents in the world.”
00 2018-10-29
Lafayette

UL Lafayette employee being hailed as hero after stopping thief who tried to steal Magna Carta


LONDON (AP) - An American tourist from Louisiana helped stop a hammer-wielding thief who unsuccessfully tried to steal the Magna Carta at Salisbury Cathedral, working in tandem with a church employee to prevent the man from escaping.

Matthew Delcambre, of New Iberia, Louisiana, told The Associated Press that he and his wife Alexis were sightseeing in the southwestern English city when a man tried to shatter the glass encasing the precious manuscript in the church's Chapter House.

After Alexis tried to raise the alarm to others, Delcambre and other bystanders banded together to try to hold the thief back behind the doors of the Chapter House.

When the thief pushed past them, the 56-year-old IT expert gave chase into an outer courtyard. He grabbed the man's arm near the courtyard gate and knocked away the hammer. A church employee tackled him and held him down.

"It wasn't me by myself," he said. "It was completely a group effort."

The Magna Carta, which was protected by two layers of thick glass, wasn't damaged.

Wiltshire police said Saturday that a 45-year-old man was freed on bail until Nov. 20 as officers continue their investigation.

Salisbury Cathedral's Magna Carta is one of four existing specimens of the 1215 charter that established the principle that the king is subject to the law. It is considered the founding document of English law and civil liberties and influenced the creation of the U.S. Constitution.

The document, Latin for "Great Charter" was short-lived. Despotic King John, who met disgruntled barons and agreed to a list of basic rights, almost immediately went back on his word and asked the pope to annul it, plunging England into civil war. It was re-issued after the king's death.

Even so, its importance cannot be underestimated, as it has inspired everyone from Mahatma Gandhi to Nelson Mandela. Matthew Delcambre, the director for the Center for Business & Information Technologies at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, said he has been a bit taken aback by the attention his efforts have earned, but told his story so that his efforts would not be exaggerated at the expense of others.

Of all those who played a part in corralling the thief, he credits his wife Alexis first and foremost, since it was she who noticed the thief coming out of the disabled bathroom wielding the hammer and tried to get help. He played down earlier reports which depicted him as the hero, and said the people who should get the credit are cathedral workers and volunteers who tried to protect the Magna Carta.

"The heroes are the staff employees of the cathedral who protected the document, helped catch the guy and helped retain him until the police got there," he said. "It was a team effort."

Lafayette Mayor President Joel Robideaux hailed Delcambre as an international hero after hearing of the events that unfolded:

"Our very own Matt Delcambre, Director of the Center for Business and Information Technologies at UL is an international hero! While visiting the UK, Matt tackled a hooded, hammer wielding man who was trying to steal the Magna Carta! Matt held the perpetrator down until security arrived. We are proud of his courage and humbled by his bravery."

photo
(Photo Credit: The Sun Times, London)
00 2018-10-29
Lafayette

Researchers, students harnessing futuristic power of 3D printing


Imagine a world where doctors tailor medications for your body, where they can kill cancer while repairing the tissue around it and where kids who break their glasses can print new custom-made pairs.

Sounds like science fiction, right?

In universities around Louisiana, researchers are harnessing the futuristic power of 3D printing and trying to catch up with other states in using this technology to help people.

Dr. David K. Mills, professor and biomedical research director at Louisiana Tech University, is exploring how to produce pills and biomedical devices with 3D printing to let doctors customize care in ways they never could with standard medications for general consumption.



Dr. David K. Mills, a professor at Louisiana Tech University, is one of the state’s leading researchers on using 3D printing in biomedical research. Photo credit: Courtesy of David K. Mills.
Dr. David K. Mills, a professor at Louisiana Tech University, is one of the state’s leading researchers on using 3D printing in biomedical research. Photo credit: Courtesy of David K. Mills.
“Instead of prescribing a large antibiotic pill, your doctor can prescribe one made specifically for you,” he said.

Mills’ lab has discovered how to help patients with rhinitis, a chronic nasal inflammation caused by allergies, breathe better by implanting a tiny 3D-printed device that releases just the right amount of medicine directly into the patient’s nose.

This is an improvement over current treatment, which requires an “overdose” of medication for enough to make its way to the nose, Mills said. He expects to submit this project for FDA approval in the next few months.

“We are living in amazing times,” Mills said. “Future medicine is now.”

3D printing works by breaking down three-dimensional designs into two-dimensional layers. The printer nozzle forces material–most often thin plastic filaments, metal powders, or biomaterials for medical uses–into these 2D layers at high temperatures. These malleable layers build the 3D object.



A prototype of the 3D-printed eyeglasses created by the LSU team. Credit: Macie Coker.
A prototype of the 3D-printed eyeglasses created by the LSU team. Credit: Macie Coker.
3D printing also opens up new ways to tackle cancer, Mills said. His lab is designing 3D-printed micro particles that emit a low magnetic field when implanted in bone marrow tumors, which are often responsible for cancer’s full-body spread.

He said this approach could enable doctors to “target and ‘cook’ only the tumor cells.”

The micro particles also would carry regenerative materials, like medications, to help the tissue regrow while the tumor was being destroyed, Mills said.

He said 3D technology is opening doors in biomedical research that will make personalized treatments more accessible and cost-effective. That could particularly help people who lack health insurance.

Mills said that the research in Louisiana on biomedical 3D printing lags behind some other states partly because of the frequent cuts in spending on higher education over the past decade. Louisiana’s universities also have not joined together to share resources, a model used in other states. He said that could help speed research here.

3D printing also can improve the lives of disabled individuals. For instance, two LSU mechanical engineering seniors, Macie Coker and April Gaydos, have collaborated with the Louisiana School for the Visually Impaired (LSVI) to create replacement eyeglass frames for students.

Currently, when their glasses break, students at the K-12 school must either tape them together or hold them on, said Heather Lavender, education and outreach coordinator for the Consortium for Innovation of Manufacturing and Materials grant proposal at LSU’s engineering college.

Worse, many LSVI students who live on campus during the semester face long stretches of work with broken glasses, according to Leslie Bello, the school’s director.

This program could change that. The idea was the brainchild of an LSVI teacher, Bello said. Coker, Gaydos and a third student, Lucy Guo, who has since left the project, stepped in to harness their 3D-printing expertise.

The program would work by scanning each student’s glasses frames at the start of each school year. These scans would be saved to a file that faculty members could modify with the software for 3D printing.

“Whenever the kids’ glasses break, they’ll get a new pair of 3D printed glasses that they get to watch being made,” Coker said. “Over a period of four hours, you can watch something literally being made out of nothing.”

The glasses project is waiting on funding of $80,000 to purchase the scanner and the program needed to make and save copies of the students’ glasses frames. Coker said her team is using the time to teach the LSVI faculty how to use the software they will need once the project goes live.

3D printing technology also could give the students an accessible, tactile way to learn about science.

“With the LSVI kids, it isn’t a question of ability; it’s a question of accessibility,” Lavender said. “It comes down to what has been made accessible to help them to break the barrier of the disability.”
00 2018-10-29
Lake Charles

McNeese State University celebrates homecoming




By Shelby Trahan | October 27, 2018 at 6:24 PM CDT - Updated October 28 at 3:26 PM
LAKE CHARLES, LA (KPLC) -Students, alumni, family and friends, everyone came out to celebrate McNeese State University Homecoming.

Unlike other weekends, the weather held up pretty nicely, and Cowboy fans took full advantage.

With the smell of the food and the sound of the fans, it wasn’t hard to see that homecoming festivities were in full swing.

“How can you not describe this atmosphere with anything but spectacular, this is awesome,” McNeese alumni Chaz Farrel said.

“It’s popping today, we got a lot of people here,” McNeese alumni matt Hardy said.

Parades, games and more there were plenty of activities for everyone to get in the spirit. But McNeese alumni say it’s not the activities that brings them back every year.

“I graduated here in 1981 and I come back here every year for homecoming, Lake Charles Toyota owner Phillip Tarver said. “You get to see people here that you don’t always see, see every week. You know some people come in from out of town. They come back home.”

“But they do it for the pure enjoyment that they love McNeese,” McNeese alumni Stephanie Clark added.

As for fans here at home, all week long they've been preparing for the big day.

“The comradery, the friendship, the atmosphere, just being with your friends and the people before the game, it’s awesome,” alumni Scott O’Kelly said.

“We need to win this game and everybody knows that and we gone be rocking the stadium I can tell you,” Tarver added. Because fans say ‘there's no party like a McNeese tailgate party.’

“I think it’s food, I think its friends, and I think a little beer helps,” Clark said.

“People they enjoy themselves, family, community, people we work with, we all get together and just relax,” Hardy said.

If you couldn’t make it to Cowboy Stadium, visit the McNeese website to watch the game.

Copyright 2018 KPLC. All rights reserved.
00 2018-10-29
Monroe

Louisiana Tech students hold candlelight vigil for domestic violence victims


Many Louisiana Tech students came together and raised awareness about domestic violence.

A group held a candlelight vigil Wednesday night to honor those who lost their lives.

"It's just really empowering to kind of come out and have a lot of support from the Greek community on campus, as well as the student community," said Alex Wynne from Louisiana Tech's Alpha Chi Omega sorority.

The candlelight vigil focused the attention on bringing awareness to domestic violence issues.

Members of the Alpha Chi Omega sorority decorated bags each with a candle inside, but also a message of hope on the outside.

"Domestic violence awareness is Alpha Chi Omega's philanthropy."

Members even read out aloud the names of victims who didn't make it.

Alpha Chi Omega also teamed up with DART or the Domestic Abuse Resistance Team, a non-profit group that gives support services to those who've been abused.

"Every year they (Alpha Chi Omega) bring so much to the community at DART, but also for campus awareness," said Kate Sartor Hilburn from DART.

On average, nearly 20 people a minute are abused by a partner in the U.S.

That equates to more than 10 million a year.

"Domestic violence, one thing is that it's not very well known about it, is that it is a private matter."

Everyone at the vigil even says they want victims to know they're not alone.

"The more we talk about it and the more we're out there, the more people that know that there's help, that you can come and get help."

Alpha Chi Omega also did the vigil as a fundraiser.

Money was raised through the purchase of each candle with all funds going towards DART.
00 2018-10-29
Monroe

Grambling's financial outlook is improving


The University of Louisiana System says Grambling State University is doing better financially than it was two years ago when it was placed on a "fiscal watch" by the Louisiana's Board of Regents.

2016 story: Grambling placed on 'fiscal watch' by Board of Regents

A 2015 Louisiana Legislative Auditor's report suggested Grambling's leadership spent more money than it brought into the university.

Universities are graded on their fiscal health on a scale from 0-5, with 5 being the top score. In the 2016 report, Grambling scored 1.30. The newest report shows Grambling's fiscal health score has doubled from 1.30 to 2.60.

The Louisiana Board of Regents developed the fiscal health score to measure the overall financial well being of Louisiana universities. The scores factor in debt, revenue and other measures.

According to a press release issued by Grambling State University, the university's president, Rick Gallot, said, "As a part of our commitment to innovation, we’ve engaged new talent and alumni from across the U.S. who not only understand our charge but offer us expert perspectives and thought leadership.”

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Here's what the press had to say on Peloton
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A university press release suggests Grambling's financial situation is getting better because of several factors, including:

Participation in the Department of Educations Historically Black College and University Capital Financing program.
Expense reductions of $6 million
An increase in state and federal grant receipts
“Grambling State University is experiencing a renaissance. Its vastly improved fiscal health is yet another indication of the effective leadership and hard work occurring at all levels of the institution,” University of Louisiana System President Jim Henderson said. “From its enrollment numbers to its operations, it’s exciting to see the rapid and significant advancement of this historic institution,” according to the release.
00 2018-10-29
Monroe

College student fees set to increase this spring across Louisiana


Student fee increases have been approved and will go up at many Louisiana colleges.


ULM, Louisiana Tech, and Grambling State University are among that group.

The University of Louisiana System gave the green light for the increase at eight of nine of its universities. This also comes after the LSU and Southern University Systems already increased their student fees earlier this year.

UL System President Dr. Jim Henderson says the schools were asked to explain their need for it.

"We asked our colleges and universities to come to us with a strategic reinvestment if they were going to propose fee increases," said Henderson.

He also says, "Each university took a different approach based on their student mix and their program mix."

The hike will raise an extra $9 million across the UL System schools.

It's designed to help with faculty pay raises, expanded student services, technology upgrades, and more course offerings.

The changes include adding $10 per every credit hour for each ULM student.

"$10 doesn't seem like a bunch to me and if it's going to a good cause like raises and other fundings in the school. I think it would be worth it," said Taylor Hughes, a ULM student.

Meanwhile, Louisiana Tech students will also have to pay an extra $90 more for every credit hour, about eight hours.

Grambling will charge another $100 for per semester, per student, for a technology fee.

Henderson knows they're trying to put students first.

He says, "It's important that we work to keep costs as low as possible for students. We know educational attainment in Louisiana is the future for Louisiana and because we had some stability, we were able to keep tuition fee increases to the lowest amount in a decade and we hope to maintain stability for students."

It's anticipated $500,000 out of that $9 million will also go toward needed-based aid for students.
00 2018-10-29
Natchitoches

The 2018 Northwestern State University Homecoming Parade and Pep Rally Fires Up the Demon Family!


NSU Demon school spirit was in evidence throughout Natchitoches as the Demons held their Homecoming parade and pep rally Friday October 26th. The parade began at the university’s main gate and progressed to the downtown Riverbank. NSU Greek organizations, ROTC, campus ministries, campus organizations, spirit groups, Scholars’ College and the NSU Homecoming Court all competed for top honors in decorating their floats and displaying school spirit. Second Street and the riverbank were lined with eager Demon fans from throughout the community who enjoyed the parade and caught candy and trinkets thrown from the floats.

The parade ended at the downtown riverbank with a pep rally. Fired up Demon fans packed the stage and seating areas. The NSU band kept spirits high playing the fight song as cheerleaders performed for the crowd. The Demon Dazzlers and Pom Line also performed routines for the audience. The evening ended with a concert that kept the dance floor crowded for hours.

The Natchitoches Parish Journal is looking forward to a Demon victory in Saturday’s Game. Come out and join us for some exciting gridiron action. Fork ’em Demons!
00 2018-10-29
Natchitoches

NSU holds Ribbon Cutting for new book store


Northwestern State University administrators, members of the NSU Foundation Board, Natchitoches Parish Chamber of Commerce and Follett Higher Education hosted a ribbon cutting for the NSU Marketplace Oct. 26, the newly-renovated campus bookstore located at 912 University Parkway. The bookstore renovation and reopening are the result of a partnership between the University and Follett, a leading provider of education technology and services. In addition to textbooks, the NSU Marketplace offers Northwestern State merchandise, clothing, supplies, technology and Apple products.
00 2018-10-29
Natchitoches

Bio lab will be named after the late Dr. Jack Pace


NATCHITOCHES, La. (NSU) - Northwestern State University will name a laboratory in Bienvenu Hall for the late Dr. Jack Pace.

The university received approval from the Board of Supervisors for the University of Louisiana System to name Room 217 of Bienvenu Hall as the Dr. Jack Pace Memorial Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory.

Pace passed away in August. He was a member of Northwestern State’s faculty from 1974 to 2015 and was awarded the title of professor emeritus upon his retirement.

During his 41 years at NSU, Pace taught animal science and preparatory classes for the nursing curriculum, served as head of the Departments of Agriculture and Biological Sciences and served as advisor for the NSU rodeo team and the NSU Vet Technology Committee.

“Jack was a wonderful teacher. His dedication to education was unmatched,” said Dr. Francene Lemoine, director of the School of Biological and Physical Science at NSU. “When you teach as many students as he did, for as long as he did, it isn’t hard to see how many lives he impacted. Not surprisingly, it wasn’t just students who he impacted. He was a great colleague who always had encouraging words/complements for his fellow faculty members.”

Lemoine said Pace continued to support encourage his colleagues after his retirement.

“Jack could frequently be seen around Bienvenu or at school-wide functions,” said Lemoine. “His support never wavered. The faculty of the School of Biological and Physical Sciences want to honor that support and dedication. There is no better way to do that than to name one of our human anatomy and physiology laboratories, where he taught for over 30 years, for Jack Pace.”

The Pace Laboratory is used primarily for the human anatomy and physiology education of nursing and allied health majors. These classes are taught by Pace’s colleagues in the School of Biological and Physical Sciences, Jack’s colleagues.

Pace was a member of Natchitoches Parish Police Jury, Natchitoches Parish Fair Board, Natchitoches Parish Farm Bureau as a board member since 1979 and a former president and the State Farm Bureau Board. He served on the Natchitoches 4-H board, was a member of the Natchitoches Jaycees and was past Master of the Masonic Lodge and Shriners. He was a gubernatorial appointee as an advisor to the Sparta Groundwater Conservation District.

A scholarship has been set up in Pace’s name at the NSU Foundation to benefit Northwestern State students. For more information on the scholarship, contact the NSU Foundation at (318) 357-4414.
00 2018-10-29
Shreveport

GSU hiring officers, moving Police Department in wake of double homicide


GRAMBLING, LA (KSLA) - It’s now been a year since Earl Andrews and his cousin Monquiarious Caldwell were killed on Grambling State University’s campus.

"Losing a loved one to gun violence, it’s not a good feeling,” says Andrews' sister Quaniece.

But it’s a feeling she knows all too well.


Last year, her brother and cousin were fatally shot near the dormitories on Grambling State’s campus.

"I’m in the bed, and I’m sleeping and you get a phone call from your mother ... you know, that’s very heartbreaking to find out that my brother and my cousin have been shot down,” Quaniece recalled.

Now freshman Jaylin Wayne, arrested just days after the shooting on a first-degree murder charge, is awaiting trial.

And this past year has been a difficult one for Quaniece and her family.

“We have our days. We have our moments, which we are going to have because this is not something we’re going to get over.”

In September, Quaniece finally stepped back on campus to honor her brother with a balloon release.

Just weeks later, Grambling State experienced another shooting on campus, one that school officials say involved adults from off campus not students.

But it left Quaniece shaking her head and asking why?

“Students shouldn’t be on the campus feeling like they’re unsafe. That’s not good,” she said.

“They should feel like they’re in a comfortable zone. And they should feel comfortable going to their classes, not having to look behind their backs.”

Since that shooting, the university has worked to add police officers.

Grambling State Police Chief Carlos Kelly says they’ve hired five officers since he took office in June and plan to hire eight more next year.

Plans also call for moving the GSU Police Department into a new building that sits in the center of the campus. Kelly gave KSLA News 12 a tour of the new location.

And he says they’ve been working more with local and state police as well.

"We have collaborations with the sheriff’s department, Grambling city, state police, and other various agencies to help us increase our security process.”

University officials say they also have updated all their cameras and lighting and adjusted campus police officers’ patrol routes and schedules.

And starting in November, all campus police will wear body cameras.

But they say students are a big help when it comes to safety and security.

"We had general assembly with our SGA last week where we got a lot of compliments on what’s going on with enforcement as it relates to safety policy, visitation policy and others,” said Jovan Hackley, with the university’s media relations.

Last year’s shooting took place during homecoming.

And with this year’s homecoming coming up next month, officials say they have added some new measures like a bike team.

"We'll have police that are a little more nimble being on a bike than they are on a car to help report and respond to emergencies or safety needs throughout the event as well as increase signage,” said Hackley.

“We’ve got new campus signage up front. We’ve got some pop-up signs that you’ll see as traffic flow management to help folks know, Number One, where to be, how to get there and where the resources are."

But while life moves on at Grambling State, Quaniece and her family have to do the same now with two fewer people in their lives.

"If I could just take it all back to have both of them here cause they didn't deserve it,” she said. “They didn't."

Quaniece says her faith in God and knowing she was able to tell her brother she loved him one last time is what’s keeping her going.

"Through it all, God has me and He will protect me and my family and we’re going to get through this.”

Hackley says the campus Police Department plans to be officially moved into its new building by January.

Copyright 2018 KSLA. All rights reserved.
00 2018-10-26
Associated Press

Student fees increasing at University of Louisiana campuses


After giving students a pass in the fall, Louisiana's largest university system will boost student charges this spring, to raise at least $9 million across campuses.

The University of Louisiana System's governing board approved the fee hikes Thursday, affecting students on eight of its nine campuses, though not every school will raise charges across the board.

The money will pay for faculty pay raises, expanded student services, technology upgrades and increased course offerings, according to information provided to the board. At least $500,000 will pay for additional need-based aid for students.

University spokeswoman Cami Geisman called the boosted charges "slight increases for strategic reinvestment."

"These were anticipated and justifiable when you consider that Louisiana continues to have the lowest resources per student in the South," she said in a statement.

The UL System joins the LSU and Southern University systems, which increased fees on students earlier this year. Louisiana's TOPS free college tuition program doesn't cover fees, so students and families have to pay the new costs.

Fees will grow per credit hour by $15 at McNeese State University, $18.59 at UL-Lafayette, $10 at UL-Monroe, $7 at Northwestern State University and $5.30 at Southeastern Louisiana University. According to the system, for full-time students that equals a $180 fee increase per semester at McNeese, a $223.08 increase at UL-Lafayette, a $120 increase at UL-Monroe and a $63.60 increase at Southeastern.

Grambling State University will charge a $100-per-semester technology fee. Parking fees and charges for students enrolled in education and human development courses at the University of New Orleans will grow.

Some campuses will increase charges for students taking more than a full-time course load, a $90 per-credit-hour fee hike at Louisiana Tech University for those students and a $36.85 per-credit-hour increase at UL-Monroe.

The Board of Supervisors didn't debate the fees at its Thursday meeting, though the finance committee held an earlier, separate discussion about the requests.

Campuses are estimated to receive an additional $9.3 million or more from students this spring through the fees: $500,000 at Grambling; $2.6 million at McNeese; $432,000 at Northwestern State; $1.7 million at Southeastern; $3.3 million at UL-Lafayette; $607,000 at UL-Monroe; and $152,000 at UNO. There was no estimate for the Louisiana Tech increase.

State lawmakers have complained about at increased charges across universities, saying they thought students would be spared such increases after higher education was shielded from state financing cuts in the current 2018-19 budget year.

To defend increased charges, college leaders point out campuses took deep and repeated reductions over nearly a decade, and tuition and fee hikes haven't fully offset the slashing. They say while campuses are digging out from prior cuts, they're coping with mandated increases in health care, retirement and insurance costs and competing to hold onto faculty.

Louisiana's public college systems don't have authority from lawmakers to raise tuition rates, but lawmakers gave them the ability to set and modify their fees within certain parameters until mid-2020.
00 2018-10-26
Associated Press

Student fees increasing at ULM, Grambling State


BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) - After giving students a pass in the fall, Louisiana's largest university system will boost student charges this spring, to raise $9 million across campuses.

The University of Louisiana System's board approved the fee hikes Thursday without debate.

Fees will grow per credit hour by $15 at McNeese State University, $18.59 at UL-Lafayette, $10 at UL-Monroe and $7 at Northwestern State University. Grambling State University will charge a $100 technology fee. Some campuses will increase charges for students taking more than a full-time course load.

The system says the money will pay for faculty pay raises, expanded student services and increased course offerings.

The LSU and Southern University systems increased fees earlier this year. The TOPS tuition program doesn't cover fees, so students and families have to pay the boosted costs.

(Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)
00 2018-10-26
Baton Rouge

Unlike sister schools, no fee increases at Nicholls


BATON ROUGE — After giving students a pass in the fall, Louisiana’s largest university system will boost student charges this spring, to raise at least $9 million across campuses.

The University of Louisiana System’s governing board approved the fee hikes Thursday, affecting students on eight of its nine campuses, though not every school will raise charges across the board.

Nicholls State University in Thibodaux is the only UL school that won’t see a fee increase this spring.

The money will pay for faculty pay raises, expanded student services, technology upgrades and increased course offerings, according to information provided to the board. At least $500,000 will pay for additional need-based aid for students.

University spokeswoman Cami Geisman called the boosted charges “slight increases for strategic reinvestment.”

“These were anticipated and justifiable when you consider that Louisiana continues to have the lowest resources per student in the South,” she said in a statement.

The UL System joins the LSU and Southern University systems, which increased fees on students earlier this year. Louisiana’s TOPS free college tuition program doesn’t cover fees, so students and families have to pay the new costs.

Fees will grow per credit hour by $15 at McNeese State University, $18.59 at UL-Lafayette, $10 at UL-Monroe, $7 at Northwestern State University and $5.30 at Southeastern Louisiana University. According to the system, for full-time students that equals a $180 fee increase per semester at McNeese, a $223.08 increase at UL-Lafayette, a $120 increase at UL-Monroe and a $63.60 increase at Southeastern.

Grambling State University will charge a $100-per-semester technology fee. Parking fees and charges for students enrolled in education and human development courses at the University of New Orleans will grow.

Some campuses will increase charges for students taking more than a full-time course load, a $90 per-credit-hour fee hike at Louisiana Tech University for those students and a $36.85 per-credit-hour increase at UL-Monroe.

The Board of Supervisors didn’t debate the fees at its Thursday meeting, though the finance committee held an earlier, separate discussion about the requests.

Campuses are estimated to receive an additional $9.3 million or more from students this spring through the fees: $500,000 at Grambling; $2.6 million at McNeese; $432,000 at Northwestern State; $1.7 million at Southeastern; $3.3 million at UL-Lafayette; $607,000 at UL-Monroe; and $152,000 at UNO. There was no estimate for the Louisiana Tech increase.

State lawmakers have complained about at increased charges across universities, saying they thought students would be spared such increases after higher education was shielded from state financing cuts in the current 2018-19 budget year.

To defend increased charges, college leaders point out campuses took deep and repeated reductions over nearly a decade, and tuition and fee hikes haven’t fully offset the slashing. They say while campuses are digging out from prior cuts, they’re coping with mandated increases in health care, retirement and insurance costs and competing to hold onto faculty.

Louisiana’s public college systems don’t have authority from lawmakers to raise tuition rates, but lawmakers gave them the ability to set and modify their fees within certain parameters until mid-2020.
00 2018-10-26
Lafayette

UL Lafayette moves ahead with graduate certificate in cardiovascular nursing


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s College of Nursing and Allied Health Professions is one step closer to offering a graduate certificate program for nurse practitioners who want to specialize in heart-related health care.

UL Lafayette’s graduate certificate in cardiovascular nursing was approved by the University of Louisiana System today. The program will be considered by the Louisiana Board of Regents on Wednesday, Dec. 12.

If approved, it will be the first of its kind in the state. It will also be one of only a handful in the country, said Dr. Melinda Oberleitner, dean of the College of Nursing and Allied Health Professions.

“There are very few opportunities to pursue coursework in graduate cardiovascular nursing. Duke University has a graduate specialty program. The Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Arizona, offers a fellowship. The nearest program to Louisiana is at the University of South Alabama,” she said.

UL Lafayette’s program will be geared toward nurse practitioners who are APRNs, or those who have earned a master’s degree. The acronym stands for advanced practice registered nurse.

Applicants who have graduated from or who are enrolled in a family nurse practitioner program, an adult gerontology nursing program, or an acute care nursing program will also be eligible.

Cardiovascular nurse practitioners work with cardiologists to help diagnose and treat heart-related medical conditions, including angina, cardiomyopathy, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure and hypertension.

If approved, the graduate certificate program will begin in the spring with a projected cohort of about a dozen students.

They will complete 12 credit hours in three consecutive accelerated sessions – a half term in the spring, a summer intercession and a summer semester.

The program will consist of eight credit hours of online instruction.

Students will complete four credit hours of clinical work under the supervision of a physician, or a nurse practitioner with cardiology experience. They will work with a range of diagnostic equipment and processes, including telecardiology, which employs robotics to enable remote diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

Students will also compile patient information to develop medical histories and create health care plans based on medical, psychological and socioeconomic factors.

The program is designed to meet a growing need, Oberleitner said.

“An aging population – coupled with the fact that heart disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S. – has increased demand for cardiovascular medical care,” she explained.

Since the instruction portion of the program will be completed online, the College of Nursing and Allied Health Professions will collaborate with medical professionals in other states to provide outlets for clinical experience.

“Students from other places will be able to enroll, provided they meet University admission requirements,” Oberleitner said.

Learn more about the College of Nursing and Allied Health Professions
00 2018-10-26
Lafayette

Report: Suspended UL-Lafayette sorority, fraternity may have involved hazing, underage drinking


The suspensions of Sigma Chi fraternity and Delta Delta Delta sorority at University of Louisiana at Lafayette may have involved hazing and possible underage drinking, KATC-TV is reporting.

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In the case of Sigma Chi, two separate complaints detailed pledges being forced to drink for points. In the case of Delta Delta Delta, the allegation is that one girl, who is underage, was forced to drink repeatedly, then left alone at a downtown bar, drunk and stumbling, according to public records KATC-TV requested and received.
00 2018-10-26
Lafayette

UL Symphony rehearses for annual Halloween concert


The UL Symphony is set to get into the holiday “spirit” in anticipation for Halloween.

Thursday, the group rehearsed well into the evening in preparation for Friday’s concert. The UL Symphony Orchestra will hold their annual concert at Angelle Hall on UL’s campus.

The theme of Friday’s concert is based around “travel to outer space.” The concert will feature “heavenly body” music including Jupiter from Holst’s The Planets, Star Trek: Into Darkness Suite, Star Wars: The Phantom Menace, The Theme from ET, and music from Battle Star Galactica.

The UL Choirs and UL Opera Theatre will also be featured in a few selections.

Members of the orchestra will be dressed in costumes and the audience is also encouraged to show up in their favorite Halloween costumes.

The show begins Friday, October 26, 7:30 pm. Admission is $10 for adults, FREE for 17 and younger, FREE for all UL students, faculty, and staff with I.D.

All proceeds benefit the UL-Lafayette Orchestra Program. For more information call the UL School of Music at (337) 482-6012.
00 2018-10-26
Lafayette

UL College of the Arts celebrates world of design


The eighth annual Beaux Arts Ball celebrated all things design from the UL Lafayette College of the Arts.

Robert and Clare Autin and Joseph Savoie
Robert and Clare Autin and Joseph Savoie (Photo: Kris Wartelle)

This year's theme was Black & White, which included far out and monochromatic inspired fashions. The costume ball and party took place on Oct. 19 at the Atchafalaya Ballroom in the UL Student Union.

Elise Domingue and Kaci Credeur
Elise Domingue and Kaci Credeur (Photo: Kris Wartelle)

Students, faculty and guests enjoyed big band jazz along with cocktails and dinner. Raymond Goodrich of Lafayette Music Company was honored with the SPARK Lifetime Achievement Award.

James Billeaudeau and Dayna Haynie
James Billeaudeau and Dayna Haynie (Photo: Kris Wartelle)

Goodrich was a past chairman of the Dean's Advisory Council of the College of the Arts. He has many good deeds to his credit, including endowed scholarships to fund music education for deserving music students.
00 2018-10-26
Lafayette

UL records detail complaints of alcohol abuse and possible illegal activity


We now have new information on the UL fraternity and sorority suspended last week.

KATC Investigates filed a public records request after the suspensions of Sigma Chi fraternity and Delta Delta Delta sorority were announced, but no reasons why were given. What we found, complaints detailing alcohol abuse and possible illegal activity. Documents accuse both entities of hazing.

In the case of Sigma Chi, two separate complaints detailed pledges being forced to drink for points. In the case of Delta Delta Delta, the allegation is that one girl, who is underage, was forced to drink repeatedly, then left alone at a downtown bar, drunk and stumbling.

The documentation the university has includes complaints from people who didn’t give their names, but also from people who did. Some were members of other fraternities and sororities, and some were members of the organizations being investigated.

The names of all students – except for that of an LSU at Eunice student involved in one incident – were redacted by UL.

The information about the fraternity or sorority of reporters was not redacted, but KATC will not identify any of the Greek groups whose members provided information about the groups being investigated.

Here are the reports of which UL provided documentation:

September 24, 2018 – Public hazing was reported, including a snap chat video showing a Sigma Chi pledge who was carrying around an inflatable alien.

September 27, 2018 – a complaint is made via the UL website about an event at an active Sigma Chi brother’s home that happened a year prior on bid night, when “they gave the pledges handles of liquor and we had to chug them all together.”

September 27, 2018 – a complaint is made via the UL website about Sigma Chi, stating that new members are called pledges and tell them what to wear. They also made the pledges call older members “brother,” the complaint alleged.

October 8, 2018 – An email is sent outlining allegations against Sigma Chi, including having freshmen dress the same and “do crazy stuff,” and that it had been going on for a while. The person sent a video from someone’s social media account and added “I didn’t want to come forward because I have heard what this fraternity does in the past to people who talk to the university.”

October 9, 2018 – Details about the Tri Delta incident were emailed to UL officials. Included in the email are screen shots that appear to be between a senior member of the sorority and a freshman member. The details of the email allege that during a pregame event the older member and some other girls “were forcibly shoving alcohol down the throat” of the younger student. Later in the evening, another Tri Delta member found the girl “visibly drunk (falling over, couldn’t stand up straight, etc.” at Nitetown. When that member called the member who had been with the girl earlier in the evening, that girl said she would pay her sorority sister to take the drunk girl “anywhere else” but her house. The girl was eventually brought to her dorm safely, the email indicates. The younger girl met with the sorority’s standards committee, and said nobody held her mouth and shoved alcohol down her throat, but she “did feel very pressured to drink the whole night.”

October 9, 2018 – A letter is sent to Delta Delta Delta informing the chapter of the Interim Suspension status and is not permitted to conduct any activities.

October 9, 2018 – an email is sent to undisclosed recipients about “conversations regarding the pledge attire, power differentials and hazing.” Because the email refers to “active brothers,” so it appears to have been sent to a fraternity. During the conversation “we all came to the conclusion that although there is good in promoting professionalism to new members, we as a community do not have the luxury to continue treading the line.”

October 14, 2018 – A student reported seeing Sigma Chi pledges, all dressed alike, go out together and then return dirty and sweaty. He said one of them said they had to “earn their way” into the frat, and that at a tailgating party they were forced to drink to get points, because the pledge with the lowest number of points would be cut. The student also said he had to go clean up the house.

October 16, 2018 – A letter is sent to Sigma Chi, informing the chapter of the Interim Suspension status and is not permitted to conduct any activities. The suspension will be in effect while an investigation is made “regarding reports of violations of the Student Code of Conduct, allegedly regarding mistreatment of new members.
00 2018-10-26
Monroe

Grambling improves campus safety monitoring


Grambling State University announced Thursday a series of safety updates that focus on improving campus monitoring.

The updates, which range from relocating the police station and command center to body cameras and new surveillance equipment, focus on response to its growing student population and feedback from a series of student and community safety forums.

“Our commitment to a safe campus is our top priority,” said President Rick Gallot. “We know that growth means we inherit a greater burden of responsibility, and these changes are just a part of how we are continuing to invest in our students.”

The University, in its fifth consecutive year of growth, shared three categories of updates that include – Service, Surveillance, and Collaboration:

Service

Police Station & Dispatch Center Relocation
The University’s Police station and dispatch center will open in a new location this November. The new location, at the corner of RWE Jones Drive and Ballock Street, will house the administrative office, dispatch, and all other police operations.

Officer Hiring
In 2018, the University has added five new officers to its team and announced that it will onboard eight additional officers in January 2019. These hires come in addition to the onboarding of the University’s new Chief of Police, Carlos Kelly, who was hired in June of 2018.

Two-Click Access with Grambling State’s Mobile App
Students, faculty, and community members now have two-click access to University police through the Grambling State University mobile app (available at gram.edu/mobile). By clicking “directory” and “university police,” app users have access to contact and location information for University police.

Surveillance

Officer Body Cameras
As of Nov. 1, all Grambling State University police officers will wear body cameras as a part of their standard uniform.

Adjusted Patrol Routes & Schedules
Starting in Fall of 2017, University Police patrol routes and schedules were adjusted to add more University Police support after hours and improve its collaboration with the City of Grambling Police Department, which also provides campus monitoring and emergency support.

Camera Maintenance & Upgrades
As a part of our routine maintenance, we continue to update campus security cameras and leverage new technology that provides an increased number of views through each camera.

Campus-wide Lighting Upgrades
Since October 2017, a collaborative of University facilities, technology, and police staff have worked to add improved lighting to six common areas based on student and staff feedback.

Increased Visitation Policy Enforcement
As the Fall 2018 semester began, University police increased visitation policy enforcement. The enforcement, aimed at ensuring safety in- and around residence halls, includes ID checks for campus visitors and students in areas surrounding residence halls.

Collaborations

Officer Active Shooter Response Training from the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center
The University’s police chief, who is now a certified trainer, and officers have received the latest training provided by the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center on active shooter response tactics and tools.

Community Safety Forums & Partnerships
The University’s police chief and officers have engaged in 18 student and community safety forums both on- and off-campus. Partnering groups include Lincoln Parrish Sherriff’s Office, the H.O.P.E team – whose focus is domestic violence prevention, the City of Grambling, Louisiana Tech, and the City of Ruston.

For safety emergencies, please contact (318) 274-2222.

EXCLUSIVE: Two players decide to leave Grambling football program
00 2018-10-26
Monroe

Grambling State approved to offer Louisiana's first cybersecurity bachelor's degree


GRAMBLING, La. (KTAL) - (10/25/18) Grambling State University has received system approval to offer the state’s first Bachelor of Science degree in Cybersecurity.

The University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors approved the University’s program that would start enrolling students in the Fall of 2019.

"With the vision of your team and the support of this Board, we are confident Grambling is prepared to educate cybersecurity professionals the market is demanding," said Board Chair Al Perkins. "These graduates will be equipped with highly sought-after skills to protect us as technology becomes more prevalent in our daily lives."

The new program’s development has been spearheaded by Grambling State faculty member, researcher and a member of the Louisiana Cybersecurity Commission, Dr. Yenumula B. Reddy.

“We are excited about the work of Dr. Reddy and his team,” said Grambling State President, Rick Gallot. “Their continuous innovation in research and the classroom are paving the way for this program. We are excited for the impact their leadership and our system-level support will have on our state and economy.”

Next, the proposal will seek approval from the Louisiana Board of Regents in order to launch its first cohort in Fall 2019.
00 2018-10-26
Monroe

One Year Later: Family remembers GSU double murder victims, campus ramps up security


Grambling, La. - Today marks a year since a Grambling State University student and his cousin were killed on campus.

"It's like they have been gone a trip and I'm just waiting for them to come home," said Crystal Coleman.

Emotions running high, Crystal Coleman, is still hurting after losing her nephew last October.

"I just wish we could turn it all around to the way it was, but it's not gone be the same. Holidays not gone be the same," said Coleman.

Her nephew 23-year-old Monquiarious Caldwell was visiting his cousin Earl Andrews at Grambling State University for homecoming when both men were gunned down on campus.

The second son Caldwell's mother has lost.

"I still get up going through the house looking for him. It's a pain i don't wish on nobody. It felt like somebody put a knife in my heart and pulled it out," said Caldwell-Cane.

Since the shooting Grambling State University has mapped out a plan for more security. Which includes more officers, body cameras, a new app and a police station.

"The growth on safety is all about listening to two things. The data about our environment and the folks that are in it. So with that we have learned that we need a few more officers so we have made five hires since June," said GSU Spokesman Javon Hackley.

Extra protection that this family prays will stop the senseless killings.
As they battle their loved ones accused killer Jaylin Wayne in court.
A fight for justice that will give them peace.

"I know that he wish he could take back what he did, but it's too late now. I just pray he realizes what he did and what he took from us," said Caldwell-Cane.

We called the district attorney about case against Jaylin Wayne.
He's due back in court December 11th.
Louisiana is seeking the death penalty.
00 2018-10-26
Monroe

ULM PD: Man sneaks into college dorm, enters rooms


A Monroe man is accused of sneaking into a dormitory on the University of Louisiana Monroe campus and stealing from one dorm room after entering several.

According to an arrest report for Keithon Courtney, 31, officers with the ULM Police Department were dispatched to University Commons regarding a man entering rooms in the women's dorm.

When officers initially spotted Courtney, he reportedly fled but was apprehended at Mitchell Street. Courtney had a laptop in his possession that officers determined was stolen from a dorm room, an arrest report states.

During questioning, Courtney reportedly confessed to taking the computer and entering three different rooms.

Per the affidavit, security video showed Courtney standing next to the east side of the dorm. When a female student exited, the suspect caught the door before it closed to gain entry to the building.

The burglary prompted the school to caution on-campus residents about allowing someone to "tailgate" into a building behind a resident.

The Department of Residential Life advised students:

Not to let anyone tailgate into a residence hall.
To lock doors. Please use the deadbolt lock on your door whether you are in the room or leaving the room.
Not to let anyone use student IDs for any reason, ever.
Registered guests cannot be in rooms unless the resident is there.
Courtney was booked at Ouachita Correctional Center Monday night on charges of resisting an officer, three counts unauthorized entry of an inhabited dwelling, simple burglary and parole violations.

Bail on the new charges is set at $23,000, and Courtney remains in custody.
00 2018-10-26
Monroe

Grambling OK'd to offer degree in cybersecurity


Grambling State University has been approved to offer the state’s first Bachelor of Science degree in cybersecurity.

The University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors offered their approval and support for the university’s program at a meeting Thursday. Students would begin enrolling in the program in fall 2019.

The proposal next will seek approval from the Louisiana Board of Regents in order to launch its first cohort.

"With the vision of your team and the support of this Board, we are confident Grambling is prepared to educate cybersecurity professionals the market is demanding," said Board Chair Al Perkins. "These graduates will be equipped with highly sought-after skills to protect us as technology becomes more prevalent in our daily lives."

Grambling State faculty member, researcher and a member of the Louisiana Cybersecurity Commission Yenumula B. Reddy, Ph.D., has been spearheading the new program’s development.

“We are excited about the work of Dr. Reddy and his team,” said Grambling State President Rick Gallot. “Their continuous innovation in research and the classroom are paving the way for this program. We are excited for the impact their leadership and our system-level support will have on our state and economy.”
00 2018-10-26
Natchitoches

Alumni to participate in Symphony Orchestra concert


NATCHITOCHES – The Natchitoches-Northwestern Symphony Orchestra will perform a concert, “A Celebration of Peace With Music of the Americas,” on Monday, Nov. 5 at 7:30 p.m. in Magale Recital Hall. Douglas Bakenhus is music director of the Natchitoches-Northwestern Symphony Orchestra and Jolie Gonzalez Masmela, is graduate assistant conductor. Tickets are $10. NSU, BPCC@NSU and LSMSA students are admitted free with a current student I.D.



The concert will feature Northwestern State alumni Dr. Raúl Antonio Munguía, director of orchestras and professor of violin and viola at Pittsburg State University in Pittsburg, Kansas, and Sherman Desselle, anchor of KALB-TV’s “Jambalaya.”



Bakenhus said the program was the idea of Masmela, who will give a pre-concert lecture at 7 p.m.



“Her (Masmela’s) master degree document is on the topic of three composers who all studied with Nadia Boulanger in Paris,” said Bakenhus. “Boulanger, who was a composer and teacher, was considered the top teacher of composition in the 20th century. Many well-known composers in Europe and in the Americas studied with her. She had a knack for teaching composers to find their own voice especially through the music of their own cultures. It is a fascinating topic, because they all sound so different. Astor Piazzolla was from Argentina, Adolfo Mejia was from Colombia and Aaron Copland was from the U.S.”





Bakenhus said he decided to go beyond Masmela’s paper by adding works by Carlos Chavez and Adolphus Hailstork, who also studied with Boulanger in Paris. Hailstork is the only composer still living. He studied with Boulanger just before she died in 1973.



The program will be “Fanfare on Amazing Grace” by Hailstork, “Las Cuatro Estaciones Porteñas” by Piazzolla and arranged by Desyatnikov featuring Munguia on violin, “Acuarela” by Mejía, “Sinfonia India for Large Orchestra” by Chávez, “Lincoln Portrait for Narrator and Orchestra” by Copland with narration by Desselle, “Cumbia” from “La Pequeña Suite” by Mejía and Copland’s “Rodeo: Hoedown.”



Munguia leads the graduate programs in orchestral conducting and is head of the string area at Pittsburg State. Munguía is the principal guest conductor of the San Pedro Sula Symphony Orchestra in his native country of Honduras. As a strong advocate of music education, Munguía has conducted several District and Honor orchestras in Missouri, Texas, Mississippi, Kansas, Louisiana, El Salvador, Brazil and Honduras. A passionate proponent for the chamber music genre, Munguía founded the Pittsburg Chamber Music Festival held every summer in Pittsburg, Kansas. Now on its sixth edition, the festival brings together renowned national and regional artists to the Four State Area.



Munguia holds a Doctoral in Musical Arts degree in Orchestral Conducting from Texas Tech University, a Masters in Orchestral Conducting and Violin Performance from Northwestern State studying violin with Dr. Andrej Kurti, and orchestral conducting with Bakenhus. He also holds a Bachelor of Music in Violin Performance from the University of Southern Mississippi.



Desselle is a native of Alexandria. He is a graduate of Peabody Magnet High School and Northwestern State in vocal music performance.



He was offered a position as a part-time videographer at KALB in June of 2008, and by the end of the year, Desselle enjoyed the experience of being on both sides of the camera. By July of 2009, he was made a “One Man Band” reporter, covering the weekend news and NSU sports. He later began anchoring the Weekend Edition newscasts on News Channel 5 and reporting our “What’s Right About Cenla” stories. Desselle is on “Jambalaya” Monday through Friday from 5 a.m. – 7 a.m.



Desselle speaks at local schools and community events and is a mentor for high school students. Desselle is a board member for the Rapides Symphony Orchestra, a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, the National Association of Black Journalists and is active in his local church.
00 2018-10-26
Regional/National

Here’s What Today’s Students Want From College


f you talk to college leaders these days, you’ll hear that one of their biggest worries is the demographic headwind facing their institutions. The number of U.S. high-school graduates is mostly flat and projected to remain that way until it declines by the middle of the next decade. The cohort that arrives on campus in the 2020s will be more racially and ethnically diverse, and will include more first-generation and low-income students than any other group of undergraduates previously served by American higher education. And all of those recent high-school graduates will hail from Generation Z, a group with different expectations than those of the millennials.

While those demographic trends have been on the radar of colleges for nearly a decade, finding a strategy to serve those students has proved elusive. So college leaders return to what is familiar, rather than listen to what prospective students want from higher education or even how current students navigate it.


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Without a clear understanding of their students, institutions often fail to think beyond the core populations they are already enrolling or assume the academic programs and student services they’re offering are suitable. This strategy plays out at institutions again and again as leaders picture their students mostly through the lens of age: traditional (18 to 22 years old) and nontraditional (everyone else).

Take, as an example, adult students. Because of the decline in high-school graduates, colleges realize that adults, part-timers, and other nontraditional students will increasingly become the norm at most institutions. But once again, colleges are failing to differentiate their offerings to the distinct needs of those new sets of students. Rather than create a set of experiences for the adult market — such as learning communities to provide academic support or competency-based degrees to move them through school more quickly — many institutions merely tweak the course schedule aimed at traditional teenagers and then add night, weekend, or online options.

The process to better align an institution with learners starts with a concept called "student segmentation." Students of all ages are increasingly vocal about what they want from a college degree and more skeptical of the existing system. Online survey tools allow colleges to constantly ask about students’ experiences. And thanks to the growing digitization of campuses, we know so much more about how students learn in the classroom and how they interact with campus services, from academic advising to the library.

Until now, however, those data have often remained isolated within academic departments or specific schools at a university and haven’t worked to the overall benefit of students or the institutions. The next step is to use that survey research and data to segment students in order to build new academic offerings and personalize campus services.

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While the idea of student segmentation is not new in higher education, the concept has failed to gain widespread adoption. Recent research I conducted on behalf of the education company Pearson suggests that by more broadly adopting a segmentation approach to inform academic majors, help students navigate campuses, and enhance recruitment practices, colleges can put themselves on stronger financial footing and improve student success.

As part of our research, the Harris Poll conducted a survey of more than 2,500 Americans, ages 14 to 40, about how they learn and about their attitudes toward college and education in general. The results point to a significant shift in the mind-sets of teenagers and adults in how they approach higher education — their purpose for going to college, what motivates them, how they want to learn, and the value they place on the degree for the price they pay.

Our survey found, for example, that adults want a degree to provide broad learning, and they understand the relevance of their education even if it’s not readily apparent. Younger students, in contrast, want college to provide financial security and to apply immediately. What this means is that colleges should design additional and flexible pathways to a degree that allow students to choose among a mix of majors combined with a healthy dose of short training courses and intensive career advising.

Our research also revealed that alternative credentials and certificates are just as popular as legacy degrees among both college graduates and nongraduates who plan to continue their education. Around a quarter of college graduates, high-school graduates, and those who started college but didn’t finish want opportunities for alternative certificates. This calls for an acceleration of existing experiments with nanodegrees, micro-master’s programs, and badges in order to sort out what is now a convoluted market for new credentials.

Using the results of the Harris survey, we developed a set of five student "personas" that function as a guide for how institutions might use segmentation to build academic programs, market to prospective students, and serve them in new ways.

The Traditional Learner is the prototypical college student, who favors in-person interactions with classmates and professors and prefers reading and listening to lectures over group study and watching videos. While such learners believe the purpose of college is to prepare them for life, a big motivation for going to college is also to get a better job. This is the largest segment of the five, accounting for 25 percent of learners.

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The Hobby Learner refers to a diverse set of older students who view education as a journey of learning about new things rather than as a way to make it to the top of their professions. What really makes this group stand out is that they are under financial pressure: A majority said ability to pay might prevent them from going to college.

The Career Learner is similar to the Traditional Learner in many ways, but members of this group have made getting a job their main focus. While this segment is made up of learners of all ages, the largest subgroup represents Generation Z — traditional undergraduates in college right now.

The Reluctant Learner is the most diverse segment in terms of enrollment, and includes those currently in college, those without a degree, and even college graduates. They are academically average students who have little passion for learning. Because they place a low value on higher education, they are searching for the best price or the biggest return on investment when comparing colleges.

The Skeptical Learner is essentially the converse of the Hobby Learner. A little more than half of this group’s members describe themselves as average or below-average learners. This segment likes the social aspects of education, such as seeing friends, but not the academic pursuit.

Each of these personas offers opportunities for colleges to expand their markets and serve new ones. For instance, institutions could design shorter, flexible academic programs, even at the single-course level, that appeal to the Hobby Learner’s desire to seek knowledge about interesting topics, or build a pricing approach based on degree progress that would incentivize price-sensitive Reluctant Learners to complete their studies.

This list of five categories is not meant to encompass all types of learners, nor do all these categories exist at every institution. But such a segmentation approach should kick off any planning exercise in higher education nowadays. To remain relevant in the decades ahead, it is critical that leaders start thinking about the broad swath of students they want to serve — or need to serve — and how to appeal to their specific needs and desires.

Jeffrey J. Selingo, formerly editor of The Chronicle, is founding director of the Academy for Innovative Higher Education Leadership, a partnership between Arizona State University and Georgetown University, and a visiting scholar at Georgia Tech's Center for 21st Century Universities. This article was adapted from a report he wrote for Pearson.
00 2018-10-26
Regional/National

Creating More Responsive Boards


How do boards do it? The scope of work for most university, college and state system boards is vast, from audits and athletics to underrepresented students and their completion. (We couldn’t quite get examples from A to Z, but A to U is arguably comprehensive.) The list of the issues that boards address is as long as the topics are complex. And this year the headlines suggest boards should pay greater attention to athletics, free speech and diversity and inclusion, among other issues.

What’s more, boards face additional challenges in how they do their work. For example, they meet only a few times a year, with public university boards typically convening more often than their private counterparts, and when they do meet, they do so only for a few days. In fact, a trustee at a private institution spends only an average of between nine and 12 days directly involved in governing through the three to four board meetings per year and associated committee meetings.

All this means that a perennial problem for boards is how to effectively address the requisite depth and breadth of their work, given the complexity of the issues and the limited time on task.

Boards extend their reach and impact through a system of committees, the unheralded workhorse of governance. Committees typically do the legwork on complex issues within their purview and make recommendations to the full board; they help frame board-level discussions and facilitate better and more effective decision making. In short, committees do much of the heavy lifting.

The problem is that some board committees have too much to lift, whereas others don’t have enough. Some committees don’t know what to lift, and others are lifting the same things, creating redundancies when they can ill afford the time. When boards are governing the full spectrum of issues from A to Z (or at least to U), they need to ensure they are working at full capacity and taking advantage of the structures they have in place.

Unfortunately, some boards are not sufficiently intentional about the work of committees. Instead, the committee structure and ways of operating go unexamined. Practices that once worked well and made sense no longer do. Two common problems exist when it comes to board committees: 1) overlaps or gaps in issues addressed and 2) work overload or underload.

Overlaps and Gaps

For example, a highly tuition-dependent private college was deeply -- and rightly -- concerned with enrollments, so much so that both its finance and its student affairs committees spent significant time on the issue, albeit from different perspectives. The result was that both would invest a lot of effort and then make decisions that would need to be reconsidered by the other committee or when the topic reached the full board. This proved to be ineffective and inefficient. Because each hand didn’t know what the other was doing, the board found that it had an overlap problem.

The solution was twofold: 1) to create what started out as a board task force on enrollment that eventually morphed into a standing board committee (once it updated its bylaws) and 2) to hold joint committee meetings between finance and the new enrollment committee to address key issues collaboratively.

The board at a second tuition-dependent college never talked about enrollment, although it was the primary source of revenue for the college, which had a five-year history of uneven (read: problematic) enrollment management. That board didn’t recognize this structural gap in its work, despite acknowledging that it needed to give more attention to the issue. The structure of the committees and the traditional focus of the work in those committees meant that enrollment never received its needed board focus. It, too, created a board committee on enrollment but for a different reason -- the gap it found in its work.

Too Much Work; Too Little Work

The second set of problems centers on committee workload. As institutions and boards evolve and the issues morph, committees too must keep pace. Some boards are finding that key committees have too much work to do. Let’s again consider the intersection of enrollment and finance. Finance committees that are giving renewed and often much deeper attention to enrollment because of the financial implications of tuition are finding themselves stretched too thin. A similar pattern is occurring when it comes to facilities and technology, since many facilities committees are also responsible for technology. As technology purchases increase in value and importance, and the issues -- which now concern not only hardware and software but also privacy, data analytics and data security -- become more complex, facilities committees learn they cannot handle the increased workload.

In contrast, some boards have discovered that committees that once were important simply do not have sufficient, meaningful work to do today. In such situations, the board is bound by committee structures from yesterday’s work and outdated bylaws. It is not uncommon for student affairs committees to wonder about their roles and contributions as enrollments have shifted from traditional-age students to adult learners; further, the boundaries between student affairs and academic affairs has blurred. Another example: one Catholic college discovered that its mission committee struggled to find purpose and focus. (Yes, mission lacked purpose.) It dissolved the mission committee and instead infused the mission work across all its committees. It created a role akin to a “mission steward” -- typically held by a member of the college’s sponsoring order -- on each committee, whose role was to ask mission-related questions and ensure that each standing committee took on the values and mission conversation in its respective domain.

How can you determine the extent to which your board committees are appropriate and functioning well? The following may be helpful:

Conduct a time audit of your committees. Which committees meet the longest? Which meet most frequently? Which ones seem to never have enough time for their work? Which committees struggle to fill their agendas? Do any committees rarely meet?
Plot the university’s strategic plan priorities against the committee structure of the board. Do some priorities not have a natural home within the current committee structure? Do multiple committees claim primary oversight of the same priority? Given the responses, boards might have gap or overlap problems.
Organize an executive or governance committee field trip. Too often committees do their work independently. Rarely do board members have a full and comparative understanding of committees and their work. Have members of the board’s executive or governance committee attend all the committee meetings over a cycle or two. Have them compare the work in the committees by asking the following questions: To what extent is each committee dealing with meaningful substance? To what extent is each committee working on distinct issues? Which committees seem overburdened? Which committees seem underutilized?
Hold a committee chairs retreat. Convene committee chairs for a focused morning discussion about the work of committees and their role in leading them. Ask committee chairs to reflect on the most salient work their committees have done over the past 12 to 18 months and the top priorities for the upcoming year. Look for opportunities among the chairs to find issues that overlap and to be intentional about how the work of the committees will address such issues.
Ad Hoc Task Forces

The salient point about attending to committees and their work is to ensure the board is able to appropriately oversee key areas and address important issues. For some matters, institutions are well served to create ad hoc working groups or task forces. Such structures allow boards and institutions to act more quickly and focus attention on a specific issue for a defined duration in time. In addition, they may open avenues to involve people beyond trustees -- like faculty members, external experts or alumni -- in important work. They also can create space for urgent matters without being overly burdensome to what might already be full board and committee agendas.

Looking at today’s headlines, the following topics are well suited for board-level ad hoc task forces:

Athletics. Some boards have standing committees on athletics, but not all do. In the wake of scandals at Michigan State University, Ohio State University, the University of Maryland and others, boards might be well served to create at least an ad hoc task force to focus on the role of athletics at the institution and consider the associated risks. Looking beyond the headlines, not all of the issues associated with athletics are negative, but given the complexity of this part of higher education enterprise from Division I to Division III, it might be a good idea for boards to give athletics special attention.
Diversity and equity. Again, a review of the headlines from the end of the last academic year into this new one suggests that issues of equity and diversity are likely to remain salient. Some boards, like the University of Pennsylvania’s, have standing committees or ad hoc bodies that address these issues. What is the board’s role related to diversity and equity? How does the board monitor progress on these issues? What are meaningful board-level dashboard indicators on such topics? What should be the key priorities and their measures of success?
Free speech. Issues of free speech, external speakers, inclusion and a sense of welcome, and safety are all issues boards and institutions can expect to face this year and into the future. Such issues, related to who speaks about what and where, are exceedingly complex, and boards must be prepared to act -- not simply react. Thus, an ad hoc committee can be a tremendously useful vehicle.
Harvard University marketing professor Theodore Levitt is said to have told his students, “People don’t want to buy a quarter-inch drill. They want a quarter-inch hole.” The lesson he was conveying was to focus not on the tools (in this case, committee structures) but instead on what needs to be accomplished and then to develop or modify structures to best make that happen.

Thus, a key starting point for boards is to ask, “What are the tasks -- or jobs -- each committee seeks to accomplish?” Different committees present a mix of jobs. Knowing the mix of what jobs different types of committees can and should be doing can help boards better use their committees, stay out of the weeds and remain focused on what matters most in terms of oversight and strategic imperatives.

Some committee assignments are entrenched in an institution’s bylaws, and to change them can be a significant undertaking. Still, it is good practice to review bylaws regularly and in doing so consider the work of committees. Many colleges and universities have rewritten their bylaws to allow more flexibility for the board’s committee structure by naming only a few standing committees (e.g., audit and compliance, executive, finance and governance) and stating provisions to create task forces and ad hoc groups as needed. The point is that institutions should be more intentional about what they want their board committees and ad hoc bodies to achieve -- and then to ensure processes for this important work to get done.
00 2018-10-25
Associated Press

Louisiana college leaders seek $172 million budget boost next year


After absorbing nearly a decade of cuts and receiving flat funding this year, Louisiana's top higher education board voted Wednesday to ask the governor and lawmakers for a $172 million increase for public colleges next year.

The request from the Board of Regents would bump up general state funds for higher education to $1.2 billion in the 2019-20 budget year that begins July 1.

Higher education leaders, meeting at Nicholls State University in Thibodaux, framed the financing boost as a way to reinvest in campuses that have struggled through cuts and to help students afford college after years of tuition and fee hikes that partially offset the slashing.

With the proposal, "Louisiana can improve affordability and reduce student debt," Commissioner of Higher Education Kim Hunter Reed said in a statement. "This is how we, as a state, will move from poverty to prosperity long-term."

Public college access in jeopardy for low-income students as tuition rises: report
Public college access in jeopardy for low-income students as tuition rises: report

Louisiana's college tuition has risen at a higher percentage than any other state nationwide.


Lawmakers will consider the funding request in the next regular session that starts in April. The proposal will compete with a multimillion-dollar effort favored by Gov. John Bel Edwards to give K-12 teachers and support staff a pay raise.

Under the Regents proposal for college campuses, the new money would be directed to need-based aid for students through the GO Grant program, faculty pay raises, e-textbooks and increased spending on the TOPS tuition program. A significant portion of the money, according to the plan, would be spread across campuses to keep schools from raising fees next year.


Amid years of state financing cuts, public colleges raised tuition and fees at rates that outpaced the nation.

The Regents said charges on students increased 107 percent over the last 11 years. Louisiana's average in-state tuition and fees at a public four-year college in 2017 represented 19.4 percent of a family's median income, compared to 16.5 percent nationally, according to the Regents. For black families in Louisiana, tuition and fees account for 31.7 percent of median household income.

Louisiana covers the cost of tuition through TOPS for students who meet certain course requirements, grade point averages and standardized testing benchmarks. But the program doesn’t cover fees, and many students don’t reach the criteria to qualify for TOPS aid.
00 2018-10-25
Baton Rouge

Southeastern Louisiana University professor honored for history book


The Gulf South Historical Association has honored Samuel C. Hyde Jr., a history professor at Southeastern Louisiana University, for his book “Pistols and Politics: Feuds, Factions, and the Struggle for Order in Louisiana’s Florida Parishes, 1810-1935.”

The association's Michael V.R. Thomason Award recognized Hyde’s work as the best book on the history of the Gulf South region published in 2018.

“Hyde’s exhaustively researched study of Louisiana’s Florida Parishes and its innovative use of game theory revolutionizes our understanding of Southern violence and provides critical insight into possible solutions for the tradition of lawlessness that continues to plague the region,” said Douglas Bristol, a member of the award committee from the University of Southern Mississippi.

Hyde, who is director of the Center for Southeast Louisiana Studies, was honored and presented with a cash prize during the Gulf South History and Humanities Conference Oct. 4-6 in Baton Rouge.
00 2018-10-25
Baton Rouge

Wine tasting will benefit Southeastern Library


Friends of Sims Library will present its 10th annual Wine with Friends, a fundraiser for Southeastern Louisiana University’s Linus A. Sims Memorial Library, at 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 2.

Held on the second floor of the library on campus in Hammond, the event will offer six wines paired with food samplings, live music, a silent auction featuring art and photography, books, wine and gift certificates and door prizes.

"FoSL is an organization that supports the activities and collections of the library. Funds generated by FoSL are used to supplement the library’s annual budget, purchase needed equipment and resources, and provide programs, lectures, author readings and signings and other special events," a news release says.

Tickets are $35 each. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. with the tasting beginning at 7 p.m. Space is limited; reservations are required by Sunday. Tickets will not be sold at the door. Order tickets online at southeastern.edu/library/about/friends/wine/index.html or via check payable to Southeastern Foundation, SLU 10896, Hammond, LA 70402.

For more information about the wine tasting or the FoSL, contact Janie Branham at (985) 549-2186 or jbranham@southeastern.edu.
00 2018-10-25
Houma/Thibodaux

Nicholls volleyball coach placed on administrative leave


Nicholls State University head volleyball coach Jay Van Vark has been placed on administrative leave, according to the school’s athletic department.
Nicholls confirmed the news today but didn’t give any reasons for his leave.
The school declined further comment.
“This is an ongoing university matter,” the Nicholls athletic department said in a statement to The Courier and Daily Comet. “We reserve comment at the appropriate time.”
Van Vark is in his first season as Nicholls head volleyball coach. The Colonels have a 3-21 overall record and are 1-10 in the Southland Conference.
Nicholls will play its next match against Incarnate Word at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Stopher Gym in Thibodaux.
Nicholls has five more games left on its regular-season schedule. Nicholls announced today that assistant coach Chelsi Carter will serve as interim head coach while Van Vark is on leave. Carter is a former Samford and UAB volleyball player who joined Van Vark’s coaching staff this season.
Van Vark took over the head volleyball coaching job at Nicholls after previous successful stints as an assistant coach at Grand Canyon University, Ohio State University, San Diego State University and UC-Santa Barbara.
He also has worked with USA Volleyball.
During his final years in college at Iowa State, he played semi-pro indoor with the ACCO Sportswear team for two seasons, followed by three campaigns of outdoor for East Beach as an AAA-rated beach and grass player.
He has also played in five indoor USVBA Open National Championships. In the late 1980s, he was a college referee and at one point was the youngest official for the Big 8 (now the Big 12).
Van Vark moved to San Diego after college, heading the Rancho Bernardo High School boys’ and girls’ volleyball programs for 10 seasons. He led the Bronco girls to their only CIF volleyball title in 1994.
In addition to coaching, Van Vark is the co-founder of a successful software firm called Envision Sports Inc., a statistical and technology enhancement high-tech firm focusing on volleyball. He is also the author of one of the most successful volleyball statistics packages, iVolleyStats.
00 2018-10-25
Lafayette

UL researchers sending more than 100K crustaceans to the Smithsonian


These crustaceans found by University of Louisiana of Lafayette researchers aren't going to the next crawfish boil — they're going to the Smithsonian.

The UL Lafayette Zoological Crustacean Collection may be the largest archive of marine decapod specimens from the Americas, according to a press release from the university.

The collection includes more than 100,000 preserved crabs, shrimp, lobsters and other crustaceans that researchers collected over the past 40 years. They were gathered near Cuba, the Bahamas, Mexico, Nicaragua, Belize, Venezuela, Brazil, Colombia, and the Gulf of Mexico.

The specimens will be relocated to the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C.

Darryl Felder, a professor in the Department of Biology, worked with graduate students, faculty researchers and other collaborators to build the collection and maintain its specimens, said Azmy S. Ackleh, Ph.D., dean of the Ray P. Authement College of Sciences.

Decapods are a scientific order of crustaceans encompassing nearly 15,000 unique species, including shrimp, crawfish and lobsters. Five pairs of thoracic legs, equaling 10 limbs, give the order its name; deca is Greek for “10;” pod means “foot.”

The collection also includes a database for the crustaceans, research notes and more than 50,000 photographs Felder took before the specimens were preserved.
00 2018-10-25
Monroe

ULM Art Crawl set for Nov. 1


The College of Arts, Education, and Sciences at the University of Louisiana Monroe is hosting the Fall 2018 Art Crawl at several campus locations on Thursday, Nov. 1, from 5-7 p.m. Admission is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided.

Participating sites include the Walker Gallery, Walker Hall Dean’s Conference Room, Bry Art Gallery, ULM Sculpture Garden, and the Stubbs Hall advanced art student studios. A showcase of ULM’s talented students, faculty, staff, and alumni will be on display throughout the crawl.

The Walker Gallery includes student and faculty artwork including paintings, pottery, sculpture, prints and photographs. Photographs will be on display in the CAES Dean’s Conference Room in Walker Hall.

A selection from ULM photographer Emerald McIntyre will be one of the highlights and will include her photographs of the student murals from Garrett Hall, which once stood at the corner of Northeast Drive and University Avenue. Also in the Dean’s Conference Room will be striking drone photography from ULM professor Dr. Sean Chenoweth. Heather Pilcher and Cyndy Robertson will be on hand as well, signing copies of their collection of historical photographs, entitled “University of Louisiana Monroe,” which will be available for purchase.

Bry Gallery will display the work of visiting artist, Joshua Brinlee, from Oxford, Miss., who will be showing Masculine Projections, a collection of digital prints. The nearby advanced art students’ studios in Stubbs Hall will be open so that visitors may meet some of the student artists and see their works in progress. Visitors are also encouraged to walk through our beautiful Sculpture Garden.

Various performers from the Music Program will display their talents in Walker Gallery and Bry Hall during the crawl. Among them will be cast members of “Candide,” who will perform selections from the opera in Walker Gallery between 5- 6 p.m., offering a sneak preview of the production.

The College of Arts, Education, and Sciences hopes to enrich the community by giving its members the opportunity for the community to walk through our beautiful campus and appreciate the outstanding work of each artist. Dr. Joni Henry Noble, Professor in ULM’s School of Visual and Performing Arts, recognizes students’ accomplishments. “I am so proud of our ULM Art Majors and all of their efforts to curate and operate Walker Gallery. I hope everyone can attend our ULM Art Crawl and meet these talented artists.”

Following the ULM Art Crawl, the Music, Theatre, and Dance departments will present “Candide” at 7:30 p.m. in Brown Hall. The community can enjoy a full evening of entertainment and culture on ULM’s campus that night. General admission to this performance is $15, and tickets for ULM faculty and staff are $5. Students will be admitted for free with a valid ID.

For more information contact Dr. Joni Noble at noble@ulm.edu or 342-1383 or the ULM School of Visual and Performing Arts at 342-1569.
00 2018-10-25
Natchitoches

AMT Open House Nov. 1


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University and Central Louisiana Technical Community College Natchitoches Campus will host an open house for students interested in the Advance Manufacturing Technician program in which students can earn an associate degree from NSU while taking classes and working part-time at a sponsoring manufacturing facility.



The Open House will be from 5-7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 1 at CLTCC Natchitoches, located at 6587 Hwy. 1 Bypass next to Natchitoches Central High School.



Through the AMT program, participants work in one of six local manufacturing facilities to earn an associate degree from NSU, along with a Certificate in Manufacturing from CLTCC. Participants qualify for the TOPS TECH Award and work three days a week earning $12 per hour. AMT participants gain not only work skills, but also soft skills in written and verbal communication, dress code and interacting with management.



After completing the AMT program, students have the option of applying the associate degree towards a bachelor’s degree in engineering technology at Northwestern State. Program participants must meet eligibility requirements.



Industry partners are Roy O. Martin, Boise Cascade, Alliance Compressors, Stella Jones, Pilgrims and AFCO. The program is supported by the Natchitoches Community Alliance Foundation.



To register for the Open House, visit www.nsula.edu and click on the Advanced Manufacturing Technician Open House link. Information is also available by contacting Cade Stepp at steppj@nsula.edu or (318) 357-4612 or Laurie Morrow at lauriemorrow@cltcc.edu or (318) 357-3162.
00 2018-10-25
Natchitoches

Ribbon-cutting for new NSU Marketplace bookstore Friday


NATCHITOCHES – A ribbon-cutting for Northwestern State University’s newly renovated campus bookstore, the NSU Marketplace, will held at 3 p.m. Friday, Oct. 26. Officials from NSU, the Natchitoches Area Chamber of Commerce and Follett Higher Education will gather for the grand opening event at the store, located at 912 University Parkway across from NSU’s Watson Library.



Students, alumni and the public are invited to attend the event, which will include $10 off of a $50 purchase for all NSU imprinted clothing and gift purchases, along with refreshments, games, prizes and fun for all NSU fans.



Prior to Friday’s ribbon-cutting, on Thursday, Oct. 25, the NSU Marketplace will offer 20 percent off all NSU imprinted gift purchases and a pumpkin painting contest from 2-4 p.m.



NSU announced its partnership with Follett for bookstore operations in February. Follett is a leading provider of education technology, services and physical and digital content and works with 70,000 schools and operates more than 1,250 local campus stores and 1,600 virtual stores. In addition to textbooks, the NSU Marketplace offers NSU merchandise, clothing, supplies, technology and Apple products.



The NSU Marketplace opened for business in August, just prior to NSU’s Fall semester. Renovations for the bookstore at NSU’s Shreveport campus is ongoing. Information about products and services offered can be explored both in-store and online through www.bkstr.com/northwesternstateustore or www.nsulashreveportshop.com.
00 2018-10-25
New Orleans

UNO School of the Arts awarded $100K for Visiting Artist Program


The New Orleans Theatre Association (NOTA) awarded $100,000 to the University of New Orleans School of the Arts for a guest residency program that will bring to the campus professional artists from around the country who will teach master classes in visual arts, theatre, film and music. With this award, NOTA is the sole sponsor of the guest residency program.

According to Charles Taylor, director of the University of New Orleans School of the Arts, visiting artists will complement the expertise of the permanent School of the Arts faculty and at the same time offer students exposure to the lives and experiences of working professional artists.

“Our primary mission is preparing our students to succeed in a competitive professional world,” Taylor said. “While there are many professional artists in New Orleans, it is essential for students to develop a broader conception of artistry and artistic success.

This guest residency program ensures that our students will have the benefit of instruction and interaction with successful professional artists from a variety of disciplines, backgrounds, viewpoints and locations.

“We are grateful to the New Orleans Theatre Association for its generous investment in the UNO School of the Arts and the future of our region’s cultural economy,” Taylor added.

The University hopes to attract a different artist or group of artists each year. The length of stay for each visiting artist will vary depending the artist’s availability and the University’s needs at that time. Over the five-year grant period, each arts discipline—visual arts, theatre, film and music— will be represented at least once.

The New Orleans Theatre Association (NOTA) is a presenter of touring Broadway productions and other live performances. As a nonprofit organization, NOTA channels all proceeds back into the local arts community in the form of grants and other support.

Previous support from NOTA for University of New Orleans projects includes the New Orleans Jazz Celebration’s sponsorship of the Jazz at the Sandbar performance series and an endowed professorship in theatrical arts.

The University of New Orleans School of the Arts ranks among the leading cultural and arts education centers in the Gulf South. Offering instruction in music, film, theatre, visual arts and arts administration, the School of the Arts nurtures creative and intellectual development, fosters collaboration among disciplines, embraces diversity and encourages community engagement.

It also serves the public as a regional center of cultural and intellectual activity with performances, exhibitions, lectures and workshops by students, faculty and guest artists in its galleries and performance spaces.
00 2018-10-25
Ruston

GSU BAND GOING PRO AGAIN


GRAMBLING — The Grambling State University World-Famed Tiger Marching Band has announced its latest NFL halftime performance has been scheduled for one of the league’s highest-rated games on Thanksgiving Day.

During the Nov. 22 contest between the New Orleans Saints and the Atlanta Falcons at the Mercedes Benz Superdome in New Orleans, Grambling State will welcome its longtime Bayou Classic rival Southern University to take the field at halftime.
00 2018-10-24
Baton Rouge

Southern University, Grambling bands to perform at Saints-Falcons Thanksgiving game


You'll be sorry if you head to the kitchen to make that leftover turkey sandwich during halftime of the New Orleans Saints vs. Atlanta Falcons game on Thanksgiving Day.

The halftime show could be almost as exciting as the much-hyped game with performances by Southern University's Human Jukebox and Dancing Dolls, along with Grambling State University's "World Famed" marching band.

The bands will not be performing together, said Southern University's Janene Tate. Both, however, are high-energy units that dazzle with their music, marching and showmanship.

The performances will just whet the appetite of fans.

On Nov. 23, the two bands will face off in the Bayou Classic Battle of the Bands, and then on Nov. 24 both will again perform at halftime of the Bayou Classic game, also in the Mercedes-Benz Superdome.

While the performances at the nationally-broadcast Saints-Falcons game will put the attention on the bands, it's almost business as usual for these two storied programs, both of which have performed at Super Bowls among many other prestigious events.
00 2018-10-24
Houma/Thibodaux

Nicholls cooking school research heads to Washington


When you go out somewhere nice to eat, are you worried about the nutritional qualities of your food or the taste?

A joint study conducted by the Nicholls State University dietetics department and the Chef John Folse Culinary Institute discussing that topic, and other questions, is being presented this week at an annual conference in Washington, D.C.

Brigett Scott, interim assistant dean of the College of Nursing and Allied Health, was set to give a presentation at the 2018 Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo, a three-day conference that ends today. Her research is called “Culinary and Dietetics Collaboration in the Kitchen Healthy Bistro Outcomes.”

“This research is important because we want to make sure we are meeting the needs of all of the customers at Bistro Ruth,” Dr. Scott said. “This helps us understand our customer’s preferences and through this research, we could see people were making health-conscious decisions.”

Culinary and dietetics students teamed up to create a healthy menu option -– fewer than 550 calories, 18 grams of fat, 100 milligrams of cholesterol and 700 milligrams of sodium -– at the popular, student-run Bistro Ruth restaurant on the university’s Thibodaux campus. Dietetic students surveyed 315 restaurant-goers to determine what menu item they chose, why they chose that meal and if they were satisfied with their choice.

Results, taken during the 2017-18 year, found that of the 12.5 percent who chose the modified healthy option, 96 percent were satisfied with their choice. More than one-third of those surveyed made their menu choice based on the protein in the meal.

“The overall health in Louisiana depends on healthier food options being available,” said Chef John Kozar, department head of the Chef John Folse Culinary Institute and co-author of the study. “What this research does is it shows our students that their customers are health-conscious and it’s important to keep that in mind as they advance in the industry.”
00 2018-10-24
Houma/Thibodaux

Nicholls launches $700,000 fundraising campaign


Nicholls State University has launched a campaign to raise $700,000 for various campus programs and upgrades.

“This is a pivotal moment for our campus,” university president Jay Clune said Tuesday in a news release announcing the Nicholls Forward campaign. “I believe this campaign will help advance Nicholls’ position as a top-tier regional university that benefits communities not only in the Bayou Region but also in Louisiana.”

Money raised during the yearlong effort will go toward building maintenance, campus beautification, faculty training and related materials, student scholarships and emergency costs.

“This is going to be a challenging goal to reach, but with more than 40,000 living alumni and even more community support, I believe it’s one we can achieve,” said Jeremy Becker, executive director of the Nicholls Foundation.

Clune has embarked on a campus beautification initiative since taking office in January, having already targeted Ellender Memorial Library, Bollinger Memorial Student Union, Babbington Hall and the Nicholls Greenhouse as facilities in need of renovation or maintenance.

Despite declining or stagnant levels of state funding, Nicholls’ enrollment has grown each of the past three years, now standing at about 6,500 students. Clune has set a goal of 10,000 and said additional scholarships can help recruit students who may not otherwise be able to afford the cost of higher education.

“Our students need access to modern facilities that will maximize their quality of life and enhance their academic potential,” Clune said. “By supporting Nicholls Forward, you are helping ensure that Nicholls continues to provide an education like no other at an affordable cost. ”

Aligning with Nicholls 70th anniversary, donors are encouraged to donate $70 per month over the next 10 months, Becker said.

For information on how you can get involved, visit nichollsfoundation.org/nichollsforward.
00 2018-10-24
Lafayette

UL & USL Choir Alumni Group Sing


The UL/USL Choir Alumni Group Sing (3:30-5pm) and Fall Concert (7pm) will take place on Saturday November 3rd. All alumni are welcome to attend this special night as we honor the memory of past choir director Dr Brian Busch. At the concert the University Chorale, Chamber Singers, and Ragin’ Cajun Women’s Choir will join forces to sing music that evokes dance imagery through song. More information on our UL Lafayette choirs Facebook page and the School of Music website music.louisiana.edu The UL Choirs Alumni Group Sing and Fall Concert. It will take place at Angelle Hall on Saturday, November 3rd from 3:30pm to 5pm.
00 2018-10-24
Lafayette

Former CEO of Ruth's Chris Steak House to speak at UL Thursday


Bill Hyde Jr., a former chief executive officer of Ruth's Chris Steak House, will speak at 6 p.m. Thursday as part of the Louisiana Impact Series hosted by the University of Louisiana at Lafayette's Moody College of Business.

Hyde will speak on "Creating Customer Experiences One Meal at a Time" during the event at the LITE Center Auditorium, 537 Cajundome Blvd. The restaurant veteran is currently CEO of Briarwood West Investments, which focuses on the creation and development of higher-end casual dining restaurant concepts.

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Hyde discuss his journey from UL student to the boardrooms of America's great restaurants, followed by a question and answer session.

Seating is limited. To RSVP, click here.
00 2018-10-24
Monroe

Which La. schools make 'Best Colleges' list, give students a good deal?


WalletHub released its "Best Colleges" list, ranking schools across the country on whether they offer students a good deal — "top-performing schools at the lowest possible costs to undergraduates."

Five Louisiana universities made the financial advising website's top 500.

No. 82: Tulane University of Louisiana
No. 296: Louisiana Tech University
No. 335: University of Louisiana at Lafayette
No. 364: Loyola University New Orleans
No. 438: University of Louisiana at Monroe
WalletHub compared 951 higher education institutions in the U.S. across 30 "key measures," grouped into seven categories, including student selectivity, cost and financing, and career outcomes.

Tulane, a private university in New Orleans, did well in categories like admission rate, student-faculty ratio, graduation rate and post-attendance median salary. Those factors outweighed its low rank in net cost and gender and racial diversity.

READ MORE: What is it like to teach today? We spent a day with a Louisiana teacher, and we were exhausted

It was a morning of excitement for the students who
It was a morning of excitement for the students who were awarded diplomas from the University of Louisiana Monroe at Saturday morning’s Spring 2018 Commencement Ceremony. It was the largest number of diplomas ever awarded in the history of the university totaling 923. (Photo: Emerald McIntyre/ULM Photo Services)

Louisiana Tech in Ruston fared better in net cost and did well in graduation rate, but student-faculty ratio and admission rate held the school back a little.

UL Lafayette scored in the middle of the pack on most categories, including admission rate, on-campus crime and gender and racial diversity. Its lowest score was in student-faculty ratio.

ULM, like other public universities on the list, scored well for net cost but worse in "faculty resources," while the opposite was true for private schools like Loyola and Tulane.
00 2018-10-24
Monroe

Northeast Louisiana College groups stressing the importance of voting during midterm elections


Will young voters make the difference in the midterm elections?


Northeast Louisiana College groups have been stressing the importance of getting out to vote saying it matters.

Many students are either registered to vote or not.

"I just never felt the need to vote to register to vote, so I never really had anyone candidate wise that I've cared to vote for," said James Coker, a ULM student.

"My main reason for voting is not for myself, but for my parents who don't have the right to vote since they are illegal residents and I try to represent them when I vote," said Alfonzo Galvan, a ULM student.

Political experts point to a factor that keeps students or young men and women from voting.

"Commonly many of your candidates do not speak to college students. The issues that they choose to emphasis are not first and foremost on the minds of many 18-29-year-olds," said Dr. Joshua Stockley from ULM Political Sciences.

But with many recent national tragedies, more young men and women are finding their voice.

"Registration increased after the Parkland shooting massacre. One of the reasons was the mobilization of many of these high school students trying to encourage not just people in Florida, but across the nation to registers first and foremost as an electoral weapon," said Stockley.

Several political groups from Northeast Louisiana Colleges have been stressing the importance of voting, including the ULM College Democrats.

ULM College Democrats President, Eli Bell says"If you don't vote, your voice doesn't get heard."

Bell and his group have been making a strong social media presence by getting the word out about voting.

"Many students, they didn't think there was any need to vote until they've seen that there are candidates out there representing them. It's not just a single party, single candidate ballot right now."

The Louisiana Tech College Republicans even stress it to their campus.

"Getting out on campus and getting people registered, that's something we believe in."

A non-profit group "Rock the Vote" says many young people are self-conscious and passionate about their issues.

It's just a matter of helping them.
00 2018-10-24
Monroe

Olive oil's effects on Alzheimer's to be further researched at ULM thanks to a funding grant


MONROE, La. - (10/22/18) Could olive oil be the key to reversing Alzheimer's?

Thanks to a grant, ULM will be able to continue studying the oil using technology developed exclusively at the university.

The research will dive deeper into the effects of the oil on Alzheimer's, other related dementia's, skin conditions, even some forms of cancer.

CEO of Oleolive Kyley Grant says, "It's to commercialize the effort around oleocanthal for Alzheimer's disease and so the phase one, the ground floor in all of that is figuring out does it work in mice, and then moving on beyond that to potentially humans."

Their research aims to make these compounds more available to other researchers, as well as larger consumer brands.

Any revenue generated by this research returns to ULM to fund future projects.
00 2018-10-24
Monroe

GSU students taught what to do in dangerous situations


GRAMBLING, La, (KNOE) - Homecoming is just around the corner and folks at Grambling are trying to make sure people stay safe.

They held bystander training to make sure students and staff know what to do in dangerous situations.

Students and faculty learned about how to handle situations that could end in a bad way and acted them out. They include things such as sexual assault, alcohol abuse, substance abuse, and hazing.

"We're 80 percent likely to help someone in distress if we're by our self and that drops to about 20 percent when other people are around,” said program coordinator, Allison Smith. “Learning to be an active bystander, that being a good bystander, is everyone's job and different ways we can intervene to help keep our family, friends, and community safe."

Organizers say those are the main causes of problems on college campuses.

"It may be as simple as teaching them how to get their keys away from a drunk friend who has had too much to drink or being able to get someone led off to safety who may be in a dangerous situation," Smith said.

Richards says she took a lot from the training. She even learned something she could have done differently in a previous situation.

"I've seen it live and direct,” said Richards. “I had one time went out with our friend to the point where she ended up on top of a vehicle and there was a like a live wire and she wanted to swing on it. We were like 'No! Stop the drinking.' Next time, hopefully, there won't be a next time, we know that we can actually prevent anything from actually happening."

Richards says she wishes more students came to the event because it could have been an eye-opener to others as well.

"You and I can step in as a bystander before it's too late," Richards said.

Organizers say they hope to have another seminar in the spring.
00 2018-10-24
Natchitoches

Candlelight vigil planned for former LSU All-American track star following unexpected death


NATCHITOCHES - Northwestern State University will host a vigil for an All-American college athlete who suddenly died over the weekend.

According to the university's athletic department, friends, family and students will gather on campus Thursday to honor 22-year-old Daeshon Gordon.

A spokesperson said, Gordon, a former track star at LSU, became ill Saturday and was taken to the hospital by her roommate. She died the next morning. Officilas have released few details about the circumstances surrounding her death.

The candlelight vigil will be held at 7 p.m. at Northwestern State’s Walter P. Ledet Track Complex. The ceremony will conclude with NSU track and field student-athletes and coaches leading all participants in a ceremonial victory lap around the oval at the Ledet Complex, with hurdles adorned with black ribbons occupying the inside lane.

Gordon was a two-time All-America hurdler at LSU who transferred to Northwestern State and starred for the Lady Demons in the last two seasons. She won four Southland Conference hurdles championships indoors and outdoors and also ran on a Southland champion 4x100 meter relay team as a senior.
00 2018-10-24
Natchitoches

NSU SGA will host ‘Hidden Figures’ author Nov. 5


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Student Government Association will host an evening with Margot Lee Shettery, author of the book that inspired the film “Hidden Figures.”



Shettery will speak Monday, November 5 at 6:15 p.m. in A.A. Fredericks Auditorium on the NSU campus. The event is free and open to the public.



Shettery is an American non-fiction writer who has also worked in investment banking and media startups. Her first book, “Hidden Figures: The Story of the African-American Women Who Helped Win the Space Race,” is about African-American women mathematicians working at NASA who were instrumental to the success of the United States space program. She sold the movie rights while still working on the book, and it was adapted as a feature film of the same name.



For several years Shetterly and her husband lived and worked in Mexico, where they founded and published Inside Mexico, a magazine directed to English-speaking expats.



“NSU’s SGA sponsors a regular speakers’ series, bringing guests to campus throughout the year to give students a chance to experience different points of view and inspirational messages,” said SGA President Jacob Ellis of Athens. “We invite people to come out to hear this message and feel inspired by this amazing story.”
00 2018-10-24
Natchitoches

NSU presents Homecoming Honor Court


NATCHITOCHES – Rebekah Aultman of Mangham and Char’Tarian Wilson of Shreveport were selected as queen and king of the 2018 Homecoming Honor Court at Northwestern State University. Aultman and Wilson are part of a 22-member honor court, which will participate in activities during Homecoming activities on Oct. 25-27 at Northwestern State and will be presented at halftime of the Homecoming game against Houston Baptist University on Saturday, Oct. 27.



The Homecoming Honor Court also includes Zachary Breaux of Cut Off, Darius Brock, Daniel Crews, Brea Housley and Hayden Pilcher of Shreveport, Rowdy Burleson of Mansfield, Cylandria Clemons of Tomball, Texas, Luke Conway and Hannah Gaspard of Pineville, Kennedy Cullen of Port Allen, Jacob Ellis of Athens, Emilee Leger of Lafayette, Charles McClintock III of Logansport, Emily Miller of Grand Cane, Aaron Murray of Coushatta, Abigail Reynolds of Minden. Le’Kayla Smith of Princeton, Shelby Sullivan of Sulphur, Michael Thomas of Lake Charles and Madysen Watts of Saline.



Aultman is the daughter of Jean and Rick Aultman. She is a senior strategic communications major. Aultman is a member of Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority, the Baptist Collegiate Ministry, the Demon Days Welcome Committee, Demon Volunteers in Progress. She is a member of Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi Kappa Phi, the Order of Omega, Purple Jackets and the President’s Leadership Program. Aultman was a freshman orientation leader.



Wilson is the son of Charles Wilson and Sylvia Wilson. He is a junior biology major. Wilson is a mentor in the President’s Leadership Program and a member of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, the Spirit of Northwestern Marching Band, Demon Days Welcome Committee, the Student Activities Board and Alpha Lambda Delta. He was a freshman orientation leader.



Breaux is the son of Andrea Breaux. He is a junior business administration major. Breaux is co-chair of the Demon Days Welcome Committee and a freshman orientation leader. He is a member of Kappa Alpha Order and Alpha Lambda Delta Honor Society. Breaux is a President’s Leadership Program mentor and a member of the Student Alumni Association. He is a President’s List student.



Brock is the son of Tasha Johnson and Cori Brock. He is a junior business administration major. Brock is president of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc. and a member of the NSU cheerleading squad. He is a member of the Student Activities Board, treasurer of Helping Hands and community service chair for the National Pan Hellenic Council.



Burleson is the son of Robert and Ruth Burleson. He is a senior criminal justice major. He is a member of Kappa Sigma Fraternity and is in the ROTC program. Burleson was on the Demon Days Welcome Week committee and the President’s Leadership Program. He is a member of the Order of Omega and was a freshman orientation leader.



Clemons is the daughter of Cynthia and Landrick Clemons. She is a senior nursing major. Clemons is a member of Phi Mu Fraternity. She was a member of the Student Activities Board, a freshman orientation leader and a Demon Days Welcome Week coordinator.



Conway is a junior business administration major. He is the son of Kevin and Susan Conway. He is president of Kappa Sigma Fraternity and was a nominee for Greek Man of the Year. Conway is a member of Alpha Lambda Delta Honor Society and was a freshman orientation leader. He is a Dean’s List student.



Crews is the son of Kerri Farmer and Paul Crews. He is a junior business administration major. Crews is a member of Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity, Demon Volunteers in Progress and served on the Demon Days Welcome Committee. He is an honor roll student.



Cullen is the daughter of Paul and Celeste Cullen. She is a senior business administration major. Cullen is a member of Phi Mu Fraternity and president of the College Panhellenic Council. She is member of the Student Activities Board, the Student Government Association, Student Alumni Association, Demon Volunteers in Progress and the Demon Days Welcome Committee. Cullen is an honor roll student.



Ellis is the son of Kim and Cathy Grigg and Chris and Cindy Ellis. He is a junior business administration major. Ellis is president of the Student Government Association and a member of Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity. He is a member of Alpha Lambda Delta Honor Society, Phi Beta Lambda and the Demon Days Welcome Committee. He was 2018 Greek Man of the Year. Ellis is a President’s List student.



Gaspard is the daughter of Sharon and Rodney Gaspard. She is a junior biology major. Gaspard is a member of Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority, Purple Jackets, Order of Omega and the Demon Days Welcome Committee. She is a member of Alpha Lambda Delta and Beta Beta Beta honor societies. Gaspard was a mentor in the President’s Leadership Program.



Housley is the daughter of Tiffany Burden. She is a junior health and exercise science major. Housley is vice president of the Student Activities Board, lieutenant officer of the Demon Dazzlers and a member of the National Society of Leadership and Success. She is a Dean’s List student.



Leger is the daughter of Michael and Kelley Leger. She is a senior criminal justice major. Leger is a member of Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority, the Student Government Association and Alpha Lambda Delta and Phi Kappa Phi honor societies. She has written for NSU’s student newspaper, the Current Sauce. She is a Dean’s List student.



McClintock is the son of Charles and Angela McClintock. He is a senior accounting major. McClintock is president of Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity and chaired the Demon Days Welcoming Committee. He is a member of Demon Volunteers in Progress. McClintock is president of the NSU Recruiting Ambassadors and is a President’s List student.



Miller is a junior biology major and the daughter of James and Kathon Miller. She is active in the Baptist Collegiate Ministry and the First Year Experience. She is a member of Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority, Alpha Lambda Delta Honor Society and Tri Beta Honor Society. Miller is a President’s List student.



Murray is the son of Rhonda and Troy Murray. He is a junior psychology major. Murray is active in the Baptist Collegiate Ministry and the President’s Leadership Program. He is a member of Alpha Lambda Delta Honor Society, the Demon Days Welcome Committee and works with the Office of The First Year Experience. Murray is a President’s List student.



Pilcher is the son of Sherry Pence. He is a junior business administration major. He is a member of Sigma Nu Fraternity and is active in the Student Government Association. Pilcher was a freshman orientation leader and a member of the Demon Days committee. He is a President’s List student.



Reynolds in the daughter of Justin and Jenny Reynolds. She is a senior hospitality management and tourism major. Reynolds is a member of Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority, the Demon Days Welcome Committee, Demon Volunteers in Progress and the Student Alumni Association. She is a member of Alpha Lambda Delta, the Order of Omega, Leadership NSU and the President’s Leadership Program. She is a President’s List student.



Smith is the daughter of Shetwan Roberison and Robert Smith. She is a senior elementary education major. Smith is a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. and Helping Hands. She is a National Pan-Hellenic Council delegate. A President’s List student, she was a member of the Student Activities Board, African-American Caucus, NAACP, Demon Days Welcome Committee and Demon N-Siders.



Sullivan is the daughter of Patrick and Karen Sullivan. She is a junior business administration major. Sullivan is a member of Phi Mu Fraternity. Purple Jackets and the University N-Siders. She is a member of Blue Key and Alpha Lambda Delta honor societies. Sullivan was a freshman orientation leader. She is a President’s List student.



Thomas is the son of Mike and Tammy Thomas. He is a senior health and exercise science major. Thomas is a member of the President’s Leadership Program, Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity, the Interfraternity Council, Alpha Lambda Delta and the National Society of Leadership and Success. He is a Dean’s List student.



Watts is the daughter of Ricky and Collette Watts. She is a senior business administration major. Watts is a member of is a member of Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority, the Order of Omega, Purple Jackets, Blue Key, Alpha Lambda Delta and Pi Kappa Phi honor societies. She is a member of the Student Alumni Association and Student Government Association. Watts is a President’s List student.


Members of the 2018 Homecoming Honor Court at Northwestern State University are Michael Thomas of Lake Charles, Le’Kayla Smith of Princeton, Aaron Murray of Coushatta, Emily Miller of Grand Cane, Jacob Ellis of Athens, Shelby Sullivan of Sulphur, Charles McClintock III of Logansport, Hannah Gaspard of Pineville, Luke Conway of Pineville, Emilee Leger of Lafayette, Honor Court King Char’Tarian Wilson of Shreveport, Honor Court Queen, Rebekah Aultman of Mangham, Brea Housley and Darius Brock of Shreveport, Madysen Watts of Saline, Zachary Breaux of Cut Off, Abigail Reynolds of Minden, Rowdy Burleson of Mansfield, , Cylandria Clemons of Tomball, Texas, Daniel Crews of Shreveport, Kennedy Cullen of Port Allen and Hayden Pilcher of Shreveport.
00 2018-10-24
New Orleans

CIvic Symphony, Concert Band join forces for show at UNO


In what is being billed as a “first,” the New Orleans Civic Symphony and the New Orleans Concert Band will perform a joint concert this Sunday on the campus of the University of New Orleans Lakefront.

Charles Taylor, UNO’s director of the arts and chairman of its Music Department, will conduct both groups in a program that is expected to run from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Each group will perform during separate halves of the program.

During the first half, the NOCS will present two pieces — the overture to Gioachino Rossini’s two-act, 1817 opera, “La Gazza Ladra” (The Thieving Magpie), and the Brahms Symphony No. 3, a follow-up to the Brahms Symphony No. 2 which the orchestra performed this past spring.

In the second half, the Concert Band will perform “Vanity Fair” by Percy Fletcher, “Dance Rhythms” by Wallingford Riegger and John Philip Sousa’s “From Maine to Oregon” march. The fourth and final piece will be “Adventures on Earth,” a 15-minute suite from the 1982 film “ET,” composed and originally conducted by John Williams.

Formed under the auspices of the New Orleans Recreational Department in the 1940s, the Civic Symphony has been affiliated with UNO for the past 20 years. It is the oldest continually performing orchestra in Louisiana, and such luminaries as Wynton Marsalis and Harry Connick Jr. have passed through the NOCS ranks.

The Concert Band, dating back to the late 1970s, was founded by Peter Dombourian, the longtime music supervisor for Orleans Parish schools and former band director at Fortier High School.

Both groups are made up entirely of volunteer musicians from the community, and both are conducted by Taylor, also on a volunteer basis.

Taylor, who has been affiliated with the NOCS since 2003, said the orchestra consists of about 50 members and the band has about 70. Seven of the musicians, all of whom are in the woodwind section, perform in both groups, Taylor said.

Commenting on what the experience of conducting both groups on the same program for the first time might be like, Taylor said with a laugh, “I’m going to need oxygen at the end of it."

“With each group, I’m going to have to conduct a little bit differently,” Taylor added. “There’s some music that you don’t have to be quite as intense with but, since each group is doing a short program, everything is pretty intense for the conductor. Both groups are bringing their A-game, so I have to be able to do the same for both of them.”

Conducting the orchestral part of the program, Taylor said, “will probably be a little less strenuous than the band portion. Conducting an orchestra through earlier music is a little more straightforward. It’s not as rhythmically complicated as later music, and the John Williams piece is quite complex. But, on the other hand, the Brahms 3rd is an incredibly challenging piece as well, so this is going to be a real exercise for me.

“But I’m looking forward to this concert,” Taylor said. “It’ll be nice to bring audiences from both groups together. And it’ll also be nice to bring both groups together so they can hear each other perform and support each other. Both of them are community music groups, and highlighting the importance of community music-making is a big part of what we do here.”

Following this performance, the NOCS will present four more concerts during the current season — in December, March, May and June. More details will be announced as the dates get closer.

************************

New Orleans Civic Symphony/New Orleans Concert Band

WHEN: 2 p.m. Sunday

WHERE: Recital Hall, first floor, UNO Performing Arts Center, University of New Orleans Lakefront Campus

Free

INFO: neworleanscivicsymphony.org
00 2018-10-24
Regional/National

A Message to College Leaders: Don’t Overlook Resources Right Under Your Nose


I’m Goldie Blumenstyk, a senior writer at The Chronicle of Higher Education covering innovation in and around academe. For more than two years, I’ve been curating the weekly Re:Learning newsletter. Now I’m using it to share my observations on the people and ideas reshaping the higher-education landscape. Subscribe here. Here’s what I’m thinking about this week:

It’s easy to paint higher education as stagnant and unresponsive to changing times and the complexities of students’ lives, but that’s an inaccurate picture. In reality, there are tons of efforts underway — movements, even — that are already making an impact on students and the institutions they attend.

Outside interests, such as foundations and investor-backed startups, often get the credit for stirring the pot on these developments. Of course, their money and clout bring influence. Yet existing projects can also be enormously important too. Innovation-minded college leaders overlook them at their peril.

I was reminded of both of those realities last week at the California State University system’s Graduation Initiative 2025 Symposium.

I was invited to give a short talk on key national trends that could affect student success. From a long list of possibilities (among them: competency-based education, stackable credentials, experiential and problem-based learning, MOOCS — yes, MOOCs, they’re still a thing), I chose five:

Data, disaggregated: By this I mean the push to look under the hood at student data to see how certain policies might be affecting students differently depending not only on their socioeconomic status but also on their race, ethnicity, and personal situation. This is not exactly a movement yet, and it’s an approach that can be fraught with unintended consequences. But as groups like the Education Trust have argued, disparities in educational attainment aren’t all explained by income levels.

Social-mobility metrics: Thanks to researchers like Raj Chetty and the Equality of Opportunity Project, we know a lot more these days about which colleges are engines of social mobility for their students. (Three Cal State campuses rank among the top 20.) I’m not naive enough to think that these measures will supplant traditional rankings, but I do find it encouraging that social-mobility stats are getting more and more attention in the popular press, and even factored into the latest U.S. News rankings more than in the past. More significantly, social-mobility rankings are catching the attention of education philanthropists.

Data analytics and its limits: For all the valuable information colleges and classroom instructors can glean from the data systems increasingly embedded in their learning-management systems, courseware, and even less-visible sources like wireless networks, many colleges haven’t yet wrestled with the many issues of ethics and privacy that arise from colleges’ embrace of big data. (Regular readers will probably find this theme familiar from a past newsletter.) However useful a data system is in helping a college identify students at risk, or an interactive textbook is in guiding a student through a hard-to-grasp concept, in the end, students aren’t inspired by apps. They’re inspired by people and their passions.

The “embedded for-profit” and hybridized business models: The nature of outsourcing in higher education is changing. It’s no longer just limited to the bookstore or the dining hall. Yet as colleges increasingly turn to outside companies to help them run and market their online programs, develop online advising systems, and manage how employers enroll their employees into academic programs, governance models haven’t caught up. Faculty, in particular, often aren’t deeply engaged in the oversight of these companies and other outside organizations playing a bigger role in activities that are at or near that academic core.

Open educational resources: More and more institutions and instructors are now eschewing textbooks in favor of course materials that they can use free of charge, edit, and remix with other sources. I was especially eager to highlight this trend because of some recent studies showing how OER is becoming a force for affordability (this study, for example, looked at two years of OER at 38 community colleges and found that students saved between $66 and $121 per course), and for better educational outcomes (this study highlighted that lower-income students at the University of Georgia performed better academically thanks to OER).

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I also noted that the OER movement had become a force for change in the textbook-publishing industry. It has led to the creation of new kinds of companies designed to promote open-source content, such as Top Hat, Lumen Learning, and OpenStax, and even prompted some traditional companies, like Cengage, to introduce new pricing strategies.

That’s all true. But as I was reminded after my talk, Cal State itself has actually been at this business for more than two decades, thanks to its own publishing project, known as MERLOT. Founded in 1997 — easily a decade before those other companies were even a glint in their founders’ eye — MERLOT is now an organization of more than 157,000 faculty members, institutions, and university systems that offers more than 80,000 pieces of free peer-reviewed or crowd-source-reviewed course materials.

I owe a debt of thanks to Gerry Hanley, executive director of MERLOT, for buttonholing me after my talk to remind me of the project. I didn’t realize the extent of its reach: More than 59,000 of its members are faculty members, and 50,000 are students. The organization is a repository of OER materials that helps individual professors and institutions evaluate them and make use of them. It works with all 23 Cal State campuses and claims credit for saving students a total of $45 million in textbooks last year. It works with other state systems too, and recently began working with historically black colleges and universities as well, with help from a grant from the Hewlett Foundation.

For me, not knowing about all of MERLOT’s capabilities was just a little bit embarrassing. But it also made me realize how easily college leaders can miss important resources right under their nose — and how costly that can be. Consider, for example, one of the findings from that study I cited above on OER usage at the community colleges: It found that costs for creating a new OER-based course could run from about $12,000 to $18,000 a course, depending on how many people were involved.

OK, maybe those colleges needed each of those courses designed from scratch. Still, when I read that, I found myself wondering whether some of what they created might have already been available via MERLOT or other sources. Sometimes the best innovation is the one that someone else has already pioneered.

What do you think? With the abundance of new educational approaches and ideas now circulating, do you share my impression that “not invented here” syndrome is an all-too- common phenomenon in higher education? Do you see it as a barrier to innovation? A driver of costs? Please share your thoughts — and even better, examples, if you have them. And while we’re at it, if you had to name five trends having the biggest impact on students, tell me what would yours be, and why? I’ll share what you’ve told me in a future newsletter.

Got a tip you’d like to share or a question you’d like me to answer? Let me know at goldie@chronicle.com. If you have been forwarded this newsletter and would like to see past editions or sign up to receive your own copy, you can do so here.

This article is part of:

Re:Learning Newsletter Archives
00 2018-10-24
Ruston

TECH COE CUTS RIBBON


The Louisiana Tech University College of Education cut the ribbon Friday on the Doug and Sandra Boulware SciTEC Learning Laboratory, named after the 2018 CoE Alumnus of the Year and his wife. Pictured left to right are Lindsey Keith-Vincent, Diane Madden, Doug and Sandra Boulware, CoE Dean Don Schillinger, Davy Norris, and Emily Becker Kabbes.
00 2018-10-23
Baton Rouge

'Promise' of college, good job promoted Monday to Baton Rouge high school students


Kendrall Webb rolled her wheelchair to the front of the room Monday morning and posed a question to a panel of leaders of Baton Rouge colleges and universities.

“What’s the minimum ACT requirements to get into one of your schools?” the high school junior asked nervously.

LSU President F. King Alexander explained to Webb how the state’s flagship university is accepting more students these days whose grades or scores on the ACT college placement test are slightly below their admission standards. It’s a move that has provoked criticism, but it got a warm reception Monday from Webb and her classmates at the EBR Career & Technical Education Center, which opened in August.

“We’re going to take a careful look at these students that are on the edge,” Alexander said.

Closer look at LSU's 'holistic' admission policy: Almost double the 'exceptions' allowed
Closer look at LSU's 'holistic' admission policy: Almost double the 'exceptions' allowed
Though the head of LSU argues that the university’s change in admission criteria is leading to an academically stronger class, the percentage …

For instance, students typically need at least a score of 22 on the ACT to get accepted to LSU — the average ACT score is 26 — but the university will make exceptions if it believes the students have potential belied by their standardized test scores, he said.

“We had a valedictorian from a rural high school who was homeless,” Alexander recalled. “Her ACT score is about a point lower than where it should be. She’s now enrolled at LSU.”

For students who are beating the odds — “which I know you’re doing every day,” Alexander told Webb — “we’re going to take a good, careful look at you,” prompting a smile from the teenager.

Alexander spent about 30 minutes answering the students' questions. He was joined by Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome, East Rouge Parish School Superintendent Warren Drake, Baton Rouge Community College Chancellor Larissa Littleton Steib, and Manicia Finch, an associate vice chancellor at Southern University.

University leaders, East Baton Rouge officials sign 'Capital Area Promise' for education
University leaders, East Baton Rouge officials sign 'Capital Area Promise' for education
Political and education leaders from around Baton Rouge signed a "Capital Area Promise" Thursday that they describe as their first effort to "…

They were visiting the new career training center to spread the word about “Capital Area Promise.” This initiative, launched in September, is aimed at putting more Baton Rouge children on the pathway to college and a good career.

The promise is modeled on the “Long Beach College Promise,” an initiative Alexander undertook at his previous job as president of California State University, Long Beach. That was a far-reaching partnership with the Long Beach Unified School District that, among other things, provided for a tuition-free semester at the Cal State campus.

The “Capital Area Promise” is less generous — it’s highlighting existing ways students can get admitted to and help pay for local colleges and universities — but it’s also broader, incorporating a separate initiative by Mayor Broome to bolster early childhood education in East Baton Rouge Rouge Parish.

“We are committed to your success, and we want you to know that,” Broome told the students.

Still waiting on equipment, students, scheduling, a new career high school opens in Baton Rouge
Still waiting on equipment, students, scheduling, a new career high school opens in Baton Rouge
A newly constructed, $17 million career high school opened its doors last week but is still waiting on much of the equipment needed for its tr…

The Career & Technical Education Center is seen as part of this promise because it’s meant to get more students on a better footing after they graduate from high school. A total of 114 teenagers from nine public high schools in Baton Rouge spend half their school day at the new center. They are taking specialized career and skilled trade courses in four areas: computer science, medical fields, construction crafts and manufacturing.

The center, at 2101 Lobdell Blvd., holds its grand-opening ceremony Tuesday at 6 p.m. It also has teamed up with its next door neighbor, Baton Rouge Community College’s new automotive training center, which opened in 2016.

“You are working on the latest and greatest technology, so when you leave here you are ready for your career,” BRCC Chancellor Larissa Littleton Steib told the students. “You’re armed and ready, so I’m very happy for you.”

Superintendent Drake said he expects enrollment at the Career & Technical Education Center will nearly triple by next year, but he wishes he could expand it further.

“I want every student to experience this type of school,” Drake said.

Alexander said persuading political leaders in Baton Rouge and Washington, D.C. to commit to expanding college attendance has been difficult.

“The biggest challenge I have is seeing people climb the ladder of opportunity to get on the boat and then turning around and pulling the ladder up,” he said.
00 2018-10-23
Lake Charles

WWII Service Animals -McNeese State University’s 2018 Fall Sage Series Continues


LAKE CHARLES, LA (KPLC) - The Assistant Director for Collections at the National World War II museum in New Orleans will be in Lake Charles today. Toni Kiser will take you on a journey of the often overlooked service animals putting their lives at risk for jobs they performed and did not return home. As part of McNeese State University’s Fall 2018 Sage Series, this series lecture is based on the book “Loyal Forces: The American Animals of World War II,” co-authored with Lindsey F. Barnes.

The event kicks off at 3 p.m. today at the McNeese Seed Center in Lake Charles.

This is the second of five lectures. It’s open to the public and the cost is $55 for the Sage Series.

Copyright 2018 KPLC. All rights reserved.
00 2018-10-23
Monroe

Shreveport community leader named Louisiana Tech's Business Alumnus of the Year


Joseph B. Psalmonds Jr., of the class of 1973, founder and president of JPJ Investments, has been named Louisiana Tech University’s 2018 College of Business Alumnus of the Year. He was honored alongside fellow distinguished alumni at the Louisiana Tech Alumni Association’s annual Alumni Awards Luncheon Oct. 19.

“We are thrilled to honor Joe’s achievements, generosity, and dedication to the College of Business,” said Chris Martin, dean of the College of Business. “Over the years, he has been one of our biggest supporters — from providing our students with internship and job opportunities to being a founding member of the Dean’s Advisory Board. I am grateful for everything he and his wife, Angie, have done.”

Psalmonds came to Louisiana Tech University on the GI Bill after serving in the U.S. Air Force. The aerial gunner flew 300 missions in Vietnam on an AC119G gunship and received the Distinguished Flying Cross and 10 awards of the Air Medal.


He earned a bachelor degree in business administration in 1973 from Louisiana Tech and went on to graduate from U.S. Air Force Pilot School in 1975. Stationed at Barksdale Air Force Base in Bossier City, Psalmonds flew long-range B-52s.

In 1984, Psalmonds founded JPJ Investments, a professional firm in Shreveport, specializing in financial services, retirement, and estate planning. He graduated from the College of Financial Planning in Denver, Colorado, in 1989, and is a Certified Financial Planner as well as a life member of the Million Dollar Round Table.

As a proud Louisiana Tech alumnus, Psalmonds served as president of the University Foundation Board of Directors from 1995-97, and was appointed a privileged life director in 1998. He is a founding member of the Louisiana Tech College of Business Dean’s Advisory Board and a champion member of the Louisiana Tech Athletic Club. His gifts created the JPJ Investments Endowed Professorship within the College of Business and has provided funding for numerous scholarships.

Psalmonds is active in the community, with previous service as chair of the Greater Shreveport Economic Foundation, vice president of the Shreveport Chamber of Commerce, past president of the Caddo Parish School Board, chair of the YMCA, board member of the Strand Theatre, member of the Caddo Industrial Development Bond Board, and elder at Yellowpine Christian Church in Sibley. In 1995, he was recognized as Volunteer Leader of the Year by the Louisiana Industrial Development Executives Association.

He resides in Shreveport with his wife, Angie, and has three children and nine grandchildren.
00 2018-10-23
Natchitoches

HMT Career Forum Thursday


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Hospitality Management and Tourism program will host a career forum this Thursday, October 25 in the Student Union Ballroom from 12:30-2 p.m. This event is open to all NSU students and will include discussion about professionalism, networking and career goals in general.



Speakers will be Lauren Sharplin of Sharpco Hotels, Tracy Young representing the Shreveport Hilton, Warren Patterson of P.J. Chang’s and Zach Ebarb, Visit Baton Rouge.



Sharplin is employed with Sharpco Hotels Group, a hotel development and management company, where she is currently general manager at Holiday Inn Express and helps oversee the company’s three other Natchitoches properties. She graduated in 2007 from Northwestern State University with a degree in Public Relations and Hospitality Management and Tourism. She earned a degree in Patisserie and Baking from the Le Cordon Bleu Academy in Austin, Texas, in 2009. Lauryn worked as the general manager of the Comfort Suites Hotel since its opening in 2010 until 2017. During that time the hotel was nationally recognized, performing in the top 2 percent of the brand and the winner for Hotel of the Year by the Louisiana Travel Promotion Association.



Sharplin is an active member of the community serving as executive chair for the Natchitoches Parish Tourist Commission, a Chamber Ambassador, founding member of Natchitoches Young Professionals and member of Service League of Natchitoches.



Young graduated with her degree in Hospitality Management & Tourism from NSU in 1997. She completed her internship at the Columns on Jordan Bed and Breakfast, worked in Gulf Coast casinos, and the Louisiana Travel Promotion Association. Currently, Young is the sales manager at the Hilton in Shreveport. She is married to Marty Young and they have two daughters. Young says she cannot imagine being in any other industry. She is passionate about making sure that people have a wonderful time when they visit Louisiana.



Patterson is a 1998 graduate of the Hospitality Management & Tourism program. He was also a member of the NSU Demon Football team from 1994 to 1998. Originally from Bunkie, Patterson has worked for many top restaurants and oil companies in their C-Store division, with his current role being an operating partner at P.F. Chang’s. He is extremely proud to be a graduate of NSU as the university is well respected.



Ebarb, a native of Converse began working at Visit Baton Rouge in April of 2016 as the CVB’s Sports & Convention Sales Manager. His previous roles with the Shreveport-Bossier Convention & Tourist Bureau, Natchitoches CVB, Holiday Inn and Hilton brands provided him with a strong foundation in tourism and hospitality management.



Ebarb earned his Bachelor of Science in Hospitality Management and Tourism from Northwestern State University in 2015. He is a member of the National Association of Sports Commissions, Louisiana Travel Association and Destinations International. In addition, he is involved in event management with the Academy of Country Music. He also serves as an alumni advisor for the NSULA HMT Program and Pi Kappa Alpha-Mu Kappa Chapter. In his free time, Ebarb can be found volunteering in Baton Rouge, playing tennis and attending concerts.



More information on the HMT Career Forum is available by contact Valerie Salter, Assistant Professor at salterv@nsula.edu
00 2018-10-23
Natchitoches

Outstanding Student Research



Four students from the Louisiana Scholars’ College at Northwestern State University – Katie Wakefield, Glendalyn Boothe, Shelby Riedel and Caleb Killer – were co-authors on a research paper with Dr. Massimo D. Bezoari, Richard Lounsbery Professor of Chemistry. The paper was entitled “Anticancer Proteasome Inhibition by Cylindrocyclophanes Using Computational Chemistry” and was published in September (2018) in the peer-reviewed Journal of Undergraduate Chemistry Research. Glendalyn Boothe and Shelby Riedel are currently attending the Scholars’ College; Katie Wakefield graduated in 2018 and is preparing to apply to a physician’s assistant program; Caleb Killer is currently attending UT Houston Dental School.
00 2018-10-23
Regional/National

Grambling and Southern will headline Thanksgiving NFL performance


GRAMBLING, LA – Oct. 22, 2018 – Today, the Grambling State University World-Famed Tiger Marching Band announced its 14 NFL halftime performance has been scheduled for one of the League’s highest-rated games, Thanksgiving Day 2018.

During the November 22 face-off between the New Orleans Saints and the Atlanta Falcons, Grambling State will welcome its long-time Bayou Classic Rival, Southern University, to take the field at halftime.


“It’s always great to get a call from the NFL. Every one of these performances is an honor,” says Dr. Edwin Thomas, Interim Band Director of the World-Famed Tiger Marching Band. “It was an NFL performance that helped recruit me to Grambling years ago. It’s a privilege to be able to share that opportunity with our students and one of our sister schools.”

Affectionately known as the “World Famed,” the students who make up the more than 220-member Band, will join a long legacy of Grambling Students who’ve performed at international marquis events including:

The first Super Bowl half-time performance (1967);
More than 50 NFL performances and 13 Super Bowls;
15 NBA performances including numerous all-star games;
Commercials with major brands including Coca-Cola, ESPN, Cartoon Network; and
Numerous presidential inaugurations domestically and abroad.

The performance, which will air on NBC nationwide, takes place just one-day prior to the 45th Bayou Classic Greek Show and Battle of the Bands competition which will feature both universities at 7 pm on Friday, November 23.
00 2018-10-22
Associated Press

After LSU violated admissions standards, scrutiny increases


Bickering about a few hundred college students at Louisiana State University has mushroomed into a far larger quarrel about lines of authority in state higher education and the autonomy of individual campuses.

The conflict began when LSU President F. King Alexander decided to lessen the use of minimum admissions criteria for first-time students without initially announcing the changes publicly or first getting the official backing of his university system board or the Board of Regents that oversees all higher education policy in Louisiana.

As scrutiny grew, including from Regents' board members, Alexander dug in. He said the Regents don't have the authority to penalize LSU for violating their minimum admission standards and granting more exceptions than are allowed.

That suggestion drew a rebuke from Gov. John Bel Edwards, who said the higher education community should be collaborating, not questioning who's in charge.

"It would be much better for the state, I think, if you didn't have all this playing out in the media, but you actually had higher education leaders sitting down and talking to one another," the Democratic governor said on his monthly radio show.

Edwards added: "Anytime you get the LSU president questioning the authority of the Board of Regents to enforce a policy that it has adopted, I think it's just unfortunate. We can do better than that."



Alexander's comments were reminiscent of years-ago disputes among higher education leaders, including disagreements about authority when the Regents set the first statewide college admissions standards in 2001.

For first-time students entering this fall, LSU reduced its reliance on standardized test scores and grade point averages. The changes drew criticism and prompted a Regents audit of university admissions across the state to determine if schools are obeying the rules.

Speaking to the Press Club of Baton Rouge last week, Alexander described college admissions criteria as a "recommendation from the Regents," rather than a requirement.

Louisiana Commissioner of Higher Education Kim Hunter Reed disagreed, citing the board's constitutional authority: "I don't think compliance with Regents' policy is optional."

Under the Regents' requirements, LSU's incoming freshmen must have a 3.0 high school GPA or a 25 ACT college entrance exam score, with up to 4 percent of the enrolling class allowed exceptions. Other Louisiana colleges have lower admissions standards and larger percentages of allowed exceptions.

Alexander acknowledged LSU breached the Regents' limit of exceptions in its student admissions this fall, with about 295 out of the 5,800 entering freshmen on LSU's main campus not meeting the minimum standards generally required of first-time students.


He defended the approach as following admissions policies at 80 percent of the nation's flagship universities and LSU's freshman class as one of the university's best-performing groups ever. He cited examples of high-achieving out-of-state students who don't meet Louisiana's core curriculum requirements, rural students who only get one opportunity to take the ACT and students whose high school years were disrupted during the 2016 floods as those who deserved consideration outside of the minimum criteria.

"We didn't lower any standards. We just took a closer look at a lot of kids that deserve a little bit closer look because they're from different circumstances," Alexander said. "We're just doing what the rest of the country is doing."

At its meeting this month, the LSU Board of Supervisors passed a resolution supporting the new "holistic admissions" approach that Alexander already had been using. And LSU isn't the only school that appears to have granted more exceptions than allowed under the admissions criteria.

Alexander, however, is the only higher education leader to publicly challenge the Regents' authority on the matter. That approach seemed unnecessary since Reed already agreed with Alexander's broader point that the Regents should revisit the minimum admissions criteria and consider adjustments.


Edwards also said the conversation about tweaking admissions standards was a worthy one - but he added that those talks didn't need to come with public confrontation.

“If there is a better way to govern the admissions process today than was the case 20 years ago and we can learn from the experience of other states, we ought to be sitting down and doing that collaboratively,” he said.

- - -

Story by Melinda Deslatte
00 2018-10-22
Baton Rouge

Former LSU All-American hurdler dies suddenly on Sunday


Daeshon Gordon, a former two-time All-American hurdler at LSU, died suddenly on Sunday morning at the age of 22, according to Northwestern State, where Gordon had been competing.

Gordon had transfered to Northwestern State after two seasons with the Tigers. She finished her collegiate career in the spring, but was still attending classes to finish her education major.

There were no further details available about her death.

"Our hearts go out to Daeshon's family, and to our track and field family, at this extremely difficult time," said Greg Burke, NSU's director of athletics, in a statement from the university. "There are no words to express the feelings that so many have when a young life ends abruptly and much before its time."

Gordon earned two honorable mention All-American honors in the 100 meter hurdles and the 4x100 meter relay at the NCAA Outdoor Championships in June. She set Northwestern State's school record in the 100 hurdles and the 60 meter indoor hurdles.

She was a bronze medalist for her native country of Jamaica in the 2015 Pan Am Junior Games in the 100 meter hurdles. She was working towards a spot on the 2020 Olympic team.

"Daeshon was a fierce competitor and a great teammate," Burke said. "I cherished the connection that she and I had that grew even stronger after she completed her eligibility in June and told me she was determined to be the first female member of her family to earn a college degree. I ask that the NSU Demon family keep Daeshon's family and our track and field program in their thoughts and prayers."
00 2018-10-22
Baton Rouge

Political Horizons: Louisiana's dismal demographic bubble should be part of college admissions conversation


In his early days as governor, John Bel Edwards laid down the law to a gathering of higher education pooh-bahs: He would brook no more bickering, “Not on my watch,” two of the participants in that conversation recalled.

Kumbaya is a heavy lift for academics and that was never more evident than last week. Defending LSU’s unilateral change in admissions standards, President F. King Alexander said higher ed’s overlords had no authority to punish the university for not following the board’s “recommendations.” Commissioner of Higher Education Kim Hunter Reed disagreed, saying the Board of Regents’ 13-year-old “minimum admission standards” were rules that could be enforced.

LSU President F. King Alexander disputes authority of state Board of Regents on ACT flap
LSU President F. King Alexander disputes authority of state Board of Regents on ACT flap
LSU President F. King Alexander said Monday the board that oversees all public colleges in Louisiana doesn’t have the authority to punish the …

But before Regents decide whether to fine LSU — as the Southeastern Conference did for fans flooding the football field at the win against Georgia — she agrees with Alexander that the validity of that criteria needs to be discussed.

Current admission standards seem to favor white kids from good high schools and relatively affluent homes free from divorce, illness and tragedy. If accessibility is really the mission of public education, then such rules could limit students of color, those in rural areas, or whose high school years were disrupted by personal tragedy or natural disasters.

“We took a closer look at a lot of kids that deserved a little bit closer look,” Alexander said in defending the new holistic process that minimizes set-in-stone test scores, grade-point averages, and required courses. “We want the Regents to take a much broader look. Who are these students we’re talking about?”

The Regents board last month launched an investigation to see how many of the 14 public four-year colleges are admitting students considered unqualified under current rules.

Not discussed, higher ed leaders say, is the interplay between “holistic admissions” and the finances of institutions that depend on tuition for about two-thirds of their revenues, and a looming drop in college-aged students.

Here's the thing. Birthrates have been declining for some time, particularly among families who can afford to pay for advanced education. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported two months ago that the numbers of births are at new low, have been declining for a decade, and likely will continue to do so.

“Total numbers of students are headed toward a cliff,” wrote Nathan D. Grawe, an economist at Carleton College. His book, “Demographics and the Demand for Higher Education,” published earlier this year, is on the nightstands of nearly every college president and his findings keep them up at night.

He predicts college enrollment will drop about 15 percent between 2025 and 2029. “Unless something unexpected intervenes, the confluence of current demographic changes foretells an unprecedented reduction in postsecondary demand about a decade ahead,” writes Grawe, whose book energized conversations college leaders have been having for the past several years.

Moody’s Investors Service, one of the big three credit rating agencies, expects 15 small, private liberal arts colleges will close each year starting in 2019 and 2020.

Leaders at public colleges, particularly ones not well supported by their legislatures, are trying to expand the pool of clientele. Online education is one idea. Going after out-of-state and foreign students, who pay full freight, is another.

Keller: Trying to sort out the mess that is LSU, 'holistic admissions,' board of regents...
Keller: Trying to sort out the mess that is LSU, 'holistic admissions,' board of regents...
Is it better to ask forgiveness than permission? LSU President F. King Alexander has pushed that saying to an extreme, unsettling a decades-ol…

Unlike the Northeast, Midwest and much of the South, Louisiana’s birthrates have remained relatively flat with 63,472 in 2006 and 64,385 in 2016. Still, Louisiana can expect about 7.5 percent fewer college students by the mid-2020s. That’s less than the double-digit dips expected in Arkansas, Mississippi and Alabama. However, the bulk of Louisiana births are to families at or near the federal poverty line and have no members who ever attended college.

Alexander says the “right size” for LSU is around 35,000 students, up from about 30,000 now. His chief financial officer, Dan Layzell, told the LSU board of supervisors that the university would need about 37,000 tuition-paying students by 2025 to cover the costs of faculty, research and facilities.

LSU can negotiate its way through the projected drop in prospective students, Alexander said. A demographic blip in the 1980s was avoided when more women started going to college.

Similarly, Alexander said, public higher education should focus on the 40 percent of Louisiana’s high school graduates who don’t seek higher education and on keeping the half who drop out before earning a degree or job training certificate.

That means attracting more students from rural areas and inner cities.

Citing Centenary College in Shreveport as a small, private college that could be endangered by the next decade’s demographic realities, he said that fate shouldn’t befall smaller public schools whose revenues are supplemented by taxpayer dollars. “The advantage McNeese, Nicholls have, is they are affordable and only about 40 percent of their students graduate with debt,” Alexander said.
00 2018-10-22
Baton Rouge

Southeastern's Columbia Theatre to present 'Tapestry: The Carole King Songbook'


Southeastern Louisiana University’s Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts will present "Tapestry: The Carole King Songbook" at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 25.

Columbia Theatre Director Roy Blackwood says the concert, featuring Suzanne O. Davis, is North America’s premiere musical tribute to King.

“Suzanne O. Davis gives an energetic and heartfelt performance along with the Tapestry band and takes the audience on a journey into those great recordings,” Blackwood says. “With songs like ‘It’s Too Late,’ ‘I Feel the Earth Move,’ ‘One Fine Day,’ and ‘Jazzman,’ 'Tapestry' brings back a beautiful flood of music memories with every song.”

The show also includes King’s hits that followed her "Tapestry" blockbuster.

Tickets are $35 in the orchestra or balcony, $45 in the loge and can be purchased at box office, 220 E. Thomas St., Hammond, which is open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, online at columbiatheatre.org or by phone at (985) 543-4371. For more information, call (985) 543-4366.
00 2018-10-22
Baton Rouge

The University of Louisiana at Lafayette Symphony Orchestra to perform its annual Halloween Concert


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette Symphony Orchestra will travel to outer space in its annual Halloween concert at 7:30 p.m. Friday in the Ducrest-Gilfry Auditorium in Angelle Hall on campus.

This year's performance will feature the orchestra's costumed members playing "heavenly body" music, including "Jupiter" from Gustav Holst's "The Planets," "Star Trek: Into Darkness Suite," "Star Wars: The Phantom Menace," "The Theme from ET" and music from "Battle Star Galactica."

There also will be guest appearances by the UL Choirs and UL Opera Theatre.

Audience members also are encouraged to show up in costume.

Admission is $10 for adults and free for ages 17 and younger and all UL students, faculty and staff with identification. All proceeds benefit the UL-Lafayette Orchestra Program. Tickets are available at the door.

For more information, call (337) 482-6012.
00 2018-10-22
Baton Rouge

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards wants higher ed officials to discuss college admissions


Gov. John Bel Edwards waded into the bickering between higher education officials by reiterating that the Board of Regents have the authority to set and enforce admission standards for public four-year universities.

But, he also wants the officials to review those rules.

In defending LSU’s unilateral change to admissions policies, President F. King Alexander said Monday the Board that governs state public colleges, universities and vocational schools had no authority to punish the university for admitting too many applicants who failed to meet the "minimum admissions standards for first-time students" set by the Board in 2001.

LSU President F. King Alexander disputes authority of state Board of Regents on ACT flap
LSU President F. King Alexander disputes authority of state Board of Regents on ACT flap
LSU President F. King Alexander said Monday the board that oversees all public colleges in Louisiana doesn’t have the authority to punish the …

Speaking for the Regents, Commissioner for Higher Education Kim Hunter Reed responded that the 16-member board doesn't make rules they can't enforce.

But before any wrists are slapped, Reed said, the Regents want more information about how many students, unqualified under current rules, were admitted by the state’s 14 four-year universities and how those students are faring. Could be that the admissions criteria needs to be changed, she said.

Regents have set hard requirements but allow universities the flexibility of accepting 4 percent to 6 percent, depending on the institution, of an incoming freshman class who don’t meet the standard. LSU’s freshman class for this academic year included almost twice as many as allowed under the Regents’ exceptions.

LSU quietly started looking beyond set-in-stone test scores and grade point averages. Where once students without a 3.0 GPA and a 22 on the ACT college board test would have been summarily rejected, LSU now looks at other factors to make a decision.

The move has caused much controversy in some quarters who claim the state’s flagship university is letting in unqualified students that could drag down the teaching of the rest.

Alexander, too, wants a conversation among higher ed leaders that would consider whether the admission rules had outlived their usefulness. LSU’s “holistic admissions” policies rely more heavily on essays, recommendations and reviews of course work for students whose grades and college board test scores failed to meet the minimum requirements. Current rules keep out smart students with extenuating circumstances – like having a disability or having their school year disrupted by a flood or a death in the family, Alexander said.

"It was just a process change for us," Alexander said, adding that he doesn't know why LSU officials didn't talk with the Regents about the plans in any depth before implementing the changes.

Edwards said that’s a discussion worth having now.

“If you listen to the explanation for why we should have holistic admissions process, they seem rather genuine and sincere,” the governor wrote The Advocate in an email late Thursday. “You’ve got highly qualified students who may come from a different state, but because their core curriculum is different than ours, they may require an exception. You also have individuals in certain parts of our state who may not have access to a foreign language because they come from a parish that doesn’t offer it in all of their high schools.

“Well, that shouldn’t be a barrier if otherwise that kid is eligible to be at LSU. We also know that there are individuals that go to schools, or we should say come from families, that are going to take the ACT once because they do not have the financial wherewithal to take it multiple times and pay out of their own pocket, and so they may come up a little bit shy. But if their grade point average suggests that they will be successful, and you look at more information around the student, then I think that it would be appropriate to let that student in,” he continued.

Edwards also said these conversations between higher education officials should take place directly and not through reporters.

"It would be much better for the state if you didn't have all this playing out in the media," Edwards said Wednesday on his monthly radio call-in show – his first comments on the brewing controversy. "These conversations need to be taking place between Regents and LSU, and I guess all of the systems. We need to be sitting down and doing this collaboratively and not playing it out in the press."


00 2018-10-22
Lafayette

As You Like It closes at UL


As You Like It, one of Shakespeare’s most beloved comedies, closed today after a week-long run at UL.

Burke Theatre was transformed into France’s Forest of Arden for the play, presented this week to kick off UL’s 2018-19 Performing Arts Season. The next presentation will be State of LA Danse, whick will be November 15 through 18 in the Ducrest-Gilfry Auditorium of Angelle Hall.

Stage manager Erica Feagin said the production was a hit with the audience, and behind the scenes.

“It’s just working wit the actors you know its just being around such a very very friendly cast and being able to collaborate with all the designers and all of my teachers and professors and really just having such a friendly friendly group of people to work with,” Feagin said of her experience.

For more information on the performances planned for this year’s season, click here.
00 2018-10-22
Lafayette

Smithsonian museum the new home for UL Lafayette crustacean collection


More than 100,000 preserved crabs, shrimp, lobsters and other crustaceans collected by University of Louisiana at Lafayette researchers over the past four decades are getting new digs: the Smithsonian Institution.

The UL Lafayette Zoological Crustacean Collection is likely the largest archive of gene sequence-quality marine decapod specimens from the Americas.

It will be relocated to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., under an agreement signed Friday by Dr. Joseph Savoie, UL Lafayette president, and Carol Butler, the museum’s assistant director for collections. A formal transfer ceremony was held in James R. Oliver Hall on campus.

Dr. Darryl Felder worked with graduate students, faculty researchers and other collaborators to build the collection and maintain its specimens, said Dr. Azmy S. Ackleh, dean of the Ray P. Authement College of Sciences.

“He is its patriarch,” Ackleh said, noting the biology professor continued to curate the collection even after his retirement in 2014.

Decapods are a scientific order of crustaceans that encompasses nearly 15,000 species, including lobsters, crabs, crawfish, prawns and shrimp. Five pairs of thoracic legs, equaling 10 limbs, give the order its name; deca is Greek for “10,” while pod means “foot.”

UL Lafayette’s specimens are preserved in more than 18,000 containers. The collection also includes a comprehensive electronic database, research notes Felder made during expeditions, and more than 50,000 photographs he took of specimens before they were preserved.

Felder said the University had a small number of decapod specimens when he became a faculty member in 1975. Expeditions over the next four decades in the Caribbean Sea, the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, and the Gulf of Mexico increased the collection’s size and geographic diversity.

It includes specimens gathered off Cuba, the Bahamas, Mexico, Nicaragua, Belize, Venezuela, Brazil and Colombia, but most are from the Gulf, Felder said.

“Some nations now restrict access to sites that were sampled years ago. What we gathered can’t be duplicated, so they are of exceptional value to researchers today.”

Much of the collection’s significance is molecular, but it isn’t small. Proper preservation in high-grade ethanol has maintained the specimens’ gene-sequence quality. That means researchers can use the samples’ DNA to track how different decapod species are related, their geographic origins and historical trends.

“Many specimens gathered decades ago reflect a moment in time that scientists can use as a baseline to examine changes within crustacean populations in the Gulf and other regions,” Felder said.

For example, researchers used the specimens to perform before-and-after analyses to determine how the 2010 BP oil spill affected Gulf crab and shrimp.

The National Museum of Natural History has about 11.3 million crustacean specimens, said Dr. Rafael Lemaitre. He is the curator of crustacea in the museum’s Department of Invertebrate Zoology.

While UL Lafayette’s collection includes specimens from other locations, Lemaitre said its emphasis on the Gulf of Mexico and the genetic quality of the samples “will fill in some critical gaps” in the Smithsonian’s present holdings.

“This acquisition essentially doubles our holdings from the Gulf. The Smithsonian will now have the most complete representation of decapod species that live there.”

Lemaitre has been affiliated with UL Lafayette as an adjunct zoology professor since 1994. He occasionally accompanied Felder during expeditions in the Gulf and Caribbean to gather specimens. He’ll curate them at the Smithsonian once the collections are merged.

“It’s very satisfying that everything is going to be in one place. The specimens have been superbly maintained and organized. That will ease the process of incorporating the collection into the museum’s holdings,” Lemaitre said.

Smithsonian technicians arrived on campus earlier this week to begin packing the specimens. Dr. Paul Leberg, head of the University’s Department of Biology, said moving the samples from Billeaud Hall to the Beltway will take about eight months.

“The Smithsonian would not accept this collection, or any collection, if its researchers and curators did not believe it had substantial scientific value. Their interest and investment shows the University created something pretty special,” Leberg said.

Felder and his collaborators secured more than $8 million in federal, state and corporate grants since the early 1980s that funded specimen collection and archival maintenance.

Ackleh said the University demonstrated “exceptional stewardship of the collection.”

“This has been Dr. Felder’s life work, and it’s a testament to his determination, the quality of the specimens and the care they were given that the Smithsonian has agreed to maintain the University’s collection in perpetuity.”

(Photo credit: Doug Dugas / University of Louisiana at Lafayette)
00 2018-10-22
Lake Charles

Weekend Scenes


PHOTOS
00 2018-10-22
Lake Charles

Jurassic Pokes theme of McNeese Homecoming


Activities will include trampoline dodgeball, free haircuts, movie showings
Dinosaurs will roam the McNeese State University campus Oct. 21-27 as students, alumni and the community prepare for 2018 Homecoming activities.

“Jurassic Pokes” is this year’s theme and rumor has it the T-Rex will make unscheduled appearances at events throughout the weeklong celebration.

Students will “jump” into homecoming today with a halfnight of wall-to-wall trampolines, trampoline basketball and dodgeball beginning at 7 p.m. at Altitude Trampoline Park.

Several activities are planned for students on Monday.

Free haircuts will be available at Rowdy’s Barbershop 10 a.m.-1 p.m. in the La Jeunesse Room. Students can also battle it out with Laser Tag 11 a.m.-3 p.m. in Parra Ballroom. Special showings of “Jurassic Park” and “Jurassic World” will be held in the Quad 7 p.m. to midnight.

On Tuesday, student volunteers will continue the tradition of giving back as part of “Community Service Day” by working around campus.

Also on Tuesday, students can have one parking ticket “forgiven” thanks to the Student Government Association’s popular “Amnesty Day,” held in La Jeunesse 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Students must bring the original ticket, which may not exceed $25 and must be from this semester to qualify.

Students will slip and slide through a game of “muddy volleyball” as Homecoming’s mucky tradition of oozeball 1-5 p.m. Wednesday on Frasch Hall’s front lawn.

The homecoming parade is scheduled to roll down Ryan Street at 7 p.m. Thursday with more than 100 entries expected. This year’s parade marshals are the Blue and Gold Peerleaders, a student leadership group celebrating 20 years.

Immediately after the parade, the homecoming pep rally will take place inside Cowboy Stadium, where the 2018 Homecoming king and queen will be announced. A fireworks display will follow the pep rally.

On Friday, the 46th annual Alumni and Friends Homecoming Golf Tournament will be held at 11 a.m. at Mallard Cove Golf Course.

On Saturday students and alumni can tailgate outside Cowboy Stadium before the big game.

The student tailgate will be held at 3 p.m. in Lot E while the alumni and Petrochem tailgate will be held 3-5:30 p.m. in the Grove for all Rowdy card and Petrochem members.

The Cowboys will face off against the Central Arkansas Bears at 6 p.m. in Cowboy Stadium. The 2018 Homecoming court will also be introduced at halftime.

Other events taking place during Homecoming week are:

20-year Blue and Gold Peerleader Reunion Dinner on Friday, for information call Karen Westfall at 475-5133 NPHA Greek Mixer on Friday in Parra Ballroom for students and alumni The 64th annual McNeese Rodeo Oct. 26-27 in the Burton Complex — for times and ticket prices call 475-5690 The induction of the 2018 Rodeo Hall of Fame members Saturday in Burton Coliseum The 40th anniversary reunion of the 1978 Southland Conference Championship Cross Country Team The annual 1960s football team reunion.
00 2018-10-22
Lake Charles

Barbara Jeanne Belew is recognized by Continental Who's Who


LAKE CHARLES, La., Oct. 18, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Barbara Jeanne Belew is recognized by Continental Who's Who as a Pinnacle Lifetime Member in the field of Music Education in recognition of her role as Associate Professor of Music at McNeese State University.

Located in Lake Charles, Louisiana, McNeese State University is a learning institution that is dedicated to enhancing the educational development of those they serve.

With over sixty years of experience in the field of Music Education, Barbara Jeanne Belew is commended for her outstanding contributions to the field. Throughout her career, Belew has attained extensive expertise in playing the piano and harp and educating aspiring young musicians.

In addition to teaching piano and harp, Belew has taught several courses in keyboard and harp literature and pedagogy of both instruments, and directs the university harp ensemble. A freelance harp soloist and chamber musician, Belew is the Founder and current Vice President of the Louisiana Chapter of the American Harp Society, and a former National Board of Directors member. Founder of the MSU Harp Camp, Belew created the camp in hopes to inspire young children of all ages from second grade up to learn more about the harp.

Early in her career, Belew attained her Bachelor's degree in Music from Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene, Texas where she graduated with Summa Cum Laude honors in 1951. Thereafter, Belew then went on to obtain her Master's degree in Music from Indiana University – Bloomington in 1953. A Nationally Certified Teacher of Music through the Music Teachers National Association, Belew truly loves what she does.

In an effort to further enhance her professional development, Belew presently serves as Recording Secretary of the Lake Charles Piano Teachers Association (an affiliate of Louisiana Music Teachers Association and MTNA), Harp Camp and is an elite member of the National Board of Directors for the American Harp Society. She also is a charter member and chapter advisor of the Delta Chi Chapter of Mu Phi Epsilon, International Professional Music Society.

In recognition of her professional accolades in the field of music and education, Belew has been named a member of the Delta Kappa Society International, and has been featured in the Who's Who of American Women through the Marquis Who's Who company.

Belew credits her excellent teachers for much of her success. They included: Mattilene Belew (her mother), Dr. E. Edwin Young and concert pianist Sidney Foster, plus Dr. T. W. Dean (in music theory), and harpist Margaret White.

When not working, Belew continues to serve as a Sunday School officer in her church, Trinity Baptist of Lake Charles, LA.

For more information, visit www.mcneese.edu and www.barbarajbelew.com.

Contact: Katherine Green, 516-825-5634, pr@continentalwhoswho.com

SOURCE Continental Who's Who

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00 2018-10-22
Monroe

Ouachita Parish folks going green by cleaning litter near waterways


OUACHITA PARISH, La. (KNOE) - Many Ouachita Parish folks spent Saturday morning going green by cleaning trash near the Ouachita River.

It's part of the annual "Water Sweep" Project, spearheaded by Ouachita Green, which encourages groups to clean litter by the river and other shorelines.

Several teams split up to cover 11 different locations, doing their part to keep the area clean.

ULM students even pitched in by picking up trash along Bayou Desiard before the homecoming game.

"A lot of times when I walk to class we see trash in the bayou. It's a lot for us to have a clean campus and for it to look good to other people," said Lillie Frazier, a ULM student.

"Everything flows downhill into the water system. It goes into our storm drains, into your front yard ditches and will end up into the river somehow. Either the bayou, the river, or the lake and that's just bad for the environment. We just want the waterways clear and clean. North Louisiana has a great natural resource of bayous and lakes. We want people to enjoy that without having to see litter floating into it," said Stuart Hodnett from Ouachita Green.
00 2018-10-22
Monroe

ULM alumni center is testament to decades of devotion, friendship


The Laird-Weems Center on the University of Louisiana Monroe campus stands as a testament to the dedication Billy Laird and Don Weems showed to the institution.

The two men worked together on alumni relations for decades, and their deep friendship continued until Don's death.

"No one could have envisioned what those two guys could do together," Jack Laird said at a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the building on Friday.

He talked about the thousands of miles and hours that Don and Billy spent together to benefit the university.

Billy was executive director of the ULM Foundation from 1967 to 1997. He hired Don, who served in various roles at ULM from 1976 until his retirement in 1999.

Don died on March 29, 2017 after a a five-year battle with multiple myeloma.

Billy can't pick one favorite memory of Don. They were all special. "He had the greatest energy. He was a get up at 4 in the morning and stay up half the night — I miss him so much," he said.


"Billy is here today in person, but I think Don is here in spirit," said DeWanda "Dee" Weems, who was married to Don for 50 years.

She spoke about his passion for the university and how his friend and former ULM coworker, Rick Owens, helped them while Don battled cancer. The year after Don was diagnosed, Rick also had to fight pancreatic cancer. Rick died in 2014.

She said Don and Rick were givers and encouraged the crowd at the ribbon-cutting for the Laird-Weems Center to go out and be like Don and Billy — selfless, loyal men who help build up the community, the university and each other.

Billy said they couldn't have done all that they did without all of the staff and alumni who worked hard with them. "We had great teams all those years," Billy said.

"It's unbelievable for a poor ol' country boy from Tallulah. It's unimaginable — a great, great, great honor," Billy said.

ULM President Nick Bruno thanked the Laird and Weems families and all the donors for making the new structure possible and supporting the campus. He also acknowledged the passing of Tex Kilpatrick, another fervent university supporter, who died earlier Friday morning.

The Laird-Weems Center at 4400 Bon Aire is the new home of the ULM Foundation and Alumni Association team.

In 2014, the ULM Foundation started discussing renovations to the Anna Gray Noe Alumni Center, which was built in 1974.The estimated costs to renovate that structure exceeded the cost of new construction.

The Foundation raised approximately $1.5 million for the new center, and they broke ground on it in October 2017.

Today, it stands on the former site of the Anna Gray Noe Alumni Center on Bayou DeSiard. The two-story building is approximately 9,500 square feet with 6,748 square feet heated.

Dee spread her husband's ashes into the foundation last year.

"So he's looking over things," Billy said.

Dream team: Meet ULM Alumni Association's new director, assistant director

The current team

The ULM Foundation and Alumni Association includes:

Susan Chappell, executive director of ULM Foundation and alumni relations
Melissa Kiper, director of alumni affairs
Jenny Pankey, associate director of alumni affairs
Cindy Foust, coordinator of alumni operations
Morgan Patrick Morgan, Allen Otts and Heather Bryan, development officers
Amanda Jett, coordinator of advancement operations
Lana Ambrose, CFO
Joel Foret, senior accountant
Shaneeka Millicks, accountant
Roxanne Smith, information systems and social media manager
Lynnetta Whitehurst, gifts processor
00 2018-10-22
Monroe

Baptist Collegiate Ministry moves into new home at ULM


There's a new building at the University of Louisiana Monroe campus at the corner of University Avenue and Cameron Street. The $1.4 million structure is the new home for Baptist Collegiate Ministries.

One of the largest student groups on campus has been without a home since its longtime structure was razed in 2015. Construction on the new facility started in June 2017 and took about 15 months. They moved in about a month ago.

Some might view that as the beginning of a well-deserved period of rest. BCM director Chad McClurg is not one of them.

"We see it as the starting point. There's a lot of things we want to do, and now we feel like we've been given a tool to really grow the ministry," he said.

When students walk in the front door, there's a high-ceiling, open space. To the left is a game room with ping-pong tables, and the staff office suite is to the right. The staff can see everyone who comes and goes from the office.

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The center of the building is the multipurpose room, which is where they host worship services and meals.

More: ULM alumni center is testament to decades of devotion, friendship

At 12:01 p.m. Wednesdays, BCM hosts a lunch. Churches provide the food, and the $2 cost supports missions. This was the only part of the program they couldn't maintain while between buildings.

McClurg said doing the lunch program is a historic campus ministry event. Becauce they haven't done it for the past three years, BCM is having to retrain students on why they do it. The campus is getting used to it again; everyone is getting back in the routine.

"For the past three years, we've just been trying to survive. We were trying to build a building and continue the ministry as one of the biggest organizations on campus, and it's just hard. It was a lot harder than I expected," he said.

At 8 p.m. Monday nights, they have a weekly service, Haven, with songs and a lesson. The student worship team leads the music.

The ministry serves 200 to 250 students a week, on average. McClurg said the student mix is about 50-50 between local students and those from outside the region.

"The thing that I am impressed by, have always been impressed by here, is you couldn't tell the difference between a student who is from Baton Rouge and moved up here — or Texas and moved up here — and the local because you get the same amount of involvement," he said.

About half of the leadership team members are local to northeastern Louisiana.

"At a lot of commuter campuses, you don't see that involvement," he said. "But here so many of our students who are local want to invest and want to be on campus and want to be involved in things. That's not just us. I think that's across the campus."

He underscores that BCM isn't an independent island on campus. It's an extension of the church, and a leading goal is to help students find a church home. The students who are happiest, eh said, are the ones who serve.

BCM wants students, churches and alumni to be involved. There's room for everyone to be involved.

"What are your talents and skills and interests? And how could those get put to use here?" he asked.

Over the course of a year, BCM has two full-time staffers and a few interns. That's not enough people to do everything they want to, so McClurg works to develop relationships with people in the community who can help with skills they lack.

It helps that energy efficiencies in the new building save BCM so much money that McClurg might be able to hire additional help.

Five student workers live in apartments in the building. ULM's BCM has apartments in two stories that can house up to eight. Residents pay reduced rent and help maintain the building for a few hours a week. No other BCM in the state has as much housing.

The building is paid for, McClurg said, thanks to donations and benevolence from churches, alumni and friends of the ministry. These people, he said, want to make sure that generations of ULM students to come have access to the same positive

More: Proposed medical school breaks ground at ULM

Looking ahead, he said, the future is cloudy because of tightening budgets.

In other states, collegiate ministries are selling buildings. In the past 12 years, Louisiana Baptists have done nine building programs, including renovations and new construction, he said. Louisiana loves its colleges and college students. There could be complications with the funding, but the support is sincere.

"There was a definite possibility that we would have not got a building. When we had to tear down and move — The plans were there, the idea was there, but if the funds had not been able to be there, it would have not happened. It's something for our area and for this campus and for our churches to be very proud of, I think, not just that this beautiful building exists but that a building exists," he said.

McClurg said they're thankful for the building and grateful to be there, but this is the beginning, not a finish line.

Know more

Go: 1005 University Avenue Monroe
8 p.m. Mondays: Haven is a weekly worship service.
12:01 p.m. Wednesdays: 12:01 is a weekly lunch. The $2 cost goes to suport BCM mission project.
Call: 318-816-4965
Click: https://www.ulmbcm.com/
00 2018-10-22
Monroe

Tex Kilpatrick of Kilpatrick Funeral Homes dies


Tex Kilpatrick, of Kilpatrick Funeral Homes, died Friday morning at age 86.

Funeral arrangements have not been announced at this time.

On Friday, Sam Henry III, Kilpatrick's close friend of more than 50 years, remembered him as a Godly man and pillar of the business community.

"He never hesitated to tell you where he stood on any matter and he never hesitated to tell you that he loved and cared about you," Henry said. "I will personally miss him immensely."

Kilpatrick Funeral Homes was started in Farmerville in 1927 by Tex's parents, Edgar Noel and Effie Kilpatrick.

Tex and his brother Kenneth Dale Kilpatrick later purchased the funeral homes from their father and owned and operated Central American Life Insurance Company in West Monroe for over 50 years.



The life insurance business was purchased by National Guardian Life Insurance Co. of Madison, Wisconsin in 2009.

"He was a gentlemen in every sense of the word," Butch Mulhearn of Mulhearn Funeral Homes said. "He made a tremendous impact on the funeral industry."


Long-time friend Vici French Brumfield said Kilpatrick was a smart, successful businessman with a generous heart.

"Tex Kilpatrick was a man who faithfully lived his values," Brumfield said. "He was devoted to his church, family, friends and community. His character was the foundation of a life well lived."

Kilpatrick and his wife Carole were extremely active in the community.

Both were previously honored by the University of Louisiana Monroe Alumni Association with the George T. Walker Lifetime Achievement Award for outstanding contributions to the university.

ULM President Nick Bruno said Kilpatrick's death is a tremendous loss.

"This is a major loss to the community, the region and of course ULM and me personally," Bruno said. "He was always very supportive of the university. He was very generous with advice when asked, but didn’t offer anything that wasn’t asked of him.

"He will be missed by the university, the community and the region for what he has contributed."

Kilpatrick served on the ULM Foundation Board of Trustees, as well as the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors. He was awarded an honorary doctorate by ULM in 2013.

Kilpatrick Enterprises or its related companies have been members of the West Monroe Chamber of Commerce for more than 50 years. Kilpatrick served as a member of the Board of Directors and president of the board.

"His contributions to the community will be a lasting legacy for future generations," West Monroe Chamber of Commerce President Lila Strode said.
00 2018-10-22
Monroe

ULM awarded $90K to teach drone technology for commercial uses


There is more to flying a drone than maneuvering it through backyard trees, especially when it is being used for commercially.

They are known as drones and also referred to as Unmanned Aerial System (UAS). A UAS has commercial and practical applications which are growing in demand. To meet that demand, the Delta Regional Authority created the program, Workforce Development: Training the Trainer Using Unmanned Aerial Systems.

The University of Louisiana Monroe’s Sean Chenoweth, associate professor of geosciences, was just awarded a $90,000 grant from the DRA for "Training the Trainer" to teach people in northeast Louisiana how to operate a UAS. Once they are trained UAS operators, they can go out and train others.

Chenoweth states in the grant application, “UAS operations have a broad range of applications, such as precision agriculture, infrastructure inspection, conservation, search and rescue missions. There is a need to train groups of UAS users across several industries with a limited amount of resources.”

DRA: Millions in investment will help Louisiana workers, families and communities

John Sutherlin, director of the Office of Sponsored Programs and Research said, "Drone technology is increasingly becoming a tool for emergency responders, law enforcement agencies and environmental companies. This grant demonstrates the importance the federal government places on the research and development of ULM."

ULM will be the center of operations, with 10 parishes in the project — Union, Morehouse, West Carroll, East Carroll, Richland, Madison, Caldwell, Franklin, Tensas and Ouachita.

“One of the main things we want to do is get in touch with ag groups in high schools, such as 4-H and FFA,” said Chenoweth. “We want to get young people interested in agriculture.”

Chenoweth said the money will be used for equipment, which can be quite pricey.

“One UAS can be $2,000 or higher. The camera can be $9,000,” he said.

The project will identify people and groups in northeast Louisiana which would benefit from UAS in their operations. A technical person within that group would be chosen for the initial training. Then, he or she would be able to train their groups. A goal is to identify people in NELA who would benefit from UAS in their work, such as farmers, fire fighters, law enforcement, search and rescue, public utilities, telecommunications and insurance.

“It’s important to reach as many people as possible in northeast Louisiana,” Chenoweth said. “There is incredible potential in this technology and applications for use in many businesses and industries. By moving forward with this project, we are keeping up with the technology, instead of chasing it.”

More: ULM alumni center is testament to decades of devotion, friendship
00 2018-10-19
Baton Rouge



00 2018-10-19
Lafayette

McIlhenny VP tells crowd at UL: 'The key to our success is sticking to our niche'


McIlhenny Co. has has become a worldwide phenomenon over the last 150 years because it's stayed true to its original flavor of Tabasco, executive vice president Harold Osborn told an audience at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette Thursday night.

Osborn, great-great-grandson of founder Edmund McIlhenny, cited two of the key factors behind that success: the traditional formula and keeping the family so heavily involved in the process. The company has stuck to making great tasting sauces that make food better.

"Only family members and the CEO are allowed to pick the seeds we send to Latin America to be grown and somewhere along the line in the production process a family member has inspected every batch," said Osborn, who was speaking as part of Louisiana Impact Series at UL's Moody College of Business.

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"But that sense of family extends to the employees. There are people who have worked for us for five or six generations. We're not just a family-run company. We're a family."

The company has had strong leadership of past CEOs and marketing success. This year Tabasco launched a Scorpion sauce, the hottest sauce the company has made, and the sauce sold out online in less than a day.

"We didn't come out with a new flavor until the early 1990s," Osborn said. "Back in the 1800s, we tried other things like canning seafood, which almost bankrupted the company, but the key to our success is sticking to our niche.

"We make hot sauces. We flavor your food and we make it taste better, and that's what's important. We're not getting out there and making Band-Aids. We're sticking to what we know and staying laser-focused, but adapting to changes in the market."

Osborn also noted the company's international success, from the early days when it was a favorite for British soldiers and how it rapidly spread across Europe to its inclusion in packaged meals for troops and its devoted fans in Japan and other countries around the world.

Tabasco has also become synonymous with adventurers and explorers, he said. He pointed to pictures of bottles on Mount Everest, the International Space Station, in King Tut's tomb at a dinner after its discovery and the spread of it along with military troops as they deployed around the world.

"Tabasco can take bad food and remind you of home," he said. "When you're out in the wilderness and exploring, the food generally isn't that great, but Tabasco can make it taste better. We don't really own the brand anymore. The consumer owns it and has decided what it is. We know we can provide a high quality product and let them decide. That's the key to keeping the brand strong."
00 2018-10-19
Lafayette

Former UL petroleum engineering department head receives honor from SPE


The Society of Petroleum Engineers honored the former head of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette's Energy Institute of Louisiana during its recent meeting at Dallas.

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Ali Ghalambor, who has 40 years of industrial and academic experience in the petroleum industry, was given the SPE/AIME Robert Earll McConnell Award during the group's Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition. The award recognizes those who provide service by engineers who make contributions to the country's standard of living or replenish its natural resource base.

Ghalambor has served as an endowed professor at the American Petroleum Institute and head of the petroleum engineering department at UL. He earned his bachelor's and master's degrees from UL and his PhD from Virginia Tech. He is currently technical adviser at Oil Research Center International.
00 2018-10-19
Lake Charles

McNeese Theatre presents centuries-old play with timeless message


McNeese State University’s 79th theatre season will open with “The Summoning of Everyman” in Tritico Theatre at 7:30 p.m. on Oct. 24 - 27 and at 2 p.m. Oct. 28. “The Summoning of Everyman” is a morality play written in the 15th century and chronicles an individual’s journey to understanding what truly matters in the span of eternity.

Originally written by clergy for an illiterate population, the play seeks to show audience members what is Biblically required to enter heaven. The cast includes four different main actors, two males and two females, in the role of “Everyman” because “even though its “Everyman” it’s mankind. The themes encompass every person on the planet,” said Director Charles McNeely.

Written as an allegory, “Everyman” meets fellowship, kindred, good deeds and knowledge and through the course of those interactions comes to understand the true weight of his time on earth. On his journey to the grave, “Everyman” realizes that ultimately he can only take his good deeds with him to the afterlife, explained McNeely.

Though the play is centuries old its message is timeless, McNeely said. “I think it’s a universal message and I think it’s a universal theme...Everybody ultimately will pass and basically, the bottom line is, you can’t bring anything with you when that time comes.”

He added, however, that teaching the Christian roots of the play is not the ultimate purpose of the production. Rather, the play is intended provoke independent thought within audience members as they consider the implications of the play’s message in their own life. “With the current culture and mind-set of many people, I’m wondering how they’re going to respond...We don’t like to shove anything down someone’s throat. We want to allow them to see something and have their own personal response to it.”

Tickets are $15 for adults and $10 for McNeese faculty/staff, senior citizens, teachers and youth. Tickets are free for McNeese students with a current ID. For tickets or more information call 337-475-5050 or visit www.mcneese.edu/performingartsboxoffice.
00 2018-10-19
Monroe

Louisiana Tech University Theatre presents: "The Groundling"


RUSTON, La (KNOE) - Louisiana Tech University Theatre presents: "The Groundling".


After stumbling upon an outdoor production of a Shakespeare play in
Manhattan, landscaper Bob Malonereturns home inspired to write a play about his troubled marriage. He hires two reluctant New York theatre professional to spend a week at his home and stage the play in his garage with a cast of colorful locals.
00 2018-10-19
Monroe

"Fields of Faith" event brings Christians together and sets a different tone


ULM students and the community came together for faith and fellowship.


It's all part of the nationwide event called "Fields of Faith."

It brings together many Christians for one night, as one body.

"We have decided to do it at ULM so that we can get all our athletes from different schools together as one," said Adebola Shoybi from the Fellowship of Christian Athletes.

The local ULM FCA joined the nationwide movement on the baseball diamond including athletes from Monroe City Schools and Ouachita Parish.

"We're here behind them for prayer warriors or anything that they need."

Having the event on an athletic field sets a neutral rally point.

People even believe it gives a different tone from what's been going on in the sports field.

"We're trying to draw back to what we're all competing for."

The atmosphere of protests and kneeling has shifted athletics.

"I feel like a lot of times it goes away from we are competing for one, and that's for Christ, and people are thinking of other things."

And others agree, there's more to sports.

"God is always the bigger picture, it's not just about the sport, or people get easily caught up in 'this athlete did this or did that, or they're doing this, but also God is the center of everything," said Richarica Mac, a ULM cheerleader.

They also hope this event sends shock waves.

"I think this can be something great, that we can all come together, and make sure that we know who we're competing for."

"We just can't wait to make this a continuing thing."

By putting faith and others first.
00 2018-10-19
Monroe

Warhawks plan to soar during homecoming weekend


University of Louisiana Monroe students and alumni will flock together this weekend for the homecoming game against Texas State.

Kick-off is 6 p.m. Saturday, but until then, the Warhawks will “Soar With Pride" and cap off an activity-filled week that ends Sunday when ULM women’s soccer has its senior day against Troy.

The Alumni Association is hosting two events on Friday. HawktoberFest Beer Tasting is from 5-7 p.m. and the ribbon cutting for the Laird-Weems Center is at 10:30 a.m.

Hawktoberfest features spirits by Flying Tiger Brewery and Marsala Beverage. The festivities will be at the Alumni Association Grove Spot with The Cookout food truck and entertainment by Joe Haydel. Tickets are $10 (https://bit.ly/2C87CLF). Dhildren 12 and younger get in free. There will be root beer for the kids.

The Laird-Weems ribbon cutting officially opens the new home of the ULM Foundation and Alumni Association. Special guest speaker will be Dewanda Weem, who will speak on behalf of the Weems and Laird families.


From 5-5:30 p.m. Friday, the Laird-Weems Center also will host a pep rally and the presentation of the homecoming court. The queen will be crowned at the pep rally.

Don't miss anything:

Friday

10:30 a.m. | Laird-Weems Center Ribbon Cutting Ceremony | Laird-Weems Center, Open to the public, free to attend
8 a.m. - 4 p.m. | ULM Pharmacy Preceptor Conference | 1800 Bienville Dr. Pre-registration is required, call 318-342-3800
4 p.m. | ULM Women’s Soccer vs. Appalachian State | ULM Soccer Complex
4-5 p.m. | Water Ski Showcase | ULM Water Ski Team | Laird Weems Bayou Terrace, open to public, free to attend
5-5:30 p.m. | Pep Rally and Homecoming Court Presentation - Crowning of Queen | Laird-Weems Bayou Terrace
5:30-7 p.m. | HawktoberFest Beer Tasting | Alumni Association Grove Spot
6:30 p.m. | ULM Women’s Volleyball vs. Georgia Southern | Fant-Ewing Coliseum
6:30 - 9 p.m. | Cheer Alumni Social | Fieldhouse Bar & Grill
6:30 - 9 p.m. | Hawkline Alumni Social | Portico
7:30-9:30 p.m. | Reminisce on the Ouachita, College of Pharmacy Alumni | Warehouse No. 1 Restaurant. Heavy hors d'oeuvres provided and a cash bar available
No place like home: ULM relishes return to Malone Stadium

Saturday

8 -10 a.m. | College of Pharmacy Open House, Honoring the "8's" Reunion | 1800 Bienville Dr.
11 a.m. | Alumni Awards Brunch and Homecoming Presentation | Bayou Pointe Event Center
11 a.m. | Softball Home Run Derby | ULM Softball Complex
12 - 6 p.m. | College of Pharmacy Super Tailgate Party | Malone Stadium
1 p.m. | BCM Ribbon Cutting and Dedication | Baptist Collegiate Ministry Building
1 - 5 p.m. | Spirit Group Alumni Tailgate | The Grove
Halftime performance for Hawkline & 3rd Quarter performance for Cheer
3-5 p.m. | Alumni Association VIP Tailgate | The Grove
3:30 p.m. | Hawk Walk and The Walk of Bayou's Best | The Grove
5:30 p.m. | Spirit Item Giveaway Sponsored by CAB | Inside Malone Student Gate
6 p.m. | Kickoff vs Texas State | Malone Stadium
00 2018-10-19
Monroe

Jazmine Sullivan, Keith Sweat and more to headline GSU Homecoming Concert


Grambling State University’s annual Homecoming Concert will feature a record number of national recording artists. Grammy-nominated artists Jazmine Sullivan, Keith Sweat, and Tank will perform along with actress and singer Teyana Taylor at 7 p.m. Nov. 7.

“This year’s homecoming week is projected to be one of our largest in history,” said Marc Newman, the university’s vice president for advancement, research and economic development. “Between our iconic football program, world-famed band, and one of our largest enrollments in recent history we’re already seeing record interest. This year’s artist list is helping to boost ticket sales to what could be a new record.”

In addition to headliners, this year Grambling State will host 2018 finale performance for the Atlantic Records First-Ever Access Granted: HBCU Tour With BET. Atlantic Records will host performances and a signing event featuring four of its top new artists: Bri Steves, Ayanis, RecoHavoc and K’ron.

Grambling State’s homecoming celebration is a joint effort bringing together the campus, alumni groups and the city of Grambling to host more than 7,000 alumni and students.

Marquis events include:

Homecoming Concert

When: 7 p.m. Nov. 2
Who: Teyana Taylor, Jasmine Sullivan, Tank and Keith Sweat
Where: Favrot Student Union
Homecoming Comedy Show

When: 7 p.m. Nov. 1
Who: Comedians Steve Brown, Toya Turn Up, King Keraun, D’Lai and Jennifer Thomas
Where: Favrot Student Union
Homecoming Football Game: GSU vs. Mississippi Valley State University

When: 2 p.m. Nov. 3
Where: Eddie G. Robinson Memorial Stadium (On-Campus)
Price: For non-students, event admission ranges from $15 to $40.
For a full list of events and pricing information, attendees can visit gram.edu/calendar or call Grambling State’s Ticket Office at (318) 274-2629.
00 2018-10-19
Monroe

ULM Online replacing textbooks with digital materials


To help ease the financial burden on students, University of Louisiana Monroe leaders decided to change from expensive commercial textbooks to cost-effective digital books and related materials.

As a result, students will save approximately $340,000 per year.

Known as Open Education Resources (OER), the digital study materials include textbooks, eBooks, software and internet resources.

The ULM Online general education courses will be redesigned to OER first, and later face-to-face classroom core courses will follow.

The projected cost to students for the digital materials is no more than $75 per course.

This can also be used as a marketing tool for the affordability of ULM.

The Office of ULM Online, the ULM Library, and the Office of Extended Learning are overseeing the project, which will rely on faculty/staff members who will form a Faculty Learning Community (FLC) to redesign the courses using OER materials.

The project is funded by the ULM Foundation for $27,000 per year.

For the next three years, 15 faculty members/staff members will be selected to serve on the Faculty Learning Community. These members will research, design, redesign and demonstrate how to use OER materials and create OER courses.

Facilitating the FLC are Director of the Library/Associate Professor Megan Lowe, Interim Director of ULM Online Katie Dawson and Director of Extended Learning Noelle Prestridge.

“This opportunity for faculty to collaborate and build courses using Open Educational Resources will enhance the academic experience of the students at ULM. Collaboration is key to innovation and the efforts of ULM Online, ULM Extended Learning, the ULM Library, and ULM Faculty shows the willingness of this institution to create an affordable and engaging academic experience for all students. Thank you to the ULM Foundation for supporting these efforts,” said Dawson.

The plan is to have all core courses transitioned to OER for incoming students by fall 2020.

Currently, eight courses have been redesigned to use OER materials, COMM 2001, UNIV 1001, ENGL 2005, ENGL 2003, HIST 2002, PHYS 1001, ATMS 1002, ENGL 1001, and ENGL 1002.

ULM Online has identified another 30 lower-level undergraduate courses to be converted over the next two years.

It is hoped as support for OER grows, more upper-upper level undergraduate and graduate courses — both online and in the classroom — can be incorporated.
00 2018-10-19
Monroe

BCM unveils new building on ULM campus


The Baptist Collegiate Ministry (BCM) at ULM opens their brand-new building to the public for a Building Dedication Ceremony on Saturday, October 20, at 1 p.m. An open house will follow at 2 p.m. Light refreshments provided.

Students, parents, alumni, and members of the community are invited to attend.

“We built this building to reach the next generation of Warhawks. We want people to come see what has been accomplished and the bright future of this ministry” Chad McClurg, the BCM Director, said.

The organization has been without a campus facility for three years. The previous structure was built in the early 1970’s but was torn down in 2016 due to structural damage.

For more information, contact Chad McClurg at (318) 816-4965 (office) or 318-450-1953 (cell) or visit ulmbcm.com. The BCM building is located at 1005 University Avenue in Monroe.

The LM BCM is a Christian campus organization supported by Louisiana Baptists that ministers to university students. The organization provides community, a weekly worship service, a campus lunch, and mission service opportunities.

This ministry works in partnership with Southern Baptist churches in the Northeast Louisiana region and is a registered campus organization on the campus of ULM.
00 2018-10-19
Natchitoches

Alpha Beta Alpha Promotes Libraries at NSU


There is a student organization founded by Eugene Watson, the namesake of Northwestern State University’s Watson Library, that is still going strong after over 60 years. Alpha Beta Alpha is a fraternity dedicated to the promotion of library science. The organization was founded at NSU by the librarian Eugene Watson in the 1950’s. The 25 members of NSU’s Alpha chapter carry on the fraternity’s mission with monthly meetings centered around different themes. October’s meeting was held October 18th at the NSU library and, of course featured a Halloween theme. Even Watson, a mannequin who is the library’s mascot, joined in the fun with a wig and little black dress. NSU is joined by Pennsylvania’s Kutztown University in hosting a Alpha Beta Alpha chapter. Scholars’ College sophomore Jean McQuilling is the fraternity’s president.
00 2018-10-19
Natchitoches

Modern in Motion Dancers Transform Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame Building


The NSU Dance Company, a truly remarkable group of talented dancers, presented a unique dance experience at the Northwest Louisiana History Museum and Sports Hall of Fame Tuesday, Oct. 16. The Museum’s distinctive architecture lent a modern flavor to the performances, as dancers moved throughout the museum.

The event began with a tap performance on the outside second story balcony before moving inside for modern dance performances. Every corner of the museum became a stage as the performers flowed throughout the building.

The NSU Dance Company is just one of the many different groups of NSU students discovering and developing their talents in a variety of endeavors. From sports to theater, music and dance, talented young people from our university are all around us. It is a joy to see their performances. The Natchitoches Parish Journal is donating tonight’s photography to the dancers’ families. Feel free to download any you wish.
Modern in Motion will continue with two performances on Oct. 18 and 19 at 7 pm. Tickets are $10 and $5 for FLASH members and students.

Modern-Motion 2018 (1) Modern-Motion 2018 (2) Modern-Motion 2018 (3)

00 2018-10-19
Natchitoches

Call for performers for 10th annual Multicultural Christmas Concert


NATCHITOCHES – The Louisiana Folklife Center at Northwestern State University, the NSU Center for Inclusion and Diversity and the Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts are seeking participants to help celebrate diversity and the cheer of Christmas through the 10th Annual Multicultural Christmas Concert on Tuesday, Dec. 4 in the Treen Auditorium on the LSMSA campus.



Performers including singers, musicians, dancers or readers are welcome to come celebrate this joyous time of the year with the Natchitoches community. All songs, readings, and instrumental performances, sacred or secular, which address Christmas or the Christmas season are welcome. All participants will perform without monetary compensation. The concert is a benefit for Cane River Children’s Services.



Those wishing to participate should contact the Louisiana Folklife Center at (318) 357-4332 or at folklife@nsula.edu by Nov. 9.
00 2018-10-19
New Orleans

UNO athletic director Derek Morel leaves for position with Sugar Bowl; interim AD named


When Derek Morel arrived at the University of New Orleans, he was the fifth athletic director named in the span of three years. Six years later, with his announced departure from the school for a position with the Allstate Sugar Bowl, he leaves with the athletic department on more solid footing.

The university announced the move Thursday (Oct. 18)

“We appreciate the dedication and leadership that Derek brought to our athletic department,” UNO president John Nicklow said in a school release. “The state of our athletic program is obviously much stronger than when he first arrived on campus. Much of that success is due to his hard work and determination. We look forward to building on our current momentum.”

With the Sugar Bowl, Morel will be the executive vice president for sales and marking, according to a Sugar Bowl official. Morel will stay at UNO through the end of the month, the school said.

While at UNO, Morel oversaw the move into the Southland Conference along with facility upgrades at Maestri Field for baseball and at the UNO Lakefront Arena, and the addition of beach volleyball to the university’s portfolio of women’s sports. Also with Morel as AD, the UNO men’s basketball team reached the NCAA tournament in 2017 for the first time in more than 20 years.



UNO will conduct a national search to find a permanent replacement.

Meanwhile, current UNO athletics administrator Vince Granito will serve as an interim AD beginning Nov. 3, pending approval from the University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors.

Granito is currently associate athletic director for internal operations at UNO. He has more than three decades of experience in college athletics, including 19 years of employment at Tulane, where he began as director of ticket operations and worked his way to an associate athletic director role. UNO hired him in 2017.
00 2018-10-18
Baton Rouge

SLU holds annual Career Fair


Southeastern Louisiana University’s annual Career Fair for students and alumni was Sept. 20.


Enter email address
More than 160 employers participated in the event designed to link students with regional and national employers.
00 2018-10-18
Hammond

Southeastern graduate, Springfield native awarded scholarship to continue studies in UK


A 2015 Southeastern Louisiana University English graduate is continuing her studies this fall in the United Kingdom after receiving a prestigious scholarship to study Victorian literature and culture.

Sarah Drago, a native of Springfield, was awarded one of only five Vice-Chancellor Scholarships to attend the master’s program at the University of York in England. She plans to specialize in Victorian literature.

“The University of York has one of the top English programs in the world,” Drago said. “Their Victorian department is especially impressive, as it features several of the most renowned scholars in the field… so this opportunity is a dream come true.”

To be considered for the scholarship, Drago had to submit a personal statement explaining her candidacy for the scholarship, how it would help her achieve future ambitions, and how she planned to cover the remaining tuition fees and living expenses.

The award announcement described the scholarship as one rewarding and encouraging “exceptionally high achieving students by offering a tuition fee discount to those expected to achieve AAA at A-level or a first class undergraduate degree or international equivalents.”

Drago credits Southeastern for preparing her to continue her education abroad, giving special thanks to the university’s English Department and “especially influential” professors Dr. David Hanson, Dr. Ziba Rashidian, and Dr. Joel Fredell.

“If it weren’t for the Southeastern Honors Award and the TOPS program, I would not have had the opportunity to travel and now study abroad,” she said. “Because of Southeastern’s generosity, I was able to travel during my undergraduate career.”

Upon completion of the one-year master’s program, Drago plans to continue her studies at the University of York to earn her doctorate and ultimately begin her career as a professor.
00 2018-10-18
Lafayette

Delta Delta Delta sorority, Sigma Chi fraternity at UL Lafayette suspended during investigation


A sorority and fraternity at UL Lafayette have been temporarily suspended pending an investigation.

UL Lafayette Dean of Students Margarita Perez said Wednesday that Delta Delta Delta and Sigma Chi had been temporarily suspended pending the results of an an investigation.

"The University will take appropriate action, based on the findings of the investigations." Perez said.

Perez did not go into details about the investigation.
00 2018-10-18
Lafayette

UL fraternity, sorority on interim suspension


The Delta Delta Delta sorority and Sigma Chi fraternity and have been placed on interim suspensions pending an investigation, according to a University of Louisiana at Lafayette statement.

Here is the statement released by the University:

Two Greek organizations at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette have been placed on interim suspension pending investigations.

UL Lafayette Dean of Students Margarita Perez said Wednesday that the University has received allegations about Sigma Chi fraternity and Delta Delta Delta sorority.

“We take all allegations seriously and have paused both organizations’ activities while we thoroughly investigate the claims,” she said.

The University will take appropriate action, based on the findings of the investigations, Perez added.

The allegations against both organizations have not been released.
00 2018-10-18
Monroe

Abraham announces $1.12 million for 8 projects


(Press Release) - (10/17/18) Congressman Ralph Abraham, M.D., R-Alto, today announced that eight projects in Louisiana’s 5th Congressional District will receive more than $1.12 million from the Delta Regional Authority (DRA), a federal economic development entity funded and authorized by Congress.
The investments will help support eight projects in Ouachita, Rapides, Lincoln, LaSalle, Concordia and East Carroll parishes.

“This is terrific news for cities and towns throughout my district and Louisiana. From infrastructure improvements to workforce development and new jobs, this funding will make a real difference in the lives of thousands of families in communities across our state,” said Dr. Abraham. “I appreciate the DRA for awarding these funds, and I look forward to continuing to work with all of our federal partners for more investments in the future.”

The 5th District is the largest recipient of a wave of DRA investments in Louisiana. In total, the state will receive $2.6 million from the DRA to support 15 projects that will benefit a combined 11,580 families, provide training for 5,145 workers, and create or retain a combined 204 jobs. Combined total public and private funding for these projects totals more than $34.6 million.

Projects in Monroe will receive a combined $540,000 for three projects. The DRA will invest $300,000 to build an access road to serve the Millhaven Industrial Park and a new manufacturing facility. It will create 40 jobs at a 1.25 million square foot plant that will build and distribute cartons. St. Francis Medical Center will receive $150,000 to help build a new helipad to improve emergency and health crisis response times. The University of Louisiana at Monroe will receive $90,000 to help train 125 workers on unmanned aerial systems that can be used by farmers, firefighters, law enforcement official and public utility companies.

The Town of Vidalia will receive $200,000 to to extend natural gas and broadband connectivity lines to serve the Vidalia Industrial Park and Port Complex. The investments will support an international manufacturing business that will locate its first facility in the United States in Concordia Parish where it will produce spherical graphite used in lithium batteries in electric vehicles. This funding will support five new jobs and workforce training for 20 workers.

The City of Grambling will receive $200,000 to upgrade its wastewater treatment plant, which serves about 1,157 families, a number of businesses and Grambling State University.

The LaSalle General Hospital in Jena will receive $180,528 to help renovate the emergency room and admitting area to help the hospital keep up with its growth as a regional hospital.

The Town of Lake Providence will receive $135,000 to help with sewer treatment improvements. The DRA funds will be used to upgrade the South Pond Sewer Treatment Facility, a 50-year-old pond that is deteriorating and could expose the town to unsafe and unsanitary conditions should it collapse. The investment will improve service for about 1,556 families.

The Town of Ball will receive $100,000 to extend sewer lines to 12 existing homes and create access points for another 90 new homes that will be built in Rapides Parish. About 1,508 families will gain better service.

To read more about these projects and the other projects funded in Louisiana, click here.
00 2018-10-18
Monroe

ULM gets more money for olive oil research on Alzheimers


Entrepreneurial Accelerator Program portfolio company Oleolive has been awarded a $350,000 federal grant to study oleocanthal, a compound found in extra virgin olive oil, and its effects on Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.

The grant from the National Institutes of Health and National Institute on Aging was awarded to the Shreveport-based company, which licensed a University of Louisiana at Monroe technology for extraction of oleocanthal from the oil.

Segue Science Management (SSM) negotiated the licensing agreement, the first technology licensing deal for ULM, and partnered with Oleolive to form a private company to provide high-quality oleocanthal to researchers, develop a consumer product to show the beneficial effects of oleocanthal on the skin, and continue research on oleocanthal’s effects on Alzheimer’s disease by Dr. Amal Kaddoumi, who also received pilot funding from BRF’s Center for Molecular Imaging and Therapy.

Oleolive operations are based out of BRF’s Intertech 1 facility in Segue Science Labs.

SSM, which aims to commercialize scientific technologies discovered in the academic setting, has entered a second-year contract with ULM to commercialize more technology developed at the university. Revenue derived from Oleolive and future licensed technologies returns to ULM in the form of royalties.

Dr. John Sutherlin, Director of the ULM Office of Sponsored Programs and Research commented, “The Office of Sponsored Programs and Research remain very proud of the hard work and brilliance of our faculty. We are so glad to have played a role in taking this project from pure research to applied research with more to come. ULM will continue to look for more opportunities for other researchers.”

Dave Smith, EAP Executive Director, added, “This federal grant further validates the research that is ongoing at ULM and the value of the technology that Oleolive and its founders are bringing to market for researchers and a possible wide range of future applications – from skin conditions to cancer and Alzheimer’s disease.

“This federal grant further validates the research that is ongoing at ULM and the value of the technology that Oleolive and its founders are bringing to market for researchers and a possible wide range of future applications – from skin conditions to cancer and Alzheimer’s disease,” said Dave Smith, EAP Executive Director.

Oleocanthal’s potential health benefits were originally studied by ULM researchers Drs. Khalid El Sayed and Amal Kaddoumi.

Oleolive founders are Kiley Grant, CEO, Drs. El Sayed and Kaddoumi, and former LSU Health Sciences Center Shreveport researchers Drs. Alana Gray, COO, and Jim Cardelli, CTO.
00 2018-10-18
Natchitoches

Engineering Technology presents inaugural Symposium


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Department of Engineering Technology hosted the inaugural Engineering Technology Symposium to connect students with industry partners and raise awareness of job opportunities in central Louisiana. High school groups and NSU students already enrolled in the program learned from a variety of speakers who discussed emerging technologies, STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Mathematics) education, innovative training programs and competencies needed in the work place.



“We are in the business of attracting students, educating them and send them on into their futures,” said Dr. Jafar Al-Sharab, head of NSU’s ET Department. He hopes the symposium, held in conjunction with National Awareness in Manufacturing Month, helped educate participants about advanced manufacturing and its impact on the regional economy.



Input from regional industry partners has played an important role in curriculum development for NSU’s ET program and industry partnerships have provided scholarship, internship and networking opportunities for students.



Organizing the symposium aligns with the Department’s mission of connecting students with industry to promote economic development in Louisiana, where high tech manufacturing is expected to boom in the next decade. There are currently an estimated 2,000 jobs in the central Louisiana region that need to be filled.



Students who attended the symposium heard from faculty at Northwestern State, as well as professors from the University of Louisiana- Lafayette, Southeastern Louisiana University and Central Louisiana Technical Community College; managers from JM Test Systems and Alliance Compressors and economic development leaders from Central Louisiana Economic Development Alliance. Topics included automation and robotics, smart factories, industry advances, additive manufacturing and nanotechnology.



Also as part of National Awareness of Manufacturing Month, the Department will host a lab demonstration in the Engineering Technology lab from 5-7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24.



Information on Northwestern State’s Department of Engineering Technology is available at engrtech.nsula.edu. Tours of the department are available to prospective students by contacting Al-Sharab at (318) 357-6751 or jafar@nsula.edu or Cade Stepp, assistant director of recruiting for Technology and Engineering at steppj@nsula.edu or (318) 357-4612.


Faculty and student volunteers from Northwestern State University’s Department of Engineering Technology presented the inaugural Engineering Technology Symposium Oct. 17 with guest speakers from industry partners and from sister universities. On the front row from left are Caleb Vining, Dr. James Stutts of Southeastern Louisiana University, Dr. Paul Darby of the University of Louisiana-Lafayette, Dr. Margaret Kilcoyne, dean of NSU’s College Business and Technology; Dr. Nabin Sapkota, Jesse Coat and Ariel Shield. On the back row are Guadelupe Mendez, Department Head Dr. Jafar Al-Sharab, Dr. Andy Hollerman of UL-L, Patrick Sprung, Dr. Rafiqul Islam and Dr. Xinjia Chen.
00 2018-10-18
Natchitoches

NSU will honor longtime team physician Dr. Chris Rich at homecoming with N-Club Distinguished Service Award


Dr. Chris Rich, an integral part of the Northwestern State sports medicine program for over three decades, will be presented the Distinguished Service Award by the university’s athletic letterwinners association on Saturday, Oct. 27, at the annual N-Club Hall of Fame ceremony.

Rich, an Alexandria orthopaedic surgeon and businessman, will be among 10 people honored during the 10 a.m. event open to the public in Prather Coliseum.

All-Americans Latrell Frederick and Jermaine Jones, NFL standout Floyd Turner, softball slugger Brandy Kenney, tennis star Barbara Tons and basketball professional Larry Terry will be inducted in the Hall, along with former softball and volleyball coach Rickey McCalister and retired athletic trainer Ed Evans. Becoming the second-ever recipient of the N-Club’s Leadership Award will be venerable NSU vice president Jerry Pierce.

Enshrinement in the N-Club Hall of Fame is the highest honor Northwestern bestows on its former competitors and staff. Those receiving N-Club Hall of Fame recognition are showcased in the brand-new N-Club display in Prather Coliseum.

The 2018 honorees will also be recognized that evening in Turpin Stadium during the Demon football team’s homecoming game against Houston Baptist.

Greg Burke, NSU’s director of athletics since 1996, praised Rich for his far-reaching impact and for his approach to his role with the department.

“Dr. Rich made an indelible mark on the sports medicine profile of the NSU athletic program for many years. Most noteworthy about his partnership with NSU Athletics was his unwavering commitment to the welfare of the student-athlete. He always found a way to work through hurdles with that mindset at the forefront of his thought process,” said Burke.

“To say that I, as an administrator, enjoyed and valued the working relationship I had with Dr. Rich would be an understatement. He is most deserving of this honor based on the contributions he made, in so many ways, to the NSU athletic program and to the field of sports medicine.”

Rich, a native of San Antonio, was a three-year football letterman as an offensive lineman at LSU from 1976-78, part of the Tigers’ fabled “Root Hogs” group that helped College Football Hall of Fame running back Charles Alexander set numerous school and Southeastern Conference records. Rich was a two-time Academic All-SEC selection in 1977-78.

From 1988-2011, Rich was managing partner of Mid State Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Center in Alexandria. In 1990, he became NSU Athletics’ Director of Sports Medicine and Head Team Physician, a role he handled through 2010.

More recently, he has served in a voluntary consulting role with NSU team physicians, the sports medicine staff and the Demons’ athletic administration, monitoring medical and health-related issues which have become impactful in intercollegiate athletics.

Rich also played a key role in promoting best practices and evidence-based medicine, as well as stewardship of financial resources related to medical care for NSU Athletics.

His practice specialized in sports medicine, arthroscopy of the knee and shoulder, and knee reconstruction. During his tenure as the chief physician for NSU Athletics, over 500 student-athletes sustained an injury requiring surgery, with an incredible rate of return to competition of 99 percent.

During his career with Mid State, the firm was twice (2004, 2007) designated as the top firm in Louisiana for orthopaedics by HealthGrades, the “Healthcare Quality Experts.”

Rich was inducted in the Louisiana Athletic Trainers Hall of Fame in 2005, and in 2013 received the Outstanding Leadership Award from the Louisiana Orthopaedic Association.
00 2018-10-17
Alexandria

Nursing Students Recruit Donors to Save Lives


Northwestern State University nursing students are looking for volunteers to cure blood cancers and diseases. It's a service learning project they are doing at the Alexandria campus, but for one student the cause is personal.
00 2018-10-17
Baton Rouge

Louisiana falls in latest ACT score snapshot, stays ahead of Alabama, Mississippi, 4 others


Louisiana slipped from 43rd to 45th nationally on a test of college readiness when the average composite score on the ACT dipped slightly, according to results released Wednesday.

The exam, which measures college readiness, is a key benchmark in gauging academic achievement.

Students are tested on English, reading, math and science.

Results are based on a 1-36 scale and are administered by a nonprofit group in Iowa City, Iowa.

Last year, the composite average for Louisiana was 19.5, good for 43rd in the U. S.

This time the average is 19.2, which put the state in a tie with Arizona.

The results include both public and private school students and are based on a student's last score.

'We are not lowering standards': LSU president makes spirited case for new admission rules
'We are not lowering standards': LSU president makes spirited case for new admission rules
LSU President F. King Alexander on Friday disputed charges that that the school's new admission policy is watering down standards.

The U.S. average is also down, from 21 last year to 20.8 this time, including the District of Columbia.

A total of 1.9 million high school graduates for 2018 took the test.

State Superintendent of Education John White said this year's results are essentially the same as 2017.

White also noted, as he has before, that Louisiana is one of 17 states where all 12th-graders are required to take the test, not just a select few.

States where relatively few students take the ACT, for a variety of reasons, consistently score higher than students in states where everyone takes the exam.

Connecticut, where most students take the SAT, has a composite ACT average of 25.6, tops in the nation.

However, just 26 percent of high school graduates there take the ACT.

Louisiana students finished 12th among states where all students take the exam.

Last year, students finished in a three-way tie with Arkansas and Oklahoma, according to state calculations.

Wisconsin at 20.5 is tops among states where all students take the test.

The state Department of Education issued an eight-page release that touted the merits of requiring all high school graduates to take the ACT.

The state's top school board approved the requirement in 2012, which took effect the next year.

The plan sparked controversy, including charges that it made little sense for students who have no intention of attending college to take the exam.

Since the new rule was approved the number of students meeting the college readiness standard — 21 and above — has risen nearly 40 percent, to 25,673 annually.

"Because more students who perform at relatively low levels are staying in school, the number of testers achieving higher scores has remained constant while the average declined this year," according to the department.

In Louisiana students had the most success with English, where 53 percent of test takers met or exceeded the benchmarks.

However, just 35 percent of students met the standard for reading; 24 percent for math and 25 percent for science.

Nationally, 60 percent of students met the English benchmark, 46 percent reading, 40 percent math and 36 percent science.

Math scores have declined nationally since 2012.

"The negative trend in math is a red flag for our country, given the growing importance of math and science skills in the increasingly tech-driven U. S. and global job market," ACT CEO Marten Roorda said in a written statement.

Louisiana students finished ahead of those in Alabama, Mississippi, Nevada, North Carolina, South Carolina and Hawaii. All of those states, but Hawaii, require all students to take the ACT, and in Hawaii 89 percent did so.

The ACT is at the center of a dispute between leaders of LSU and the state Board of Regents.

Keller: Trying to sort out the mess that is LSU, 'holistic admissions,' board of regents...
Keller: Trying to sort out the mess that is LSU, 'holistic admissions,' board of regents...
Is it better to ask forgiveness than permission? LSU President F. King Alexander has pushed that saying to an extreme, unsettling a decades-ol…

LSU has changed its admission policies so incoming freshmen can now gain admittance even if they score below what used to be a mandatory ACT minimum mark of 22.

Backers contend the new rules allow the school to review a wide range of factors in judging a student's chance for success.

Critics argue that LSU is watering down crucial academic criteria and that doing so will lead to abuses.
00 2018-10-17
Houma/Thibodaux

Nicholls CAN food drive to begin next week




Nicholls State University will begin collecting canned food later this month to donate to area food banks for the holiday season.
The annual food drive, Nicholls CAN, is a campus-wide movement to donate non-perishable food items. The collection will begin Oct. 29 and end Nov. 9. Michael Williams, associate professor of art and coordinator of the food drive, said the goal is to collect one can per student, faculty and staff on the campus, or about 7,000. Last year, the food drive collected and donated 14,386 items.
Annually, more than 5 million households in the United States required the services of a food bank. Louisiana ranks 49th in food security with more than 20 percent of its residents having “limited or uncertain” access to foods, according to a report by Hunger Free America. In Louisiana, an estimated one in four children doesn’t have access to food, according to FeedingAmerica.org.
“I feel that one of the most important things we can do as a university is to give back to our community and this is an example of that,” Williams said. “I feel better knowing that Nicholls is helping secure a meal for a child and their family during the holiday season.”
For information on how to donate, contact Williams at michael.williams@nicholls.edu.





00 2018-10-17
Monroe

Olive oil research at ULM leads to $350K grant, more study on Alzheimer's disease


MONROE, La. - (10/16/18) Entrepreneurial Accelerator Program (EAP) portfolio company Oleolive has been awarded a $350,000 federal grant to study oleocanthal, a compound found in extra virgin olive oil, and its effects on Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.

The grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and National Institute on Aging (NIA) was awarded to the Shreveport-based company, which licensed a University of Louisiana at Monroe (ULM) technology for extraction of oleocanthal from the oil.

Segue Science Management (SSM) negotiated the licensing agreement, the first technology licensing deal for ULM, and partnered with Oleolive to form a private company to provide high-quality oleocanthal to researchers, develop a consumer product to show the beneficial effects of oleocanthal on the skin, and continue research on oleocanthal’s effects on Alzheimer’s disease by Dr. Amal Kaddoumi, who also received pilot funding from BRF’s Center for Molecular Imaging and Therapy.

Oleolive operations are based out of BRF’s Intertech 1 facility in Segue Science Labs.

SSM, which aims to commercialize scientific technologies discovered in the academic setting, has entered a second-year contract with ULM to commercialize more technology developed at the university. Revenue derived from Oleolive and future licensed technologies returns to ULM in the form of royalties.

Dr. John Sutherlin, Director of the ULM Office of Sponsored Programs and Research commented, “The Office of Sponsored Programs and Research remain very proud of the hard work and brilliance of our faculty. We are so glad to have played a role in taking this project from pure research to applied research with more to come. ULM will continue to look for more opportunities for other researchers.”

Dave Smith, EAP Executive Director, added, “This federal grant further validates the research that is ongoing at ULM and the value of the technology that Oleolive and its founders are bringing to market for researchers and a possible wide range of future applications – from skin conditions to cancer and Alzheimer’s disease.”

“This federal grant further validates the research that is ongoing at ULM and the value of the technology that Oleolive and its founders are bringing to market for researchers and a possible wide range of future applications – from skin conditions to cancer and Alzheimer’s disease,” said Dave Smith, EAP Executive Director.

Oleocanthal’s potential health benefits were originally studied by ULM researchers Drs. Khalid El Sayed and Amal Kaddoumi.

Oleolive founders are Kiley Grant, CEO, Drs. El Sayed and Kaddoumi, and former LSU Health Sciences Center Shreveport researchers Drs. Alana Gray, COO, and Jim Cardelli, CTO.

For more information about the company at www.oleo.live and www.super-oli.com.
00 2018-10-17
Natchitoches

NSU opens Health Services Clinic on Shreveport campus


NATCHITOCHES – Faculty and students at Northwestern State University’s Shreveport Campus marked the opening of the Shreveport Health Services Clinic Oct. 16 with tours of the facility and information on the services it provides. The clinic will provide cost effective, convenient, high quality professional health care to address students’ physical, emotional, social and spiritual needs.



The clinic is located in Room 104 LC Building and will be open from 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. Clemy Moore, RN, a 1980 graduate of NSU’s nursing program, will be the full-time nurse on staff at the clinic.



“Starting the clinic was the quality improvement project I used for my doctorate degree. It is very dear to my heart,” said Dr. Anna Morris, an assistant professor in NSU’s College of Nursing who completed her DNP in August and holds the James K. Elrod Endowed Professorship.



The clinic operates in the same manner as the Health Services Clinic on the main campus in Natchitoches and is open to students who paid a student health fee at registration and to any student or staff member who needs quick first aid care.



“Mrs. Stephanie Campbell, director of Health Services, was very helpful in providing information so that we could pattern it after the Natchitoches Health Services,” Morris said. “Students will have free nurse visits, limited free over-the-counter medications and some free testing. We will use the same electronic health records as main campus, so if students transfer between the two campuses, we will be able to see their previous health records. This will provide greater continuity of care for our students.”



The clinic will be operated in partnership with Willis Knighton to offer physician services to students for $20. Students will be able to see the doctor at the clinic twice a month, or at one of the four Quick Care locations around Shreveport-Bossier with the nurse’s referral, Morris said. Once per semester, we will provide an all-day clinic for students to complete their nursing or allied health clinical exams at a reduced price.



“The initial clinic start-up was supported by the James K. Elrod Endowed Professorship that I was awarded,” Morris said. Ongoing support is provided by the student health fee.



“In true NSU fashion, so many people here have helped me with the project in one way or another,” Morris said. “I would like to specifically recognize Dr. Dana Clawson, dean of NSU’s College of Nursing and School of Allied Health; Dr. Geneva Caldwell, NSU graduate faculty; Erica Reynolds, Dr. Clawson’s facilitator; Buddy Melancon and Bubba Baxter from the CONSAH maintenance department; NSU undergraduate faculty Dianna Hill, Kathy Tate and Alyea Pollard; NSU Leadership Dr. Chris Maggio, president; Dr. Vickie Gentry, provost and vice president for academic affairs, and Dean of Students Frances Conine; and Stephanie Campbell, director of NSU Health Services. Outside of NSU, I would like to recognize Lesley Sawrie of Willis Knighton; my husband, Matt; and my sister, Theresa, NSU nursing alumna.”
00 2018-10-17
Natchitoches

NSU Jazz Orchestra will present alumni concert Oct. 26


NATCHITOCHES – Alumni from Northwestern State University’s Jazz Orchestra will perform a special concert on Friday, Oct. 26 at 6:30 p.m. at the Alumni Plaza on the NSU campus. Admission is free and open to the public.

A 21-piece orchestra directed by NSU Associate Professor of Music Galindo Rodriguez will perform. Nearly 20 other former members of the Jazz Orchestra are also expected to attend. The featured performers will be NSU alumni vocalist D’nissa Hester and trumpeter Carlos Ortiz IV.



The Alumni Jazz Orchestra will include saxophones Leslie Loanzon of Gonzales, Marcus Barber of San Antonio, Texas, Ken Miller of Dallas, Jason Morris of Tickfaw and Linda Aguilar of Austin, Texas. The trumpet section is Andrew Bezik of Arlington, Texas, Joel Adair of Palestine, Texas, John Chappell of Nederland, Texas, Daniel Guyton of Baton Rouge and Kazue Seo Takamatsu, Japan. The trombone section will be Eddie Elsey of Zachary, Rance Hawthorne of White Oak, Texas, Cory Knippers of Many, and Brandon Barnes of Vero Beach, Florida. The orchestra will also include Ronald Rodriguez of Cartagena, Colombia, on piano, David Brouillette of New Orleans on bass, Patrick Bordelon of Greenwell Springs on guitar, Jimmy Leach of Longview, Texas, on vibraphone and Curtis Simmons of Marshall, Texas Antoine De Hon of Monroe and Jason Lancaster of Longview, Texas on drums.



Hester is a native of Amarillo, Texas. She holds a Bachelor’s and Master of Music with a concentration in Vocal Performance and Choral Conducting from Northwestern State. She has studied at the Taos Opera Institute under world renowned sopranos Mary Jane Johnson and Linda Poetschke. She has also trained under Dr. Maryann Kyle as a teaching fellow at the International Performing Arts Institute located in Kiefersfelden, Germany. In 2010, she became a member of the NSU faculty teaching voice, theory and piano to music and theatre students. In 2012, Hester was the Louisiana representative at the regional NATSA competition. While at NSU she regularly performs with many ensembles including; the Natchitoches-Northwestern Symphony Orchestra, NSU Jazz Orchestra, NSU Wind Symphony, NSU Percussion Ensemble, as well as multiple faculty recitals and concerts. Also, she performs around the Natchitoches area with the Red River Choral, Kisatchie Sound and can be seen weekly performing with her husband as part of DAT Acoustic Act, a folk/acoustic duo.



Ortiz established himself as a versatile trumpet player performing in numerous jazz, funk and R&B bands in Louisiana as well as in Texas while studying under Rodriguez at NSU. Carlos was also part of the Natchitoches-Northwestern Symphony Orchestra where he was principal chair and co-principal of the NSU Wind Symphony. He was the first recipient of the Dave Hardin Jazz Scholarship and conducted the jazz band on numerous occasions at the Jazz R&B festival in Natchitoches.



After graduating from NSU with a bachelor’s in music, Ortiz went on to pursue his masters in jazz at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh. While at Duquesne, he again established himself as a versatile trumpet player by performing in various groups and forming his own group, Chico’s Quintet. His quintet performed at numerous clubs and private events in the Pittsburgh area and has performed at the Youngstown Jazz Festival and the 2011 Guyasuta Festival in Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania. Chico’s Quintet has also released their debut album “Just Music”, which is comprised of original music written by the members in the band. “Just Music” is available on iTunes, Amazon and Cdbaby.



The Alumni Jazz Orchestra concert is being performed in conjunction with NSU Homecoming Festivities that will take place Oct. 26-27. The concert will follow the opening of an alumni art exhibition in Hanchey Gallery featuring woodworker Michael Wilson.



A full schedule of Homecoming event is available at Northwesternalumni.com.
00 2018-10-17
Regional/National

BPCC and cyber education leader Cybint recognize National Cyber Awareness Month; host educators at elite cyber range competition and workshop


NEW YORK, Oct. 16, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Bossier Parish Community College (BPCC) and global cyber education leader Cybint Solutions, a BARBRI company, have again moved forward to bolster the collective level of cyber expertise within the higher-education market, hosting the Cyber Range Competition and Workshop for educators.

BPCC Cyber Range Event
BPCC Cyber Range Event
The October 12 event was delivered in recognition of National Cyber Awareness Month. Through the competition, deans and professors from leading colleges and universities tested their cyber skills in a fast-paced and challenging competition set within one of the world's most advanced Cyber Range environments. This important group of educators was also privy to a keynote address delivered by Roy Zur, Cybint CEO and global cyber expert. Zur shared an in-depth briefing on current cyber threats, the Dark Web, cyber intelligence, and other timely cyber topics and trends across the cyber landscape.

Participating institutions included Northwestern State University of Louisiana, Louisiana Tech, Louisiana State University (LSU) Shreveport, University of Louisiana Monroe, Louisiana Delta, and event host, Bossier Parish Community College. Representatives from the schools participated in one of two competitions where they faced cyber threats and situations based on real-life scenarios and were challenged to mitigate and resolve them as quickly as possible.

"We were exceptionally pleased and gratified with the success of our first cyber range event to which we invited area businesses," said Dr. Rick Bateman, BPCC Chancellor. "It's a natural extension of that event to now include our education partners in this initiative. The more we partner in cyber education, the more we can collectively benefit our communities, states and nation by raising the level of cyber expertise."

"Stronger cyber education starts with educators," said Zur. "It's exciting for us to see the cyber range event gain traction as more professionals – particularly in education – recognize the need for relevant, hands-on cyber skills training. We look forward to watching the professionals who participated in the event go back and incorporate a higher level of cyber knowledge in their programs."

The two winning teams, Louisiana Tech and LSU Shreveport, each received a complimentary Virtual Dark Web Workshop to be presented by Zur. The schools will also each receive five Cybint scholarships for its Cyber Security Analyst Simu-Lab Suite to be awarded at their respective schools.

"Cyber intelligence was a very important part of this event," said LSU Shreveport participant Rodney Thompson. "It was very well integrated to show how it fits into cybersecurity as a whole. Interesting events like this are important for the cyber community in our area."

"We really enjoyed the experience," added fellow LSU Shreveport participant, James Jackson. "The competition was enlightening and it will be great to introduce students to how real-life technical attacks occur."

Funding for the Cyber Range Competition and Workshop was made possible through a Rapid Response grant through the state of Louisiana.

About Bossier Parish Community College
Bossier Parish Community College is a Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance (2-Year) by the National Security Agency (NSA) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and was designated this past year as the first Center of Workforce Excellence in Cyber Technology in Louisiana.

BPCC offers a number of IT degree options including Cyber Technology, Computer Information Systems, and Systems Administration. For more information about becoming a cyber student or partnering, please contact cyber@bpcc.edu or visit www.bpcc.edu.

About Cybint
Cybint is an international cyber education company, providing training, certifications and learning solutions across the cyber security and intelligence spectrum. At Cybint we believe that protecting our assets, companies, and national security starts with cyber education. That's why we are dedicated to building the most knowledgeable cyber teams for governments, educating the best cyber experts at universities and colleges, and training employees around the world to be aware of cyber threats.

Cybint is a collaboration between military-trained cyber security and intelligence experts and the education experts at BARBRI. Together, we've created programs that address cyber security and intelligence at the individual level – creating a deep and powerful network of cyber expertise that goes far beyond the typical technical expertise.

Contact: Cindy Parks, 1-913-526-6912, cindy@parkscommunications.com

SOURCE Cybint Solutions
00 2018-10-17
Ruston

FLYING INTO THE FUTURE


Ten-year-old Gracelynn Simmons poses atop a Piper Arrow training aircraft at the Louisiana Tech Flight Operations hangar. The Tech chapter of Women in Aviation hosted a Girls in Aviation Day Saturday, in which Tech flight students introduced young girls to the aviation industry and its many career opportunities.
00 2018-10-16
Alexandria

NSU students set out to recruit lifesaving matches for sick patients


ALEXANDRIA, La. (KALB) - Northwestern State University nursing students are finding matches and hope this week.


They are on a mission to recruit more volunteers to cure blood cancers and diseases. It's a service learning project they are doing at the Alexandria campus, at England Airpark, but for one student the cause is personal.

Last spring nursing student Patricia Goodwin's son was misdiagnosed with sciatica.

"We took him to the hospital, they ran every test possible," Goodwin said. "It ended up being leukemia."

Fortunately, chemotherapy pushed the 21-year-old into remission.

"They can't find the cancer, but it doesn't mean it's gone," Goodwin said. "So, he will still get chemo for three solid years."

However, chemo doesn't work for everyone and that is where 'Be the Match' comes in.

The nonprofit's national registry often has more patients than donors.

"Any blood cancer like leukemia or lymphoma," said Life Share Coordinator Jessica Briley. "Blood diseases like sickle cell disease or aplastic anemia."

Briley said one of the biggest factors in finding a match actually comes down to ethnicity, and for minorities those odds are slim.

"If you are African American you have a 23 percent chance of finding a match," Briley said. "If you are Caucasian you have a 77 percent chance. One of our jobs is trying to get people to understand if you are a minority we need you more than ever on the registry."

Briley also said Hollywood's painful portrayal of marrow transplants is misleading. Anesthesia is given to donors, but most of the time doctors want a blood stem cell donation.

"It's just like donating blood," Briley said. "You sit in a chair, we filter stem cells out of your blood. The stem cells are what is given to the patient."

The sign-up process is simple and accessible on the nonprofit's website.

"People wait three months for a match," Goodwin said. "Some people wait three years for a match."

Goodwin hopes educating the public will multiply those matches.

"That is somebody's mom, dad, child or husband," Goodwin said. "It's somebody's something and without a match. Without a match that is their only hope."

The students will hold another registry information session on Thursday, October 18 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

That campus is located at England Airpark. Visit the attached link for more information.
00 2018-10-16
Associated Press

LSU doesn't expect penalty for violating admission standards


Louisiana State University's president said Monday he doesn't believe the state's top higher education board can penalize his school for violating Louisiana's college admissions policy in its enrollment of students who didn't meet minimum criteria.

F. King Alexander wants the Board of Regents to change existing admissions standards put into use 13 years ago, to give schools more flexibility. But he also claimed the Regents lack the authority to punish LSU for granting more exceptions than are allowed under the current policy they started requiring for the state's public four-year universities in 2005.

"We need to take a closer look at what we call an exception," Alexander said. "What do those numbers actually mean?"

LSU reworked its admissions approach for first-time students entering this fall, lessening reliance on standardized test scores and grade point averages. The changes, which weren't initially announced, have drawn criticism as diminishing standards and prompted a Regents audit of university admissions across the state to determine if schools are obeying the rules.

Alexander described the statewide college admissions criteria as a "recommendation from the Regents," rather than a requirement that must be followed.



Louisiana Commissioner of Higher Education Kim Hunter Reed disagreed, citing the board's constitutional authority and saying: "There is no question in my mind about that issue. I don't believe that Regents policy compliance is optional."

But Reed also said state college leaders shouldn't focus on questions of authority as much as they should be deciding whether Louisiana has the right policies in place to help broaden access to higher education and ensure people get the skills they need for employment.

"We have to keep our eye on the bigger conversation," she said.

The Regents divvy up most of the state financing for public college campuses through its funding formula, but Reed said the board has never penalized schools for non-compliance with the admissions criteria.

She said LSU isn't the only school that has granted more exceptions to the admissions criteria, based on historic, self-reported and unaudited data submitted by campuses. This, however, is the first audit the board has required for the numbers.

Until this year, LSU required potential incoming freshmen to have a 3.0 high school GPA and a 22 on the ACT college entrance exam to be considered for admission, with only limited exceptions — a stricter standard than required by Regents.


Under the Regents' requirements, LSU's incoming freshmen must have a 3.0 high school GPA or a 25 ACT score, with up to 4 percent of the enrolling class allowed exceptions. Other Louisiana colleges have lower admissions standards and larger percentages of exceptions allowed.

Alexander acknowledged LSU breached the Regents' limit of exceptions in its student admissions this fall, but he told the Baton Rouge Press Club that the changed approach mirrors admissions policies at 80 percent of the nation's flagship universities.

He said about 295 out of the 5,800 entering freshmen on LSU's main campus didn't meet the minimum standards generally required of first-time students. He pointed to a high school valedictorian who was homeless, a high-performing out-of-state student who didn't meet the state's core curriculum requirements, rural students who only get one opportunity to take the ACT college entrance exam and students whose high school years were disrupted during the 2016 floods as those who deserved consideration outside of the minimum criteria.

"We're taking a closer look at students who deserve a closer look," he said.
00 2018-10-16
Baton Rouge

LSU President F. King Alexander disputes authority of state Board of Regents on ACT flap


LSU President F. King Alexander said Monday the board that oversees all public colleges in Louisiana doesn’t have the authority to punish the university for admitting more students than allowed under the “minimum admission standards for first-time students.”

LSU Board OKs new admission standards that lean harder on essays, recommendations than test scores
LSU Board OKs new admission standards that lean harder on essays, recommendations than test scores
Moving clearly behind university administrators, LSU’s governing body endorsed Thursday a unilateral decision to change admission standards in…

The Board of Regents launched an investigation last month into how many of the state’s public colleges admitted students by exception to the standards with the caveat that once the audit is complete the members then would decide whether the standards need to be changed or whether to the offending colleges should be punished, which could include a loss of money. The Regents dole out to individual universities the state money appropriated by the Louisiana Legislature.

“I don’t think they have the authority to do that,” Alexander told the Press Club of Baton Rouge.

Closer look at LSU's 'holistic' admission policy: Almost double the 'exceptions' allowed
Closer look at LSU's 'holistic' admission policy: Almost double the 'exceptions' allowed
Though the head of LSU argues that the university’s change in admission criteria is leading to an academically stronger class, the percentage …

He likened the Regents’ exception policy to recommendations that need to be discussed rather than rules that can’t be broken. In setting the decade-old policies, the Regents allowed universities the flexibility of admitting students – 4 percent for LSU, 6 or 8 percent for others – who don’t meet the admission standards.

Alexander wrote Commissioner for Higher Education Kim Hunter Reed late last month that 7.5 percent of LSU’s entering class of freshman failed to meet those standards.

Alexander points out, however, that the admitted class, overall, has the highest-grade-point averages and tied with the highest college board test scores in the university’s history. He added that just because the accepted students who didn’t meet the Regents’ standards were admitted, doesn’t mean the students aren’t well qualified.

“We chose students most likely to succeed at LSU,” Alexander said.

Who should get into Louisiana universities? Board of Regents to audit schools' admission standards
Who should get into Louisiana universities? Board of Regents to audit schools' admission standards
The policy-setting board for higher education Wednesday initiated an audit of university admission standards after LSU unilaterally lessened t…

LSU recently adopted admission standards that looks beyond set-in-stone test scores and grade point averages. Where once students without a 3.0 GPA and a 22 on the ACT college board would have been summarily rejected – or asked to appeal the decision – LSU will now look at other factors to make a decision.

The move has caused much controversy in some quarters, including critics who claim the state’s flagship university is letting in unqualified students. Alexander said the more comprehensive look – called holistic admissions – has been adopted by most of the major universities in the country.

Check back with The Advocate for further details

Our Views: Regents should look deeper into LSU's new admissions policies
Our Views: Regents should look deeper into LSU's new admissions policies
As the state’s flagship institution for higher education, LSU’s abandonment of a minimum college board test score for admissions might have co…


00 2018-10-16
Lafayette

UL honors its 2018 Outstanding Alumni


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette Alumni Association has honored a business executive, an educator and an attorney as its 2018 Outstanding Alumni.

The Outstanding Alumni Award is the highest honor UL Lafayette gives to a former student. It is presented for professional and personal achievements that have brought honor and distinction to the University. Graduates and former students who attended no less than 10 years ago are eligible to receive this award.

The trio received the award during a reception that was held Thursday, Oct. 11, at the UL Lafayette Alumni Center. They were also honored at halftime of the Louisiana Ragin’ Cajuns Homecoming game vs. the New Mexico State Aggies on Saturday at Cajun Field.

Donald T. “Boysie” Bollinger earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration in 1971.

Bollinger is chairman and the chief executive officer of Bollinger Enterprises.

He is the former chairman and CEO of Bollinger Shipyards, Inc. The marine construction and ship repair company was founded in 1946 by Bollinger’s father, Donald.

In 1990, President George H. W. Bush appointed Bollinger to the President’s Export Council, the national advisory committee for international trade.

He has been a board member of many companies and organizations. They include the Coast Guard Foundation, Commissioners of the Port of New Orleans, the Louisiana Association of Business and Industry, the Louisiana Board of Regents, the National Ocean Industries Association, and the National World War II Museum.

Bollinger received the C. Alvin Bertel Award for contributions to the Greater New Orleans port area. In 2016, he was inducted into the Louisiana Political Museum and Hall of Fame.

Dr. Herman D. Hughes earned a doctoral degree in computer science at UL Lafayette in 1973.

He holds a bachelor’s degree from Tuskegee University and a master’s degree from Stillman College.

Hughes is professor emeritus of computer science and engineering at Michigan State University. He also was assistant dean of the Graduate School at Michigan State.

Hughes was a math instructor at Tuskegee University and Grambling State University. He frequently serves on national review panels, accreditation boards and committees focused on STEM education. The acronym stands for Science, Math, Engineering and Technology.

Hughes was an engineer at IBM, American Oil, Dow Chemical, and at the avionics research lab at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio.

He is an international leader in network traffic management and modeling for wireless and high-speed networks.

Hughes received Michigan State University’s Distinguished Faculty Award. He was inducted into the Stillman College Educator Hall of Fame.

Warren A. Perrin earned a bachelor’s degree in economics in 1969.

He earned a juris doctorate from LSU in 1972, and is a partner with the firm of Perrin, Landry & deLaunay.

Perrin is a skills professor at Loyola Law School in New Orleans.

In 2013, he donated papers and other materials to UL Lafayette that document his 15-year quest to obtain an official apology from England for the expulsion of Acadians from Nova Scotia in the 1700s. The apology was made on Dec. 9, 2003.

Queen Elizabeth II signed a Royal Proclamation that acknowledged wrongs committed against Acadians and established “A Day of Commemoration of the Great Upheaval” that is recognized yearly on July 28.

Perrin has earned recognition for promoting Acadian culture and history, including helping to launch UL Lafayette’s New Acadia Project. The University’s archeology and anthropology departments are attempting to locate the lost 1765 Acadian settlement on the Bayou Teche.



Photo caption: Warren A. Perrin, Donald T. “Boysie” Bollinger and Dr. Herman D. Hughes are the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s 2018 Outstanding Alumni. They were honored Thursday at a reception at the Alumni Center They were also honored at halftime of the Louisiana Ragin’ Cajuns Homecoming game on Saturday at Cajun Field. (Credit: Doug Dugas / University of Louisiana at Lafayette)
00 2018-10-16
Lake Charles

McNeese State University Homecoming Parade


LAKE CHARLES, LA (KPLC) - McNeese State University is still accepting entries for the 2018 Homecoming Parade.

The event is scheduled to roll down Ryan Street at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 25. The deadline for community entries is 4 p.m. Monday, Oct. 22. This year’s theme is “Jurassic Pokes.”

The entry fee is $50 per unit.

Copyright 2018 KPLC. All rights reserved.
00 2018-10-16
Lake Charles

McNeese Spring registration schedules available


LAKE CHARLES, LA (KPLC) - Class schedules for 2019 Spring registration at McNeese State University are available. You can find those here: www.mcneese.edu/schedule.

Priority registration will begin at 1 p.m. Monday, Oct. 29, for graduate students, seniors, student-athletes and veterans.

Junior priority registration begins at 1 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 30.

Sophomore priority registration begins at 1 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 31.

Registration opens for all students at 1 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 1, and ends Monday, Jan. 7.

Spring classes begin Monday, Jan. 14. To register, students can go online to www.mcneese.edu and click on the “Student Central” icon and then click the Banner Self-Service button to begin the registration process.

For more information about spring registration, you’re asked to contact the McNeese Student Center at 337-475-5065 or 1-800-622-3352, ext. 5065.

Copyright 2018 KPLC. All rights reserved.
00 2018-10-16
Monroe

ULM Water Ski


Video
00 2018-10-16
Natchitoches

NSU student nurses elected to state LSNA offices


Three Northwestern State University nursing students were elected to the 2018-10 Louisiana Association of Student Nurses at the organization’s 64th annual convention held in Marksville Oct. 4-6. From left are Mariah Hester, a 5th level BSN student from Shreveport, who was elected Parliamentarian; Erin Schwartz, a 2nd level ASN student from Leesville, who will serve as Fundraising Coordinator, and Bobby Guichet, a 3rd level ASN student from Leesville, who will serve as Region 1 Director. The convention offered nursing students the opportunities to attend focus session with featured speakers and included an N-CLEX review, exhibitor hall and networking.
00 2018-10-16
Natchitoches

ET Department Head visits Capitol Hill


Dr. Jafar Al-Sharab, head of the Department of Engineering Technology at Northwestern State University, attended the Engineering Technology Leadership Institute in Washington D.C., where he and ETLI leaders visited legislators to advocate for engineering technology education. ETLI is a part of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). Dr. Al-Sharab serves as the ASEE Campus representative at NSU. ASEE is the largest, most diverse and most prestigious engineering education society in the United States. Since 1893, ASEE has been at the heart of engineering education and serves as the networking center among engineering colleges. Attending the ETLI conference was a part of Lockheed Martin grant the Dr. Al-Sharab received to participate in the event. From left are Professor Mingli He, chair of Engineering and Engineering Technology at Metropolitan State University of Denver; Professor Srikanth B. Pidugu, chair of the Department of Engineering Technology at University of Arkansas-Little Rock; Pamela L. Davidson, Senior Policy Advisor at Senator Bill Cassidy’s office; Professor Zeljko “Z” Torbica, Dean of the College of Engineering and Sciences at West Virginia University, and Al-Sharab.
00 2018-10-16
New Orleans

Study gives Louisiana’s public universities failing grade in racial equity


A recent study by the University of Southern California quantifying and evaluating racial equity at the nation’s public colleges and universities placed Louisiana dead last in the country when it comes to collegiate opportunities for and the academic success of Black students on campus.

The report, conducted by the USC Race and Equity Center and titled,” Black Students at Public Colleges and Universities: a 50-state Report Card,” ranked every public, four-year institution of higher education in the country based on four equity factors — representation on campus, gender ratio, degree completion and student-to-faculty ratio — on a four-point scale.

The study then combined the ratings for each school in every state to create a statewide average, from 0 to 4.0, with 4.0 representing the maximum level of representation and success for Black students to gauge the university system’s racial inclusion and progressiveness.

Out of the 50 states, Massachusetts’ public university system earned the highest rating for racial equity and achievement at 2.81 out of 4.0. Louisiana ended up in 50th place, with a ranking of just 1.18.

Broken down into each individual public university in the Pelican State, racial equity ratings ranged from 0.75 for LSU-Alexandria to 1.75 for the University of New Orleans. LSU’s flagship campus in Baton Rouge earned a rating of 1.25, while Nicholls State in Thibodaux received a mark of 1.0.

The next-highest ratings after UNO was a 1.50 given to both LSU-Shreveport and

Northwestern State, while a mark of 1.0 was given to Louisiana Tech, McNeese State, Southeastern Louisiana and UL-Monroe.

LSU Media Relations Director Ernie Ballard responded to the Baton Rouge school’s 1.25 ranking by stressing the values contained in LSU’s diversity statement as
proof that the university places strong emphasis on racial and ethnic inclusion and fairness, a prioritization that continues to reap positive results for LSU’s Black students.

“LSU continues to see more and more successes among its African-American students, including continuing to break the record for awarding the most degrees to African-American students each year at graduation and in bringing in the university’s largest, most diverse incoming freshman class in LSU history this fall,” he said. “LSU is a national leader in a number of other ways, including leading the nation in awarding chemistry PhDs to African Americans.”

Ballard also pointed to “a number of programs focused on helping under-represented populations and minority students achieve success at LSU,” such as the Black Male Leadership Initiative in the Office of Diversity. The BMLI Fellows Program employs mentoring, leadership development academic support to boost retention, graduation and participation rates and connects Black male students with resources on campus.

In addition, Ballard noted, the National Science Foundation this fall awarded LSU more than $2.5 million to support initiatives that encourage and support underrepresented minorities math and science disciplines.

“LSU is the flagship university of Louisiana,” Ballard said, “and we hope that the success we have seen among our African-American student body can be an example to the rest of the state on how we can offer programs and opportunities for all of our students to be successful.”

UNO President Dr. John Nicklow acknowledged that while his institution can always improve when it comes to racial equity and inclusion, he added that UNO continues to make strides in that area.

“Strictly speaking, the study results indicate clear room for improvement, and the University of New Orleans is working toward that end in a variety of ways,” Nicklow said. “This fall, we increased the percentage of African-American students to 18 percent, and we continue to be one of the most diverse campuses in the state when considering all racial and ethnic groups. This is the largest African-American student enrollment in six years, and it represents the largest single year percentage increase since Katrina.”

Nicklow said the 18-percent jump stem from a 27-percent increase in admission applications by Black students; overall, he added, more than a third of UNO’s applications come from African-American prospective students.

“I believe these students recognize our activities to further improve diversity and inclusion on our campus,” Nicklow said.

Like LSU, UNO has implemented a Black male initiative, dubbed MoMENtum, and Nicklow said Privateer Pathways, a co-requisite curricular model, aims to increase campus access by the entire city’s population. Nicklow noted that UNO restarted the Progressive Black Student Union; opened a Diversity Engagement Center last year; and is enhancing hiring practices to ensure diverse candidate pools and boost the total of faculty and staff of color.

“These are only a few examples of ways we are working to better support African-American students on campus,” he said.

Nicholls State President Dr. Jay Clune said his university “is making strides everyday to address issues such as racial progressiveness and inclusion.”

Clune cited several developments and programs directed at improving racial equity on the Thibodaux campus, including the newly-created Colonels Retention of Winners Network, or CROWN, with which Nicholls officials “have set our sights firmly on both recruiting and retaining non-athlete African-American male students. Nicholls is committed to the success of these young men.”

Clune also pointed to initiatives like Tour Tuesday powered by Entergy, which provides underserved students, many of them African-American, a chance to tour campus; and the federal grant-funded Bayou Educational Opportunity Center, located on the Nicholls campus, which “serves to expose individuals of all walks of life to the idea that higher education is within their reach,” he said.

In terms of the USC study’s low statewide ranking for Louisiana public colleges and universities, Clune said diversity programs like the ones offered at Nicholls and elsewhere are important second steps toward greater racial inclusion and equity. The first, and most crucial, step, he said, is financial resources.

“We believe Louisiana is turning a corner from the years of funding reductions for higher education,” Clune said. “Funding our institutions of higher learning is the first step… Having the resources to provide funding for such programs through state support and industry partnerships are critical to making a difference. By making such programs a priority, all of Louisiana will benefit.”

UNO’s Nicklow echoed Clune’s sentiments, addition that public attention must be focused on enhancing opportunities for all students in the state, regardless of ethnicity or gender.

“Our institutions need to recognize that action and targeted support is needed to move the needle,” he said. “That will require investment of time and resources, but also strategy and deployment of best practices. Ensuring access to higher education by students of color will be a critical component of achieving our degree completion goals in the next decade.”

LSU representative Ballard added that “[c]ollectively, higher education institutions in Louisiana are working toward the goal of making Louisiana stronger and more inclusive for all of our populations. We want opportunities for all of Louisiana students to achieve an education at one of our state’s universities.”

This article originally published in the October 15, 2018 print edition of The Louisiana Weekly newspaper.
00 2018-10-16
New Orleans

Audit suggests reducing Louisiana boards and commissions


The number of state boards and commissions in Louisiana is the highest it has been since 2014, according a report released by the Louisiana Legislative Auditor Monday (Oct. 15).

In 2018, Louisiana has 477 board, commissions and similar entities -- 13 more than it did in 2017. From 2014 to 2017, the state had between 458 and 471 boards and commissions, the auditor said.

The number of boards and commissions in Louisiana has been a talking point for fiscal conservatives, who believe the Louisiana Legislature creates too many. The entities sometimes cost the state money, either through salaries or compensation for members who travel to the meetings.

For the current state budget cycle, board and commissions anticipate collectively spending $1.3 million on per diem payments, $1.7 million for salaries and $2.1 million for travel expenses, according to the audit.

Those boards and commissions with the largest, expected expenditures in this fiscal cycle include:

Louisiana Tax Commission, $320,694
Greater Lafourche Port Commission, $232,000
Atchafalaya Basin Levee District Board of Commissioners, $125,576
Greater Baton Rouge Port Commission, $123,000
Louisiana Physical Therapy Board, $116,531
Employment Security Board of Review, $114,542
Louisiana Board of Pharmacy, $109,500
Three state boards didn't cooperate with the auditor, so it's unknown whether they are performing their stated functions or how much money they spend. They include the Board of Louisiana River Pilot Review and Oversight, the Vermilion and Iberia Railroad Development District Board of Commissioners and Work Out Now: WON Louisiana Legislative Commission.

The auditors said the riverboat pilot review and railroad development district didn't respond to the auditors' requests last year. "The Legislature may wish to take some action against Boards that fail to comply with the reporting requirements in state law," the auditors said in the report.

Bobby Jindal wants to use hurricane relief money for higher education fund
Bobby Jindal wants to use hurricane relief money for higher education fund

Gov. Bobby Jindal's administration is scrambling to find money to preserve a higher education workforce development fund that was one of the governor's major state policy initiatives last year. Jindal's office has said it might be able to dump $30 million worth of federal funding for hurricane relief into the Workforce and Innovation for a Stronger Economy fund, established just...


The auditor recommended the Legislature abolish at least 14 state boards and commissions that have been inactive. In some cases, they have disbanded and aren't likely to reorganize or don't have the funding needed to perform their functions, according to the auditor.

The Workforce & Innovation for a Stronger Economy (WISE) Fund Strategic Planning Council, which Gov. Bobby Jindal set up with much fanfare in 2014, is one of the groups the auditor proposes shutting down.


Jindal created the WISE fund and council in order to push Louisiana's higher education institutions to do more workforce development and research. The money was intended to get Louisiana's colleges and universities to produce more graduates with the skills the state's job market was demanding.

In the end, Jindal and lawmakers struggled to provide funding for WISE because the state was facing massive budget cuts that affected established higher education operations during his final years in office.

The year after WISE launched, Jindal struggled to find stable funding and proposed paying for most of it with federal hurricane recovery dollars. That money could only be spent in parishes affected by hurricanes Ike and Gustav and mostly had to be used for low-income students.

Higher education leaders said it was hard to fulfill the functions of WISE with restrictions on its financing, and their attention turned to other matters.
00 2018-10-16
Regional/National

Most Republicans Still Aren’t Crazy About Higher Education. And That’s OK.


Another round of hand-wringing and soul-searching has been inspired by another set of surveys showing a decline in public confidence in American higher education. All of these surveys reveal a partisan distinction, with the sharpest decline and the most negative attitudes among respondents who identify themselves as Republican.

A new Gallup poll shows 62 percent of Democrats and only 39 percent of Republicans expressing "a great deal" or "quite a lot" of confidence in higher education. The proportion of Republicans is a decline of 17 percentage points from a similar survey administered in 2015, before the most recent presidential election. Another recent poll, by the Pew Research Center, found that 73 percent of Republican and Republican-leaning respondents judged higher education to be "going in the wrong direction," as compared with 52 percent of Democratic and Democratic-leaning respondents. The most commonly cited concern among Democratic respondents was the cost of tuition; the most commonly cited concern among Republican respondents was the "political and social views" of professors.

I am as much a fan of soul-searching as the next person, but I think that most of the diagnoses of this phenomenon and prescriptions for "fixing" it misstate what is going on. Confidence in higher education among those with a particular party affiliation is declining not because we are doing something wrong but because we are doing something right.

Sustaining the College Business Model

This loss of confidence is being driven less by changes in higher education than by changes in the attitudes of a large segment of the American public. We are inspiring distrust not because we are abandoning our mission but because we are doing our best to carry it out. That mission has not significantly altered in the past two years, but the world around us has.

Let me be clear. Colleges and universities are highly imperfect and regularly make bad decisions. That is true now and was true in the past. Our collective history is filled with examples of racism, sexism, and anti-Semitism, including during those times when public confidence in our work was very high. I readily acknowledge that it is difficult today to be a thoughtful conservative on most American college campuses, and for this we should be ashamed. Higher education, unfortunately, mirrors the broader culture in its increasing inability to speak constructively across reasonable differences of opinion.

But bringing more conservative speakers to campus or listening with more civility to conservative viewpoints, while desirable, will not make us significantly more popular. The mission of higher education and the central tenets of a major political party have become so disconnected that it is hard to imagine, in our current moment, how they can be reconciled.

The mission statement of my institution, Macalester College, is distinctive but also representative of what you find when perusing many college catalogs: It specifically cites the importance of "internationalism" and "multiculturalism." To the extent that we attempt to carry out that mission, we are running counter to a political agenda that has become increasingly nationalistic and resistant to the notion that diversity is an American strength.

Much of the science providing our understanding of climate change is being generated at colleges, and it is hard to see how such work would be embraced by those who reject the conclusions of climate science. Another recent Pew survey revealed that only 16 percent of conservative Republicans believed that "almost all climate scientists agree that human behavior is mostly responsible for climate change," compared with 55 percent of liberal Democrats.

A Time/SurveyMonkey poll taken before the recent Senate confirmation hearings for then-Supreme Court nominee Brett M. Kavanaugh indicated that 77 percent of Democrats believe that the #MeToo movement will "lead to meaningful change," while 55 percent of Republicans consider it a "distraction." My guess is that a poll taken today would reveal an even sharper divide.

Perhaps most important, higher education is organized around the belief that rigorous, ethical research is central to a better understanding of the world. This belief has become increasingly rare — and therefore increasingly important — in a world buffeted by the currents of social media, but it is unhelpful that the current president of the United States has carried one party further and further away from the notion that facts matter. A YouGov poll conducted less than a year ago indicated that 51 percent of Republican respondents still believed that Barack Obama was born in Kenya. That poll is not an anomaly.

I have heard many times the argument that self-interest alone should dictate that colleges attempt to become more popular among those who currently wield most of the political power. But I am skeptical, after signing countless petitions, amicus briefs, and letters of concern, that there is much that we can do at the moment to shape the priorities of the federal government.

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Will Betsy DeVos stop trying to repeal the borrower-defense rule and stop advancing the interests of predatory lenders because we invite Charles Murray to campus? Will Stephen Miller stop trying to keep certain people out of the country if we hold campus debates on immigration? Will the Supreme Court be less likely to strike down affirmative action if we do targeted hiring of conservative faculty? Consider me unconvinced.

We live in a democracy — or at least a republic that approximates a democracy — and elections have consequences. It is entirely possible that a plurality or even a majority of the American public disapproves of those things that we have adopted as our mission, and they have every right to do so. But that does not mean that we should abandon our fidelity to that mission.

We should always strive to improve, based not on calculations of what will make us more popular but what will make us better. It is nice when those two things are aligned, but often that is not the case: Keeping Jews out of Ivy League universities was once pretty darn popular. If we become convinced that our commitment to internationalism or multiculturalism or gender equity or facts is impeding our ability to educate, then we should alter those commitments. We should not do so merely because they have become less widely embraced.

In fact, our work is more, not less, important when it is unpopular, if we believe in the rightness of that work: If everyone accepted the value of what we do, we would probably need to do less of it. So long as there are students who want what we offer, we should remain true to our calling. Perhaps, if we do, it will one day become more popular.

Oh, and in that same Gallup poll, confidence in Congress stood at 11 percent. So there’s that.

Brian Rosenberg is president of Macalester College.
00 2018-10-16
Regional/National

M.I.T. Plans College for Artificial Intelligence, Backed by $1 Billion



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The goal of the college, said L. Rafael Reif, the president of M.I.T., is to “educate the bilinguals of the future.” He defines bilinguals as people in fields like biology, chemistry, politics, history and linguistics who are also skilled in the techniques of modern computing that can be applied to them.

But, he said, “to educate bilinguals, we have to create a new structure.”

Academic departments still tend to be silos, Mr. Reif explained, despite interdisciplinary programs that cross the departmental boundaries. Half the 50 faculty positions will focus on advancing computer science, and the other half will be jointly appointed by the college and by other departments across M.I.T.

Traditionally, departments hold sway in hiring and tenure decisions at universities. So, for example, a researcher who applied A.I.-based text analysis tools in a field like history might be regarded as too much a computer scientist by the humanities department and not sufficiently technical by the computer science department.

M.I.T.’s leaders hope the new college will alter traditional academic thinking and practice.

“We need to rewire how we hire and promote faculty,” said Martin Schmidt, the provost of M.I.T.

Today, most dual-major programs involve taking courses in a computer science department in machine learning or data science in addition to a student’s major. The M.I.T. college is an effort to have computing baked into the curriculum rather than stapled on. It will grant degrees, though what they will be or their names have not been determined.

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That appealed to Melissa Nobles, dean of M.I.T.’s School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences, who said she saw the new college as helping non-computer scientists bring A.I. tools to their fields — “to what they really care about.”

The college, Ms. Nobles said, offers the possibility of a renewal for humanities studies at M.I.T., where students flock to computer science and engineering.

“We’re excited by the possibilities,” she said. “That’s how the humanities are going to survive, not by running from the future but by embracing it.”

Image
Stephen A. Schwarzman, chief executive of the private equity firm the Blackstone Group, has given $350 million for the new college, to be called the M.I.T. Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing.CreditShannon Stapleton/Reuters
Donors, like students, are attracted more to computer science programs than to many other disciplines. But the new college at M.I.T. is designed to spread the wealth.

“It’s a major fund-raising mechanism that gives M.I.T. a huge resource to apply A.I. to other fields,” said Eric Schmidt, who was the executive chairman of Alphabet, the parent company of Google, and is a visiting innovation fellow at M.I.T.

The college and its goals were shaped by a long-running conversation between Mr. Schwarzman, the principal donor, and Mr. Reif, the M.I.T. president. They first met in 2015 when Mr. Schwarzman was setting up the Schwarzman Scholars program, which awards scholarships for young people to gain a greater understanding of China.

At the time, Mr. Schwarzman was becoming increasingly fascinated by the debate over the opportunity and challenge presented by artificial intelligence. A lengthy conversation with Jack Ma, founder of the Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba, piqued his interest, Mr. Schwarzman recalled, and he kept talking to experts and reading.

“I became convinced that this technology was so powerful it was really going to remake a lot of the world as we know it,” he said.

Over the next few years, Mr. Schwarzman and Mr. Reif picked up the conversation about the trajectory of A.I. and its broad impact, when their paths crossed in places like New York and Davos, Switzerland.

Over the past year, M.I.T.’s leaders and faculty were brainstorming to chart a course for the university’s future. The university had done individual initiatives in areas like the future of work and a research project on the human and machine intelligence.

But Mr. Schwarzman urged Mr. Reif to go further, emphasizing the ethical issues raised by automated decision-making in everything from medical diagnosis to self-driving cars. He also stressed the workplace impact.

“We really need to try to understand this technology, not just get hit by it,” Mr. Schwarzman said.

Meanwhile, Mr. Reif was also focused on making a universitywide impact. His persistent question: “How do I make sure these tools are used by everyone in every discipline?”

The new college structure was his answer. Mr. Schwarzman said he would be interested in contributing, and soon after, Mr. Reif made his pitch.

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“Well, that is a big number,” Mr. Schwarzman said, recalling his initial reaction.

After further study, he said yes.

Mr. Schwarzman said he hoped that the M.I.T. move might trigger others to invest in America’s A.I. future, not just commercially. He points to the major push the Chinese government is making, and notes the fruits of United States government-funded research in the past — technologies that helped America take the global lead in industries from the personal computer to the internet.

“I think we’ve been lagging, for whatever reason,” Mr. Schwarzman said.

Correction: October 14, 2018
An earlier version of this article misspelled the given name of the chief executive of the Blackstone Group. He is Stephen A. Schwarzman, not Steven. The error was repeated in a picture caption.
00 2018-10-15
Houma/Thibodaux

College-ranking website calls Nicholls a ‘Hidden Gem’


Nicholls State University was named a “Hidden Gem” by a national college ranking website for the second straight year.
College Raptor gave Nicholls the ranking among colleges in an 11-state southeastern region.
“It is wonderful to be recognized in this way,” said Sue Westbrook, Nicholls provost and vice president of academic affairs. “We may not be a large, flagship university, but as a regional university, we offer many quality programs of study to prepare our graduates for the work world at a very competitive price.”
Nicholls was the only Louisiana university on the national 2018 Hidden Gems list.
The southeast region includes schools in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia.
College Raptor chose the top three Hidden Gems in each state that met the minimum qualifications of having fewer than 5,000 applications a year and fewer than 7,000 undergraduates enrolled.
The two other Louisiana schools on the regional list are Centenary College in Shreveport and McNeese State University in Lake Charles. This year, Centenary beat Nicholls for Louisiana’s spot on the national Hidden Gem list.
College Raptor reviewed numerous factors including the number of applications received, graduation rates, campus diversity, endowment per student and other metrics reported via the National Center for Education Statistics.
According to the website, Nicholls was chosen for “not only its excellent education program, but its marine research and environmental science departments.”
Also this week, another website ranked Nicholls’ favorability among students above the national average and in the top five overall in Louisiana.
In its second year, College Consensus combines rankings from respected college publishers with student reviews.
“Recognition like this is gratifying because it reinforces what our faculty and students already know — that Nicholls is among the best in the state and region,” said Nicholls President Jay Clune. “Our goal is to provide one of the best possible experiences for our students in the Bayou Region.”
Nicholls’ student score of 76.7 is second highest in Louisiana and above the national average of 72.2.
-- Staff Writer Julia Arenstam can be reached at 448-7636 or julia.arenstam@houmatoday.com. Follow her on Twitter at @JuliaArenstam.
00 2018-10-15
Lafayette

Applications available for La. teachers to take tuition-free college courses


The Louisiana Department of Education and the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education have released the application for the BESE Tuition Program for Teachers.

This competitive program provides funding for selected teachers who enroll in courses at regionally accredited colleges or universities in Louisiana. Teachers selected to participate in this round will have their tuition for courses offered in spring 2019 paid by the state.

All teachers, especially those in rural or low-performing school systems or who seek a higher degree, are encouraged to apply. However, the highest priority will be given to applicants who want to take science, technology, engineering and math coursework to ultimately gain certification to teach those subjects.

According to the state, Louisiana has a shortage of educators trained to teach STEM courses. A recent report indicated that 12 percent of all math courses and 13 percent of all science courses are taught by educators who are not certified in those subject areas.

RELATED: Louisiana students may soon earn STEM credentials on diplomas

"Louisiana strives to make STEM education available to all students to help build a workforce and a citizenry fluent in future technologies," said State Superintendent John White. "To do this, we must fully prepare teachers with every opportunity to further their own education."


Teachers who are selected to participate in the program and who are pursuing coursework to support their teaching of STEM will join a cadre of educators called STEM Fellows who work with the Department and the LaSTEM Advisory Council to further STEM initiatives across the state.

"Louisiana educators play a pivotal role in ensuring all students have access to state-of-the-art STEM experiences in order to prepare for the economy of tomorrow," said State Sen. Sharon Hewitt, R-Slidell, author of the legislation creating the statewide LaSTEM Advisory Council. "This program and the STEM Fellows initiative are important steps forward for Louisiana."

Louisiana education plan provides more — and better — information to families, educators

The program, supported by state and federal dollars, made available at least 21 seats for the 2018-2019 school year. The submission deadline for Spring 2019 is Nov. 9, 2018.

Any applicant not accepted to the program is encouraged to explore a similar state program that offers college coursework at no cost. The Classroom Teacher Enrollment Program (CTEP), which was recently revived by the Board of Regents, goes into effect when all funding for the BESE Tuition Program for Teachers is exhausted and allows public school teachers to register for courses that have available seats after that college's enrollment period closes.

The CTEP program is not limited to those who applied to the BESE Tuition Program for Teachers. It is available to any interested educator.
00 2018-10-15
Lafayette

La. students may soon earn STEM credentials on high school diplomas


Louisiana students who successfully complete coursework in science, technology, engineering and math may soon be eligible to receive special endorsements on their high school diplomas.

The Louisiana Board of Elementary and Secondary Education will vote on the endorsement options next week.

“More than half of Louisiana students are interested in pursuing careers in STEM fields, but only 10 percent meet the benchmark demonstrating their readiness for math and science coursework in college,” said State Superintendent John White. “Louisiana is working to change this by ensuring students have exposure to STEM coursework and credentials starting in the early grades and continuing through college. The new diploma endorsements not only serve as an incentive for students to engage in these fields of student, but also as a reward for doing so.”

Here's how grading is changing in Lafayette Parish schools

If approved, the diploma endorsements will be effective immediately and will include two options. One option is a silver seal that indicates a student has successfully completed required courses within a BESE-approved Jump Start STEM pathway. The other option is a gold seal that indicates a student has successfully completed all courses that comprise a BESE-approved Jump Start STEM pathway.


Each year, the Louisiana Department of Education will publish on its website a list of courses required for the STEM endorsement for each graduating class before the start of each school year. The required courses for 2018-19 are now available on the LDOE website.

“The STEM diploma endorsement is another stackable credential that allows our students in Louisiana to be more competitive in the workforce,” said BESE member Jada Lewis. “It also complements and aligns with our strategic priorities around developing credentials for students on a path to college or a career.”

Fatima showcases technology lab, aims to be Apple Distinguished School

The endorsements are part of the state’s broader push to boost STEM education and career preparation.

Last year, the state legislature established the LaSTEM Advisory Council to increase the number of students, particularly women, pursuing careers in engineering, cybertechnology, digital media and other high-demand fields to satisfy the state’s workforce needs. The council, in part, was charged with establishing diploma endorsements to recognize students who exhibit superior academic achievement in STEM subjects.
00 2018-10-15
Regional/National

New Roles Focus on First-Generation Students’ Issues


One-third of college students are the first in their family to attend, and four-year colleges are starting to devote more resources to this group, creating administrative positions to support them.


Ron Oliver
Last April at Florida Atlantic University, Ron Oliver became director of a newly created Office of First-Generation Student Success. About a quarter of the university’s students, or 7,151 students, are first-generation, he says.

"We want them to interact with their peers," he says, "and have a place where they have a voice."

Among the first things his office did was to create a student organization, First and Proud, to foster a sense of belonging. Tapping skills he developed as an assistant basketball coach at Florida Atlantic and as a career coach, Oliver tries to understand first-generation students’ mind-sets and help them overcome obstacles. "If you’re thinking in a more positive way," he says, "you tend to push through that challenge."

His office oversees an emerging-scholars program whose goal is to have selected first-generation students graduate debt free, without missing out on opportunities like study abroad.

A second program provides students with books and academic support. A third program, the Urban Male Initiative, tries to motivate students to finish college in four years.

Long-term goals of the office are to improve retention and graduation rates among first-generation students, Oliver says. Over all, he says, 25 percent of first-generation students "drop out after year one, so that’s also a huge reason why you’re seeing the creation of offices and positions" like the ones at Florida Atlantic.

For help with best practices, Oliver turns to a center started last year by Naspa: Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education, in partnership with the Suder Foundation.

Sarah E. Whitley, senior director of Naspa’s Center for First-Generation Student Success, can’t say exactly how many directors of first-generation student success colleges have hired, but "interest is growing rapidly." The center provides people in those roles with training, conferences, research, and ways to connect.

One reason it is hard to tally up an exact number is the frequent intersection between students’ first-generation identity and other identities, like being from low-income families or rural communities, or being adult students, undocumented immigrants, members of racial or ethnic minority groups, or LGBT, Whitley says. Job titles often refer to oversight for at least one of those other groups.

The greater focus on first-generation students includes highly selective colleges. At the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, where about 3,400 undergraduates are first-generation, Adan Hussain oversees the First-Generation Student Gateway, a space where students can meet and get help navigating assistance from four offices. It is "the place that they can ask the question they’re nervous about asking outside because it seems like their peers all seem to understand what rushing is, or what Greek life is, or what credit hour means," he says.

Hussain’s position as first-generation project manager evolved from an organization for first-generation students that was started 11 years ago by Dwight Lang, a sociology lecturer. The group eventually outgrew meetings at Lang’s home. Hussain began his role a year and a half ago.

"We focus on first-gens getting connected to staff and faculty, to build their network on campus, and we also want first-gens to meet one another, since it’s an invisible identity," he says.

In forming the center, Hussain looked to Brown and Stanford Universities as models. At Stanford, the Diversity and First-Gen Office, created seven years ago, has grown to the point where it will soon be split in two. Dereca Blackmon, assistant vice provost and executive director of the office, will lead the diversity and inclusivity side. Her colleague, Jennifer Rolen, assistant dean and associate director, will lead the first-generation and low-income side.

Having a dedicated office that supports these students from acceptance to graduation has "a huge impact on infrastructure at the university and raising the consciousness about these issues campuswide," Blackmon says.

Services include a mentoring program that pairs up first-generation graduate students with undergraduates, a textbook-exchange program, and an Opportunity Fund to help students meet unexpected costs. The push for the services has come from interested donors and the university’s first-generation and low-income students. Rolen sums up the office’s message for those students: "You’re not alone, you belong here, and you’ll be successful."

Many administrators who work with first-generation students, like Blackmon, Rolen, and Hussain, were themselves the first in their families to attend college.

Whitley, of Naspa, says that directors of such services are often relatively new to their institutions. In such cases, she says, they may need the support of "a more seasoned person at the institution who has the ear of senior leadership." Whether new to the university or familiar with the campus culture, Whitley says, those administrators need to be "a jack of all trades."

Send ideas for Hiring Trends to Julia Piper.


00 2018-10-15
Ruston

TECH PREPS FOR HOMECOMING LUNCHEON


The Louisiana Tech Alumni Association will honor its 2018 Alumnus of the Year and Distinguished Alumni of the Colleges Oct. 19 at its annual Alumni Awards Luncheon.

The luncheon is set for noon in the Club Lounge of the Davison Athletics Complex. Tickets are $30 per person and $300 for a reserved table of eight. For tickets, contact Marbury Alumni House coordinator Barbara Swart at 318-497-7985 or barbara@latechalumni.org, or visit latechalumni.org, click on “Events” and register online.
00 2018-10-15
Shreveport

LSU’S NEW ADMISSION POLICIES EXPLAINED [VIDEO]


Dr. Jim Henderson, University of Louisiana System President, talks with 101.7 / 710 KEEL's Robert J Wright and Erin McCarty about changes in admission standards coming to Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge.

Henderson explains the reasoning behind the changes made by the school's administration, saying that the state's major university is looking to take a more "holistic" approach in selecting future students. From theadvocate.com:

LSU is relaxing a generation-old policy of automatically rejecting applicants who score too low on the standardized entrance exams like the ACT.

Instead, the state’s flagship university will be placing more emphasis on recommendation letters, personal essays and activities outside academia. Though the first in Louisiana to eject hard minimums, LSU is joining a national “holistic admissions” wave that diminishes the importance of tests like the ACT and SAT.

More than 1,000 schools in the nation have eliminated standardized testing as an admissions requirement as of January, according to the National Association for College Admission Counseling.

Henderson, who has authority over nine of the state's universities - LSU not among them - says his system's goal is to "serve more students because we have to have a more educated workforce."
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Lafayette

UL Lafayette's 2018 Homecoming Court makes history


LAFAYETTE, La. (KLFY) -


LAFAYETTE, La.- Rachel Lautigar and Dominique Williams will reign as queen and king of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s historic 2018 Homecoming.

This year’s court is the first since at least the 1930s that’s included both women and men members, said KarliSherman, assistant director of the Office of Student Engagement and Leadership. She oversees the University Program Council and the Homecoming Court selection process.

Lautigar is a junior from Bastrop, Louisiana, and is pursuing a double major in political science and history. Williams is a junior business management major from Lafayette.

Other members of the Homecoming Court are Jonathan Adams, of Opelousas, Louisiana; Claire Carriere of Lafayette; Rebecca Foley of Coral Springs, Florida; Vickie Lynne Jacquet, of Port Arthur, Texas; Jacob LeMeunier, of Lafayette; Benjamin Messner, of Lafayette; Kaleb Moore, of DeRidder, Louisiana; and Erica Stewart, of Houston.

Read the full story here.
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Lafayette

Poet, literary critic to give Levy Lecture at UL Lafayette


Poet and literary critic Adam Kirsch will discuss “Poetry and the Problem of Politics” during the 2018 Flora Plonsky Levy Lecture.

Kirsch will speak at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 18, in the Oliver Hall Auditorium on campus.

His presentation will examine how and why politics fuels the creativity of many writers.

Kirsch will consider the work of several influential poets, including Percy Bysshe Shelley’s “England in 1819,” Ezra Pound’s “Canto 45,” William Butler Yeats’s “Ancestral Houses,” and W.H. Auden’s “September 1, 1939.”

Kirsch is the author of 10 books of poetry and prose, including “Emblems of the Passing World; Poems after Photographs by August Sander” and “The Modern Element: Essays on Contemporary Poetry.”

He is an editor for the Weekend Review section of the Wall Street Journal. Kirsch was a writer and editor for The New Republic.

His writing has appeared in The New Yorker, New York Review of Books, and Poetry.

He received a bachelor’s degree from Harvard University. Kirsch has taught at Columbia University and Sarah Lawrence College.

The annual Flora Levy Lecture Series is hosted by the UL Lafayette English Department through a UL Lafayette Foundation endowment. The free lecture is open to the public.
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Lafayette

Anna Petrakova credits UL for work ethic that led to international success


This is part of a series on the 2018 Louisiana Athletics Hall of Fame Class ahead of Saturday's Homecoming game against New Mexico State.

She was in an unfamiliar country and spoke only halting English, what little she’d picked up from older sister Marina’s two years of living and working in Baton Rouge. She’d already missed the first half of the 2001-02 basketball season.

When Anna Petrakova, her sister and then-USL women’s coach Gay Nix walked into former academic coordinator Danny Cottonham’s office before the 2002 spring semester, Cottonham was uncertain to say the least.

“She’d just turned 17 the month prior, and it was my job to get her registered and enrolled in classes for that semester,” Cottonham said. “I was not very optimistic about Anna’s future. She spoke fluent Russian, but most of her other communication was with a smile.”

More: UL Lafayette homecoming week is taking over campus. Here's what's happening

Flash forward three-and-a-half years, to the time that the Moscow-born Petrakova was completing one of the best careers in the history of the program, one that included being honored as the Sun Belt Conference’s Player of the Year. No other Cajun has ever held that distinction.


“I learned everything I know about work ethic there,” Petrakova said. “I learned you can pave your own way and make your own mark if you work hard and mean well. And Lafayette was the perfect place for me. I didn’t know if I would feel welcomed or would I feel like an outcast, but that all went away that first day in Mr. C’s (Cottonham’s) office.”

That began a career that eventually made her an Olympian, the Player of the Year in the Russian Premier League and to her current role in international basketball as an assistant coach with the Russian National Team.

In honor of those accomplishments, but mostly in honor of her performance as one of the top players in Cajun basketball history, Petrakova is one of this year’s inductees into the Louisiana Athletics Hall of Fame. Her induction is part of the university’s Homecoming activities this week.

UL's Anna Petrakova is fouled while shooting a layup during a 2004 exhibition game at the Cajundome in Lafayette. Petrakova will be inducted to the Louisiana Athletic Hall of Fame on Friday as part of Homecoming festivities.Buy Photo
UL's Anna Petrakova is fouled while shooting a layup during a 2004 exhibition game at the Cajundome in Lafayette. Petrakova will be inducted to the Louisiana Athletic Hall of Fame on Friday as part of Homecoming festivities. (Photo: Advertiser file photo)

Petrakova will be honored along with fellow former student-athletes Damon Mason (football), Tiffany Clark Gusman (softball) and Scott Dohmann (baseball), and Lifetime Achievement recipients Yvette Girouard (softball) and Gerald Hebert (administration) as the newest Hall of Fame members.

The group will be inducted into the Louisiana Athletics Hall of Fame on Friday at an evening reception, will be honored during the university’s annual Homecoming parade Saturday morning, and recognized during halftime activities of Saturday’s Homecoming game against New Mexico State at Cajun Field.

Petrakova’s mid-term arrival in 2002 didn’t help the Cajun program immediately. UL finished 7-21 in Nix’s final year and went 8-19 under new coach J. Kelley Hall one year later. But Petrakova’s work ethic continued to elevate her game, and she had a breakout junior year in the 2003-04 season and led the Cajuns to a 13-15 mark – their best record in 16 seasons.

More: Here's UL's 2018 Homecoming Court

That year, despite the record, Petrakova was named the Sun Belt’s Player of the Year after averaging 18.6 points and 9.5 rebounds along with 65 blocked shots. It was during that time that she and Coach Hall, who tragically died from a heart attack in 2010 at age 51.

“I miss Coach Hall so much,” Petrakova said. “The first thing I think of while I was there was him with his Dr. Pepper can next to the bench and how mad he would get at us. At some point it became a running joke because we’d all be laughing a few minutes later and I’d tell him don’t worry, we got this. I was always afraid he was going to hurt his foot stomping so hard. But after the game we’d always laugh about it.”

Under Hall and with Petrakova leading the way, the Cajuns made a quantum leap the next year, finishing at 22-9, winning the Sun Belt West Division and reaching the finals of the conference tournament. Petrakova won her second All-Sun Belt honor and was named UL’s female Student-Athlete of the Year. A few years later, she was the only Cajun on the all-time Sun Belt women’s team.

The 6-foot-3 Petrakova finished her Cajun career as the 10th player to score 1,000 points, currently ranking ninth in school history in scoring, and she remains the all-time leader in blocked shots (188) and free throw percentage (76.6) along with high rankings in virtually every offensive category.

But Petrakova was only getting started. Almost immediately after her graduation – which included an overall 3.4 grade point average despite her initial language barrier – she joined the Russian women’s national team program. She won two European championships with the Junior National Team, and continued to improve until she was selected to her country’s Olympic team and was a stalwart on a unit that finished fourth in the 2012 Olympics in London.

Three years later, she was the Player of the Year in the Russian Premier League, and continued to be one of her country’s best players before retiring last year.

How well respected was she as a player and a person? Letters of recommendation for the Hall of Fame came from such basketball notables as Becky Hammon, an Olympic teammate and now assistant coach of the NBA’s San Antonio Spurs, and Candace Parker, two-time WNBA Most Valuable Player and a two-time Olympic gold medalist who also played with Petrakova in Russia.

Petrakova now spends half her year as an assistant coach with that national team, and the other half in California in other basketball-related ventures. But she hasn’t forgotten those early steps.

“Since I was 8 I played basketball almost non-stop, and it definitely paid off for me,” she said. “I feel like I got really lucky. I never had any major injuries and I chose when to finish my career and wasn’t forced to stop. And Lafayette and the Cajuns were a huge step for me. I loved all of it. I would do it all over again and wouldn’t change a thing.”
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Lafayette

Wagner joins University of Louisiana at Lafayette as Acadiana business economist


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette named Gary Wagner with as the B.I. Moody III College of Business Administration’s Acadiana Business Economist/BORSF Eminent Scholar Endowed Chair in Economics.

Wagner, an economic researcher and adviser with interests in regional economics and state and local public finance issues, will monitor the regional economic environment, conduct research and analysis and share those results with the business community.

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Wagner has authored or coauthored more than 40 professional articles and reports on state and local policy issues and has delivered more than 200 public and non-academic presentations. He is a respondent in the Survey of Professional Forecasters, the oldest quarterly survey of national economic forecasters in the United States.

“One of my first objectives is to develop a detailed economic forecasting model for the Lafayette metro area,” he said. “Not only will this provide businesses and elected officials with relevant and timely information to help guide their strategies, it will also enhance our understanding of the interrelationships between our region’s diverse economic sectors and how changes in various national, state, and local policies might affect us.”

Wagner earned a Ph.D. and master’s degree in economics from West Virginia University and his bachelor’s degree in economics and political Science from Youngstown State University.

FOLLOW ADAM DAIGLE ON TWITTER, @ADAMDAIGLEADV.
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Lafayette

UL Homecoming: Parade, tailgate, game info and more


Homecoming Parade
10 a.m. Oct. 13 | Ragin' Cajun spirit is on the move as our students, alumni, and fans watch the parade roll down Johnston Street and St. Mary Boulevard. Begins at Blackham Coliseum and ends by the Alumni Center.

Homecoming Football Game
Who: Louisiana vs. New Mexico State

When: 4 p.m. Oct. 13

TV: None.

Streaming: ESPN+/WatchESPN (Dan McDonald, play-by-play; Gerald Broussard, analyst)

Radio: 1420 AM/ 107.9 FM (Jay Walker, play-by-play; Chris Lanaux, analyst; Cody Junot, sideline)

More: There's a reason UL's Napier will stick with two-QB plan

More: Napier looks for ways to help Cajun defense with fatigue

Weather forecast
The high in Lafayette on Saturday is 84 degrees with plenty of sun, dropping into the low 70s that night.

UL homecoming week: Here's what's happening

Tailgating/parking
8 a.m. | Parking gates at Cajun Field open for reserved parking. Free general parking will be updated closer to the game.


10 a.m. | Cajun Field ticket office opens | Purchase tickets at Cajun Field's LHC Gate C and at the main ticket booth at State Farm Gate A.

10 a.m. | Official Ragin' Cajuns apparel outlets open | Buy your gear at the apparel outlets by Gate A and inside Russo Park at 'Tigue' Moore Field.

Here's UL's 2018 Homecoming Court

1 p.m. | Student tailgating at Bourgeois Park | Your chance to see and be seen at tailgating and grab some free food and drinks.

Also at tailgating:

» Cajun Walk down Reinhardt Drive | Bring your ragin' spirit and wish the team good luck before the big game.

» Band begins Ragin' March along Stadium Way | Join the Pride of Acadiana Marching Band in the fight song and the classic "R-E-S-P-E-C-T."

» Pride of Acadiana Marching Band's pregame performance | Arrive early, wear red, get LOUD, and stay late!

Hall of Fame inductees
Former student athletes Anna Petrakova (basketball), Damon Mason (football), Tiffany Clark Gusman (softball) and Scott Dohmann (baseball), as well as Lifetime Achievement recipients Yvette Girouard (softball) and Gerald Hebert (administration), will be honored as the newest Louisiana Athletics Hall of Fame members.

The group will be inducted Friday at an evening reception, honored during the university’s annual Homecoming parade Saturday morning, and recognized during halftime activities of Saturday’s Homecoming game against New Mexico State at Cajun Field.

More sports reads:

Mark Ingram has sights set on his own Saints record

Jerry Stovall's No. 21 jersey to be retired

LSU defense uncharacteristically struggling
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Monroe

National Guard ULM students owe thousands of dollars after TOPS funds misappropriated


MONROE, La. - MONROE, La. (10/11/18) - . Students say all they wanted to do was serve their country while avoiding the very debt they're now facing. Senior nursing student Daijah Cobb and junior Ryan Hicks are both TOPS recipients and in the National Guard.

But it turns out they can't get money from both and now their student bills have spiked.

"My payment plan has been changed to 200 dollars to 1200 dollars", said Daijah Cobb.
Ryan Hicks added, "I had to pay 1600 this semester out of my personal pocket."

This is the letter they received stating students aren't allowed to receive the National Guard waiver and the full TOPS scholarship. The problem is that money has already been spent on books, tuition, and housing. Now these students have to come up with more than $8,000.

"That's a big deal. Why am I getting penalized for something that the university had no idea about", said Cobb.

ULM says after an internal investigation they realized 18 students got too much money.

"That's something we should have caught some time ago and we didn't", said Dr. Michael Camille, vice president of information services and student success.

"They should have to deal with the problem since they made the mistake", said Hicks.
Dr. Camille says after looking into various options, legally they have to collect all the money they gave out.

"Because the students received that money, we're obligated as a state institution to collect money on behalf of the state. It goes straight to the state of Louisiana", said Camille.

But students feel they're getting punished for doing what they thought was right.

"Technically I earned both", said Cobb.
Ryan hicks junior

"Most of us joined the National Guard because first of all we wanted to serve our country and then we also wanted our school to help be paid for", said Hicks.

ULM says the over awarding started in 2013 and the bills range from $1,700 dollars to $14,000. Dr. Camille says they've made several changes to ensure this doesn't happen again-- including posting new information on their website, cross training staff so everyone is aware, and working with the National Guard and TOPS Louisiana so all future students are informed from the start.
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Monroe

250 Monroe students to attend educational retreat at ULM


Chase, in partnership with the University of Louisiana Monroe, will host more than 250 junior-high girls from Monroe City Schools for an educational, half-day retreat on campus, inspiring them to dream big.

The students will get a campus tour and hear a motivational address from Miss Louisiana, Holli Conway. There will be a panel discussion of hometown girls currently enrolled at ULM and at Louisiana Delta Community College, followed by lunch and a step show from the ULM Greeks.

The event is being supported by Louisiana Delta Community College and the Monroe Chamber of Commerce. The theme of the event will be “See Past Your Now,” with emphasis on empowering young women.

The theme of the event will be “See Past Your Now,” with emphasis on empowering young women.

“This is a great opportunity to bring these young women to campus and say to them, ‘You belong here. If you can dream it and

Every girl enrolled in the 8th grade at all Monroe City Schools is invited to attend. This will be the second year for Our Girls Rock. Last year more than 200 junior high girls attended a private viewing of the movie “Hidden Figures” at Pecanland Mall.

This year’s panelists will include eight students from ULM and Delta Community College who will share their personal stories to motivate girls in the next, critically important phase of their education.

More than 40 Chase volunteers and members of the ULM Hawkline will greet each student as she arrives on campus. The girls will experience the Chase “blue carpet” welcome where volunteers will cheer, hold motivational signs, and high-five the girls. The goal is to give each student a sense of belonging, acceptance and significance.

Chase has 1,000 employees in Monroe, making it one of the largest employers in Ouachita Parish. Monroe City Schools serves 8,500 children at 19 schools, including three middle schools — Carroll Junior High School, Lee Junior High School and Martin Luther King Jr. Junior High School.
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New Orleans

The man who put UNO on the map


The Times-Picayune is marking the tricentennial of New Orleans with its ongoing 300 for 300 project, running through 2018 and highlighting 300 people who have made New Orleans New Orleans, featuring original artwork commissioned by NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune with Where Y'Art gallery. Today: Homer Hitt.


The icon: Homer Hitt.

The legacy: Homer Hitt was associate dean of LSU's graduate school when, in 1957, LSU President Troy Middleton asked him to lead what would be called Louisiana State University in New Orleans, or LSUNO. Enabled by state legislation authored by Sen. Ted Hickey, the new university -- now known simply as UNO -- would rise on a 178-acre tract near Lake Pontchartrain that had been a naval air station and which abutted the Pontchartrain Beach amusement park. As the school's leader, Hitt set high standards, and colleagues recalled that, to make the new school flourish, he frequently had to fight state officials who were leery of underwriting a rival to LSU. "Homer wanted UNO to have the best academics you could possibly have," said Tim Ryan, who was UNO chancellor from 2003 to 2010. "Homer had to fight so many battles to make UNO grow and prosper."

The artist: Jeremy Paten.


The quote: "The thing that gives me pride and satisfaction is to walk across the campus now and realize that when I came, it was an abandoned naval air station with barracks and hangars and concrete strips. Before it had UNO, New Orleans was the largest city in America without a public college. To walk across the campus now and be able to realize those things -- well, few people are that fortunate in their lives." -- Homer Hitt, in a 1992 interview

Explore more of Paten's work online at WhereYart.net and in person at the Where Y'Art gallery, 1901 Royal St.

TRI-via

After earning master's degrees at LSU and Harvard, Hitt earned a doctorate in sociology at Harvard in 1941.
Although Hitt was best known as UNO's chancellor, it took him six years to get that title. In 1957, he was named the first dean of the new campus. He became chancellor in 1963.
He was in charge of the first component of the LSU System that was integrated.
Hitt stepped down in 1980.
The Lakefront school originally was called Louisiana State University in New Orleans. In 1974, students successfully pushed to have the name changed to the University of New Orleans to give the school its own identity.
UNO originally was part of the LSU system. In that role, it existed in the shadow of the main campus in Baton Rouge. In 2011, the Legislature transferred UNO to the University of Louisiana System. Gov. Bobby Jindal came to campus to sign the legislation on Hitt's desk.
According to UNO records, Hitt had wanted to move the school to the UL System since the mid-1960s.
At first, classes were held in World War II-era barracks. The buildings also housed offices and a cafeteria, and for a while, there was this reminder of the tract's past: Runways crisscrossed the treeless campus.
By John Pope, contributing writer
Source: The Times-Picayune archives; staff research
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Alexandria

Vernon students attend college fair


More than 100 Vernon Parish students attended the Vernon Parish College Fair Sept. 25 at Leesville High School (LHS). All Vernon Parish juniors and seniors were invited to attend, and 25 recruiters were set up in the LHS cafeteria to meet with students and parents.

With many students unable to schedule college visits due to transportation or financial issues, the college fair provided the opportunity for Vernon Parish students to meet with recruiters from four-year colleges, vocational and technical schools and military branches in one location.

Students who attended the college fair registered with www.gotocollegefairs.com to create a personalized barcode with all of their information. Instead of completing an information card at each table, the recruiters were able scan the students' barcodes to receive their information. This allowed the students more face-to-face time with each recruiter.

"I was very pleased with the turnout of students and parents, and the representation of four-year colleges, technical schools, and military branches," said Chasity Cryer, senior counselor at LHS. "The college fair is a great opportunity for our students to see the various post-secondary options available to them, and obtain valuable information on admission requirements, scholarships and financial aid."

The following schools/military branches were in attendance:

* ABC Technical

* ARMY

* Career Compass

* Central Louisiana Technical Community College

* East Texas Baptist University

* Grambling State University

* Louisiana College

* Louisiana State University

* Louisiana Tech University

* LSU Alexandria

* LSU Eunice

* LSU Shreveport

* Marines

* McNeese State University

* National Guard

* Nicholls State University

* Northwestern State University

* Our Lady of the Lake College

* Southern Arkansas University

* Southern University

* SOWELA

* University of Louisiana Lafayette

* University of Louisiana Monroe

* University of New Orleans
00 2018-10-11
Baton Rouge

Tangipahoa Parish calendar for Oct. 11-18, 2018


THURSDAY
Story Time: 10:30 a.m., Ponchatoula Branch Library.

Adventure Club: 3:30 p.m. and 4 p.m., Kentwood Branch and Amite Branch Library.

Games Corner: 4 p.m., Independence Branch Library.

Teen Club: 5 p.m., Loranger Branch and Ponchatoula Branch Library.

FRIDAY
Loopy Loopers: 9 a.m., Amite Branch Library.

Computer Basics: 10 a.m., Amite Branch Library. Learn basics like how to start a computer, save and re-open a file, and create a folder in this class.

Family Movie Night: 4 p.m., Amite Branch Library.

Fitness Friday — Zumba!: 5 p.m., Amite Branch Library.

Halloween at the Square: 5:30 p.m., Hammond Square, 411 Palace Drive, Hammond.

SATURDAY
Book Festival: 9 a.m., Hammond Branch Library.

Southeastern Louisiana University Homecoming: Parade at noon, kick-off at 4 p.m.

MONDAY
Loopy Loopers: 9 a.m., Amite Branch Library.

Knitting: 2 p.m., Kentwood Branch Library.

Game Day: 4 p.m., Amite Branch Library.

Teen Maker Club: 4 p.m., Independence Branch Library.

Knitting 101: 5 p.m., Ponchatoula Branch Library.

TUESDAY
Story Time: 10:30 a.m., Hammond Branch Library.

Stitch Niche: 1 p.m., Hammond Branch Library.

Family Bingo: 3:30 p.m., Kentwood Branch Library.

Cut Ups: 4 p.m., Hammond Branch Library.

Indy Story & Discovery Time: 4 p.m., Independence Branch Library.

Fandom Club: 4:30 p.m., Hammond Branch Library.

Resume Basics: 5 p.m., Amite Branch Library. Learn how to create a resume and format the resume to best sell your skills and experience to potential employers in this class.

WEDNESDAY
Story Time: 10:30 a.m. and 11 a.m., Kentwood Branch, Loranger Branch and Amite Branch libraries.

Home School Book Club: 1 p.m. and 1:30 p.m., Ponchatoula Branch and Hammond Branch Library.

Adventure Club: 4 p.m., Loranger Branch and Independence Branch Library.

Homeschool Group: 4 p.m., Amite Branch Library.

OCT. 18
Story Time: 10:30 a.m., Ponchatoula Branch Library.

Adventure Club: 3:30 p.m. and 4 p.m., Kentwood Branch and Amite Branch Library.

Games Corner: 4 p.m., Independence Branch Library.

Teen Club: 5 p.m., Loranger Branch and Ponchatoula Branch Library.

Bling a Pair to Save a Pair: 6:30 p.m., Hammond Regional Art Center, 217 E Thomas St., Hammond.

ONGOING
RISE Haunted House: 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m., 10342 La. 442, Tickfaw. risehauntedhouse.com. Through Oct. 31.
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Hammond

Southeastern Louisiana University professor earns award for book


Samuel C. Hyde, Jr., Southeastern Louisiana University Professor of History and Director of the Center for Southeast Louisiana Studies, was honored with the Michael V. R. Thomason Award by the Gulf South Historical Association.

Hyde, an SLU professor in his 26th year, was awarded for his book “Pistols and Politics: Feuds, Factions, and the Struggle for Order in Louisiana’s Florida Parishes, 1810-1935.” The work was recognized as the best book on the history of the Gulf South region published in 2018.

Named for Thomason, professor of history and longtime editor of the Gulf Coast Historical Review at the University of South Alabama in Mobile, the award recognizes scholarly studies that advance awareness and understanding of the historical pattern of development characterizing the states of the Gulf South and the Caribbean Basin.

Southeastern Louisiana University professor’s new book delves into dangerous past
LIVING
Southeastern Louisiana University professor’s new book delves into dangerous past
David Gray | The News
College professor delves into area’s violent past during Edward Livingston Historical Association meeting
LIVING
College professor delves into area’s violent past during Edward Livingston Historical Association meeting
Story Submitted
“Hyde’s exhaustively researched study of Louisiana’s Florida Parishes and its innovative use of game theory revolutionizes our understanding of southern violence and provides critical insight into possible solutions for the tradition of lawlessness that continues to plague the region,” said Douglas Bristol, a member of the award committee from the University of Southern Mississippi.

Hyde has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the President's Award for Excellence in Research (2014), the Lifetime Achievement Award for Remarkable Efforts in Historical Research and Preservation (2014), and an Emmy nomination for script writing in “Storms: Louisiana and Nature's Wrath” (2006).

According to his SLU bio, Hyde has published eight books and been featured in nearly 20 published articles.

“Pistols and Politics,” which was released through LSU Press, is a follow-up to Hyde’s “Pistols and Politics: The Dilemma of Democracy in Louisiana’s Florida Parishes, 1810-1899,” a historical monograph that was published in 1998.

Hyde, a Denham Springs resident, will be honored and presented with a cash prize during the upcoming 36th Annual Gulf South History and Humanities Conference in Baton Rouge.
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Hammond

SLU channel's game broadcast honored as one of nation's best


HAMMOND — The live student-produced broadcast of a Southeastern Louisiana University basketball game has been honored as fourth-best in the nation.

The Southeastern Channel’s production and live broadcast of the Southeastern vs. Southern University of New Orleans men’s basketball game on Dec. 14, 2017, won the Award of Excellence for student "Television Sports Event Production” at the Broadcast Education Association’s 2018 Festival of Media Arts in Las Vegas recently.

The winning broadcast was one of 14 produced by the 15-person student crew during the past year, including Lions football, soccer, baseball, softball, and men’s and women’s basketball games. Plans are to add volleyball this fall.

The Southeastern Channel is scheduled to produce and air the Lions’ homecoming football game Saturday, along with the Hall of Fame game Oct. 20.

The all-student production featured John Sartori, of Mandeville, as play-by-play announcer with Wesley Boone, of Alexandria, as color commentator. Dylan Domangue, of Houma, was the courtside reporter while Freddie Rosario, of Hahnville, was director and technical director.

Other student crew members were Tyler Guidroz, of Ponchatoula; Tyler Rogers and Alexander Castro, of Hammond; Schuylar Ramsey, of Springfield; Taylor Sharp, of Walker; Jordan Rheams and Zechariah Cameron, of Baton Rouge; Andrew Scherer, Courtney Bruno, Richie Solares and Blair Joseph, of New Orleans; and Adam Cortez of El Paso, Texas.

The Southeastern Channel can be seen on Charter Spectrum 199 in Tangipahoa, St. Tammany, Livingston and St. Helena parishes and viewed online via live webcast at thesoutheasternchannel.com.
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Houma/Thibodaux

Nicholls’ theater series offers something for everyone


Nicholls State University’s second season Oh Là Là theater series will include music originating in the 40s, 50s, 60s and 70s from the beaches of California to the heart and soul of Motown.

All performances will be held at the Mary and Al Danos Theater. Here’s a rundown:


“Sail On: The Beach Boys Tribute,” 7 p.m. Oct. 21.

The Victory Belles singers, 6:30 p.m. Nov. 6.

The Diamonds will perform their holiday show, “The Silver Bells and Diamonds,” at 7 p.m. Dec. 13.

The Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra kicks off the second half of the season at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 15.

“The Chipper Experience: Where Comedy and Magic Collide” is scheduled for 7 p.m. April 13.

“Shadows of the 60′s: A Tribute to Motown,” 7 p.m. May 16.

“I’m thrilled to death about this year’s series,” said Monique Crochet, the university’s executive director of External Affairs. “We started working on this a year ago, and we’re really excited to add a sixth show. This is a great way for the Nicholls and Thibodaux community to come to our campus where they can see a beautiful theater, see how wonderful Nicholls is and see a great show.”

“Sail On: The Beach Boys Tribute” will take you back to the beaches of California with an authentic sound that compares to the original Beach Boys during their prime. The musicians in the Nashville-based group have performed with Brian Wilson’s band, the Zombies, Earth Wind and Fire, Cheap Trick and Mark Lindsay, among others.

The National World War II Museum’s Victory Belles are a globally recognized trio known for their elegance, charm, spirited singing performances and dazzling costumes. Representing the patriotic fabric of World War II America, the group has performed at Ellis Island, Japan, Hawaii, Guam and with multiple military bands across the country.

Originally formed in 1953, The Diamonds are known for their multiple hits throughout the 1950s and 1960s. The group, now made up of Gary Owens, Adam David Marino, Chris Caldwell and Jeff Dolan, has revamped its holiday show. The quartet combines high-energy, holiday favorites with classic tunes from the height of their career.

The Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra is a full-scale symphonic orchestra located in New Orleans. Formed in 1991, the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra is the oldest full-time musician-governed and collaboratively-operated orchestra in the United States.

Chipper Lowell brings his popular show, “The Chipper Experience,” which combines clean but edgy comedy with quirky magic and hilarious banter with audience members. His shows have been known to include a flying turtle, juggling medieval weaponry, mind-reading and zany inventions. Lowell’s television appearances include “Masters Of Illusion, Don’t Blink,” “The Tonight Show” and the Disney Channel.

“Shadows of the 60s” pays tribute to the legacy of Motown’s most well-known artists, including The Supremes, The Four Tops, Smokey Robinson, Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, Gladys Knight & the Pips and The Temptations. Featuring top industry musicians and singers, the group aims to take you back to Motown in the 1960s with costumes, choreography and soul.

Cenac Marine Services is sponsoring the theater series and several individual shows. Sponsorship opportunities are available.

Upper-level season tickets are $125 and single tickets are $30, while lower-level season tickets are $150 and single tickets are $35.

To purchase tickets or become a sponsor, call Jeanne’-Morgan Gernon at 448-4270 or email at jm.gernon@nicholls.edu.
00 2018-10-11
Lafayette

Federal grant to benefit economic development center at UL Lafayette


The University of Louisiana at Lafayette's B.I. Moody College of Business Administration received the first of what could be a five-year federal grant that will benefit the Louisiana Entrepreneurship and Economic Development Center.

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The college was among 20 colleges and universities to receive a federal grant from the U.S. Economic Development Administration’s 2018 University Center Economic Development Program Competition. UL and nine others each received $112,850, and it will reapply each year for the next five years in what could total $564,250, said Geoffrey Stewart, UL marketing professor and endowed chair in regional business development.

The funding will help expand LEED in developing regional innovation clusters, advancing high-growth entrepreneurship, cultivating innovation in rural and underrepresented communities and supporting regional commercialization, Stewart said. It will start in the Lafayette region and grow to cover the state over a five-year period.

"The LEED Center believes Louisiana must remain vigilant in attempts to strengthen and diversify its economy while it currently manages the effects of a downturn in the Gulf of Mexico energy industry," Stewart said.

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00 2018-10-11
Monroe

Letlow named director of external affairs and strategic communications at ULM


Julia Letlow has been named executive director of external affairs and strategic communications at the University of Louisiana Monroe.

Letlow most recently served as the director of marketing and communications, and she helped lead the rebranding initiative for ULM.

In her new role, she serves as the governmental liaison on behalf of the university. Her work includes developing and strengthening relationships with governmental policy-makers who have a direct impact on ULM. Letlow also supervises strategic communications and initiatives to promote a positive public opinion of ULM.

“Dr. Letlow brings experience in the public and private sectors to her work for ULM,” said ULM President Nick J. Bruno. “It is important to have someone with her knowledge of the political climate in the position to provide advice on governmental matters and policy changes at the local, state, and federal levels.”

Letlow’s experience in higher education began at ULM in 2003 as a teaching associate in the communication department. She continued her graduate studies at the University of South Florida and completed her Ph.D. in communication.

Letlow began her professional career at ULM in 2007 working on special projects for the provost and vice president of academic affairs. She then accepted a position at Tulane University School of Medicine as the director of education and patient safety. During her tenure there she created a curriculum for physicians to strengthen their communication skills and served as an advocate for patient safety.

“The University of Louisiana Monroe is a huge economic driver for north Louisiana with a strong state and national footprint,” Letlow said. “I look forward to strengthening relationships with those who will continue to champion our university and the students we serve.”

Letlow has worked for political campaigns in north Louisiana as both a volunteer and staff member. Her direct participation in Louisiana politics gives her insight into strategies and alliances necessary to accomplish goals when working with elected officials.
00 2018-10-11
Natchitoches

First Ladies host Princess Retreat


The first ladies of Northwestern State University and Nicholls State University collaborated on a service project for young ladies from the Boys and Girls Club of El Camino Real and Cane River Children’s Services prior to the Northwestern State-Nicholls State football game Oct. 6. Northwestern State’s Jennifer Maggio and Nicholls State’s Allison Clune hosted the inaugural Princess Retreat, an event to empower girls and promote inner beauty, good health, kindness, self-confidence and positive support networks. Volunteers from several campus organizations helped with the event by decorating the Student Union Ballroom with Disney Princess characters, floral arrangements, a snack table, a selfie-booth and beauty stations for nails and skincare. Maggio, who has initiated several service projects on campus, hopes to make the Princess Retreat an annual event and collaborate with the first ladies of other University of Louisiana System schools on future service projects.
00 2018-10-11
Natchitoches

NSU Alumna Eckert selected as NEA Foundation Global Fellow


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University alumna Kimberly Eckert was selected as a NEA Foundation Global Learning Fellow and attended the “Keeping the Promise of Public Education” symposium in Washington, D.C., on World Teachers Day, Oct. 5. The NEA Foundation, a separate entity from National Education Association, developed the Global Learning Fellowship to allow educators the opportunity to develop the knowledge and skills to integrate global competency into their daily classroom instruction, advocate for global competency in their schools and districts and help students thrive in our increasingly interconnected world.



After a selection process, one fellow is selected from each state to embark on 12 months of professional development that culminates in an international exchange that enables them to design lesson plans with global focus connected to the UN Sustainable Development Goals and to become better equipped for advocacy.



Eckert’s task will culminate in South Africa next summer.



Eckert is a high school English teacher at Brusly High School. She earned a Bachelor of Social Work is 2004 and Master’s of Education in special education in 2013 at NSU and is also a reading specialist. In addition to serving as an NEA Global Fellow, she is also a Stand for Children’s LEAD Fellow, recently received Louisiana’s Public Interest Fellowship for work with Educators Rising and is the 2018 Louisiana State Teacher of the Year.



“I can’t imagine a better way to have celebrated World Teachers Day 2018 than by listening to the beautiful stories of teachers inspiring us to keep the promise of public education,” Eckert said. “I got to meet the other 2019 Fellows for The NEA Foundation and I’m so thankful to be a part of this group committed to global education.”



The NEA is a public charity founded by educators for educators to improve public education for all students. For more information visit https://www.neafoundation.org/for-educators/global-learning-resources/meet-the-fellows/.


Northwestern State University alumna Kimberly Eckert, left, was selected as on of the 1019 NEA Foundation Global Learning Fellows. She is pictured with Susan Koch, left, a first grade teacher from Montpelier, Vermont.
00 2018-10-10
Associated Press

Louisiana Tech student flies for round-the-world record by youngest pilot


A Louisiana teenager flew for 10½ hours through a sandstorm over Saudi Arabia, got stuck in the Philippines by typhoons, and set three youth aviation records.

Flying entirely by instruments through the sandstorm's turbulence was the worst part of the trip, Mason Andrews, 18, of Monroe in northeast Louisiana, said Monday. "It seemed like a hundred hours."

"The highlight was flying into Paris. I saw the Eiffel Tower on the approach — I landed at night," he said in a telephone interview from Louisiana Tech in Ruston. On the ground, "I went and saw it all lit up and walked along the Seine. ... I was able to realize, 'I just flew across the Atlantic Ocean!'"

He'd planned to spend two nights in the Philippines, but three typhoons — two of them Category 5 — kept him at Subic Bay from Sept. 2-21. "Jebi and Mangkhut were the biggest typhoons in ages," he said.

Between Subic Bay and Naha, Okinawa, his radio went out and, trying to avoid bad weather ahead, he strayed into Taiwan's airspace. "I was intercepted by a Taiwan F-16," Andrews said.



Was it scary? "A little bit. It was cool to see." Andrews said he'd have liked to take a photo, but "I didn't want to provoke the guy. I knew he could see me."



He edged back into Japanese airspace and the incident was over.

The aviation records aren't official yet, but Andrews doesn't expect any problems being certified as the youngest pilot to fly solo around the world and over the Atlantic and the Pacific oceans.

He was 18 years, 163 days old when his Piper PA-32 Lance, called The Spirit of Louisiane, touched down Saturday in Monroe — 71 days younger than Lachlan Smart of Queensland, Australia, at the end of his solo flight in 2016.

Andrews will be submitting a fat file of documentation both to the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale , which certifies international air sport records, and to Guinness World Records.

"I know I did it. I'll send them the information and get to work," he said.

Guinness will certify only one record, the circumnavigation, he said, but the Federation will look at all three.

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Andrews, who is majoring in professional aviation at Louisiana Tech, does face catch-up work in some tough college courses, since the trip took 76 days rather than the 40 he'd planned on. He was able to take two courses online during his voyage. However, he said, he'll need extra time with his professor on two others: aviation law and power plant systems.

The trip's 180 hours brings him about halfway to the 1,000 he needs for an airline transport pilot rating, but won't count toward his commercial or flight instructor's licenses, he said.


University President Les Guice greeted him at the airport Saturday with a $10,000 scholarship from the Louisiana Tech Foundation. That will be a huge help both with expenses from the trip and school expenses, Andrews said. Louisiana's TOPS scholarship covers tuition, but not such expenses as flight fuel and time.

Andrews said the round-the-world flight raised about $30,000 for MedCamps of Louisiana, which runs free summer camps for children who have disabilities or illnesses. Andrews has worked at his local camp three summers running as a counselor.

"Almost all was pledged after I left," he said. "Just in the last week I think we've raised the better part of $10,000."

He said about 20 of the children he's worked with there were among about a thousand people who were at the Monroe airport to greet him Saturday.

"I will be attempting another aviation world record. No details yet. But there are more plans in the future," he said.
00 2018-10-10
Baton Rouge

Closer look at LSU's 'holistic' admission policy: More than double the 'exceptions' allowed


Though the head of LSU argues that the university’s change in admission criteria is leading to an academically stronger class, the percentage of “exceptions” to the set standards were almost double the level the state’s higher education board allows.

LSU President F. King Alexander wrote Commissioner for Higher Education Kim Hunter Reed that 7.5 percent of the freshman students who entered LSU last month scored lower on college board tests and had lower grades than the minimum admission standards set by the Board of Regents.

Regents allow 4 percent of LSU’s incoming class to come from applicants who failed to meet the admissions standards. Other public colleges have leeway to except 6 to 8 percent of its freshmen from Regents criteria.

Reed is taking a wait and see approach to the news in Alexander’s correspondence.

The Regents have embarked on an audit of all 14 of the state’s four-year colleges to identify and count the students being “admitted by exception.” Only then will the Regents determine whether the admission rules need to be changed or whether schools taking too many students without the proper credentials need to be punished.

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Who should get into Louisiana universities? Board of Regents to audit schools' admission standards
The policy-setting board for higher education Wednesday initiated an audit of university admission standards after LSU unilaterally lessened t…

“Once we have actual data, that is no longer preliminary, such as what was shared in the letter, Regents will discuss the audit findings, the implications for student success and the appropriate response to any deviations from our policy,” Deputy Commissioner for Strategic Communication Meg Casper Sunstrom said in prepared statement for Reed.

Under the Regents minimum admission standards, first-time freshmen had to take in high school 19 credits of core courses, such as English, math and science. They also need to exceed either a minimum grade point average or a minimum ACT composite score.

LSU requires the 19 core course credits plus both minimum GPAs and ACT results – currently set at a 3.0 grade point average and a 22 out of 36 ACT score.

When LSU officials quietly embarked on trying out “holistic admissions” policies, they did so saying they could accept students with either a lower GPA or a lower ACT and still comply with the Regents 4 percent exception rule.

Critics say relaxing minimum test scores and GPAs will lead to admitting unprepared students who could slow the education of others and could undermine LSU’s flagship status.

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Group blasts new LSU admissions policy, calls 'holistic' process 'lowering standards'
A group headed by a member of the Board of Regents blasted LSU President F. King Alexander on Tuesday for the university’s recent decision to …

Alexander counters that most major universities are using the holistic method to shape their incoming freshmen classes because the policy identifies smart students who don’t fit in the tidy box of rigid scores and grades.

“The holistic review process includes a ‘deeper dive’ into course selection, rigor, persistence, grit and other variables that can assist in the prediction of a student’s success,” Alexander wrote Reed on Sept. 23.

Alexander argued that if the students LSU admitted by exception since 2011 were in their own college, their 48 percent graduation rate would put them at the third highest after LSU and Louisiana Tech.

Holistic admissions allow LSU to admit more demographically diverse students, as well as students from other states who pay higher tuition than Louisiana residents. The LSU Board of Supervisors recently approved the shift from set-in-stone GPA and ACT minimums to a more holistic approach.

Low ACT score? No problem: LSU to increase opportunities for all students with 'holistic admissions'
Low ACT score? No problem: LSU to increase opportunities for all students with 'holistic admissions'
LSU is relaxing a generation-old policy of automatically rejecting applicants who score too low on the standardized entrance exams like the ACT.

But holistic also means many more students who don’t meet the Regents’ minimum standards will be admitted.

Among the 5,809 freshmen LSU enrolled this fall – the largest and academically strongest in its history, averaging a 26 ACT score and a 3.5 GPA – 433 students were admitted by exception, Alexander wrote.

The exceptions averaged a 21.3 on the ACT and had a grade point average of 2.9, Alexander wrote. The Regents’ rules would have LSU summarily reject all but 4 percent, or 232, of those 433 applications.

Eighty-two of the excepted Fall 2018 admissions came from other states that didn’t require students to complete 19 credits in core courses. Twenty others were international students and 32 were athletes.

The largest contingent were the 195 students who did not meet LSU’s 3.0 GPA requirements.

Students dealing with personal trauma during their high school years, such as divorce, death, or flooding, often see their grades drop. And in some cases, the students started poorly, but developed into superior students as they matured, Alexander wrote.

Almost 19 percent of the students admitted by exception are the first in their families to attend college, two thirds came from public high schools and 57 percent studied in rural high schools, which often don’t have the similar resources as urban and suburban schools. One third of the students were low income Pell Grant recipients, he wrote.
00 2018-10-10
Houma/Thibodaux

Nicholls partners with coastal researchers


Nicholls State University has partnered with a Baton Rouge research group to work on projects to fight coastal erosion and flooding in south Louisiana.

Officials with the Thibodaux university and the not-for-profit Water Institute of the Gulf announced the collaboration today.

“Given our proximity to the Gulf of Mexico and the large number of our students that live in coastal parishes, it is imperative that Nicholls play an active role in the restoration of our coast,” Nicholls President Jay Clune said in a news release. “We’re excited to work with the Water Institute of the Gulf. Their internationally recognized work in coastal resiliency aligns with our mission to protect coastal Louisiana.”

The agreement sets out the potential for collaboration on research, faculty exchanges, student mentorship programs and shared work space on Nicholls main campus, farm and Fourchon lab.

“The great challenges facing Louisiana and coastal areas around the world require an immense amount of research and action and that work only gets done through partnerships,” said Justin Ehrenwerth, president and CEO of the Water Institute. “We are proud to formalize our collaboration with Nicholls State University given their long track record of coastal research and their wealth of knowledge around deltaic systems.”

Officials from the two institutions will meet yearly to discuss work plans and opportunities for collaboration.

The Water Institute has been involved with similar research around the globe. It has partnerships with Tulane, Harvard, the Universidad de Los Lagos in Chile and Columbia University’s Center for Resilient Cities and Landscapes. It also collaborates with global organizations including Deltares in the Netherlands, Ecole des Ingénieurs de la Ville de Paris and the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme based in Samoa.
00 2018-10-10
Lafayette

Study: How well do Louisiana's universities recruit and graduate black students?


A new study out of the University of Southern California found Louisiana does a bad job recruiting and graduating black students from its public colleges — not just bad, the worst.

The report from the USC Race and Equity Center gave each institution a letter grade and an "equity index score." Those were averaged to get the state's overall score. Louisiana's was the lowest of 50 states at 1.18.

The average equity index score across the 506 public institutions in the study was 2.02. No campus earned above 3.5. Two hundred colleges and universities earned scores below 2.0, including all of the Louisiana schools in the study.

The scores were based on four "equity indicators" — representation equity, gender equity, completion equity and black student-to-faculty ratio.

Analysts used U.S. Census population statistics and quantitative data from the U.S. Department of Education to measure post-secondary access and student success for black undergrads.

But no HBCUs were included
The analysis focused on black undergraduate students enrolled at every four-year, non-specialized, public post-secondary institution in the nation, according to the summary. That comes to 506 schools.

Graduate Halle Taylor gets a hug from teacher AlineBuy Photo
Graduate Halle Taylor gets a hug from teacher Aline Macklemore during the commencement of Lafayette High at the Cajundome Sat., May 20, 2016. (Photo: LEE CELANO/THE ADVERTISER)

The report did not include historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in its analyses, considering them specialized, like private schools or military institutes.

The list includes 11 schools from the Louisiana State University System and University of Louisiana System. As HBCUs, two four-years in the Southern University System are not included.

Louisiana is home to three four-year HBCUs — Grambling State, Southern University A&M and Southern University New Orleans — and together they had 10,393 black undergraduate students enrolled in fall 2017. All three see a majority of black students.

That data likely would have improved the state's grade had it been included in the scope of the report, increasing both the number of enrolled black students and black graduates. However, these schools have low graduation rates.


When including HBCUs, Louisiana's 14 four-year universities had an undergraduate student population that was nearly 25 percent black in fall 2007, according to enrollment data from the Louisiana Board of Regents..

RELATED: What La. universities are learning about diversity and inclusion and how that could impact you | What is an HBCU's mission today?

How did the Louisiana schools score?
The 11 Louisiana schools in the study were scored as such:

Louisiana State University at Alexandria, 0.75
Louisiana Tech University, 1.0
McNeese State University, 1.0
Nicholls State University, 1.0
University of Louisiana at Monroe, 1.0
Southeastern Louisiana University, 1.0
Louisiana State University, 1.25
University of Louisiana at Lafayette, 1.25
Louisiana State University-Shreveport, 1.5
Northwestern State University, 1.5
University of New Orleans, 1.75
UNO, the Louisiana school with the highest score, had a student population in fall 2017 that was 16.6 percent black, according to data from the Louisiana Board of Regents.

The letter grades showed most of these schools struggled with all four "equity indicators" but especially in representation. In that, Northwestern State ranked the highest with a D.

Schools fared better at gender equity — UL Lafayette and UNO each had B's — and completion equity. Northwestern State got an A in completion, which was the only A for any of the Louisiana schools in any indicator.

LSU-Shreveport did the best when it comes to black student-to-black faculty ratio, earning a B.

Louisiana schools are working on this, incorporating support systems through on-campus centers and a more diverse faculty and leadership teams.

"It is in our stated purpose to diversify our leadership teams. Success is directly attributable to the diversity of leadership teams," University of Louisiana System President and CEO Jim Henderson said in August.

In fact, UL Lafayette just received the 2018 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity Award. The 96 colleges and universities to receive this award were announced recently by INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, the largest diversity magazine and website in higher education.

"The honor recognizes a university-wide focus on providing underrepresented groups equal access to educational opportunities and resources," Taniecea Mallery, UL Lafayette’s director of Equity, Diversity and Community Engagement, said in a statement.

More findings from the USC study:
►Louisiana wasn't the only Southern state to come in at the bottom of the study. Nearby Mississippi was fourth to last.

►Massachusetts had the highest equity score at 2.81.

►Black citizens are 14.6 percent of 18- to 24-year-olds across the 50 states. Only 9.8 percent of full-time, degree-seeking undergraduates at public colleges and universities are black.

►For every full-time black faculty member at a public college or university, there are 42 full-time, degree-seeking black undergraduates.

►Forty institutions employ no full-time black instructors. On 44 percent of public campuses, there are 10 or fewer full-time black faculty members across all ranks and academic fields.
00 2018-10-10
Lafayette

Schools participate in UL’s Paint the Town Red


Ragin’ Spirit fills the air as UL Homecoming week is underway.

Today, several Lafayette Parish Schools Painted the Town Red. KATC’s Chris Welty was one of the guest judges.

Students at each school sang the Fight Song at the top of their lungs as they made their Ragin’ Cajuns pride known. Schools were decked out in Vermilion and white and participants recited UL cheers and chants.

This year’s theme is Back in the Mix Back on the Bricks.

Fisher Early Childhood Development Center is known for elaborate skits and decorations. Once the theme is announced, the school takes roughly two weeks to formulate a game plan, start crafting and teaching skits.

“When we decided to start doing this, it was like this is a win-win for our community, our schools—every school,” said Sharon O’Neill with Fisher’s. “It brings attention to our schools and awareness to the University.”

Paint the Town Red Schools Event Chair, Sara Bourque said this week is all about community involvement.

“This is such an important tradition because it is rooted so deep within our community and it really provides an overall sense of coming together and showing Ragin’ Cajun pride,” said Bourque.

St. Cecilia counselor Holly Leger believes this event falls in the top five at her school. Students take pride in their work and are excited to show off.

“My favorite part was making the balloon arch,” said third grader Isabella Huval.

“Their level of enthusiasm for a school they haven’t even attended before…I mean you’d think they went there themselves and they absolutely love it,” said St. Cecilia Councelor Holly Leger. “They’re so proud.”

Each school was judged on theme, skit and Ragin’ Spirit.

Best Chant: Youngsville Middle School
Best Skit: Woodvale Elementary School
Most Creative Theme: Our Lady of Fatima
Most Creative Decorations: Fisher Early Childhood Development
Best Academic Connection: Cpl. Michael Middlebrook Elementary
Most Ragin’ Cajun Spirit: Edward J. Sam
Best School Participation: St. Cecilia
Best Costume: Woodvale Elementary School
Judges Choice: Fisher Early Childhood Development
Best Overall: Fisher Early Childhood Development
00 2018-10-10
Lake Charles

McNeese State University gets report of 2nd sexual assault case in 2018


LAKE CHARLES, LA (KPLC) - McNeese State University Police have identified a suspect in an alleged sexual assault over the weekend, which would be the school’s second sexual assault case in 2018.

“Saturday afternoon, McNeese received a telephone call from Memorial Hospital notifying us that they had a student there that possibly had been sexually assaulted,” Candace Townsend, director of public relations and university events said.

A mass message was sent over the weekend to staff and students alerting them that the alleged assault happened at an on-campus residence hall. Townsend said just a few hours of investigation led them to identify a suspect, but the university police have not yet released a name.

Townsend said she wants McNeese students to know school officials take these cases very seriously and the university has different preventative measures in place to keep its students safe.

“Throughout the year—but especially in the beginning months of the fall semester—there are a number of programs that we have for students, both resident students and all students, on things such as preventing sexual assault. We have a campaign that’s going: what does ‘no’ mean?”

In addition to emergency call boxes in every parking lot, Townsend said each dorm and apartment on campus has an emergency panic button in every room. Both of these devices ring straight to the McNeese State Police dispatch.

Townsend said although these cases happen very rarely at McNeese, their number one priority is to look out for the victim and provide them with any on-campus resources they may need.

No further details about this case have been released at this time.

Copyright 2018 KPLC. All rights reserved.
00 2018-10-10
Monroe

Conference on Disability Advocacy held at ULM today


MONROE, La. - (10/9/18) October is National Disability Employment Awareness month.

Today dozens gathered at ULM for the Conference on Disability Advocacy.

The purpose of the program is to raise awareness on the barriers people with disabilities face by encouraging them to focus on their strengths.

Also by working with small businesses and non-profits to focus on employment opportunities for people with disabilities.

Dr. Anita Sharma says, "What this event is doing is highlighting and focusing on people who usually get sidelined or marginalized because they have a disability. So we are celebrating the fact that they are a part of the workforce.. They are part of the mainstream. And they are as able as anyone else."

The conference was a partnership with ULM's College of Business and Social Sciences and Families Helping Families of Northeast Louisiana.
00 2018-10-10
Natchitoches

NSU slates Homecoming festivities for Oct. 25-27


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University will celebrate Homecoming 2018 with a slate of activities, reunions, alumni gatherings, parade, pep rally and more beginning Thursday, Oct. 25 and continuing through Saturday, Oct. 27.



Northwestern State’s School of Business will present the 52th annual J. Walter Porter Forum beginning at 9:30 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 25 in Russell Hall Room 107. This year’s theme is “Leadership and Empowerment: Time’s Up,” centered on highlighting the importance of why all business professionals should lead in the fight against sexual harassment in the workplace.



At 6 p.m. Friday, the NSU Black Alumni Association will host a BAA Alumni Mixer at Chateau St. Denis, 751 Second St.



Events on Friday, Oct. 26 begin with the annual Homecoming Golf Tournament at 11 a.m. at the NSU Rec Complex.



At 1 p.m. the Black Alumni Association will host “Life Lessons with Laughter and Love” featuring the Al Rucker Show in the Student Union Ballroom.



Evening events begin at 5 p.m. with an alumni art exhibit, “Woodworking with Mike Wilson” at Orville Hanchey Gallery.



The Homecoming parade will roll at 5:30 p.m. and will feature student groups, floats and throws. The parade will start at NSU’s main gate and will proceed down Second Street, turn right onto Rue Touline and proceed to Rue Beauport for a 6 p.m. pep rally on the Fleur De Lis Stage where the Homecoming Honor Court will be recognized and spirit groups will perform. Following the pep rally, the Rockin’ on the Riverbank Homecoming Festival will take place on the riverbank. Homecoming Awards will be presented to student groups at 7:30 p.m.



An alumni jazz concert will also take place in the Alumni Plaza on campus starting at 6:30 p.m.



At 7 p.m., the Black Alumni Association will host the Diamond Greek Life Show in A.A. Fredericks Auditorium on campus and the 1988 and 1998 football teams will gather for a reunion at Chateau St. Denis.



The AKA/Alpha Reunion Gala will begin at 8 p.m. in the Student Union Ballroom.



Downtown by the Decades will begin at 8:30 p.m. where alumni will meet up at specific locations by graduation year. Alumni from the 1950s and 1960s will meet at the Pioneer Pub. Alumni from the 1970s will meet in the main dining room at Merci Beaucoup while alumni from the 1980s will meet in the Merci Beaucoup banquet room. Alumni from the 1990s will meet at Bon Ami above The Landing. Alumni from the 2000s will meet at Mama’s Blues Room and alumni from the 2010s will meet at Maglieux’s.



The Black Alumni Association Diamond Life After Party will begin at 10 p.m. at The Edge.



Events on Saturday, Oct. 27 will begin at 9 a.m. with the Breakfast and Bingo at Collins Pavilion



Also beginning at 9 a.m., Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority will present a mentoring workshop in the Student Union Room 321.



The N Club Hall of Fame Induction ceremony will begin at 10 a.m. in Prather Coliseum.



The College of Business and Technology Outstanding Business Awards and Reception will begin at 11 a.m. in the Natchitoches Room in Russell Hall.



A luncheon for past Homecoming Kings and Queens and past Mr. and Miss NSUs will begin at 11:30 a.m. in the Student Union Ballroom.



A reunion luncheon for alumni of Sigma Tau Gamma will begin at noon in the President’s Room of the Student Union.



At 1 p.m. the Gallaspy College of Education and Human Development will host a reunion in the Commons Area of the Teacher Education Center. A ceremony for honorees who will be inducted into the Hall of Distinguished Educators will begin at 1:30 p.m. in the Teacher Education Auditorium – Pod A.



Also at 1 p.m., the Alphas and AKAs will take a group photo at the front entrance of the Student Union.



Tailgating activities in and around Collins Pavilion, Donald’s Demon Alley and the practice field will begin at 2 p.m. The Black Alumni Association will host a tailgate and picnic at the practice field at 2 p.m.



The Demon Regiment Open House and tailgate will begin at 3 p.m. at the James A. Noe Military Science Building.



Pregame activities at Turpin Stadium will begin at 5:30 p.m. Inductees into the Hall of Distinguished Educators and the Business Hall of Distinguished Honors will be recognized on the field at 5:45 p.m. Kick-off for Northwestern versus Houston Baptist will be at 6 p.m.



Halftime ceremonies will take place at about 7:30 p.m. where the Homecoming Honor Court will be introduced.



The Black Alumni Association After Party will begin at 10 p.m. at the Natchitoches Country Club.



Times and locations for some events may be subject to change, so those planning to attend should check with the host to verify plans. A detailed schedule of events is also available at northwesternalumni.com under Upcoming Events.






NSU Homecoming 2017
00 2018-10-10
Ruston

Louisiana Tech Theatre presents 'The Groundling'


RUSTON, La. - Louisiana Tech Theatre Department presents 'The Groundling'.

This show will be held at the following dates and times:

October 23 - 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

October 24 - 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

October 25 - 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

October 26 - 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

October 27 - 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

Read the synopsis of the play below:

ll the world's a stage, including Bob's garage.

After stumbling upon an outdoor production of a Shakespeare play in Manhattan, Long Island, landscaper Bob Malone returns home inspired to write a play about his troubled marriage. He hires two reluctant New York theatre professionals to spend a week at his home and stage the play in his garage with a cast of colorful locals. THE GROUNDLING is a comedy exploring the meaning of the final moments of Shakespeare’s LOVE'S LABOUR'S LOST, and how the power of theatre can affect the most unsuspecting, and perhaps most deserving, of us all.
00 2018-10-09
Baton Rouge

Louisiana tax incentive programs cost taxpayers $1B last year


Louisiana spent more than $1 billion on tax breaks for people and corporations during the budget cycle that ended in July.

An annual audit of the state's tax revenue loss, released this week, also found that the return on investment for the 78 rebates and other perks evaluated isn't always known.

"There are no specifications in the statutes regarding the method of calculation to be used in determining the (return) related to each incentive," the Louisiana Legislative Auditor's Office wrote in an executive summary of their findings. "With no guidelines or restrictions, the accuracy of the (return on investment) calculation and the appropriateness of the methodology used cannot readily be determined."

The incentive programs are largely meant to stimulate the economy or provide a benefit for special circumstances.

One of the largest in the budget cycle covered was about $205 million in revenue lost to the Motion Picture Investor Tax Credit. That program, which subsidizes movie-makers who film in Louisiana, is estimated as having a return of 22 cents for every dollar spent.

Officials have recently touted changes made to the film tax credit program in 2016 as offering more stability that has stimulated the film industry here, after a brief decline. Gov. John Bel Edwards' administration plans to release an "economic impact" report in the spring.

Gov. Edwards on visits with Hollywood execs: 'They like doing business here'
Gov. Edwards on visits with Hollywood execs: 'They like doing business here'
Back from a short trip to California to promote the generous subsidies Louisiana offers to film and TV productions, Gov. John Bel Edwards says…

Other breaks also are given for some child care expenses, rehabilitation of historic structures and solar panel installation, among others.

Revenue Secretary Kimberly Robinson said in response to the audit that the state Revenue Department plans to develop and dedicate resources to a team of economists to better keep up with how productive incentive programs are.

"The economists, working in conjunction with our analysts, will develop consistent procedures and defined calculations for use in (return on investment) analysis for those incentives that are legislatively intended to provide a return of revenue to Louisiana," she wrote.

Robinson also noted that not all incentives are designed to have a positive return on investment.

She pointed out one such program for members of the military to receive discounted hunting and fishing licenses.

"As a benefit to service members and their families, the credit does not return a certain dollar amount for each dollar of credit granted," she wrote. "Instead, the credit is designed to reimburse service members and their families for the purchase of Louisiana noncommercial hunting or fishing licenses without reducing the self-generated revenues of the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries."

Tax breaks, particularly the motion picture credit, have frequently been a point of debate as lawmakers have grappled with repeated budget crises in recent years.

The Legislature earlier this year agreed to extend part of a sales tax hike that was set to expire July 1 to shore up the state's finances.
00 2018-10-09
Hammond

Southeastern Channel game broadcast named one of nation’s best


The live, student-produced broadcast of a Southeastern Louisiana University basketball game has been honored as fourth best in the nation.

The Southeastern Channel’s production and live broadcast of the Southeastern vs. Southern University of New Orleans men’s basketball game on Dec. 14, 2017, won the Award of Excellence for student “Television Sports Event Production” at the Broadcast Education Association’s 2018 Festival of Media Arts in Las Vegas recently.

The winning broadcast was one of 14 produced by the 15-man student crew during the past year, including Lions’ football, soccer, baseball, softball, and men’s and women’s basketball games. Plans are to add volleyball to the mix this fall.

The Southeastern Channel is scheduled to produce and air the Lions’ Homecoming football game Oct. 13, along with the Hall of Fame game Oct. 20.

The all-student production featured John Sartori of Mandeville as play-by-play announcer with Wesley Boone of Alexandria as color commentator. Dylan Domangue of Houma was the courtside reporter while Freddie Rosario of Hahnville was both director and technical director.

Other student crew members were Andrew Scherer of New Orleans, Tyler Guidroz of Ponchatoula, Jordan Rheams of Baton Rouge, Courtney Bruno of New Orleans, Richie Solares of New Orleans, Tyler Rogers of Hammond, Alexander Castro of Hammond, Schuylar Ramsey of Springfield, Zechariah Cameron of Baton Rouge, Taylor Sharp of Walker, Blair Joseph of New Orleans and Adam Cortez of El Paso, Texas.

“We’re one of the very few college television stations in the entire country where students are able to do play-by-play announcing, color commentating, sideline reporting and live event directing for Division One sports events,” said Southeastern Channel General Manager Rick Settoon.

“So it’s an even greater honor for our students to have the quality of their work recognized by industry executives and professionals as among the very best in the nation.”

BEA judges wrote on the entry score sheet, “This is a solid broadcast. The announcers are good, young announcers. The directing was solid. I loved the graphics; they were clean and easy to read. The game cameras did an excellent job of following the play-by-play and were framed just right for normal coverage. Overall, really nice production and very well done.”

“Personally, play-by-play announcing before arriving at the Southeastern Channel was a dream, a bucket-list item,” said Sartori. “But here I am, having the opportunity to live out a dream multiple times a year at the Division 1 level, which is something no student takes for granted. We understand some individuals never reach this point in their career at any stage, and we are being given this opportunity before we reach the age of 25.”

“The experience is priceless,” said Boone. “It’s a situation for those who have always had an interest in the field to have that first-hand encounter with how professional broadcasts are put together. The experience is second-to-none, nationwide.”

Settoon said the students’ quality of work has led to a rarity for student productions — their broadcasts airing on national sports networks. The channel broadcasts stream live on the Southland Digital Network and airs on Cox Sports Television (CST) for 5.5 million viewers.

“Every aspect of Southeastern Channel live productions is high quality,” said Southland Conference Associate Commissioner for Television and New Media Chris Mycoskie. “From the announcers, to the camera work, to the graphics, we’ve been impressed. The ability to simulcast those broadcasts on the Southland Digital Network gives us some great programming and allows fans to watch the games on our website and apps.”

“The students at the Southeastern Channel do a great job of putting on a game broadcast,” said CST Executive Producer Jeff Brenner, producer of CST games for the last 15 years. “It’s not often that a completely student-run game from the announcers to the camera operators looks so professional. These are skills that take years to develop, and the Southeastern Channel has the students well prepared to join the working world right out of college.”

The Southeastern Channel has won 17 Emmys in the past 15 years and can be seen on Charter Spectrum 199 in Tangipahoa, St. Tammany, Livingston and St. Helena parishes and viewed online via live webcast at thesoutheasternchannel.com.
00 2018-10-09
Houma/Thibodaux

Houma businessman donates golf carts to Nicholls


Nicholls State University Bridge to Independence Program students and members of the Alumni Federation will now be able to scoot around campus in their own golf carts thanks to a gift from a Houma philanthropist.

Arlen “Benny” Cenac Jr., owner of Cenac Marine, gave the two new carts to the two programs last week.

“We here at the Arlen B. Cenac Jr. Family of Companies are proud to be able to supply the Bridge to Independence Program and Alumni Federation with the resources to make their job and lives a little easier and faster to accomplish their remarkable goals,” said Cenac, who has served on the board for the Nicholls College of Business and the Nicholls Foundation.

The Bridge program will use its six-passenger cart to assist in transporting students across campus to their jobs, while the alumni office will use its cart to haul supplies across campus to events such as tailgating.

“This will allow myself and my staff to spend more time connecting with our alumni and our students in order to generate much-needed support for the Alumni Federation and Nicholls as a whole,” said Katherine Gianelloni, director of Alumni Affairs. “We are truly fortunate to have donors like Mr. Benny, who love our alma mater and the Nicholls Alumni Federation as much as we do.”

Bridge advisor Mary Breaud said this new cart will be great for a program that has grown from eight to 30 in the last two years.

“It is especially important during inclement weather and for our students who have some health issues and walking long distances in the heat is very difficult,” she said. “We feel very fortunate to have wonderful donors to the Bridge to Independence program like Mr. Benny Cenac. His generosity is greatly appreciated.”

Bridge to Independence assists students with intellectual disabilities or autism spectrum disorder with job and social skills. Nicholls’ program is one of only 50 in the United States certified by the U.S. Department of Education and the only one in Louisiana.

Research competition returns to Nicholls

Nicholls State University students will be tested on their ability to effectively communicate scientific research regarding coastal Louisiana during a competition hosted by Louisiana Sea Grant.

The public competition, titled Coastal Connections, challenges students to concisely communicate their research in three minutes or less, with no more than two Powerpoint slides. Three winners will receive $500 travel awards to attend conferences that align with their research.

Students submit their research to Louisiana Sea Grant, and a panel will select the finalists to present their research at 4 p.m. Oct. 29 at the Wetlands Acadia Cultural Center at Jean Lafitte National Park in Thibodaux.

“It’s important for our students, who are scientists-in-training, to practice explaining their science to the public and why our research involving coastal issues is important,” said Aimee Hollander, assistant professor of biological sciences.

Competitors will be judged on their ability to capture an audience’s attention, quickly and effectively communicate the significance of their research and whether their presentations leave the audience with new information.

The three judges are Virginia Schutte, social media director for the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium; Susan Testroet-Bergeron, program director at the Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program; and Jay Clune, Nicholls president.

The event is free and open to the public.
00 2018-10-09
Lafayette

UL marks Homecoming with talent show, food drive, Yell Like Hell


UL Lafayette

Homecoming Week 2018 continues with activities that give students an outlet to display their talents, and their generosity.

The “Cajuns Got Talent” competition for UL Lafayette students will be held at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 9, at the Cajundome Convention Center.

Students will sing karaoke, dance or demonstrate other talents during the popular contest, said Ruben Henderson, assistant director of University Program Council. The public is invited to attend the free event.

“The competition has been focused on karaoke in the past, but this format gives students a chance to showcase any talent,” Henderson said.

On Wednesday, Oct. 10, the Wear Red, Get Fed and the Cajuns Can Care Food Drive events will be held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Boucher Street.

Attendees who wear Louisiana Ragin’ Cajuns apparel will be able to snack on pulled pork sandwiches, macaroni and cheese, salad, brownies and soft drinks while the lunch lasts. For the food drive, students who bring canned and nonperishable goods will help stock shelves at local food pantries.

“Students display their school spirit, and their willingness to help others,” Henderson said.

On Thursday, Oct. 11, the Yell Like Hell Pep Rally will be held at 7 p.m. on the Student Union porch and in the courtyard near Cypress Lake. The traditional Yell Like Hell pep rally was started in 1969 by Delta Delta Delta sorority.

Attendees will enjoy music played by the Pride of Acadiana Marching Band, and a DJ. Members of the football team, the Homecoming Court, cheerleaders, and the Ragin’ Jazz dance team will attend.

Visit louisiana.edu/homecoming to learn more about Homecoming 2018 events.
00 2018-10-09
Lafayette

UL Lafayette student creates artwork for Andouille Fest


The 2018 Andouille Festival will be held October 19th-21st in Laplace, Louisiana. UL Lafayette student and Laplace native Ciara Sanders created the artwork for the popular festival. For information on how to purchase the poster, log on to www.andouillefestival.com.
00 2018-10-09
Lafayette

Places and Faces: UL Lafayette Homecoming


News 15’s Megan Woods spent the morning at Cajun Field kicking off homecoming week with the university’s police, alumni association, homecoming court and more. For the full homecoming schedule click here.
00 2018-10-09
Monroe

GSU talks safety following shooting | Nearly one year after double homicide


GRAMBLING, La. (KNOE) - A Lincoln Parish man is facing an Attempted 2nd Degree Murder charge after being accused of shooting one man on the campus of Grambling State University. Neither the suspect nor the victim is a student at the school. Students received a campus-wide alert shortly before 10 p.m. urging them to stay inside their rooms on Sunday.

Dwayne Fletcher charged with Attempted 2nd Degree Murder.
Dwayne Fletcher charged with Attempted 2nd Degree Murder.
Deputies say the shooting happened at the basketball courts. After the incident, deputies say the suspect, Dwayne Fletcher, fled the scene on foot. He was later found hiding in a bush near the elementary school.

"I just want to go where I need to go without worrying about getting shot or anything like that," one student said.

GSU President Rick Gallot says they "are committed to keeping this campus safe.”

He said he wants students and parents to know the shooting was an isolated situation.

"I would say the individuals involved were not Grambling State University students," Gallot said.

The later days of October will make a year since the double homicide took place on campus last year. Gallot says they have made some changes since then.

“Police have asked for student identification on different times and locations," he said.

Gallot says since GSU is an open campus, they are working with the parish and city to control who comes on and off campus.

"We want to make sure that our students are the ones here on campus as oppose to outsiders," he said.

Media Coordinator Javon Hackley is urging students to voice their concerns to the university's staff.

“You’ve got a president that you can reach. You’ve got faculty and staff that you can reach that are actively concerned here," he said. "If you see something to say something because they are our best lens to what’s happening here on campus.”

Fletcher is in custody at the Lincoln Parish Detention Center on a $760,000 bond. The victim is in stable condition.
00 2018-10-09
Monroe

GSU students turning to prayer after Sunday's shooting


GRAMGLING, La. (KNOE) - Every Monday, the student body at Grambling State University comes together, joins hands, and asks God for a good week.


"Our students, they really thrive in taking religion very seriously and we thought this was another way we can incorporate it with the student body," said SGA vice president Kyla Nelson.

But Monday's prayer was different. Sunday's shooting left students praying for safety and recovery.

"Prayer is much needed after things like that happen, said Miss Grambling Jamaria Davis Miller. “of course, everything isn't perfect. Everything isn't going to go well. It's not going to always be good news, but in the mist of the bad news, you have to turn it into good news and find the best in things."

The weekly prayer meeting started after a fatal shooting on campus last year and ever since it's had a positive impact on students like Shawn Shoemaker.

"It's something I look forward to doing every Monday because I do believe that prayer doesn't just help everybody, but it helps us as individuals," Shoemaker said.

He says the campus-wide prayer has helped him with grades and every day college struggles. Shoemaker says he's hoping it will put an end to campus violence too.

"It's not about the violence,” said Shoemaker. “It's not about the shootings, but it is about being there for one another. It's about loving each other. For the word of God teaches us that all things work together for the good of those who love God and are called according to his purpose. So I believe that if we're called according to his purpose, I believe that we should all stand in unity."

Baptist Student Union president Michael Douglas led today's prayer. He says going to God is the best way to work through tragedy.

"If we want the shootings to stop, we don't need to go to those people and tell them to stop shooting, we need to go to god on their behalf," said Douglas.

Trying to find light, in the darkness that started this week.

Students will be talking more about this at their weekly "Talk to Me Thursday" meeting and what can be done to prevent this from happening in the future.
00 2018-10-09
Natchitoches

Jazz Orchestra to perform Oct. 15


NATCHITOCHES – The Northwestern State University Jazz Orchestra will present a concert on Monday, Oct. 15 at 7:30 p.m.in Magale Recital Hall. The Jazz Orchestra is directed by Associate Professor of Music Galindo Rodriguez.



The Jazz Orchestra includes saxophone section members Alex Guillory of Goldonna, Stephen Garrett of Arlington, Texas, Adam Normand of Panama City, Florida, Kenyon Johnson II of DeRidder and Jordan Davis of Yantis, Texas; trombone section members Michael Dailey of West Monroe, Jacob St. Pierre of Laplace, John Floyd of Henderson, Texas, and Byron Walters of Bentley.



Members of the trumpet section are Nathan Roth of Luling, Lane Clevenger of Bush and Sebastian A. Fontalvo and Sadoc S. Calderon of Cartegena, Colombia. On piano are Romulo Osorio Herrera of Cartagena, Colombia and James Armstrong of Natchitoches. Bass players are Jon Colon of Cartagena, Colombia, and Abigail Hoy of Juneau, Alaska. Andrew Boyd of Frisco, Texas is on vibraphone and Elias Castro Caballero and Luis Colon of Cartegena, Colombia, are on drums.



The Jazz Orchestra will perform “Who’s Sorry Now” by Ted Snyder with words by Bert Kalmer and Harry Ruby and arranged by Sammy Nestico featuring Dailey and Johnson, “Back Home in Indiana” by James F. Hanley and arranged by Gregg Yasinitsky featuring Normand, “Maiden Voyage” by Herbie Hancock and arranged by Erik Morales featuring Normand, Armstrong and Boyd, “Recordame” by Joe Henderson and arranged by Erik Richards featuring Normand, Boyd and Herrera.



The orchestra will also play “Havana” by John Fedchock featuring Dailey, Boyd and Guillory and “Struttin’ With Some Barbecue” with words and music by Lilian Hardin Armstrong and Don Raye and arranged by Mike Tomaro featuring Dailey, Normand and Caballero.
00 2018-10-09
Regional/National

You can now take a college course on all things Anthony Bourdain


CNN) — In the last episode of "Parts Unknown" completed before Anthony Bourdain's death, the Emmy-award winning TV travel host and best-selling author leaves us with these haunting and poignant words in Kenya: "Who gets to tell the stories?"
"The answer in this case, for better or for worse, is I do -- at least this time. I do my best. I look. I listen. But in the end, I know it's my story, not Kamau's [reference to comedian and television host W. Kamau Bell, Bourdain's sidekick in the episode], not Kenya's, or Kenyans'. Those stories are yet to be heard."
Anthony Bourdain with W. Kamau Bell in the Kibera slums in Nairobi, Kenya in February 2018 during the filming of Season 12 'Parts Unknown.'
Anthony Bourdain with W. Kamau Bell in the Kibera slums in Nairobi, Kenya in February 2018 during the filming of Season 12 'Parts Unknown.'
David Scott Holloway for CNN
There's no doubt Bourdain's profound influence on how we view the world as travelers, as storytellers, as both outsiders and insiders, as consumers — of food, culture and media — will stir thoughtful discourse for years to come.
But if you're a student at Nicholls State University in Thibodaux, Louisiana, you'll have a chance to discuss all things Bourdain — and earn college credit for it — as early as 2019.
Professor Todd Kennedy, the head of the university's film studies program, is teaching a new class entitled "Anthony Bourdain and His Influencers" next spring.
Conception of the course
Kennedy, who holds a Ph.D. in 20th century American literature and film, spoke to me recently about how deeply shaken he was by news of Bourdain's death: "I was in Spain at the time with my wife, and I found myself bawling for days and days afterwards. ... I started thinking about the way Bourdain encapsulates so much of everything we do in film studies, in English studies, in cultural studies and what I do for a living."
Kennedy admits that while he enjoyed Bourdain's TV programs, he didn't consider himself a super-fan. "While I was a fan of his show, I don't think like one. Maybe it's the academic in me, but I'm always removed from things. I wrote a master's thesis on Bob Dylan, but I'm not invested in Bob Dylan as a person," says Kennedy.
But Kennedy couldn't remove himself from Anthony Bourdain, especially how much the chef-turned-host elevated television — creating shows that were some of the most filmic in the history of the small screen. "A lot of times we don't think of television as film — even I can sometimes be a little harsh on it — but what Bourdain did visually was some of the most innovative I've ever seen on TV."
Anthony Bourdain in conversation over a traditional meal at Aizepe, a gastronomic society in the heart of San Sebastian's Old Town.
Anthony Bourdain in conversation over a traditional meal at Aizepe, a gastronomic society in the heart of San Sebastian's Old Town.
STAFF
Kennedy recalls reading this 2010 interview in which Bourdain shares his goal of trying to make something novel and taking risks with his show. The Travel Channel's "No Reservations," which preceded "Parts Unknown," was being filmed at the time.
In the 2010 CityBeat interview, Bourdain offered some insight into his method: "Often before we even pick what country we're going to we start with a movie that we love and start thinking about where we might apply that look."
"In the best-case scenario, we're trying to make a different independent film every week," Bourdain said.
"I started realizing in almost every episode there's these obscure visual allusions to films that probably only he and his cinematographers were likely to know," says Kennedy.
Of course, the cinematic "No Reservations" Rome episode immediately comes to mind. Shot entirely in black and white, it evokes Italian film icons Fellini, Bertolucci and Antonioni. But Kennedy started spotting more and more film allusions in every episode, some that were not always obvious.
Anthony Bourdain in Tokyo, an episode in Season 2 'Parts Unknown.'
Anthony Bourdain in Tokyo, an episode in Season 2 'Parts Unknown.'
Zero Point Zero Production
In the "Parts Unknown" San Sebastian episode, Kennedy sees nods to Spanish filmmaker Julio Medem. Most of the professor's research has been focused on feminist film theory including the work of director Sofia Coppola, so he quickly realized the "Parts Unknown" Tokyo episode paid homage to "Lost in Translation."
The Literary Aspect
Kennedy also sees a number of literary influences in Bourdain's storytelling. Jim Harrison's novella "Legends of the Fall" is on the syllabus. A hero of Bourdain's, the celebrated author and poet's work was anchored in the wide open spaces of America's great outdoors, and his novella inspired the iconic 1994 film.
Tony spoke with author, Jim Harrison after a drive through Paradise Valley, Montana.
Tony spoke with author, Jim Harrison after a drive through Paradise Valley, Montana.
ZPZ/CNN
Fans may recall Bourdain meeting Harrison in the "No Reservations" Big Sky Country episode; later, in season seven of "Parts Unknown," Bourdain returns to Montana to bask in his literary hero's light one last time, as Harrison passed away shortly after this episode was filmed.
As for other literary influences of Bourdain's, Kennedy is also particularly excited to discuss the brash voice of New York's underground, Lydia Lunch, the no wave moment singer/poet/spoken word performer who will be featured in the final episode: the Lower East Side.
Students will start the course where it all began, by reading "Kitchen Confidential," Bourdain's tell-all memoir that shook up the culinary industry and catapulted the truth-serving chef into fame. The syllabus will also include "Between Meals: An Appetite of Paris" by A.J. Liebling, one of Bourdain's biggest inspirations for food writing.
Each week, the class will focus on an episode from one of Bourdain's shows —"A Cook's Tour," "No Reservations" and "Parts Unknown," — as well as the novel and/or film that Kennedy believes influenced Bourdain.
Anthony Bourdain in Hanoi.
Anthony Bourdain in Hanoi.
Zero Point Zero for CNN
For instance, the course will take a close look at one of Bourdain's favorite places, Vietnam. Kennedy will encourage students to consider what influenced Bourdain's exploration of the country. Ancillary material will include "Apocalypse Now" and Graham Greene's "The Quiet American," both of which inspired Bourdain while he was filming in Vietnam. Other readings on Vietnam will be assigned; watching the actual episode comes at the end.
"By the end of the week, we'll be debating Vietnam through the lens of how Anthony Bourdain saw it, but also with an awareness of what influenced Bourdain's perspectives of Vietnam before he ever got there," explains Kennedy.
Anthony Bourdain gets to know the locals in Hanoi.
Anthony Bourdain gets to know the locals in Hanoi.
Zero Point Zero for CNN
While Bourdain was committed to immersing himself in the local culture, he was also quite conscious of the baggage he brought to each destination.
"Bourdain was aware of the perspective he was coming at as a Westerner from North America, the films he had seen, and the films' influence on how he sees what he sees. He was both trying to immerse himself locally, while making you hyper-aware of what bias and outside perspectives he was bringing to the show," surmises Kennedy.
Like the man himself, Bourdain's work seems to have endless layers to unpack.
Related content
Anthony Bourdain was a voice for the underdog
What would Bourdain think?
"I'm excited about it, in some ways more than any other class I've taught, but for a class that seems so pop culture and shallow, it's really proving to be the exact opposite: It's the most layered of an onion of a class I've ever taught, with some of the most complicated themes," Kennedy says.
It's not a prerequisite for students to be familiar with Anthony Bourdain or a fan of his work. In fact, Kennedy hopes some students who register for the course will have barely heard of Bourdain because he feels studying the chef and TV personality with a blank canvas could offer a more nuanced perspective.
But what would Bourdain — a man who often seemed uneasy with his own celebrity and influence — think of Kennedy's class?
Professor Kennedy thinks Bourdain would ultimately approve.
"I think he would want to make fun of it," considers Kennedy. "I think he'd be a little intimidated by it, in a way that would probably make him a little self-aware. But I think he'd appreciate it at the same time. He liked ideas — I think he would like the idea even if he was uncomfortable with the attention."
Related content
A fan's tribute to Anthony Bourdain
Kathleen Rellihan is a travel writer and editor based in Brooklyn, New York. She considers herself lucky to have worked at Travel Channel as a digital producer and editor when Anthony Bourdain was making great TV there.
00 2018-10-09
Regional/National

What the Degree Really Means


I’m not Goldie Blumenstyk. I’m Scott Carlson, also a senior writer at The Chronicle of Higher Education. While Goldie frequently has her sights on innovation in education, I am often thinking about the value and return on investment in higher education. Goldie asked me to pick up her Re:Learning column for another week, and so I’ll further explore the connections — and disconnections — between college and career. Please subscribe to Goldie’s newsletter here. And here’s what’s on my mind this week:

What a diploma signals now, and how it’s changing.
Last week I wrote about Mike, who had graduated from an elite college but was stocking shelves at a grocery store. This week I want to discuss those at the opposite end of the credential-to-career spectrum: people who excel at intellectually challenging jobs yet hit ceilings in their careers because they didn’t go to college or didn’t finish.

About two weeks ago, Goldie got a letter from someone who had read her column on “reverse transfer,” a mechanism for awarding degrees to people who never finished college. The reader related the story of her sister, who faced challenges in her personal life and had to switch colleges throughout her undergraduate years. Credits from her general-education requirements didn’t transfer from institution to institution. “Eventually she had more undergraduate credits — including many in majors courses — than I did, though no degree (while I went on from B.S. to M.D./Ph.D.),” the reader wrote.

“She went on to administrative positions in departments at two major universities, where she was pretty consistently undervalued by HR and hiring managers,” the letter continued, “though her direct supervisors always came to appreciate her intelligence and skills.”

The story highlighted two problematic elements of the education-industrial complex: The first is the convoluted pathways faced by students in our nation’s education “system.” It’s really not a system at all, but a bunch of disparate pieces that still don’t interact well, even after decades of discussion about seamless transfer.

Someone I know, who never finished an undergraduate degree at a prominent state institution, was recently told by officials at a widely known institution with a fast-growing online profile that it would consider how many of her credits would transfer after she enrolled. Plop down your money, they as much as said, then you’ll find out how much more education you’re in for.

A second, more pervasive problem is the role of the college degree as a signal, and what it’s signaling. Over the past several decades, the wage premium for a college degree — the amount of money that someone with a college diploma gets paid above that of a high-school graduate — has doubled. That’s not because college graduates are making so much more than they used to, but because high-school graduates are making so much less.

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Essentially, as a society, we have put a “pay to play” barrier on the path to good jobs — and we have put the certification of prospective employees in the hands of colleges, organizations often distant from employers. Perhaps it’s a sensible barrier. After all, people who graduate from college probably, on average, display more tenacity, work ethic, and intelligence than people who don’t.

Then again, anyone who studies this topic runs across puzzling and depressing examples. Enterprise Holdings, which runs a car-rental company, strongly favors applicants who have a college degree. The job can become a life raft for college graduates who floundered. When I rented a car from Enterprise a few months ago, the young branch manager who filled out my rental contract told me her story: She had earned a degree in elementary education from Towson University, a public institution in Maryland, but discovered within the first few months in the classroom that she hated being a teacher.

“I knew that Enterprise hired college grads, so I applied here,” she said with a shrug. Her husband, who also held an education degree from Towson and discovered he didn’t like teaching, drove trucks that deliver recycled oil.

A college degree is merely a signal, and an increasing number of people question what that signal means. Of course, one part of that signal is the status of your alma mater. In September, Gallup and the Strada Education Network released survey results suggesting that 90 percent of employers focus on experience and skills, not college rankings, in hiring. That could be true for the vast array of companies out there.

But conversations with hiring managers at top-ranked companies reveal that those businesses often hire from elite colleges — and, in fact, solidify their hiring pipelines by building relationships with those institutions. For the most desirable jobs, prestige still matters.

We’ve all known people, much like the reader’s sister, who display innate intelligence, a solid work ethic, and mastery of relevant skills acquired through years of work. They can outperform colleagues with fancy pedigrees, yet their lack of formal education — or merely the last few credits that would earn them a degree — diminishes their standing among managers.

It makes for an odd paradox: Employers prefer applicants who have college degrees, but they complain that college graduates do not bring skills relevant to the jobs they seek.

And does that degree really represent the skills, work ethic, and thoughtfulness it’s supposed to? The public is aware that employers and colleges use opaque and expensive certifications to judge a person’s employment potential, and it’s a big source of the resentment and skepticism about higher education’s value today.

It’s also a driving force behind the phenomena of “helicopter” or “snowplow” parents. Parents realize that a credential is the coin of the realm in the job market, and that while failures or detours might offer valuable lessons, they also represent huge risks to middle-class kids, who have an equal chance of doing better financially — or worse — than their parents did.

So is that pattern changing? Recent research from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York shows that non-college-educated workers are switching jobs at the highest rate in the past four years, perhaps suggesting that employers are less concerned about an employee’s credentials. But while job satisfaction among those workers seems to be rising, the bank’s economists observed, salaries are not.

More employers are considering programs that blend work experience and formal education, with apprenticeships standing out as a leading example. Those arrangements give experience more equal standing with education, although they still require students to earn that credential.

Ryan Craig, managing director of the University Ventures investment fund and the author of A New U: Faster + Cheaper Alternatives to College, sees a “people-analytics revolution” coming to the work world. Assessments will identify the key drivers of high-performing employees, he says, then correlate those qualities to people on internal career paths or new applicants. Those characteristics would be valued over “big, broad signals, like degrees,” he says.

The problem, for the time being, is that those kinds of assessments might run afoul of labor laws in the United States if done improperly, Craig writes in a recent column, and doing them well can be labor-intensive. So for now, he says, employers have passed them up, opting instead for degree requirements.

But once the pressure to hire and promote high-performing employees becomes urgent, and once students and prospective employees discover other ways to demonstrate their skills, I think the college-to-career landscape will change radically.
00 2018-10-09
Ruston

RECORD-BREAKING TOUCHDOWN


Though everything from mechanical issues to typhoons sought to defeat him, Mason Andrews has at long last completed his record-breaking solo flight around the world.

As much of the Ruston community knows by now, Andrews, an 18-year-old sophomore in Louisiana Tech University’s professional aviation program, departed on July 22 in an attempt to become the youngest pilot to ever circumnavigate the earth solo. Despite taking about a month longer than originally projected, his journey successfully concluded Saturday morning at the Pilots for Patients hangar at Monroe Regional Airport.

00 2018-10-09
Ruston

Beaming with pride


More than 100 people, including Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards, were on hand Saturday for a beam-signing ceremony for the new Integrated Engineering and Science Building currently under construction at Louisiana Tech University. Pictured below are from left, state Rep. Rob Shadoin, University of Louisiana System President and CEO Jim Henderson, Gov. John Bel Edwards and Tech President Les Guice signing the beam, which was the last one placed in the only academic building currently under construction in Louisiana.
00 2018-10-09
Ruston

Tech rocks Railroad Park


Pictured above are the Louisiana Tech cheerleaders during a pep rally held Friday night as part of the Rock the Railroad festivities held before each home football game for the Bulldogs. Tech took on Alabama-Birmingham Saturday night to cap off the festivities. Pictured below is Madelyn Marshal, 2, of Ruston, giving Railroad Park’s Star Stuff bulldog a hug.
00 2018-10-08
Baton Rouge

Max Gruver 'very alive' in LSU students' minds amid heavy dose of anti-hazing messaging


In the wake of Max Gruver's death, Louisiana college students are getting a barrage of messages with one common theme: never again.

They heard it from Lianne Kowiak, whose son Harrison died in a fraternity hazing incident.

They heard it from East Baton Rouge District Attorney Hillar Moore III, who spelled out for LSU fraternity and sorority leaders exactly how anti-hazing laws have gotten tougher.

In one case they heard and saw too much.

At the University of Louisiana at Monroe, some students complained that the anti-hazing message was too graphic, that being forced to watch the movie "Haze" was so upsetting that some students fled.

It all stems from one of three get-tough-on-hazing laws enacted earlier this year after the 2017 death of LSU student Max Gruver, who died after he was forced to chug alcohol during a Phi Delta Theta fraternity initiation game.

LSU announces zero-tolerance policy for hazing, but six arrested in Gruver case still enrolled at school
LSU announces zero-tolerance policy for hazing, but six arrested in Gruver case still enrolled at school
From now on, LSU students who are caught hazing will be expelled and the involved fraternities or other student organizations will be kicked o…

The legislation, House Bill 793 by Rep. Steve Carter, R-Baton Rouge, spelled out a variety of anti-hazing education steps that colleges and universities had to launch this year, with more to come in 2019.

Whether all the messages will take hold and make a difference is unclear.

"I do think the students are aware of the dangers of hazing, the risks associated with hazing, the consequences which could ultimately lead to death," said Margarita Perez, dean of students at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

“But I still think we need to work hard to lessen the perception that ‘it won't happen to me,’ or ‘we wouldn't let that happen to our teammate or band members or brother or sorority sister,’ ” Perez added.

The legislation required the state Board of Regents to adopt a uniform anti-hazing policy for colleges statewide, which it did.

Individual schools had to submit their own policies to the regents by Sept. 15, which can expand on the state rules but have to remain consistent with the Louisiana policy.

Each college's set of rules is about the same, detailing what hazing is, reporting requirements and how students are now required to offer assistance to those injured in a hazing incident.

Hazing includes physical brutality, sleep deprivation and the unreasonable consumption of alcohol as part of initiation requirements for fraternities and other groups.

Under the new rules, those found guilty of hazing face fines of up to $5,000 and five years in prison.

Those who fail to assist victims face fines of up to $2,000 and a maximum of five years behind bars.

LSU, UL-Lafayette, Southeastern Louisiana University and the University of New Orleans were among schools that held anti-hazing events during the last week of September, which was National Hazing Prevention Week.

While Gruver was an LSU student, his death has reverberated on campuses 55, 45 and 75 miles away.

"It definitely had an impact here," Perez said of the UL-Lafayette campus, which has 23 fraternities and sororities.

"A lot of students here are friends with students at LSU who either were in the fraternity or had classes with Max," she said.

Family of Max Gruver files lawsuit seeking $25 million in damages against LSU, fraternity
Family of Max Gruver files lawsuit seeking $25 million in damages against LSU, fraternity
The family of Maxwell Gruver, an LSU student who died in a Phi Delta Theta hazing incident last year, filed a federal lawsuit Thursday, saying…

Aside from anti-hazing workshops for fraternity and sorority leaders, about 1,000 students heard Kowiak describe how her teenage son Harrison died in a North Carolina hazing incident.

In an interview Friday, Kowiak said she wants college students to hear from a mom and to understand that hazing is no joke.

Moore said he was struck by the turnout and questions when he detailed the new anti-hazing laws to Greek leaders and others at LSU.

"I was really impressed by the attention that they gave, it was amazing," he said.

"The challenge is what we can put in place that actually stays," Moore added. "That is going to be the toughest part."

The school has 40 fraternities and sororities.

Max Gruver's parents: LSU's plan to curb fraternity hazing, drinking contains no meaningful reform
Max Gruver's parents: LSU's plan to curb fraternity hazing, drinking contains no meaningful reform
Responding to the death of a fraternity pledge last fall, LSU unveiled its highly anticipated corrective action plan on Wednesday — a list of …

The Office of Greek Life at LSU sent letters on the changes to new and old fraternity members and their families on how the laws have changed as well as a video.

Another letter was sent to more than 2,100 student organization leaders and advisers.

Gruver's death is far from faded, said Mari Fuentes-Martin, associate vice president and dean of students at LSU and the mother of a freshman student.

"As time goes by, the emotion of that moment may wane a little," she said.

"But I get a feeling that Max is very alive in the minds of LSU students," Fuentes-Martin said. "There are small reminders that we are still living with this, that we are trying to change the campus culture for the better."

The fallout from Gruver's death resurfaced last week when the school announced that Greek groups would be prohibited from tailgating at chapter houses for the rest of the football season.

Greeks and other student groups are also banned from tailgating on the Parade Ground.

Big change: LSU restricts Greeks from tailgating at houses for rest of football season
Big change: LSU restricts Greeks from tailgating at houses for rest of football season
Tailgating at Greek houses and on the LSU Parade Ground for Greeks and other student groups will be banned for the rest of the football season…

Fraternities are required to have a security detail at tailgating and other social events.

Lofton Security, which previously did the work, told LSU without explanation it was ending the service.

Neither fraternity nor sorority leaders have commented.

On Friday officials at LSU said fraternity members can set up tailgates at other campus locations as long as they register the locations and those requested spots are approved.

Days of anti-hazing programs also took place at UNO, which has 16 fraternities and sororities and SLU, which has 15.

"My sense is last year really impacted the campus," UNO Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students Carolyn Golz said of Gruver's death.

"We have students who maybe went to school with Max or people who went to school with friends of Max," she said.

About 700 students at SLU were on hand to hear from a national hazing expert.

Gabe Willis, interim Dean of Students at the school, also said Gruver's death had an impact on students in Hammond.

"I don't think anyone is allowing it to be pushed to the back burner," Willis said.

At UL-Monroe, days of anti-hazing education programs culminated in the required viewing of the movie "Haze."

It is a fictional story aimed at driving home the message that hazing can provide "hedonistic thrills of fraternity life" but also wreck friendships and families.

The same movie, which is aimed at jolting students on the dangers of hazing, has been shown at campuses nationally, according to state officials.

Lisa Miller, a spokeswoman for the school, said there is a reason why fraternity and sorority members were required to watch the 1 hour, 52 minute film.

That is how to get to students to an event, Miller said.

But once the movie started some students were uncomfortable.

UL-Monroe's Greek adviser sent a text message that students were free to leave.

"At that point in time some left, some stayed, as you can imagine," Miller said.
00 2018-10-08
Baton Rouge

On the area arts and cultural scene


Registration is open for classes for all ages at Theatre Baton Rouge, 7155 Florida Blvd. For a full list or to register, call (225) 924-6496 or visit theatrebr.org.
The Capitol Park Museum, 660 N. Fourth St., will host "Archaeology in Louisiana: Living in the Past" from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 13. The event will include a flint-knapping demonstration, making clay pots with ceramic artists and an excavation of artifacts. Admission is free. For more information, call (225) 342-5428 or visit louisianastatemuseum.org/museum/capitol-park-museum.
The LSU College of Art's Glassell Gallery in the Shaw Center for the Arts, 100 Lafayette St., is hosting a photography show by Meghan Saas, "TAKING(birth)CONTROL: Empowerment through Contraceptive Education," Oct. 16-Oct. 19. The exhibit runs in conjunction with the Society of Photographic Education Conference in Baton Rouge. There will be a reception from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Oct. 19. Admission is free. For more information, call (225) 389-7180.
Tickets are on sale for Theatre Baton Rouge's "The Rocky Horror Show," opening Oct. 18 in the Studio Theatre, 7155 Florida Blvd. For tickets, call (225) 924-6496 or visit theatrebr.org.
Tickets are on sale for New Venture Theatre's production of "Love, Whitney," opening Oct. 19 in the Hayden Hall Theatre on the Southern University campus. For tickets, visit newventuretheatre.org.
Tickets are on sale for LSU Opera's production of "Eugene Onegin," opening Oct. 25 in the Claude L. Shaver Theatre in the LSU Music and Dramatic Arts Building, Dalrymple Drive. For tickets, call lsu.edu/cmda/events.
The second lecture in the “Let’s Talk: Art” series, sponsored jointly by Southeastern Louisiana University’s Department of Visual Art + Design and the Friends of Sims Library, will be at 5:30 p.m. Oct. 11, at SLU’s Contemporary Art Gallery. Tom Walton, an SLU assistant professor of painting, will present “Why Draw a Line in the Sand? A Contemporary View on the Relationship between Abstract and Representational Painting.” Admission is free. For more information, call (985) 549-3962.
00 2018-10-08
Lafayette

UL Master Plan eyes new hotel and housing opportunities near Cajundome


LAFAYETTE, La. (KLFY) - Excitement is brewing over an old master plan that's recently come back into light.
Created by the University of Louisiana, the plan could include more housing, a hotel, and businesses around the Cajundome.

"The University Common Project could be a game changer for tourism in our area," said Ben Berthelot with the Lafayette Convention and Visitors Commission.

The plans were finalized by the University of Louisiana system all the way back in 2012.
It includes mixed-used areas around the Cajundome that will contain parking, businesses and living spaces.

"And then it looked at alternative development patterns for property acquisitions that could occur, and should occur in the next 5 to 7 years," said Steve Oubre of Architects Southwest.

The University is trying to better connect the main campus and satellite campus around the Cajundome.
The plan could include more than 600 housing units, a hotel, parks and businesses within walking distance of a new Research Village.

"So we looked at what viability housing would have, what viability would commercial have, and we found that there was significant depth in both of those avenues. Not to mention a Performing Arts Center, and of course the expansion of the Convention Center," said Oubre.

The full service hotel and the expansion of the Cajundome Convention Center has Berthlot excited, as this has been his number one priority for him for quite some time now.

It will also allow conventions that come to the Hub City, to make sure all their attendees are under one roof.
"Ultimately it's going to be up to the University to make it happen. I know it's on their list they're excited about it, so it can't happen soon enough for our standpoint, but I know it's going to be a multi-year project," said Berthelot.

No word on what the remaining projects set to be completed could cost, or when construction could begin.
00 2018-10-08
Lafayette

Here's UL's 2018 Homecoming Court


2018 marks a historic year for the UL Lafayette Homecoming Court. For the first time in the Court’s more than 80 year history, the group consists of 10 members and includes men as well as women.

This impressive group showcases the brightest of UL’s student leaders, athletes and scholars. The University Program Council proudly presents your 2018 Homecoming Court!



Claire Carriere

From Lafayette, Louisiana, Claire is a Senior majoring in Organizational Communication.

She is the daughter of Wendy Reaux and Chad Carriere, and was nominated by the Beacon Club.

Claire has made a large impact on our campus, serving as Beacon Club President, a Peer Mentor, Delta Delta Delta sorority, and the LIFE Program. Claire strives to educate the community on what it means to be differently abled, and would describe herself as resilient, motherly, and a little extra.

UL homecoming week: Here's what's happening



Claire is escorted by Kaleb Moore

from DeRidder, Louisiana, Kaleb is a Senior majoring in Political Science.

He is the son of Joey and Ronald Moore, and was nominated by the Young Americans for Liberty.

Kaleb has striven to make his mark both at UL and in the political sphere serving as the Young Americans for Liberty Louisiana State Chair, as a member of the Philadelphia Society, and as Student Government Association justice. Kaleb would describe himself as motivated, ambitious, and impactful.



Vickie Lynne Jacquet (ja-KWET)

from Port Arthur, Texas, Vickie is a Junior majoring in Mass Communications.

She is the daughter of Jonathan and Vickie Jacquet (Ja-KWET) and was nominated by the Black Women Leadership Association.


Vickie has been recognized for her loyalty to UL, being named the Black Women Leadership Association’s President, a Resident Assistant, on the Student Orientation Staff, and the Community Outreach Mentorship Program. Vickie describes herself as Vivacious, Motivational, and optimistic.



Vickie is escorted by Benjamin Messner

from Lafayette, Louisiana, Benjamin is a Junior majoring in English.

He is the son of Nick and Stacey Savoy and Blake Messner, and was nominated by the Student Leadership Council.

Ben has been on the Student Orientation Staff, Student Government Association, Student Leadership Council, Sigma Chi Fraternity, and the Interfraternity Council. Ben describes himself as optimistic, industrious, and reliable.

Erica Stewart

From Houston, Texas, Erica is a Junior Majoring in Electrical Engineering.

She is the daughter of Jacqueline and Allen Stewart and was nominated by Ragin’ Cajuns Women’s Track and Field.

Erica has served as a UL Engineer Ambassador, the National Society of Black Engineers, New Hope Tutor, and an intern for Chevron. Erica describes herself as joyful, ambitious, and reliable.



Erica is escorted Jacob Lemeunier

From Lafayette, Louisiana, Jacob is a Senior Majoring in Finance.

He is the son of Nock and Jennifer LeMeunier and was nominated by Sigma Chi Fraternity.

Jacob has served in many positions within his fraternity, a member of the Pride of Acadiana Marching Band, Student Government Association, and a Peer Mentor. Jacob would describe himself as prideful, passionate, and enthusiastic.




Rebecca Foley

From Coral Springs, Florida, Rebecca is a Graduate Student pursuing her Master’s of Business Administration.

She is the daughter of Donna & Brett Schroy and John & Sheila Foley. She was nominated by Ragin Cajuns Women’s Soccer.

Rebecca is a founding Member of Cypress Communications PR firm, is Captain of the UL Women’s Soccer Team, and will be a double UL alum as she already has her Bachelor’s in Strategic Communications. Rebecca describes herself as passionate, empathetic and courageous.



Rebecca is escorted by Jonathan Adams

From Opelousas, Louisiana, Jonathan is a Junior majoring in Political Science.

He is the son of Theresa and Donald Adams and was nominated by the Association of Future Alumni.

Jonathan has served as the Association of Future Alumni Executive Director, on the Student Government Association, and the Student Orientation Staff. Jonathan would describe himself as pragmatic, passionate, and caring.



2018 Homecoming Queen: Rachel Margaret Lautigar

From Bastrop, Louisiana, Rachel is a Junior double majoring in Political Science and History.

She is the daughter of Scott Lautigar and Delene and Jamie Rawls, and was nominated by Young Americans for Liberty.

Rachel is an Executive Board member of Pi Sigma Alpha Honor Society, serves as the Chief Justice for the Student Government Association, and is the current president of the Pulse Campus Ministry. Rachel would describe herself as diplomatic, optimistic, and ambitious.



Rachel is escorted by 2018 Homecoming King: Dominique Williams

From Lafayette, Louisiana, Dominique is a Junior Majoring in Business Management.

He is the son of Christopher and Bonita Williams, and was nominated by Ragin’ Cajun Men’s Track and Field.

Dominique has made an impressive mark on UL’s campus as both a student athlete and a student leader serving as the Student Athlete Advisory Committee president, the Association of Future Alumni, and is a Sunbelt Conference Ambassador. Dominique describes himself as courageous, loving, and intelligent
00 2018-10-08
Lafayette

UL Lafayette homecoming week is taking over campus. Here's what's happening


We know it doesn't necessarily feel like Homecoming with the heat index still hovering near 100. But homecoming week is upon us.

Here are some of the events to look forward to this week:

Sunday, Oct. 7
8 a.m. | Ragin' Road Race 5K Run | Starts at the Alumni Center with winners for each age division and for most spirited runner! Pre-registration is encouraged.

6 p.m. | Homecoming Mass at Our Lady of Wisdom Church and Catholic Student Center

MORE: UL football: What you need to know

Monday, Oct. 8
11 a.m. - 2 p.m. | Allons Manger: Food Truck Round-Up at the Alumni Center | Check out the local flavor for lunch with some of Lafayette's favorite food trucks pull in for an afternoon of music and good eats.

7 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Campus Scavenger Hunt | Meet in Bayou Bijou before spreading out across campus for a massive scavenger hunt. Teams and individuals welcome. No preregistration required — just show up!

Tuesday, Oct. 9
8 a.m. | Paint the Town Red — Schools | Schools across Acadiana show their spirit for the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

7 p.m. | Cajuns Got Talent at the Cajundome Convention Center | Singing, dancing and laughs! Watch students put on a spirited evening of karaoke on stage as they kick off Homecoming week.

MORE: Napier alters plan for use of Cajun QBs Nunez, Lewis

Wednesday, Oct. 10
Local businesses decorate their workplaces in celebrationBuy Photo
Local businesses decorate their workplaces in celebration of UL homecoming week during the Paint the Town Red competition in Lafayette, La., Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014. Paul Kieu, The Advertiser (Photo: Paul Kieu, The Advertiser)

9 a.m. | Paint the Town Red — Businesses | Businesses in Acadiana show their Ragin' Cajuns pride in this annual tradition!

11 a.m. - 1 p.m. | Wear Red, Get Fed & Cajuns Can Care on Boucher Street | Wear your favorite Ragin' Cajuns gear and get free lunch from UPC. Drop off non-perishable food items to help local pantries.

Thursday, Oct. 11
UL students cheer during the Yell Like Hell homecomingBuy Photo
UL students cheer during the Yell Like Hell homecoming week pep rally at the UL Student Union in Lafayette Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015. (Photo: Paul Kieu, Paul Kieu, The Advertiser)

7 p.m. | Yell Like Hell on the Student Union Porch | Students bring the noise in a big way at this Homecoming Pep Rally. Catch the spirit at this night of music, performance, and Ragin' Cajuns fun.

MORE: Cajuns ground game showed a flash vs. No. 1 Alabama

Friday, Oct. 12
8 a.m. - 5 p.m. | Tennis Tournament at Red Lerille's Health and Raquet Club | Tournament proceeds contribute to the Bourg Scholarship fund and other Alumni Association programs. Pre-registration required.

10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. | Bill Bass Open Golf Tournament at Vieux Chenes Golf Course | Pre-registration required.


5:30 - 8:30 p.m. | Paint the Town Red — Festivals Acadiens et Creoles | Wear your red to the festival and pass a good time with other Louisiana Ragin' Cajuns fans in Girard Park.

5:30 - 9 p.m. | Golden Ambassador Society Dinner | Open to all graduates who have celebrated their 50th graduating class reunion at the University.

7 p.m. | Louisiana Ragin' Cajuns Soccer vs. Little Rock Trojans | Admission is free to see the two teams face off at the Ragin' Cajuns Soccer/Track Complex.

7:30 p.m. | NPHC Greek Expo at the Cajundome Convention Center | Watch the NPHC fraternities and sororities strut their stuff at the step show.

MORE: UL's Napier wants Cajuns to play like late father's teams

Saturday, Oct. 13
Go to a UL football game in full-blown UL attire— faceBuy Photo
Go to a UL football game in full-blown UL attire— face painted and all. (Photo: Brad Kemp, The Advertiser)

8 a.m. | Parking gates at Cajun Field open for reserved parking. Free general parking will be updated closer to the game.

9 to 11:30 a.m. | Open House at the Alumni Center | Stop by before the parade and connect with fellow alumni.

10 a.m. | Homecoming Parade | Ragin' Cajun spirit is on the move as our students, alumni, and fans watch the parade roll down Johnston Street and St. Mary Boulevard. Begins at Blackham Coliseum and ends by the Alumni Center.

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. | Hilliard University Art Museum | Free admission for all Homecoming and Festivals Acadiens et Créoles attendees on Saturday and Sunday.

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. | Zydeco Brunch | Join us in Cypress Lake Dining Hall in the Student Union for an all-you-can eat buffet and music.

10 a.m. | Cajun Field ticket office opens | Purchase tickets at Cajun Field's LHC Gate C and at the main ticket booth at State Farm Gate A.

10 a.m. | Official Ragin' Cajuns apparel outlets open | Buy your gear at the apparel outlets by Gate A and inside Russo Park at 'Tigue' Moore Field.

1 p.m. | Student tailgating at Bourgeois Park | Your chance to see and be seen at tailgating and grab some free food and drinks.

Also at tailgating:

Cajun Walk down Reinhardt Drive | Bring your ragin' spirit and wish the team good luck before the big game.
Cajun Field gates open | Stop by the Ragin' Cajuns apparel outlet inside Cajun Field before heading to your seat.
Band begins Ragin' March along Stadium Way | Join the Pride of Acadiana Marching Band in the fight song and the classic "R-E-S-P-E-C-T."
The Louisiana Ragin' Cajuns football team begins on-field warm-ups.
Pride of Acadiana Marching Band's pregame performance | Arrive early, wear red, get LOUD, and stay late!
4 p.m. | Louisiana Ragin' Cajuns vs. New Mexico State Aggies at Cajun Field

8 p.m. | Christiana Smith "Sweet Sounds of Sharing" at the Mardi Gras Ballroom in the Cajundome Convention Center | The Christiana Smith African American Alumni Chapter celebrates this year's honorees. Pre-registration is encouraged.
00 2018-10-08
Lake Charles

Going to college gets tougher


Going to college in Louisiana has become too expensive for many prospective students because of severe reductions in state support since 2008. A report by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities said Louisiana has been affected more than any other region.

Funding per student in Louisiana since 2008 has been cut by $4,949 and tuition has risen by $4,773 during the same time period. Average tuition per student at a four-year Louisiana public university is now $9,302 a year, and that doesn’t cover related costs.

The Center on Budget report said only six other states — Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia and Hawaii — charged more for tuition and fees than Louisiana.

Average tuition and fees at a public four-year Louisiana university in 2017 accounted for nearly 32 percent of median household income for black families, 23 percent for Hispanic families, 16 percent for white families and 14 percent for Asian families. The average tuition and fees for all families accounted for 19 percent of median household income.

The Times-Picayune in its report about the cost of attending college notes there are 34 public colleges and universities in Louisiana, including 14 four-year institutions. Jan Moller, executive director of the Louisiana Budget Project, told the newspaper budget cuts have taken place all over the country since 2008, but “it’s just happened more in Louisiana than anywhere else.”

Moller added, “We’re not saying that you shouldn’t have a merit-based program (TOPS), but we are saying that there are ways that you can make college more affordable for lowincome and nontraditional students.”

Those of us who grew up in post-Depression families had a difficult time paying college tuition, which was almost nothing compared to today’s tuition. If memory serves me correctly, my tuition for summer school at McNeese State University in 1951 was $10. It was about $22 for the fall semester and $18 in the spring.

I worked part-time at a grocery store and as janitor at my church during my time in college, but I still needed some financial assistance. J.J. Verret, my high school principal, was a state representative during part of that time and he gave me a legislative scholarship that paid my tuition. I also had a T.H. Harris Scholarship that gave me $100 annually, and it covered many of my other expenses.

Today’s prospective students need even more financial help to attend college. TOPS scholarships pick up a nice chunk of the tuition, but students who don’t qualify for those grants have to struggle to attend college.

The cost of TOPS is approaching $300 million annually, but GO Grants that help low-income students totaled only $28.4 million this year. That is only $2.4 million more than in 2008 when the economic collapse hit and state government started cutting its state support for higher education.

Davante Lewis, federal policy advocate for the Budget Project, said, “Year after year TOPS is put on a pedestal and prioritized by lawmakers, even in dire financial times, but funding for GO Grants has been mostly flat, even as student financial needs have increased. This is unacceptable.”

The Legislature has stabilized college and university budgets, but it needs to appropriate more funds for those Go Grants and restore some of that funding institutions have lost since 2008. Major universities in the country aren’t waiting for their reluctant legislatures to close the funding losses.

The Wall Street Journal said for the first time this year students in more than half of all U.S. states are paying more in tuition to attend public colleges or universities than the government contributes. To close the funding gap, the newspaper said the University of Michigan has completed a $5 billion fund-raising effort, what it calls the largest ever for a public school.

The Universities of Washington, North Carolina, Florida and Illinois are also engaged in major fund-raising campaigns.

David Bass, senior director of research for the Council for Advancement and Support of Education, told the Journal private support “has become mission critical for a lot of those institutions.”

LSU and other Louisiana universities are also trying to raise funds on their own, but they need more giving from their alumni and supporters. The no-tax attitude of the Legislature won’t change anytime soon, so more state support isn’t likely.

Unfortunately, that attitude has come at a time when many of today’s prospective college students can’t afford the tuition. Higher education is their best ticket to a better life, but some won’t make it without financial help.

God bless my late mother who convinced me the higher education she experienced was my best hope for a brighter and more successful future. It has worked for me, and every prospective Louisiana college student deserves his or her best shot at the good life.
00 2018-10-08
Monroe

Louisiana teen brings home 3 world aviation records


Mason William Andrews, 18, is home in Monroe, Louisiana, after successfully circumnavigating the globe — alone — in 76 days. He returned with three world aviation titles.

His next trip will be much shorter: He's walking to his classes at Louisiana Tech on Monday.

Mason took off from Monroe on July 22 and landed at his home airport on Saturday, Oct. 6. In addition to his total circumnavigation, he's the youngest pilot to cross the Atlantic and Pacific oceans solo.

Until Mason landed, the circumnavigation title was held by Lachlan Smart. The Australian took the title in 2016 at 18 years, 234 days old.

Mason is 18 years, 163 days old.

He flew a single-engine Piper PA-32 Lance, called The Spirit of Louisiane, for his round-the-world flight.

The Fédération Aéronautique Internationale will have to verify documentation including fuel receipts and passport stamps. The FAI is the official certifying body for all aviation records.

Once it's certified by the FAI, the information will be sent to Guinness World Records.

Jeb Andrews, Mason's father, said the records verification process could take months. He's relieved the flight is complete, and they don't foresee any problems ahead.

The community welcomes Mason Andrews home from his world record journey around the globe on Saturday, October 6, at the Pilots for Patients Hanger at the Monroe Regional Airport.Buy Photo
The community welcomes Mason Andrews home from his world record journey around the globe on Saturday, October 6, at the Pilots for Patients Hanger at the Monroe Regional Airport. (Photo: Michelle Tripp/The News-Star)

Support from home

Mason said he kept track with friends and family online, but the trip could get lonely. At any point, hundreds of people were tracking his flights.

"It's kind of a weird feeling. You're alone, but you've got a ton of people who are following you, supporting you all the time," he said.

He said Jeb spent a lot of nights skipping sleep to make sure he made it to his destinations. Mason credited his father for learning a lot about aviation, weather and flight planning.

"He's done an unbelievable job that I wouldn't expect anybody else who's not a pilot to even be able to do," he said.


The trip was almost point-by-point perfectly in line with planning until he hit the Mediterranean. But the circumnavigation, which was originally meant to take 40 days almost doubled because of weather delays. Mason was stranded the longest in the Philippines; he said he landed Sept. 2 and left Sept. 21.

Some people said he was abandoning the attempt.

"First of all, I didn't even have that option. Me coming back home, at a certain point, was just me completing the trip," he said.

His favorite part of the trip was seeing the pyramids. He said he saw landmarks in Paris during the eight hours he was there but generally didn't do a lot of sightseeing while on the ground.

In September, he accidentally deviated into Taiwan's airspace. His radios failed mid-flight and there was some weather along his route. He deviated and wasn't talking to anyone.

An F-16 from the Republic of China came across. At first, he saw the profile and lost it in the clouds. Then it came up five feet off his left wing. He tried to deviate back to Japan's airspace as best he could.

"It's kind of what you'd expect to happen if you entered someone's airspace without them expecting you," he said.

The intercept's job is to make the airplane aware of their presence.

"It's not like they're going to shoot me down or anything," Mason said.

The community welcomes Mason Andrews home from his world record journey around the globe on Saturday, October 6, at the Pilots for Patients Hanger at the Monroe Regional Airport.Buy Photo
The community welcomes Mason Andrews home from his world record journey around the globe on Saturday, October 6, at the Pilots for Patients Hanger at the Monroe Regional Airport. (Photo: Michelle Tripp/The News-Star)

Welcome back

Right now, he's glad to be home, but he's not taking a lot of time to rest

Mason is a professional aviation major at Louisiana Tech. He'll be honored at the football game Saturday night, have Sunday off, then return to classes Monday morning at Louisiana Tech. While he was on the trip, Mason kept up with his studies online and will get one-on-one work in some of his aviation classes to catch up.

He wouldn't let his parents — Jeb and Nancy Andrews — come see him at his other stops since returning to the U.S. He wanted their reactions to be genuine when he landed in Monroe. Anything else would be cheating.

On Saturday morning, they met him at the Pilots for Patients hangar at Monroe Regional Airport, along with lots of cheering fans, friends, family, dignitaries and MedCamps of Louisiana campers.

Mason used the trip to help raise funds for the free summer camps for children with developmental and physical disabilities. Mason has worked at MedCamps for three years, and he's passionate about the program.

The community welcomes Mason Andrews home from his world record journey around the globe on Saturday, October 6, at the Pilots for Patients Hanger at the Monroe Regional Airport.Buy Photo
The community welcomes Mason Andrews home from his world record journey around the globe on Saturday, October 6, at the Pilots for Patients Hanger at the Monroe Regional Airport. (Photo: Michelle Tripp/The News-Star)

University President Les Guice presented Mason with a $10,000 scholarship from the Louisiana Tech Foundation on Saturday morning, noting the sacrifices that the Andrews family made to make the trip possible.

"I don't know that you can have that much more flying experience, but I know you've got a lot of flight fees coming up," Guice joked.

Flying congressman: Don't worry, I have parachute

U.S. Rep. Ralph Abraham, R-Alto, was among the well-wishers at the hangar to meet Mason. He presented the record-breaker with a certificate from the federal government recognizing his accomplishment and a flag flown over the U.S. Capitol in Mason's honor.

The community welcomes Mason Andrews home from his world record journey around the globe on Saturday, October 6, at the Pilots for Patients Hanger at the Monroe Regional Airport.Buy Photo
The community welcomes Mason Andrews home from his world record journey around the globe on Saturday, October 6, at the Pilots for Patients Hanger at the Monroe Regional Airport. (Photo: Michelle Tripp/The News-Star)

"For those that aren't aviators, what he accomplished these last 75 days was just next to impossible. A single-engine aircraft in weather that's very unpredictable, despite the best forecasts, and things that you run into in the air, on the ground that no one would understand unless you've been to foreign countries. It's very, very tough and this guy did it," Abraham said.

Abraham is a major in the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary Civil Air Patrol and a pilot with the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary. He flies airplanes and helicopters.

He referred to Mason as an ambassador for the U.S.

"We can pat each other on backs and say, 'this is our guy.' And it doesn't matter what particular breed of politics you believe in — we believe in America. And if I don't have an American patriot right here, there is not one on this earth," Abraham said.

Monroe Mayor Jamie Mayo presented Mason with a proclamation noting his accomplishment.

“Mason’s journey is a noble and adventurous feat! I am happy to hear Mason returned back to Monroe safely. His courage and dedication earned him a new world record and helped raise over $25,000 for Louisiana MedCamps. This is an incredible accomplishment," said U.S. Sen. John Kennedy in a news release.

City Councilman Mike Echols gave Mason the Distinguished Service Award on behalf of the council. He said the honor goes to those who give unique service to the city, and it's only been presented a handful of times in the past few years.

Echols also gave Jeb and Nancy a bag of coffee to deal with the many sleepless nights ahead while Mason pursues even larger goals.

Nell Calloway with the Chennault Aviation & Military Museum presented Mason with a hand-carved replica of his plane and a basket of gifts. She said it's a great day not just for aviation.

Jeb Andrews, far right, puts a replica of a World War II airman jacket on his son, Mason Andrews, while John James watches on Saturday, Oct. 6, in Monroe, Louisiana. Mason Andrews just completed a solo flight around the world, bringing home three world records.Buy Photo
Jeb Andrews, far right, puts a replica of a World War II airman jacket on his son, Mason Andrews, while John James watches on Saturday, Oct. 6, in Monroe, Louisiana. Mason Andrews just completed a solo flight around the world, bringing home three world records. (Photo: Michelle Tripp/The News-Star)

The final presentation of the morning was from Jeb. He said he's a planner, but when Mason left Monroe, it was 102 degrees out, and his son was in a T-shirt and shorts. They didn't think he'd be in Siberian winter, but weather delays extended the trip. Jeb said he wants to make sure Mason stays warm in the future.

"You're going to let him go back to Siberia?" someone cracked.

Jeb gave Mason with a replica of a World War II bomber jacket.

"If he takes care of it, it should last him a lifetime, and hopefully a mighty long and mighty good one," Jeb said.

John James, one of Mason's campers, adjusted the front of the leatehr bomber while Mason put it on.

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The community welcomes Mason Andrews home from his world record journey around the globe on Saturday, October 6, at the Pilots for Patients Hanger at the Monroe Regional Airport. Michelle Tripp/The News-Star
Our history: Navigation school in Monroe was nation's largest

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https://www.medcampsmission.org/
Facebook: Mason’s MedCamps Mission
GoFundMe: https://www.gofundme.com/masons-medcamps-mission
Follow the story:

Sept. 28: Monroe aviator trying to break world record has landed in Alaska

Sept. 21: Mason Andrews is back in the air after round-the-world trip met delays

Aug. 24: Attempt to break aviation world record meets weather delay

Aug. 1: La. teen pilot crosses Atlantic in quest to circle globe

July 22: Louisiana man takes off, plans to break world record with round-the-world flight

A higher calling: Louisiana teen plans to break world aviation record

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00 2018-10-08
Monroe

Mason Andrews comes home after record breaking trip around the world


MONROE, La. - Louisiana Tech student and Monroe native, Mason Andrews has returned home after completing his mission to fly around the world. NBC 10 News talked to Andrews and his family when he landed safely on the ground at the Monroe Regional Airport.

It was a 75-day mission accomplished with a hero's welcome as Mason Andrews became the youngest pilot to fly around the world.

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18-year-old Andrews cherished the moment, "That was awesome I've been waiting for that for a long time now," he shared with NBC 10.

His parents were also basking in their sons homecoming, "Two words to describe that joy and relief," said Andrew's father Jeb.

His mother Nancy, said she couldn't contain herself, "He was trying to let go and I said uh uh don't let go because I wasn't done hugging yet."

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The home crowd cheered him on," The community was so supportive, the messages from people in the community, people we didn't even know," said J. Andrews.

However, the journey came with many obstacles, starting with the weather said M. Andrews. His parents shared that it was frightening.

"He took off literally in the face of a typhoon which we would call a hurricane here and it was a big one. That was a pretty hairy scary moment for us," said his father.

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It was with prayer and planning that got mason home safe indicated his mother, "It's been amazing, I can't imagine we would've had the kind of support anywhere, that we've had right here in Monroe."

Mason's mission is to bring awareness and support to MedCamps Louisiana, and it touched the hearts of many.

"He didn't have to bring us along with him and he did and because of him we've raised $30,000 for MedCamps in his honor," said MedCamps Executive Director Caleb Seney.

Through it all, his parents shared that they're just happy he's home safe. "I told him from the start I didn't care anything about the record me and his mom were not for the record," said his father

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"I'm so proud of him but I was proud before I'm just so glad he's home," his mother said.

For Mason, it's back campus life at Louisiana Tech and even though he's been all over the globe he's been keeping up, "I've been taking online classes," he said.

It appears that support will be the least of his worries on his next journey.

"He's in a position to pick up national sponsorships now because he's made a name for himself," J. Andrews said.

photo
For Mason even the sky won't be the limit. He told NBC 10 that he will likely take on his next mission in 2019 after he gets some much needed sleep!

He also received a $10,000 scholarship from Louisiana Tech to help him take his goals to even higher heights.
00 2018-10-08
Monroe

TRIO grant will help ULM student-parents with campus-based childcare


The University of Louisiana Monroe has received a federal grant of $122,626 from the U.S. Department of Education to help student-parents earn a college degree by providing campus-based childcare.

The ULM TRIO Program received the grant through the Child Care Access Means Parents in School Program. The program, “supports the participation of low-income parents in postsecondary education through the provision of campus-based childcare services.”

“Research shows that parents with access to childcare on campus are nearly three times more likely to graduate or pursue additional degrees within three years of enrollment,” said Dr. Catherine Estis, TRIO Executive Director. “This grant aids in filling a major gap for many of our student-parents who grapple with providing quality childcare while juggling the demands of higher education.”

“ULM TRIO is thrilled for the impact this grant program will have on our student-parents and the community at large. It is envisioned that the services provided through the award might make the difference between graduating and not graduating for some student-parents,” Estis said.
00 2018-10-08
Monroe

'See Past Your Now' empowers teen girls to envision themselves succeeding


More than 250 eighth-grade girls from Monroe City Schools got the "blue carpet" treatment Friday. The University of Louisiana Monroe Hawkline dance team greeted the young women for a half-day of the star treatment on campus. Chase volunteers cheered, high-fived the girls and waved motivational signs to give each one a sense of belonging, acceptance and significance.

At an event encouraging the girls to "See Past Your Now," volunteers with Chase and the University of Louisiana Monroe showed the teens that there are adults who believe in them and support them. Every girl enrolled in eighth grade at Carroll, Lee and Martin Luther King Jr. junior high schools were invited to attend.

University of Louisiana at Monroe, in cooperation with Chase Bank, hosted the 2nd annual Our Girls Rock on campus in Monroe, La. on Oct. 5. The event is held for 8th grade girls to help them feel empowered and to instill a set of goals and ideas which that they can achieve more for themselves through education. The event consisted of a tour of ULM's campus by current students, a Q & A panel featuring current college students who were graduates of the four Monroe area middle schools, and 2018 Ms. Louisiana, Holli' Conway, speaking and performing.Buy Photo
University of Louisiana at Monroe, in cooperation with Chase Bank, hosted the 2nd annual Our Girls Rock on campus in Monroe, La. on Oct. 5. The event is held for 8th grade girls to help them feel empowered and to instill a set of goals and ideas which that they can achieve more for themselves through education. The event consisted of a tour of ULM's campus by current students, a Q & A panel featuring current college students who were graduates of the four Monroe area middle schools, and 2018 Ms. Louisiana, Holli' Conway, speaking and performing. (Photo: Nicolas Galindo/The News-Star)

“This is a great opportunity to bring these young women to campus and say to them, ‘You belong here. If you can dream it and work hard for it, great things will happen for you,’” said Tania Hilburn, site leader for Chase in Monroe.

The students toured the University of Louisiana Monroe campus on Friday. Then they heard a panel discussion of hometown girls currently enrolled at ULM and at Louisiana Delta Community College. The panelists shared their personal stories to motivate girls in the next, critically important phase of their education. Miss Louisiana Holli' Conway talked to the girls about reaching for their goals. Conway was raised in Monroe and was named second runner-up at Miss America and plans to move to New York and pursue a Broadway career after her reign.

It was the second year of Our Girls Rock, an initiative started by Chase in 2017 to encourage young women to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Last year more than 200 junior high girls attended a private viewing of the movie “Hidden Figures” at Pecanland Mall.

University of Louisiana at Monroe, in cooperation with Chase Bank, hosted the 2nd annual Our Girls Rock on campus in Monroe, La. on Oct. 5. The event is held for 8th grade girls to help them feel empowered and to instill a set of goals and ideas which that they can achieve more for themselves through education. The event consisted of a tour of ULM's campus by current students, a Q & A panel featuring current college students who were graduates of the four Monroe area middle schools, and 2018 Ms. Louisiana, Holli' Conway, speaking and performing.Buy Photo
University of Louisiana at Monroe, in cooperation with Chase Bank, hosted the 2nd annual Our Girls Rock on campus in Monroe, La. on Oct. 5. The event is held for 8th grade girls to help them feel empowered and to instill a set of goals and ideas which that they can achieve more for themselves through education. The event consisted of a tour of ULM's campus by current students, a Q & A panel featuring current college students who were graduates of the four Monroe area middle schools, and 2018 Ms. Louisiana, Holli' Conway, speaking and performing. (Photo: Nicolas Galindo/The News-Star)

Morgan Buxton, communication and community engagement manager for Chase, said they felt like the girls most appreciated the empowering message at last year's event, so that's what they focused on.

She said they hope to keep Our Girls Rock going as an annual event and expand it.

"They really felt like it was important for these girls to come and see the campus, not every student has that opportunity to be even just exposed to what the campus looks like, so if even that could inspire them for more for their future, then mission accomplished," Buxton said.

Women on the Move is the volunteer resource group for women within Chase. They had 50 female volunteers at the event, hoping to make a connection. It's a message of girls lifting girls. Buxton said Chase supports volunteerism and supports employees through resource groups.

University of Louisiana at Monroe, in cooperation with Chase Bank, hosted the 2nd annual Our Girls Rock on campus in Monroe, La. on Oct. 5. The event is held for 8th grade girls to help them feel empowered and to instill a set of goals and ideas which that they can achieve more for themselves through education. The event consisted of a tour of ULM's campus by current students, a Q & A panel featuring current college students who were graduates of the four Monroe area middle schools, and 2018 Ms. Louisiana, Holli' Conway, speaking and performing.Buy Photo
University of Louisiana at Monroe, in cooperation with Chase Bank, hosted the 2nd annual Our Girls Rock on campus in Monroe, La. on Oct. 5. The event is held for 8th grade girls to help them feel empowered and to instill a set of goals and ideas which that they can achieve more for themselves through education. The event consisted of a tour of ULM's campus by current students, a Q & A panel featuring current college students who were graduates of the four Monroe area middle schools, and 2018 Ms. Louisiana, Holli' Conway, speaking and performing. (Photo: Nicolas Galindo/The News-Star)

Louisiana Delta Community College and the Monroe Chamber of Commerce also supported the event.

“We are thrilled to host these vibrant young women for a mini-retreat at ULM,” said Chief Communications Officer Lisa Miller. “We appreciate all of the sponsors supporting this important day in their lives.”

A news release contributed to this report.


Monique Tate wrote "She Is Power" for an event to inspire young women. Chase, in partnership with the Monroe Chamber Foundation, hosted more than 250 eighth-grade girls from Monroe City Schools for a private viewing of "Hidden Figures" at the Pecanland Mall in Monroe, Louisiana, on Sept. 8. Bonnie Bolden/The News-Star
00 2018-10-08
Natchitoches

Executive coach to offer leadership advantage seminar


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’ School of Business will sponsor a leadership advantage seminar hosted by Julie Couret from noon-1 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 24 in the Natchitoches Room of Russell Hall, 125 Central Ave.



“The Leadership Edge Advantage: The 5 Musts of Being Effective and Straight Up Awesome” is free and open to the public. The brown bag power lunch will address processes and approaching to personnel management situations from the mundane to the uncomfortable and complex.



Couret is founder and Chief Executive Coach of her management consulting firm, 7602 Business Performance. She has been training leaders and developing team communication and problem-solving skills for more than 15 years. She helps leaders reach their most effective potential through focused and results driven one-on-one coaching and training. She utilizes a direct and solution-orientated approach with her clients as she swiftly and effectively identifies the opportunities, strengths and solutions for her clients’ personnel management situations. Couret is the trusted sounding board for senior leaders, leading and navigating sensitive and critical decisions.



Couret is a graduate of Leadership Jefferson, the youngest female president of the Greater New Orleans Executive Association and serves on the board of directors for both the Jefferson Chamber of Commerce and the Advisory Council of the New Orleans.



She will also be one of the featured speakers at the J. Walter Porter Forum that will take place from 9:40 a.m.-noon Thursday, Oct. 25, also hosted by NSU’s School of Business.



To register for leadership advantage brown bag seminar, visit. https://leadershipedgeadvantage.eventbrite.com
00 2018-10-08
New Orleans

If Louisiana families can't afford college, then say goodbye to social mobility


A friend in the St. Louis area is on a mission to help as many people as she can get into college and, in addition to that, help them acquire a "debt-free degree." In the course of her work, she wrote on Facebook last month, she's encountered the naysayers, the contrarians who tell her that "College isn't for everybody." It's not her position that it is, she responds. But it is her position that college is for and that "it's been for" more people than have had access to it.

Louisianians should know that to be true. During the past 10 years, the average tuition at the state's public universities has increased 105 percent. Of all the states in the Union, that's the largest percentage increase of all. Since 2008, Louisiana has cut funding for public education by 40 percent. That is the second-largest percentage decrease in the nation. In 2008, average tuition at a public four-year university was $4,529 per year. Now the cost for a year of school is $9,302.

Public college access in jeopardy for students as tuition rises: report
Public college access in jeopardy for students as tuition rises: report

Louisiana's college tuition has risen at a higher percentage than any other state nationwide.


Louisiana has the second-highest poverty rate in the nation and the fourth-lowest median income. When you combine those statistics with the doubling of tuition, then you can see why it's so much harder to attend college in Louisiana now than it was a decade ago.

According to a 2016 report from the Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce, the U.S. economy had added 11.6 million jobs since the Great Recession, and 11.5 million (or 99 percent of them) required at least some college.


Despite the persistent belief that college isn't for everybody, it's just about mandatory for anybody who wants to take advantage of new job opportunities that are being created.

The recession didn't single out Louisiana. According to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, across the country, "Overall state funding for public two- and four-year colleges in the school year ending in 2018 was more than $7 billion below its 2008 level, after adjusting for inflation." The CBPP didn't have 2018 data from Illinois, but did have budgetary data for all the other 49 states from 2008 to 2018. Of those 49, "45 states spent less per student in the 2018 school year than in 2008."

But, as stated above, only one state -- Arizona -- cut higher education funding more aggressively. For most of the decade in question, Louisiana was led by a governor who wanted to main ideologically pure for a quixotic White House run. Not only did Bobby Jindal foolishly sign on to a no-new-taxes pledge created by Grover Norquist, but he also supported the effort to roll back the Stelly Plan, which had, at long last, stabilized the state's budget. Yes, the recession hurt families with hopes of sending their children to college, but Louisiana was hit doubly hard because the governor intentionally supported a legislative mutiny to deny the state needed revenue.


To take an absolute hardline against taxes is to argue that taxes don't pay for anything of value. But few things are as valuable as an education, and responsible government leaders understand that as they help more residents get educated that they're benefiting the state itself. Responsible government leaders also understand that if the state decreases the amount it appropriates for its colleges, then it's only shifting the costs onto those families who attend.

In 2015, complaining about the budgetary cuts in Arizona, Michael Crow, the president of Arizona State University, said in a statement, "Over the years, the enormous reductions in the State of Arizona's investment in higher education have had to be replaced by, among other things, higher tuition (i.e. higher taxes) for our students and their families."

Statements such as Crow's appropriately point out the lie. If your anti-tax pledge leads to families paying more for a public education, then you're not really against taxes. You're just against the word "taxes."

Yes, Louisiana has a program that pays the tuition for students who qualify. But the cost of an education includes more than tuition, and, besides, there are students who don't meet the academic threshold for TOPS who can and do well in college. Putting college out of reach for them isn't in the state's best interest.

Louisiana budget protects TOPS: Watch high school seniors react
Louisiana budget protects TOPS: Watch high school seniors react

Girls State is a program for high school seniors with leadership qualities and an interest in government.


But there's another -- even more compelling -- reason why TOPS is an insufficient answer to the problem of college affordability. TOPS is for students coming out of high school, but that's not the only group colleges educate. A report from the Lumina Foundation finds that, nationally, full time students between the ages of 18-21 account for only a third of the total college population. Almost 40 percent of today's undergraduates are older than 25. A tuition program that rewards students who are exiting high school does nothing for those nontraditional students. And if they're employed in a state with the fourth-lowest median income, those older folks who might want to go to college might find that they simply can't.

If people don't want to go to college, then that's fine, but those who want to go shouldn't have state officials placing that dream out of reach.




Jarvis DeBerry is a columnist on the Latitude team at NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune. Latitude is a place to share opinions about the challenges facing Louisiana. Follow @LatitudeNOLA on Facebook and Twitter. Write Jarvis at jdeberry@nola.com or @jarvisdeberry.
00 2018-10-08
Regional/National

Career-Ready Education Needs Colleges and Businesses Working Together


Business can be a fickle friend to higher education, though the symbiotic nature of the two entities is irrefutable. Colleges entice students with the prospect of finding a good job. Business leaders need colleges to prepare a well-trained work force.

Whether colleges are holding up their end of the bargain, however, is a source of contention. A common refrain from employers is that colleges must do a better job of preparing students to be ready for "Day 1" on their jobs. In other words, businesses want students to be prepared to succeed with little or no additional training. Given the stunning variety of jobs and careers in our modern age, this is no small feat. However, it is an expectation that higher-education professionals have tried to meet through campus programs and resources, many within campus-career centers.

The efforts seem to be having some success. A recent survey of employers conducted by the Association of American Colleges & Universities found that business executives appeared to be more bullish on higher education than in the recent past, with 82 percent saying that a college degree is essential and 88 percent saying it is worth the time and money to earn. What’s more, 60 percent of hiring managers and executives believed that recent graduates had the skills and abilities to be successful in entry-level positions.

While this was heartening news, it was coupled with an additional assessment: Colleges and universities were not doing enough to prepare students for success beyond their first jobs. For many of us in academe, it is exasperating to realize, perhaps for the first time, that business leaders expect us to prepare students to be ready not only on Day 1 but also for jobs well into the future — in a world that is changing every day. We are expected, in the words of the educator Karl Fisch and others, to prepare students "for jobs that don’t yet exist, using technologies that haven’t been invented, in order to solve problems we don’t even know are problems yet." When the challenges are stated in such blunt terms, it seems outrageous to critique higher education for its inability to do that.

My colleague Michael Preston and I recently released a leadership model, published in the Journal of the National Association of Colleges and Employers, that provides a structure for meeting this seemingly impossible expectation. We propose that, to be successful in preparing students for leadership and success throughout their careers, higher education and business leaders must seek alignment.

Leadership programs on college campuses are often designed to provide practical guidance to students, but they can end up confirming some of the very stereotypes about leadership that they are designed to dispel. Among these are the myths that leadership is a personal quality possessed by some and not all, or that leadership is simply a set of tools that one can acquire and then use to "become a leader." These cotton-candy notions of leadership melt quickly in the heat of one’s first professional experiences, in which outcomes often gain priority over style or even process.

Additionally, business leaders often invest in management training rather than leadership. While the two share many similarities, management is focused on employing existing strategies and technologies to solve problems that can be predicted, while leadership focuses on developing strategies for problems and opportunities as they emerge. It seems reasonable to conclude that as individuals advance in their careers, the latter ability becomes increasingly instrumental in their success. It also seems logical that leadership programs in college will have only limited power to affect that outcome. Business leaders, too, must adapt what they do to bridge the gap.

Our model proposes that cocurricular experiences on campus — planned learning activities, like structured leadership-development programs, and more-emergent learning experiences, such as participation in a student organization, fraternity or sorority, campus publication, or job — be used to draw students into deeper levels of involvement and leadership. From this engagement, we can create learning outcomes in which students accomplish higher-order learning. This can replace a common method of developing learning outcomes in which broad skills such as "teamwork" or "communication" are encouraged without regard for how students might advance within the skills we identify. That is the rough equivalent of asking a student to take introductory composition in all four years of college.

Skill development is certainly important, but as others have pointed out, what employers often see as a skills gap might actually be an awareness gap. There is ample evidence to suggest that students do develop desirable skills from their experiences both inside and outside the classroom.

The proposed antidote to the awareness gap has been to focus on teaching students to articulate the skills they are gaining. But data from the most recent "Job Outlook" survey, produced annually by the National Association of Colleges and Employers, suggest that this approach may have limited utility. In nearly every competency studied, a considerably higher percentage of students rated themselves proficient than did employers. This suggests that the students’ problem may run deeper than simply learning to recognize their skills.

That is why we advance the "Five A’s" of skill development: awareness, acquiring, applying, advancing, and, finally, articulating. Students must first be aware of a skill they want to develop. They then begin the process of learning about it, finding opportunities to apply what they learn, and making a plan to get better. Eventually they can gain the ability to articulate their skill to others.

That dovetails well with the central theme of the model, which is that cocurricular experiences can help students bridge both the skills gap and the awareness gap. These experiences provide learning environments in which students can gain essential skills, which are focused on application, and, even more important, are compelling and fun. Cocurricular experiences are, after all, mostly just group projects that students enjoy doing.

For all of their differences, employers and higher-education professionals have similar goals. Colleges want to prepare students to be knowledgeable in their fields, excel in their careers, and be lifelong learners who can adapt to changes over time. To reach those worthy ideals, however, colleges and industries will need to work together.

Adam Peck is assistant vice president and dean of student affairs at Stephen F. Austin State University.
00 2018-10-08
Regional/National

Career-Ready Education Needs Colleges and Businesses Working Together


Business can be a fickle friend to higher education, though the symbiotic nature of the two entities is irrefutable. Colleges entice students with the prospect of finding a good job. Business leaders need colleges to prepare a well-trained work force.

Whether colleges are holding up their end of the bargain, however, is a source of contention. A common refrain from employers is that colleges must do a better job of preparing students to be ready for "Day 1" on their jobs. In other words, businesses want students to be prepared to succeed with little or no additional training. Given the stunning variety of jobs and careers in our modern age, this is no small feat. However, it is an expectation that higher-education professionals have tried to meet through campus programs and resources, many within campus-career centers.

The efforts seem to be having some success. A recent survey of employers conducted by the Association of American Colleges & Universities found that business executives appeared to be more bullish on higher education than in the recent past, with 82 percent saying that a college degree is essential and 88 percent saying it is worth the time and money to earn. What’s more, 60 percent of hiring managers and executives believed that recent graduates had the skills and abilities to be successful in entry-level positions.

While this was heartening news, it was coupled with an additional assessment: Colleges and universities were not doing enough to prepare students for success beyond their first jobs. For many of us in academe, it is exasperating to realize, perhaps for the first time, that business leaders expect us to prepare students to be ready not only on Day 1 but also for jobs well into the future — in a world that is changing every day. We are expected, in the words of the educator Karl Fisch and others, to prepare students "for jobs that don’t yet exist, using technologies that haven’t been invented, in order to solve problems we don’t even know are problems yet." When the challenges are stated in such blunt terms, it seems outrageous to critique higher education for its inability to do that.

My colleague Michael Preston and I recently released a leadership model, published in the Journal of the National Association of Colleges and Employers, that provides a structure for meeting this seemingly impossible expectation. We propose that, to be successful in preparing students for leadership and success throughout their careers, higher education and business leaders must seek alignment.

Leadership programs on college campuses are often designed to provide practical guidance to students, but they can end up confirming some of the very stereotypes about leadership that they are designed to dispel. Among these are the myths that leadership is a personal quality possessed by some and not all, or that leadership is simply a set of tools that one can acquire and then use to "become a leader." These cotton-candy notions of leadership melt quickly in the heat of one’s first professional experiences, in which outcomes often gain priority over style or even process.

Additionally, business leaders often invest in management training rather than leadership. While the two share many similarities, management is focused on employing existing strategies and technologies to solve problems that can be predicted, while leadership focuses on developing strategies for problems and opportunities as they emerge. It seems reasonable to conclude that as individuals advance in their careers, the latter ability becomes increasingly instrumental in their success. It also seems logical that leadership programs in college will have only limited power to affect that outcome. Business leaders, too, must adapt what they do to bridge the gap.

Our model proposes that cocurricular experiences on campus — planned learning activities, like structured leadership-development programs, and more-emergent learning experiences, such as participation in a student organization, fraternity or sorority, campus publication, or job — be used to draw students into deeper levels of involvement and leadership. From this engagement, we can create learning outcomes in which students accomplish higher-order learning. This can replace a common method of developing learning outcomes in which broad skills such as "teamwork" or "communication" are encouraged without regard for how students might advance within the skills we identify. That is the rough equivalent of asking a student to take introductory composition in all four years of college.

Skill development is certainly important, but as others have pointed out, what employers often see as a skills gap might actually be an awareness gap. There is ample evidence to suggest that students do develop desirable skills from their experiences both inside and outside the classroom.

The proposed antidote to the awareness gap has been to focus on teaching students to articulate the skills they are gaining. But data from the most recent "Job Outlook" survey, produced annually by the National Association of Colleges and Employers, suggest that this approach may have limited utility. In nearly every competency studied, a considerably higher percentage of students rated themselves proficient than did employers. This suggests that the students’ problem may run deeper than simply learning to recognize their skills.

That is why we advance the "Five A’s" of skill development: awareness, acquiring, applying, advancing, and, finally, articulating. Students must first be aware of a skill they want to develop. They then begin the process of learning about it, finding opportunities to apply what they learn, and making a plan to get better. Eventually they can gain the ability to articulate their skill to others.

That dovetails well with the central theme of the model, which is that cocurricular experiences can help students bridge both the skills gap and the awareness gap. These experiences provide learning environments in which students can gain essential skills, which are focused on application, and, even more important, are compelling and fun. Cocurricular experiences are, after all, mostly just group projects that students enjoy doing.

For all of their differences, employers and higher-education professionals have similar goals. Colleges want to prepare students to be knowledgeable in their fields, excel in their careers, and be lifelong learners who can adapt to changes over time. To reach those worthy ideals, however, colleges and industries will need to work together.

Adam Peck is assistant vice president and dean of student affairs at Stephen F. Austin State University.
00 2018-10-08
Regional/National

You can now take a college course on all things Anthony Bourdain


CNN) — In the last episode of "Parts Unknown" completed before Anthony Bourdain's death, the Emmy-award winning TV travel host and best-selling author leaves us with these haunting and poignant words in Kenya: "Who gets to tell the stories?"
"The answer in this case, for better or for worse, is I do -- at least this time. I do my best. I look. I listen. But in the end, I know it's my story, not Kamau's [reference to comedian and television host W. Kamau Bell, Bourdain's sidekick in the episode], not Kenya's, or Kenyans'. Those stories are yet to be heard."
Anthony Bourdain with W. Kamau Bell in the Kibera slums in Nairobi, Kenya in February 2018 during the filming of Season 12 'Parts Unknown.'
Anthony Bourdain with W. Kamau Bell in the Kibera slums in Nairobi, Kenya in February 2018 during the filming of Season 12 'Parts Unknown.'
David Scott Holloway for CNN
There's no doubt Bourdain's profound influence on how we view the world as travelers, as storytellers, as both outsiders and insiders, as consumers — of food, culture and media — will stir thoughtful discourse for years to come.
But if you're a student at Nicholls State University in Thibodaux, Louisiana, you'll have a chance to discuss all things Bourdain — and earn college credit for it — as early as 2019.
Professor Todd Kennedy, the head of the university's film studies program, is teaching a new class entitled "Anthony Bourdain and His Influencers" next spring.
Conception of the course
Kennedy, who holds a Ph.D. in 20th century American literature and film, spoke to me recently about how deeply shaken he was by news of Bourdain's death: "I was in Spain at the time with my wife, and I found myself bawling for days and days afterwards. ... I started thinking about the way Bourdain encapsulates so much of everything we do in film studies, in English studies, in cultural studies and what I do for a living."
Kennedy admits that while he enjoyed Bourdain's TV programs, he didn't consider himself a super-fan. "While I was a fan of his show, I don't think like one. Maybe it's the academic in me, but I'm always removed from things. I wrote a master's thesis on Bob Dylan, but I'm not invested in Bob Dylan as a person," says Kennedy.
But Kennedy couldn't remove himself from Anthony Bourdain, especially how much the chef-turned-host elevated television — creating shows that were some of the most filmic in the history of the small screen. "A lot of times we don't think of television as film — even I can sometimes be a little harsh on it — but what Bourdain did visually was some of the most innovative I've ever seen on TV."
Anthony Bourdain in conversation over a traditional meal at Aizepe, a gastronomic society in the heart of San Sebastian's Old Town.
Anthony Bourdain in conversation over a traditional meal at Aizepe, a gastronomic society in the heart of San Sebastian's Old Town.
STAFF
Kennedy recalls reading this 2010 interview in which Bourdain shares his goal of trying to make something novel and taking risks with his show. The Travel Channel's "No Reservations," which preceded "Parts Unknown," was being filmed at the time.
In the 2010 CityBeat interview, Bourdain offered some insight into his method: "Often before we even pick what country we're going to we start with a movie that we love and start thinking about where we might apply that look."
"In the best-case scenario, we're trying to make a different independent film every week," Bourdain said.
"I started realizing in almost every episode there's these obscure visual allusions to films that probably only he and his cinematographers were likely to know," says Kennedy.
Of course, the cinematic "No Reservations" Rome episode immediately comes to mind. Shot entirely in black and white, it evokes Italian film icons Fellini, Bertolucci and Antonioni. But Kennedy started spotting more and more film allusions in every episode, some that were not always obvious.
Anthony Bourdain in Tokyo, an episode in Season 2 'Parts Unknown.'
Anthony Bourdain in Tokyo, an episode in Season 2 'Parts Unknown.'
Zero Point Zero Production
In the "Parts Unknown" San Sebastian episode, Kennedy sees nods to Spanish filmmaker Julio Medem. Most of the professor's research has been focused on feminist film theory including the work of director Sofia Coppola, so he quickly realized the "Parts Unknown" Tokyo episode paid homage to "Lost in Translation."
The Literary Aspect
Kennedy also sees a number of literary influences in Bourdain's storytelling. Jim Harrison's novella "Legends of the Fall" is on the syllabus. A hero of Bourdain's, the celebrated author and poet's work was anchored in the wide open spaces of America's great outdoors, and his novella inspired the iconic 1994 film.
Tony spoke with author, Jim Harrison after a drive through Paradise Valley, Montana.
Tony spoke with author, Jim Harrison after a drive through Paradise Valley, Montana.
ZPZ/CNN
Fans may recall Bourdain meeting Harrison in the "No Reservations" Big Sky Country episode; later, in season seven of "Parts Unknown," Bourdain returns to Montana to bask in his literary hero's light one last time, as Harrison passed away shortly after this episode was filmed.
As for other literary influences of Bourdain's, Kennedy is also particularly excited to discuss the brash voice of New York's underground, Lydia Lunch, the no wave moment singer/poet/spoken word performer who will be featured in the final episode: the Lower East Side.
Students will start the course where it all began, by reading "Kitchen Confidential," Bourdain's tell-all memoir that shook up the culinary industry and catapulted the truth-serving chef into fame. The syllabus will also include "Between Meals: An Appetite of Paris" by A.J. Liebling, one of Bourdain's biggest inspirations for food writing.
Each week, the class will focus on an episode from one of Bourdain's shows —"A Cook's Tour," "No Reservations" and "Parts Unknown," — as well as the novel and/or film that Kennedy believes influenced Bourdain.
Anthony Bourdain in Hanoi.
Anthony Bourdain in Hanoi.
Zero Point Zero for CNN
For instance, the course will take a close look at one of Bourdain's favorite places, Vietnam. Kennedy will encourage students to consider what influenced Bourdain's exploration of the country. Ancillary material will include "Apocalypse Now" and Graham Greene's "The Quiet American," both of which inspired Bourdain while he was filming in Vietnam. Other readings on Vietnam will be assigned; watching the actual episode comes at the end.
"By the end of the week, we'll be debating Vietnam through the lens of how Anthony Bourdain saw it, but also with an awareness of what influenced Bourdain's perspectives of Vietnam before he ever got there," explains Kennedy.
Anthony Bourdain gets to know the locals in Hanoi.
Anthony Bourdain gets to know the locals in Hanoi.
Zero Point Zero for CNN
While Bourdain was committed to immersing himself in the local culture, he was also quite conscious of the baggage he brought to each destination.
"Bourdain was aware of the perspective he was coming at as a Westerner from North America, the films he had seen, and the films' influence on how he sees what he sees. He was both trying to immerse himself locally, while making you hyper-aware of what bias and outside perspectives he was bringing to the show," surmises Kennedy.
Like the man himself, Bourdain's work seems to have endless layers to unpack.
Related content
Anthony Bourdain was a voice for the underdog
What would Bourdain think?
"I'm excited about it, in some ways more than any other class I've taught, but for a class that seems so pop culture and shallow, it's really proving to be the exact opposite: It's the most layered of an onion of a class I've ever taught, with some of the most complicated themes," Kennedy says.
It's not a prerequisite for students to be familiar with Anthony Bourdain or a fan of his work. In fact, Kennedy hopes some students who register for the course will have barely heard of Bourdain because he feels studying the chef and TV personality with a blank canvas could offer a more nuanced perspective.
But what would Bourdain — a man who often seemed uneasy with his own celebrity and influence — think of Kennedy's class?
Professor Kennedy thinks Bourdain would ultimately approve.
"I think he would want to make fun of it," considers Kennedy. "I think he'd be a little intimidated by it, in a way that would probably make him a little self-aware. But I think he'd appreciate it at the same time. He liked ideas — I think he would like the idea even if he was uncomfortable with the attention."
Related content
A fan's tribute to Anthony Bourdain
Kathleen Rellihan is a travel writer and editor based in Brooklyn, New York. She considers herself lucky to have worked at Travel Channel as a digital producer and editor when Anthony Bourdain was making great TV there.
00 2018-10-08
Ruston

LA Tech hosts signing for the last beam to be placed at new STEM building


RUSTON, La. - It was cause for celebration at Louisiana Tech as distinguished guests, including Gov. John Bel Edwards, signed the last beam to be placed at the new Integrated Engineering and Science Education building.

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This building will be open to first and second year STEM students to learn with the most up-to-date technologies.

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Gov. Edwards says STEM is the future. "Why is this important? First of all this is important because stem is critically important if we're going to progress as a society, but those are where the job opportunities are going to be, but also the average stem jobs are going to pay twice as the average non stem job," he said.

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The new 130,000 square foot building will open Fall 2019.
00 2018-10-08
Shreveport

Louisiana Tech Celebrates New Construction Milestone


Governor John Bel Edwards paid a visit to Ruston today to celebrate a milestone in the construction of Louisiana Tech's new Engineering & Science building.

State and university officials gathered at the intersection of Homer St. and Texas Ave. to celebrate the placement of the building’s last steel beam.

Construction on the $35 Million facility began in January.

The state capital outlay is funding $30 Million of the project.

The university will be footing the rest of the bill through private money and fundraising efforts.

"This building was sorely needed to replace an antiquated building but also to continue the momentum that we have here. We are attracting students not just from northern parts of the state but really from all over the country, because of the excellent education that is afforded to them here. In fact, the only Cyber Engineering Degree Program anywhere in the country is right here at Louisiana Tech," said Governor Edwards.

The new IESB is one of the first academic buildings that the governor has authorized since being elected.
00 2018-10-05
Baton Rouge

LSU Board OKs new admission standards that lean harder on essays, recommendations than test scores


Moving clearly behind university administrators, LSU’s governing body endorsed Thursday a unilateral decision to change admission standards in a way that relaxes a generation-old requirement that applicants surpass a minimum score on college board tests, such as the ACT.

LSU Board of Supervisors Chairman James M. Williams insisted the resolution was not a direct response to the state Board of Regents, which last week launched an investigation into how often colleges are straying from the minimum admissions standards. Rather, he said, the leaders of LSU merely wanted to affirm a change that staff quietly began to put into effect last year.

“This wasn’t a reaction to the Regents,” said Williams, a Metairie lawyer. “We had always planned to evaluate it once we had all that data in.”

After more than a century of admitting any Louisiana resident with a high school diploma, the board voted in 1985 to make a minimum college board test score a prerequisite for having an application considered. LSU staff, without input from the university’s governing board, relaxed those rigid admission standards.

Critics slammed university administrators, saying that lowering the standards was aimed at putting more tuition-paying students in LSU classrooms — at the expense of the state’s other four-year universities — and could endanger the university’s flagship status. Some had even hoped the supervisors would rein in LSU President F. King Alexander and his staff by returning the admissions process to how it has been for more than 30 years.

That’s not happening. In fact, the Board also unanimously increased Alexander’s $610,666 salary by 3 percent and extended his contract until July 1, 2023.

“To move from a rigid admissions process to a comprehensive admissions process, all we’re doing is looking at a variety of factors instead of just one,” Williams said, adding that the broader review hasn’t translated to admitting less qualified students.

Incoming freshmen who arrived for class last month had an average ACT score of nearly 25.5 on a scale of 14-36 and a 3.53 grade point average on scale of 0 to 4.0 — tied for the highest achieving entering class in LSU history.

The new admissions process leans harder on essays and recommendations than on ACT scores and grade point averages. Test scores and grades are still important, but admissions officers now will evaluate transcripts not just for a flat GPA, but for whether the applicant took more rigorous courses, and if given a choice of courses, whether the student took the harder route. LSU also is looking for whether grades improved over a high school career and what life events, like the 2016 floods or family crisis, took a toll on academic performance.

Board member Ronald Anderson, who is president of the Louisiana Farm Bureau Federation, said the new process addresses a problem many rural students had brought up to him over the years — that the lack of resources in their communities worked against them entering LSU because of the set-in-stone admissions requirements.

A lot of smart students who failed to enter LSU because of a test score went on to success at other colleges, said Board member R. Blake Chatelain, of Alexandria. “It is the right thing to do for our kids,” he added.

“The ability to fully evaluate our applicants will help keep Louisiana’s best students in state,” Alexander said in a prepared statement. “We are pleased that the Board of Supervisors has recognized this comprehensive admission process, along with the modernization we have added to our admissions process, is the best way for LSU to compete on a national stage to attract and identify the best and brightest students.”

LSU set its strict requirements including a minimum ACT score and a minimum grade point average back in 1985. The Board of Regents, which oversees all of higher education, required in 2005 either a set ACT score or a minimum grade point average as part of the requirements for admission in the rest of the state’s public colleges and universities.

But the Board of Regents gave the universities some wiggle room, allowing the schools to admit a small percentage of students who didn’t meet the set criteria. In their audit, the Regents are looking at how many students were admitted without meeting the minimum standards, then deciding what, if any, sanctions should be taken against schools that admitted too many.

The Regents noted that last year LSU flagged 5.1 percent of its entering freshmen as “admit by exception,” which is more than the 4 percent allowed by the Regents. Presumably, that percentage would increase once “holistic admissions” kicks in full gear next academic year.

LSU Board Chairman Williams said he’s not concerned. “We provided our exceptions report in accordance with law and Board of Regents requirements,” he said.
00 2018-10-05
Lafayette

Drag Queen Story Time officially postponed


Lafayette’s first Drag Queen Story Time has been postponed indefinitely.

The decision came after South Louisiana Community College announced it would not hold the event on Saturday afternoon as planned.

A new date for the event has yet to be announced.

“With the loss of the host site, the library is forced to postpone the program until a new venue can be secured,” library officials said in a statement. “While this is a temporary setback, the Lafayette Public Library confirms that it is not permanently canceling the program. The library administration and its Board of Control firmly believe in carrying out its mission to serve a diverse community. In addition, many families have stood in support of this program which promotes respect and inclusiveness.”

Meet the drag queen who's reading to kids

The college cited concerns about safety, potential protests and large crowds as the reasons for canceling the event at its campus on Bertrand Drive.

“Based upon the information provided by law enforcement, the ongoing and increasing concerns regarding safety and security, and the limited capacity of the College to manage a potential event of this magnitude, the Drag Queen Storytime event cannot move forward at SLCC,” officials said in a statement.

The original plan was for the event to take place at the Lafayette Public Library’s main branch on Congress Street. Last week, library officials announced the program was being relocated to SLCC to accommodate the large expected crowds and eliminate disruptions to normal library activities.

The event was slated to include fraternity members from Delta Lambda Phi dressed in drag and reading to children ages 3 to 6.

The program spurred controversy since it was announced in mid-August. Council and library board meetings about the topic have drawn hundreds of attendees, including supporters and opponents.

Lafayette's Drag Queen Story Time: A timeline of events

In its statement, SLCC officials said law enforcement told them they were aware of plans to protest the event “at a scale that is beyond the College’s capacity to manage.” At least one national organization intended to be at the event, SLCC said.

The auditorium that was to hold the event at SLCC can accommodate 300 people.

“Similar to the Library’s original interest in moving the event, the College finds itself with significant anticipated overflow and has growing concerns for heightened safety implications,” officials said in a statement.

The college has a “limited security force” and cannot increase its security presence because of a state policy that says there can be no direct cost to the system for such events.

“In addition, the College has a responsibility to students taking classes Saturday to provide a setting conducive to learning, which could be severely disrupted by such a large crowd,” the statement said.
00 2018-10-05
Lafayette

What is a research village and does UL Lafayette need one?


As the University of Louisiana at Lafayette aims to become a Research 1-classified institution, a crucial part might be a place for researchers to work and live near the school.

This is called a research village, and it's the trend for high-tech companies like Microsoft and some top universities across the country.

"Research parks are no longer the model a university succeeds at," said Steve Oubre of Architects Southwest. "Now they have research villages. People want to live in place, work in place and entertain in place."

Oubre discussed the next phases of this research village Wednesday at a breakfast series at the Lafayette Economic Development Authority.

It is part of UL Lafayette's master plan that Oubre and his team at Architects Southwest began drafting in 2010. The plan was finalized and adopted in 2012.

"I guarantee the plan we did for the university has not been gathering dust," Oubre said. "It is a living document, which means we can respond and change to things that are added around us."

University of Louisiana at Lafayette President Joseph Savoie and Steve Oubre with Architects Southwest discuss the university's master plan at the Lafayette Economic Development Authority on Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018.
University of Louisiana at Lafayette President Joseph Savoie and Steve Oubre with Architects Southwest discuss the university's master plan at the Lafayette Economic Development Authority on Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018. (Photo: Leigh Guidry/USA TODAY Network)

The University of Louisiana at Lafayette master plan was the topic of discussion of a breakfast meeting at the Lafayette Economic Development Authority on Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018.
The University of Louisiana at Lafayette master plan was the topic of discussion of a breakfast meeting at the Lafayette Economic Development Authority on Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018. (Photo: Leigh Guidry/USA TODAY Network)

MORE:Older students are the new normal at U.S. colleges | Apollo 13 pilot speaks at UL Lafayette

Although several components of the master plan have been accomplished — a new student union, parking garages, bicycle shelters, Russo Park and more — there's more to go, including this research village.

The area for this village includes Cajundome Boulevard from Congress Street to Eraste Landry Road.

It already includes CGI and LITE Center but would grow to include mixed-use commercial and residential buildings, housing future students, professors, researchers and other Lafayette residents, Oubre explained.

Market studies conducted for the master plan called for 625 housing units, Oubre said.

"I think the opportunity of creating this mixed-use environment would set us apart from any other university, at least regionally," Oubre said.

UL Lafayette President Joseph Savoie agreed.

"It certainly would make the university more attractive and allow us to expand and grow our research and the research dollars," Savoie said. "We could broaden (our research) if we had not only additional lab space but also living space."

This could be of significant help in getting the university to Research 1 status by 2020, a goal in the school's strategic plan.

UL Lafayette currently is considered a Research 2 university, or one that produces "higher research activity," according to the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education.

The school announced in August it had reached an important step to becoming R-1 —exceeding $100 million in research and development expenditures for the first time.

It is typical of R-1 universities to have a funding portfolio of $100 million or more in research and development, said Ramesh Kolluru, UL Lafayette’s vice president for research, innovation and economic development.

Developing a research village could be the next step toward R-1.

But it won't be easy or immediate. Oubre knows this firsthand. The project went out for requests for quotation (RFQs) about a month before the price of oil dropped significantly.

MORE: These aren't your father's dorms. Living on campus has changed

Steve Oubre with Architects Southwest discusses the University of Louisiana at Lafayette master plan at the Lafayette Economic Development Authority on Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018.
Steve Oubre with Architects Southwest discusses the University of Louisiana at Lafayette master plan at the Lafayette Economic Development Authority on Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018. (Photo: Leigh Guidry/USA TODAY Network)

The ball stopped rolling as interested developers decided to wait and watch the economy before making such an investment, Oubre said.

Their next effort was to break the whole project into more manageable pieces, but the prices that came back from that were "not responsible," he said.

Right now the project is being "repackaged," and there's interest again, he said.

"We're seeing some interest," Oubre said. "It's on people's radar."
00 2018-10-05
Lafayette

UL Lafayette Homecoming Week features entertainment and activities for students, alums


University of Louisiana at Lafayette students, alumni and football fans have plenty to get fired up about during Homecoming Week 2018.

The Louisiana Ragin’ Cajuns and the New Mexico State Aggies will face off at 4 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 13, at Cajun Field, but not before a week filled with activities and entertainment.

A pep rally, parade, tailgating, food truck roundup, talent show, and road race are just some of the events planned by the University of Louisiana at Lafayette Alumni Association and the University Program Council.

The Homecoming 2018 theme, “Back in the Mix, Back on the Bricks,” refers to alumni – often from other cities or states – who return to campus and search for bricks on the Walk of Honor, said Homecoming 2018 chair Summer Hvasta, ’07, ’11.

The Walk of Honor features names of graduates inscribed on bricks on campus walkways. Bricks are arranged alphabetically and by year of graduation. The walk begins near Martin Hall, continues into the Quadrangle, and along Hebrard Boulevard and Boucher and McKinley streets.

To date, bricks for graduates through December 2015 have been placed along the Walk of Honor.

“The idea is to encourage alums to find their brick. They find it fun, and many snap pictures to post on social media,” Hvasta said.

Homecoming Week will get a running start with the Ragin’ Road Race at 8 a.m. on Sunday, Oct. 7. The 5K follows a route through and near campus. It begins and ends near the UL Lafayette Alumni Center, 600 E. St. Mary Blvd.

Overall first- and second-place male and female finishers will be recognized. So will male and female competitors who place first and second in a range of age groups. Spirit will count as much as speed for the runner wearing the most creative Louisiana Ragin’ Cajuns- or Homecoming-themed costume.

Following the race, runners can enjoy red beans and rice during an after-party at the Alumni Center. The event is open to the public.

On Monday, fare such as po-boys, chicken wings, and desserts will be sold during the Allons Manger Food Truck Roundup. The event will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Alumni Center. Vendors are C’est Bon Manger, KOK Wings, Mad LuAnns and The Bus Stop. Southern Chics Boutique with sell clothes and accessories.

That night, a Campus Scavenger Hunt will be held from 7-9 p.m. Students will meet in the Atchafalaya Ballrooom in the Student Union, then trek across campus to locate spots that won’t be revealed until just before the competition starts.

On Tuesday, Oct. 9, the two-day “Paint the Town Red” contest will begin. Judges will visit businesses and schools to select winners in categories, such as exterior and interior decorations and skits. Judges will visit schools starting at 8 a.m. on Tuesday and businesses starting at 9 a.m. the next day.

The “Cajuns Got Talent” contest will be held at 7 p.m. on Tuesday at the Cajundome Convention Center.

“Students can showcase any talent they possess, such as singing, dancing, comedy or performing magic tricks,” said Karli Sherman, assistant director of the University Program Council’s Office of Student Engagement and Leadership.

On Wednesday, Oct. 10, Wear Red, Get Fed will be held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Boucher Street. Attendees who wear Louisiana Ragin’ Cajuns gear will be able to eat free pulled pork sandwiches, macaroni and cheese, salad, brownies and soft drinks while the lunches last.

The Cajuns Can Care Food Drive will be held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednesday on Boucher Street. Canned goods that are dropped off will be donated to local food pantries.

The Yell Like Hell Pep Rally will be held at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 11, on the Student Union porch and in the courtyard. The Homecoming Week tradition will feature music by the Pride of Acadiana Marching Band, and a DJ. Members of the football team and head coach Billy Napier, the Homecoming Court, cheerleaders, and the Ragin’ Jazz dance team will attend.

On Friday, Oct. 12, activities include a tennis tournament from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Red Lerille’s Health and Racquet Club. The Bill Bass Open Golf Tournament will be held from 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at Les Vieux Chenes Golf Course.

The National Panhellinic Greek Expo will be held at 7:30 p.m. Friday at the Cajundome Convention Center. Fraternity and sorority members will perform during the step show.

Homecoming Day begins with an open house from 9-11:30 a.m. at the Alumni Center. Attendees can connect with fellow alumni, enjoy a breakfast buffet and beverages, and watch the Homecoming Parade from the center’s front lawn.

The parade will begin at 10 a.m. at Blackham Coliseum. A float carrying the queen, the king and their courts will stop in front of the Alumni Center for a toast by University President Dr. Joseph Savoie.

A Zydeco Brunch will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Cypress Lake Dining Hall in the Student Union. Diners can purchase tickets for an all-you-can-eat buffet.

The menu includes duck and andouille gumbo, crab cakes, boudin potato skins, French toast, Cajun-smothered seven steak, alligator sausage hash, scrambled eggs, jalapeno smoked cheddar grits, sweet potato cane syrupy cathead biscuits, crawfish étouffée, barbecue shrimp, tarte a la bouilli (sweet dough pies) with salted caramel, and beignets.

Tailgating will start at 1 p.m. outside Cajun Field at the Alumni tent at the soccer and track and field parking lot on Reinhardt Drive. Cracklings and jambalaya will be served.

Beginning at 1 p.m., students can enjoy food, soft drinks and listen to music played by a DJ during tailgating at Bourgeois Park.

The game day Cajun Walk will begin at 1:45 p.m. on Reinhardt Drive.

The Pride of Acadiana Marching Band’s pregame performance will be at 3:50 p.m. at Cajun Field.

That night, the Christiana Smith African-American Alumni Chapter will celebrate its annual “Sweet Sounds of Sharing.” Proceeds from the reception will benefit the Christiana Smith endowed scholarship fund. The event will be held at 8 p.m. at the Cajundome Convention Center, Mardi Gras Ballroom.


00 2018-10-05
Monroe

ULM to host Conference on Disability Advocacy on Tuesday


Each year, October is commemorated as National Disability Employment Awareness Month. This year’s theme is “America’s Workforce: Empowering All.”

In the words of the Office of Disability Employment Policy, “NDEAM celebrates the contributions of workers with disabilities and educates about the value of a workforce inclusive of their skills and talents.”

The ULM College of Business and Social Sciences (Gerontology Program), in collaboration with Families Helping Families of NELA, is commemorating NDEAM by hosting the Conference on Disability Advocacy from 1-4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 9, at the ULM Conference Center on the seventh floor of the ULM Library.

The purpose of this conference is to raise awareness on the barriers faced by people with disabilities and to empower them by focusing on their strengths. It is not about “disability” — it is all about “ability.”

A panel discussion by people with disabilities will be one of the components of this conference. The second component will consist of ADA training for small businesses and nonprofits to enable them to become ADA compliant and partners in employment. The third component will focus on employment opportunities for people with disabilities.

“ULM’s Gerontology program is happy to offer this conference as part of our continued outreach to have a positive impact on America’s workforce,” said Dr. Ron Berry, Dean of the College of Business and Social Sciences.

Several organizations will have booths and refreshments will be served. For more information, contact Dr. Anita Sharma at asharma@ulm.edu.
Registration, free of charge, can be made online at https://www.ulm.edu/gerontology/conferences.html.
00 2018-10-05
Monroe

Abraham announces $123,000 for ULM student-parent childcare grant


Fifth District Congressman Ralph Abraham recently announced that the University of Louisiana at Monroe is expected to receive a grant of about $123,000 from the U.S. Department of Education to help student-parents reach their goal of earning a college degree.

The ULM TRIO Programs received the grant through the Child Care Access Means Parents In School (CCAMPIS) Program, which helps low-income parents pursue a college degree by providing access to campus-based childcare programs. The full amount of the grant is $122,626.

“Going to school while raising kids is tough; I know because I’ve done it. The student-parents eligible for this program face added financial challenges, too. This grant is so important because it will help students from across Northeast Louisiana achieve their dreams of earning a college degree that they’ll use to get better jobs and make more money to help raise their families,” said Abraham, R-Alto.

Abraham and his wife, Dianne, raised three small children while he commuted daily from Rayville to Shreveport for medical school.

Student-parents are more than three times as likely to finish their degrees if they have access to childcare on campus, according to TRIO Programs Executive Director Catherine Estis. She said the grant will help fill funding gaps for student-parents who struggle to provide childcare and balance the demands of higher education.

Abraham has announced nearly $750,000 in federal funding for ULM in the last two months. He has previously announced a $352,500 grant to study obesity and diabetes research and a $275,000 grant for to purchase research equipment for the atmospheric sciences program.
00 2018-10-05
Natchitoches

ECE will offer Security Boot Camp


NATCHITOCHES – The Office of Electronic and Continuing Education at Northwestern State University will offer a Security+Intensive Boot Camp online. The course has open enrollment. The fee is $1,899. This intensive boot camp is designed to prepare individuals for the CompTIA Security+ (SYO-501) exam. Those taking the course will be provided resources, lecture notes and access to a live professor that will prepare them to take the certification exam.

This comprehensive package includes the software, recorded lectures, a test voucher (good for one year), a free retake and a weekly live session should participants need it. The course is self-paced so that students may begin any time and will have nine months of live access.

For more information on non-credit programs at Northwestern State, go to nsula.edu/ece/non-credit-programs or call (318) 357-6355 or (800) 376-2422. To register for classes, go to checkout.nsula.edu. To learn more about NSU’s online non-credit courses, go to gatlineducation.com/nsula or ed2go.com/nsu.
00 2018-10-05
New Orleans

Public college access in jeopardy for low-income students as tuition rises: report


The burden of paying for higher education has shifted significantly from state governments to students and families since the Great Recession, and a new report states Louisiana for the most part has been affected by this more than any other region.

State funding for higher education remains "far below" pre-recession levels in most states, and Louisiana's funding dropped by more than 40 percent since 2008, according to a report released Thursday (Oct. 4) by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. Researchers found Louisiana cut more state funding from higher education than any other state, on a per-student basis of $4,949, over this period.

State cuts have helped drive up tuition at public universities, and researchers found Louisiana more than doubled the tuition it charges students — a 105 percent increase that is also the nation's largest. Public college tuition in Louisiana has risen by $4,773 per student since 2008, and average tuition at a four-year Louisiana public university is now $9,302 a year, the report stated.


The report stated only six other states — Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia, and Hawaii — charged more for tuition and fees than Louisiana. Arizona, the state with the largest dollar increase since the recession hit, experienced a tuition increase of $5,355 per student, or 91.3 percent. Average tuition at a four-year Arizona public university is now $11,218 a year.

The Louisiana Budget Project, a group that advocates for low-income people on state fiscal policy, said this "massive shift" in the burden of paying for higher education has affected families at all economic levels. Budget Project executive director Jan Moller Thursday said it's especially tough on low-income students, including many who are the first in their families to attend college. The report warns tuition costs will not only deter some students from enrolling in college, but it may also reduce campus diversity and push low-income students "toward less-selective public institutions, reducing their future earnings."


Average tuition and fees at a public four-year university accounted for nearly 32 percent of median household income for black families in Louisiana and nearly 23 percent for Hispanic families in 2017, according to the center's report. This compares to nearly 16 percent of median household income for white families, 14 percent for Asian families, and 19 percent of median household income for all families in the state. The report comes as many universities in Louisiana and across the nation see record increases in the diversity of their latest student populations.

"The rising cost of college risks blocking one of America's most important paths to economic mobility. And while these costs hinder progress for everyone, Black and Hispanic students continue to face the most significant barriers to opportunity," said Michael Mitchell, the center's senior policy analyst and lead author of the report in a released statement.

Louisiana has 34 public colleges and universities, including 14 four-year institutions. Moller said Thursday Louisiana's funding woes aren't be a "mystery" to anyone who has followed the state's budget for the last decade. He said the state government's "decade-long budget crisis" resulted in a lot of cuts to higher education.


"That has happened all over the country, it's just happened more in Louisiana than anywhere else," Moller said.

The center has kept track of the nation's rising public college tuition costs in reports for several years now, but Moller said this year's report calculates the burden of tuition and fees on the median household income for families for the first time. Although Louisiana doesn't have the highest tuition in the U.S., Moller said higher education is "particularly unaffordable" for the state's low-income families, including those with students still struggling with debt.

Louisiana rises to No. 1 in FAFSA completion within two months
Louisiana rises to No. 1 in FAFSA completion within two months

The state's new ranking comes after it climbed from eighth to third for FAFSA in April.


The report comes after the U.S. Department of Education Monday released the Free Application for Federal Student Aid for the 2019-20 school year, and the Budget Project deemed state financial aid programs like TOPS and GO Grants crucial in addressing the report's findings. However, Davante Lewis, the Budget Project's federal policy advocate, addressed the shortcomings of those programs in a released statement Thursday.

"Year after year TOPS is put on a pedestal and prioritized by lawmakers, even in dire financial times, but funding for GO Grants has been mostly flat, even as student financial needs have increased. This is unacceptable," Lewis stated.


Moller said TOPS has been "very effective" in paying tuition for those who qualify, but it doesn't cover fees such as housing and books. Moller also said most TOPS recipients are skewing to the "whiter, richer" demographic of students than the state as a whole, which excludes "everybody else," including many first-generation college students, people going back to college, people who are part-time students, and adult learners.

"We're not saying that you shouldn't have a merit-based program, but we are saying that there are ways that you can make college more affordable for low-income and nontraditional students," Moller said.

Moller said the $28.4 million allocation to GO Grants for this school year is an all-time high, but it is only $2.4 million more than what was allocated during the 2008-09 school year. He also lauded the government for managing "to stop the bleeding" by stabilizing higher education funding this year as he urged the Legislature to replace the money that's been cut.

Moller said policymakers can either increase state investments in higher education or in need-based programs to shift the burden off of families. His comments were echoed in the center's report, which also advised lawmakers to focus additional state funds on building the capacity of colleges with fewer resources.


"The primary purpose of need-based aid is to expand access to higher education. For low-income students, financial aid can make a significant difference in not only affording the cost of college but in being able to graduate," the report stated.
00 2018-10-05
Ruston

ANDREWS IN NEW MEXICO; TO LAND IN MONROE ON SATURDAY


Louisiana Tech University student Mason Andrews was in Roswell, New Mexico this morning as he continues his quest to become the youngest pilot to solo around the world.
The final scheduling for Mason’s return is 9 a.m. this Saturday morning (10.6.18) at the Pilots for Patients Hangar at Monroe Regional Airport.
00 2018-10-05
Ruston

LA Tech business student Martinez receives prestigious PCAOB scholarship


RUSTON — Bailey Martinez, a master of accountancy student in Louisiana Tech University’s College of Business, was recently awarded a $10,000 scholarship by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB) intended to encourage outstanding accounting students to pursue careers in audit.

“It is truly an honor to have been nominated for the PCAOB scholarship,” said Martinez. “I am so grateful to receive this nationally recognized award. I look forward to utilizing the scholarship to further my education at the best university—Louisiana Tech.”

The scholarship is awarded to one student at 332 colleges and universities who is excellent in his or her accounting degree program and has been nominated by a professor or by the school. Martinez was nominated by KPMG Endowed Professor David Herda, Ph.D.

“I was asked to nominate one student for this scholarship. When I read the eligibility criteria, it was as if they were describing Bailey,” said Dr. Herda. “Bailey is an outstanding student and person and is truly deserving of this award.”

Originally from Austin, Texas, Martinez graduated from Louisiana Tech in August 2018 with a bachelor’s degree in accounting and is currently pursuing her master of accountancy degree. During her time as an undergraduate, Martinez served as president of Beta Alpha Psi, and completed an audit internship in Dallas, Texas, with Deloitte. Martinez has accepted a full-time position as auditor with Deloitte and will join their Dallas office upon graduation.

“The professors in the College of Business are always willing to help, encourage, and push me to reach my highest potential,” said Martinez. “I would not be where I am today without them.”

For more information about the PCAOB scholarship, visit pcaobus.org.
00 2018-10-04
Hammond

SLU announces 2018 Homecoming and Beau courts


HAMMOND — Fourteen Southeastern Louisiana University students have been chosen as members of the 2018 Homecoming queen and beau courts. The seven women and seven men will reign over homecoming festivities Oct. 8-14.

Chosen as members of the queen court are seniors De’Kayta Alex, Natchitoches; Lyndsey Devaney, Hammond; Sydnie McClinton, New Orleans; Gillian Miculek, Gramercy; and Jill Munchausen, Ponchatoula; junior Da Jon Shauntreal Beard, New Orleans; and sophomore Victoria Alexius of Spanish Fort, Alabama.

Members of the beau court are seniors Daniel Cuevas, Ponchatoula; Cedric Dent Jr., New Orleans; Claudio Franc, Baia Mare, Romania; Griffin Hakenjos, Covington; and Tyler Olivier, Mandeville; and juniors Bomani Brown Jr., New Orleans; and Matthew Matherne, Amite.

The 2018 queen and beau, the top junior or senior vote-getters in the recent online campus election, will be announced at halftime of the homecoming football game when the Lions take on Houston Baptist at 4 p.m. Homecoming Day, Oct. 13, in Strawberry Stadium.

The court also will participate in homecoming festivities such as Gumbo YaYa on Oct. 10, the bonfire and pep rally Oct. 12, and the noon Homecoming Day parade.

For information about Southeastern homecoming events, contact the Alumni Association at (985) 549-2150 or (800) SLU-ALUM or visit www.southeastern.edu/homecoming.
00 2018-10-04
Lafayette

UL Lafayette master plan calls for development near Cajundome to feature housing, hotel, businesses


A University of Louisiana at Lafayette master plan includes a mixed-use area around the Cajundome that will contain parking, businesses and living spaces, officials said during a Wednesday presentation.

UL-Lafayette President Joseph Savoie and Steve Oubre, of Architects Southwest, spoke to local business and community leaders at the Lafayette Economic Development Authority and the Realtor Association breakfast to give updates on the master plan. The plan focuses on improving transportation and parking as well as adding covered walkways, outdoor plazas, a new student union and parking garages.

One focus is on connecting UL-Lafayette's main campus and the satellite campus around Cajundome, an area called the Research Village that would include around 625 housing units, a hotel, businesses, parks and other amenities within walking distance of where the researchers work.

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"Research parks just don't work anymore," Oubre said. "The kids we're doing this for are in fifth grade right now. The new generation wants something different. Besides parking, the mixed use environment for the research village would set UL apart from all other universities in the region.

"The millennial generation — which is really the activator of research villages — love the ability to live in place, work in place and entertain in place. So creating this research environment was now finding a way to get this mix of uses and make it viable."

This plan also includes multi-use buildings for the main campus, including two on Johnston Street and St. Mary Boulevard across from campus that would include a Taco Bell and a Burger King with apartments above them.

Also in the plan is a monorail that would connect the two campuses, Oubre said, but that project likely would not happen for the foreseeable future due to costs.

"The basis of the plan is not our ideas but your ideas," Oubre told the audience. "It's what you want with a little bit of science to round it out."

Some parts of the plans are in progress or have been completed, such as remodeling of the Student Union and the Quad and construction of the Path of Knowledge, a bike path connecting the two campuses via St. Landry Street.

"We have accomplished quite a bit so far, constructionwise, but the more important part of this plan is that we have guidance going forward with future improvements," Savoie said. "We've gotten a lot done, we have a lot left to do, but we have a good road map on what we have to do."

The master plan was finalized and officially adopted by the University of Louisiana system in 2012. The master plan took into account public comment, LEDA-funded market studies and recommendations from Lafayette Consolidated Government.
00 2018-10-04
Lafayette

LEDA helping UL implement master plan


LEDA is helping administrators at UL implement their master plan.

Today, leaders from both organizations met to discuss ideas for how they can improve the plan in the future.

The Master Plan is a comprehensive plan created as a vision to improve the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s environment and make it one of the most comfortable and inspiring academic institutions in America. LEDA helped UL develop the plan five years ago.

“It definitely brings joy to me because that’s our ultimate goal. It’s to help students to succeed and it helps them to be successful citizens in the community,” said Dr. Joe Savoie, UL President. “So once they leave from what we call our little nest, and they become adults, well we’re just glad that we’re able to help them with that process.”
00 2018-10-04
Lafayette

UL Homecoming Week events and activities


Ragin’ Cajun fans can celebrate the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s 2018 Homecoming in many ways.

Homecoming Week activities and events include a Homecoming Day parade, pep rally, and a scavenger hunt.

The Louisiana Ragin’ Cajuns will face the New Mexico State Aggies at 4 p.m. at Cajun Field on Saturday, Oct. 13, Homecoming Day.

Here’s a look at Homecoming 2018 events:



Sunday, Oct. 7

• Ragin’ Road Race 5K

Starts at the Alumni Center, 8 a.m.



Monday, Oct. 8

• Cupcake Giveaway

Alumni Center, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.



• Allons Manger Food Truck Roundup

Alumni Center, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.



• Scavenger Hunt

Student Union, Atchafalaya Ballroom, 7 p.m.



Tuesday, Oct. 9

• Cajuns Got Talent

Cajundome Convention Center, 7 p.m.



Wednesday, Oct. 10

• Cajuns Can Care Food Drive

Boucher Street, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.



• Wear Red, Get Fed

Boucher Street, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.



Thursday, Oct. 11

• Yell Like Hell Pep Rally

Student Union porch and courtyard, 7 p.m.



Friday, Oct. 12

• Tennis Tournament

Red Lerille’s Health and Racquet Club, 8 a.m.



• Bill Bass Open Golf Tournament

Vieux Chenes Golf Course, 10:30 a.m.



• National Panhellenic Greek Expo
Cajundome Convention Center, 7:30 p.m.



Saturday, Oct. 13

• Open House

Alumni Center, 9 – 11:30 a.m.



• Homecoming Parade

Viewing at Alumni Center, 10 a.m.

Parade begins at Blackham Coliseum and ends on St. Mary Boulevard near the Alumni Center.



• Zydeco Brunch

Cypress Lake Dining Hall,

Student Union, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.



• Cajun Walk

Reinhardt Drive, 1:45 p.m.



• Pride of Acadiana Marching Band pregame performance

Cajun Field, 3:50 p.m.



• Louisiana Ragin’ Cajuns vs. New Mexico State Aggies

Cajun Field, 4 p.m.



• “Sweet Sounds of Sharing” reception

Cajundome Convention Center, Mardi Gras Ballroom, 8 p.m.
00 2018-10-04
Monroe

Mason Andrews' trip around the world ends Saturday


10/3/2018) Mason Andrews, the Louisiana Tech student trying to become the youngest person to fly solo around the world, will finish his mission Saturday in Monroe.

His father Jeb has been updating friends, family, and strangers on Mason's progress via Facebook.





Mason is flying to raise money and awareness for MedCamps, a local camp for kids with special needs.

CLICK HERE to see a previous story when we caught up with Mason in Greece.
00 2018-10-04
Natchitoches

Engineering Technology Symposium Oct. 17


NATCHITOCHES – Northwestern State University’s Department of Engineering Technology will present an Engineering Technology Symposium from 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 17 in the NSU Student Union Ballroom.



The event is intended to educate participants on advanced manufacturing and its impact on the regional economy. Topics will include automation and robotics, advanced materials and techniques for CubeSat applications, workforce competencies for the 21st century, smart factories, advances in the lumber and timber industries, STEAM education and its importance on the success of the youth community, additive manufacturing and nanotechnology and advanced manufacturing.



The event is supported by the Natchitoches Community Alliance Foundation. To register, visit engrtech.nsula.edu and click on the symposium link. For more information, contact Dr. Jafar Al-Sharab at jafar@nsula.edu or (318) 357-6751.
00 2018-10-04
Regional/National

New Tool for FAFSA Completion


Students seeking financial aid for college can encounter any number of obstacles to completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA. The application, which includes more than 100 questions, can be daunting, and students may need assistance answering even basic questions.

And sometimes they just don’t have access to a computer to complete the application.

College-access advocates hope a new mobile student aid app launched by the Education Department this week will remove one barrier to financial aid by allowing applicants to access the FAFSA on their smartphone.

“Students live on their phones, as we all know,” said Sujuan Boutté, executive director of the Louisiana Office of Student Financial Assistance.

Student aid professionals say the biggest measure of the app’s impact will be whether it leads to an increase in the FAFSA completion rate. But they’re also balancing excitement about the app with realism over the challenges still facing many students most in need of federal aid.

The Trump administration announced plans last year to develop the mobile app -- part of a broader overhaul it envisions for the student experience from seeking aid to repaying loans. In a statement heralding the app’s release, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said students will have even greater access to information about colleges they’re applying to and information about their financial future.

The Education Department released an unfinished “beta” version of the myStudentAid app in July. The final version that launched this week lets students navigate the FAFSA one question at a time, allows parents to separately enter their own income information for one or more students and displays College Scorecard data for comparisons of multiple colleges.

“Our ultimate measure will be if we see increase in FAFSA completion,” said Kim Cook, executive director of the National College Access Network, of assessing the app’s impact. “We hope that a mobile platform is more accessible to students so more students will check out FAFSA and complete it.”

A new report released by the National College Access Network shows that students who need financial support the most to attend college continue to struggle the most with completing the application. The group examined completion rates at the school-district level and found that the greater the share of children living in poverty, the lower the FAFSA completion rate for graduating high school seniors.

Ellie Bruecker, a doctoral student in Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis at the University of Wisconsin Madison, said she expects higher filing rates for the 2019-20 award cycle, which started Oct. 1. But that’s because of ongoing efforts in local school districts and states like Louisiana, which last year began requiring all high school seniors to complete the application.

“I’d guess you’ll see some schools and their college counselors advertise the app as an easy way to complete the FAFSA, but I think that’s just part of the larger push to get more students to file and will likely happen in schools that are already making these efforts,” she said.

Bruecker said she doesn’t expect the mobile app to move the needle for FAFSA completion among low-income students and students of color -- those who are most in need of federal assistance. Low-income adults and black adults are slightly less likely to own a smartphone, according to Pew data. And Bruecker noted that the FAFSA mobile app so far is only available in English.

Justin Draeger, president and CEO of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, said the mobile app is best viewed as one of several steps the Education Department has taken in recent years to incrementally improve the application process.

Earlier, it helped create the IRS data retrieval tool, which allows applicants to automatically import family tax data into their FAFSA application. And in 2016, it moved the beginning of the federal financial aid cycle up two months so that students could start the process earlier in the year.

“I think we’ve made a lot of progress on the FAFSA over the last decade,” Draeger said. “This is just another step in the right direction and I totally applaud them for that.”

Boutté of the Louisiana Office of Student Financial Assistance said the mobile app is another tool for advisers helping students navigate the financial aid process. She said students and their advocates should keep in mind it’s just the beginning of a process that should include choosing the institution that’s the best fit for them.

“It’s another option, and really, anything that makes the FAFSA more accessible in the minds of our students -- for us, that’s a win,” she said.
00 2018-10-04
Regional/National

Anthony Bourdain Is the Subject of a New Class at Louisiana's Nicholls State University


ARROW
SCHOOL
Anthony Bourdain Is the Subject of a New Class at Louisiana's Nicholls State University
BY MICHELE DEBCZAK OCTOBER 3, 2018
Larry French/Getty Images for DC Central Kitchen
LARRY FRENCH/GETTY IMAGES FOR DC CENTRAL KITCHEN

From journalism and television to the travel and restaurant industries, Anthony Bourdain influenced numerous fields throughout his career. His own work was also heavily influenced by the art, films, and literature he loved—and he wasn't afraid to make that clear in his shows. Next year, Nicholls State University in Thibodaux, Louisiana is hosting an entire class dedicated to the media that shaped the chef/writer/television personality, USA Today reports.

Nicholls State professor Todd Kennedy was inspired to design the course following Bourdain's death in June. Like many fans, he was affected by the loss, and started reflecting on how successful Bourdain had been in seamlessly blending literature, film, travel, and food into his documentaries. He pitched a class called "Anthony Bourdain and His Influencers" for the spring 2019 semester, which was quickly approved by the college.

"Almost every episode of Bourdain's shows directly reference and/or pay homage to a major work of literature or film as he develops his own visual and narrative argument about culture, politics, food, art, and the intersections therein," the class description reads. "This course will pair Bourdain's work with the writings and films that influenced him, connecting ways of understanding the world around us through the lens of a transformative writer and public figure."

Based on an image Kennedy shared on Twitter, the course materials will includes movies such as Apocalypse Now (1979) and Aguirre, the Wrath of God (1972) and books like Legends of the Fall by Jim Harrison and The Quiet American by Graham Greene. The class is a film studies course, but it also satisfies some English credits.

View image on Twitter
View image on Twitter

Todd Kennedy
@NSUFilmStudies
So, it's happening. For real. And I doubt they ever let me do this again. So spread the word to interested Nicholls students: a cross-listed literature and film studies course on Anthony Bourdain and his Influencers @PartsUnknownCNN

12:16 PM - Sep 19, 2018
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Enrollment for the class opens sometime this month, and it will only be open to current students at Nicholls State. A condensed version of the class will also be made available online to students outside southern Louisiana.
00 2018-10-04
Ruston

LA Tech College of Business announces record enrollment


RUSTON — Louisiana Tech University’s College of Business recently welcomed its largest-ever entering class comprised of 264 first-time freshmen.

Fall 2018 marks the largest enrollment in the history of the College with 1,393 undergraduate and graduate students, continuing a trend of steadily increasing enrollment figures.

“We’re thrilled that these outstanding students have chosen the College of Business to learn how to leverage technology in business and lead innovation,” said Chris Martin, Ph.D., dean of the College of Business. “Our increase in enrollment — including a 31 percent increase in first-time freshmen year-over-year — is a testament to the innovative programs offered in and outside our classrooms.”

The College also introduced several new academic programs on the graduate level including the Graduate Certificate in Business Administration, which provides professionals with a milestone accomplishment for career advancement and a pathway into Louisiana Tech’s Master of Business Administration (MBA) program. Graduate students also now have the opportunity to earn a Green Belt or Black Belt Six Sigma certification alongside the MBA. This online option offers highly sought after technical and analytical skills to improve quality of the output of a process in organizations, and is a collaboration between the College of Business and the College of Engineering and Science.

Designed for place-bound students living and working in Shreveport-Bossier City, the College’s new “2+2 Pathway to Tech” in computer information systems provides professionals with 60 hours of college credit with the chance to earn a bachelor of science degree in our Bossier City Academic Success Center.

“Our students graduate from Louisiana Tech prepared to successfully meet the workforce needs of the I-20 corridor and beyond,” said Martin. “We aim to develop innovative and relative programs and designed to give students the real-world experience employers value.”
00 2018-10-03
Hammond

Southeastern Symphony Orchestra to present concert Oct. 2


The Southeastern Symphony Orchestra will present its first fall concert in the Pottle Music Auditorium on Tuesday, Oct. 2.

Titled “The Clock Symphony,” the free concert is scheduled the begin at 7:30 p.m. Violin Professor and Orchestra Director Victor Correa-Cruz will serve as conductor.

Correa-Cruz said the symphony will perform one of the most popular works composed by Joseph Haydn, Symphony No. 101 in D major. Nicknamed “The Clock” because of the constant rhythmic display of its second movement, the piece has become one of the most performed works in the symphonic repertoire.

“Haydn had a big orchestra at his disposal during the years spent at the English capital, and that explains the large-scale structure and the monumental quality of some of the sections,” said Correa-Cruz. “Haydn combines lighter themes with deep and dramatic moments along this entire work.”

The orchestra will also present Beethoven’s “Egmont” overture, as well as the overture to “Il Barbiere di Siviglia” by Rossini, a cheerful tune that suits the operatic world perfectly, according to Correa-Cruz.

“After the slow introduction, one can hear the main theme with its scherzando (joking) character,” Correa-Cruz said. “The second section offers challenging solos for the woodwinds and first horn. The closing section is a brilliant coda with the orchestra showing its full potential. We will present the ‘German version,’ which adds three trombones to the original by Rossini.”

For more information about the concert, contact the Department of Music and Performing Arts at (985) 549-2184.
00 2018-10-03
Lafayette

Grammy award winner Peter Rowan will perform at UL


Grammy award winner and six-time Grammy nominee, Peter Rowan will perform a solo concert on Thursday, October 25, 7:30 – 9pm at Burke-Hawthorne Hall at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.



UL’s own student bluegrass band, Vermilion Express, under the direction of Dr. Len Springer will perform the opening.

The concert is free to UL Lafayette students, staff, and faculty with UL ID card, as well as anyone under 18. Tickets for the general public are $20 at the door (cash only) and $15 in advance. Advance sales are reserved seating and online only, available now at rowan.brownpapertickets.com. Advance reservations for UL Lafayette students, staff, and faculty, as well as anyone under 18, are also available there.

Burke-Hawthorne Hall is located on campus at 231 Hebrard Blvd in Lafayette, near the intersection with St Mary Blvd. There is limited street parking nearby. Visitor parking is available in the Girard Park Circle Parking Garage.
00 2018-10-03
Lake Charles

First Generation Day


Louisiana Commissioner of Higher Education Kim Hunter Reed visited Lake Charles on Monday as part of her “Focus on First Generation Students” tour at McNeese State University and hosted a “listening and learning” Stakeholder Engagement Luncheon at Sowela Technical Community College.

Reed is visiting Southwest Louisiana for the second time since her appointment as Commissioner in April and said her visits are purposeful because “You can’t do great policy work from Baton Rouge. You have to walk the campuses.”

Oct. 1 was Louisiana’s “First Generation Day” and Reed felt there was no better place to begin the celebration than a university with a president who is a first generation college student. Twenty seven percent of McNeese’s student body are first generation students and speaking from experience, President Daryl Burckel said often the struggle for first generation students is the fear that comes from “not knowing what’s around the corner” in a university setting.

The mission of all McNeese’s faculty and staff is to create an environment that “takes some of the curves out of the way to help you see where you’re going,” said Burckel.

The university celebrated “First Generation Day” by hosting a student services breakfast expo featuring information on campus amenities like mental health counseling and tutoring especially catered for McNeese’s current first-generation students.

At Sowela, Reed met with local dignitaries, business leaders and academic leaders in a forum style session to take pulse on the work needed to be done in workforce development. She applauded the progress of Sowela saying the college has grown from the “sleepy place” of yesteryear to a developmental “power house.”

Reed accredited Sowela’s growth to the “nimble and responsive” nature of a community college because it is able to more easily tailor programs especifically for industry needs.

During the forum session, conversation arose about the state’s “skilled labor gap.”

While Reed acknowledged the presence of such a gap across the country, she urged leaders to actively “close the conversation gap.” In order to continue to grow Southwest Louisiana, she said K-12 leaders and business members must to work “blur the lines” of work force development by providing training and career education long before high school graduation. “We have to send a clear message…We have to talk about honoring all pathways.”
00 2018-10-03
New Orleans

Study Anthony Bourdain for college credit at Nicholls State University


When Nicholls State University professor Todd Kennedy first considered a class on Anthony Bourdain, he didn't think it was a serious idea.

"The more I thought about it, the less shallow I thought it would be," said Kennedy, who teaches in the department of language and literature and directs the film studies program at the university in Thibodaux.

Kennedy admired Bourdain, but he never considered himself a major fan. When Bourdain died in June, however, Kennedy was profoundly affected in a way he'd never been by the death of other celebrities, writers or artists.

For Anthony Bourdain, LA was a favorite destination
For Anthony Bourdain, LA was a favorite destination

The author and celebrity chef returned to the state often to film episodes of his television show.


On his television series, "Parts Unknown" on CNN and before that "No Reservations" on the Travel Channel, Bourdain traveled the globe, often heading to countries that other travel shows rarely visited.

Bourdain, Kennedy realized, was a master in his series of tying together literature and film to illuminate the countries he visited.

"He quoted from film, he quoted from literature, he tied that into food and travel," Kennedy said. "He was very aware when he walked into San Sebastian or Vietnam that what he was seeing was colored by the movies he'd seen and the literature he'd read."

In the class, a 400-level elective that will be offered in the spring, Kennedy's students will read the books and watch the movies that informed Bourdain's work. The syllabus includes A.J. Liebling's "Between Meals," Graham Greene's "The Quiet American" and Jim Harrison's "Legends of the Fall."


Kennedy announced his class on Twitter, hoping to attract potential students. Media from around the country also took notice.

"The next thing I know, CNN and USA Today were calling," he said. "I had no idea this would be as big or popular as it was."

The story has been picked up by Food & Wine, Travel+Leisure and numerous websites.

Kennedy is also offering a second, online version of the Bourdain class. So far, 25 people from around the world have emailed asking to enroll.

"(Bourdain) meant so many things to so many people," he said. "He did things that were daring on television. He's one of the few people that I've seen on television who asks better questions than he gives answers."
00 2018-10-03
New Orleans

Group holds anti-gay protests on Southeastern's campus


A regular day on the campus of Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond turned into a spectacle when a Christian group called Consuming Fire Fellowship held large signs and spoke loudly to a crowd of students against sin and homosexuality.

Some of the signs members of the group were holding while protesting read, “Homosexuality is perversion.”

“All I heard was like, ‘Gays are wrong!” student Joshua Erikson said.

He says the message the group is sending makes him sick to his stomach.

“No one should feel like an outcast because they’ve chosen a lifestyle they like,” he said.

One viewer who sent photos of the protest said one student was told before going to class that he will go to hell for his homosexuality. Other students were in tears while others yelled back.

According to the group’s website, the group started in 1995 and is doing what they say they are called to do, which is to "spread God’s word." They have also appeared at LSU and other universities across the nation.

Erikson said he understands the constitution allows for free speech, but also says people have a right to be who they are.

“If you are gay, go ahead and do that. Muslim, go ahead and do that, you believe in a different religion, go ahead and to that. It’s your life. You’re put on this world for a reason and that reason is to live. Not be controlled by some protestors who think they know everything,” he said.
00 2018-10-03
Regional/National

International Students’ Graduate Enrollment Is Down, Study Finds. Some Say U.S. Policy Is to Blame.


Graduate enrollment by international students in the United States has decreased for the second time since 2003, according to an annual report by the Council of Graduate Schools.
The report, “Graduate Enrollment and Degrees, 2007 to 2017,” released on Wednesday, shows that first-time graduate enrollment of international students fell 4 percent from 2016 to 2017.

After the Supreme Court upheld President Trump’s ban on travel from several countries, most of them with Muslim majorities, experts said the policy could be a significant factor in a possible decrease.

The decline wasn’t across the board. Universities categorized as “highest research activity” under the Carnegie Classifications of Institutions of Higher Learning saw a 3-percent increase in international graduate enrollment from 2016 to 2017, said an author of the report, Hironao Okahana.

Bowling Green State University, a moderate-research institution, is among those with a decline in international graduate-student applicants, said Keith Ramsdell, graduate enrollment director.

Delays in processing visa applications, he said, are also discouraging admitted students from enrolling. “The challenge that we are hearing is with international students having a hard time getting cleared for their visas,” he said. “The process for getting cleared for the visa is taking longer than it has taken in the past. And so in some cases, they don’t start the process early enough to get approved for the term for which they applied.”

This year, Ramsdell said, he and his staff have received emails from incoming international students experiencing difficulties over delays or denials. Last year some students from India told him that they were concerned with meeting visa requirements.

“What we are hearing is that employers are less enthusiastic about hiring international graduate students” for training positions after graduation, he said.

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In response to the delays, Ramsdell and a recruiter are presenting webinars to admitted international graduate students. Students are shown how to enroll and are guided through the visa-application process.

“We talk about what the next steps are and what they can do to be more successful in getting through that process in a timely manner,” Ramsdell said.

In terms of total graduate enrollment, moderate-research universities saw a decrease of 7 percent. The number of first-time graduate applications fell, too, by 9 percent — the largest percentage drop — compared with the highest-research universities, which saw just a 0.1-percent decrease.

“We can’t quite tell what contributed to the decline in applications at these institutions,” Okahana said. “But looking at a relatively large decline in international graduate students, the drop was probably influenced by that.”

Follow Andy Tsubasa Field on Twitter at @AndyTsubasaF, or email him at andy.field@chronicle.com.
00 2018-10-03
Regional/National

Youngest Pilot to Circumnavigate Globe


Video
00 2018-10-03
Ruston

Louisiana Tech achieves first World University Ranking


RUSTON, LA (KSLA) - Louisiana Tech is ranked in the Times Higher Education World University Rankings for the first time in school history.

The Times Higher Education World University Rankings 2019 includes more than 1,250 universities. The rankings are determined by several performance indicators including teaching and research output.

“We know that Tech has exceptional faculty members whose passion for learning is shown through the new programs they create, in the community and industry partnerships they build, and through the research they conduct to find innovative ways to solve problems,” said Dr. Les Guice, president of Louisiana Tech in a news release from the university.


“We’re excited for this recognition,” said Provost Dr. Terry McConathy. “Louisiana Tech offers students an unparalleled educational experience. The University has a history of and commitment to creating programs that are the first in their fields, and our studios, labs, and classrooms are places of innovation, where students work side-by-side with faculty members to achieve excellence."

The University of Oxford in England is ranked number one, followed by the University of Cambridge and Stanford University.

For the full 2019 Times Higher Education World University Rankings click here.

Copyright 2018 KSLA. All rights reserved.
00 2018-10-03
Shreveport

Grambling State University launches new app


GRAMBLING, LA (KSLA) - There’s a new app for everything Grambling State University. According to the university, the new app brings news, events and student services straight to your smartphone.

The app includes several features for future students, current students, faculty, parents and alumni. You can schedule a tour, learn about GSU sports, check grades and stay connected with alumni.


(Grambling State University)
“This mobile application is an important step forward for Grambling State,” said President Rick Gallot. “We’ve heard from students and alumni across the country and how they want to engage. We’re excited about making it even easier to stay connected to Grambling State.”

To get the new app, go to your app store or marketplace and search for “Grambling State” and click the “G” or visit gram.edu/mobile and click the icon for your device platform.

Copyright 2018 KSLA. All rights reserved.
00 2018-10-03
Shreveport

GDIT, BPCC among those honored with economic development award


TLANTA, Ga. — General Dynamics Information Technology’s (GDIT) Integrated Technology Center in Bossier City and other partners, including Bossier Parish Community College (BPCC), have won an economic development award.

GDIT, BPCC, the North Louisiana Economic Partnership (NLEP), Louisiana Economic Development (LED), Louisiana Tech University, and Northwestern State University (NSU) won an Excellence in Economic Development Silver Award from the International Economic Development Council (IEDC).

IEDC is the largest membership organization for economic developers in the world. The honor was presented at an awards ceremony on Tuesday, Oct. 2, during the IEDC Annual Conference in Atlanta, Ga.

This IEDC Award recognized the six partners in the category of Partnerships with Educational Institutions for populations between 200,000 – 500,000. The Partnership Award honors excellence in economic development through meaningful linkages with postsecondary education. NLEP submitted the project on behalf of its higher education and economic development partners.

“North Louisiana’s 11 colleges and universities represent one of our region’s most significant assets, and this IEDC Award validates the importance of partnerships with our higher education institutions,” said Scott Martinez, NLEP President. “The collaboration between General Dynamics Information Technology, the three high education partners and economic development organizations is an excellent example of the impact from partnerships.”


LED Assistant Secretary Mandi Mitchell and Dan Gahagan, Vice President of Technology Services of General Dynamics Information Technology accepts the Excellence in Economic Development Award, along with President Chris Maggio, Northwestern State University; Associate Vice Chancellor Sandra Partain, Bossier Parish Community College; and Associate Vice President Sumeet Dua, Research and Partnerships, Louisiana Tech University.
Louisiana Tech, NSU and BPCC partnered with GDIT to expand the IT talent pipeline coming out of the three schools. Funded by a higher education initiative from LED and supported by NLEP, the program allowed GDIT to ramp up its workforce to 1,000 employees. In fact, 30 percent of GDIT’s workforce are veterans ̶ many exiting active duty from Barksdale Air Force Base in Bossier, LA.

“Louisiana committed to a 10-year, $14.5 million initiative with area colleges, and that commitment made it possible to recruit, train and deliver a critical workforce pipeline to General Dynamics Information Technology. In just over four years since the project was announced, our STEM emphasis has allowed GDIT to establish its workforce in Northwest Louisiana,” LED Secretary Don Pierson said. “We are also pleased that many military veterans exiting service from Barksdale Air Force Base and Fort Polk have found great job opportunities with GDIT.”

The collaboration with GDIT demonstrates how partnerships can transform a region’s economy. A driving force behind the rapid growth of North Louisiana’s Cyber Corridor is the expansion of the area’s IT-skilled workforce, in part fostered by our high education institutions’ push to dramatically expand their enrollment and graduation of computer-related majors.

Louisiana Tech, BPCC and NSU developed new academic programs to support GDIT, hired additional faculty, upgraded technology and increased their enrollment in their Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, and other related IT programs to create a talent pipeline.

“We are delighted to be recognized in this way by the IEDC. What makes this award special is that it recognizes the value of partnerships,” said Dr. Rick Bateman, chancellor of Bossier Parish Community College. “To be clear, no one of us could have achieved the outstanding economic development results on our own. Partnerships matter, and we are grateful for the opportunity to work with world class partners in Louisiana Economic Development, General Dynamics Information Technology, Louisiana Tech University, and Northwestern State University.”

The GDIT partnership has been mutually beneficial for the higher education partners involved, because it has created a workforce pipeline for its graduates. The state funding allowed the schools to hire faculty and staff, created student scholarships, supported student recruitment efforts and faculty development. Input from GDIT also ensured university curriculum met industry needs.
00 2018-10-02
Houma/Thibodaux

Nicholls professor on editorial board for publication series


U.S.-China relations are at a precarious moment with stories about tensions popping up daily.

With this backdrop, Nicholls State University professor Rya Butterfield has been named to a Michigan State University Press editorial board looking for submissions on that exact topic.

The U.S.-China Relations in the Age of Globalization series aims to publish book submissions that encompass both historical studies and contemporary analyses on the opportunities and dilemmas of relations between the two great powers. Butterfield was first appointed to the project’s task force and then the editorial board, which will review submissions.

“The appointment is significant for me, especially as junior faculty, because my cohort on this board are all admirable scholars,” she said. “The appointment is also significant because it is recognition of my previous successes in the field. It also associates Nicholls with circles of academics dealing with some of the most important international issues of our times.”

Butterfield serves on the standing committee of the Chinese Rhetoric Society of the World and has previously served as president and program planner of the Association for Chinese Communication Studies.

The series seeks submissions that are in-depth communication-based analyses of how United States and Chinese officials, scholars, artists and activists configure each other, portray the relations between the two nations and depict their shared and competing interests.

“The Chinese have long suspected Americans of the desire to prevent China’s global rise,” said Butterfield, whose course load includes speech and contemporary Chinese politics. “Still, the two nations have managed to build a structure of friendship against this backdrop of suspicion. This has been accomplished by establishing what diplomat Chas W. Freeman Jr. has referred to as many ‘bureaucratic entanglements,’ built largely around industry. The severing of these entanglements does not bode well for the future of U.S.-China relations.”
00 2018-10-02
Houma/Thibodaux

Nicholls online programs rank highly


Nicholls State University has been ranked in the top 10 for both Most Affordable and Best Online Bachelor’s in English by the guide College Choice.
Nicholls Online’s English degree ranks ninth in the Best category and third in Most Affordable.
“We are offering an equally excellent program through Nicholls Online that is becoming more and more attractive to in-state and out-of-state students,” said Ellen Barker, Department of Languages and Literature chairwoman. “Students are attracted to the fact that our program is affordable, but students [also] like that we have three areas of concentration; not many programs do. Our classes also remain at 25 so that students get individual attention.”
College Choice considered factors including academic reputation, student-to-faculty ratio, student retention rate, tuition, financial aid and student debt for its rankings.
00 2018-10-02
Lafayette

UL Lafayette recognized for diversity and inclusion efforts


PRESS RELEASE:

The University of Louisiana at Lafayette is among 96 colleges and universities to earn the 2018 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity Award.

Award recipients were announced recently by INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine. It is the largest diversity magazine and website in higher education.

The publication evaluated colleges and universities in the U.S. and Canada for bolstering diversity and inclusion. Recruitment and campus leadership were also considered.

“The honor recognizes a University-wide focus on providing underrepresented groups equal access to educational opportunities and resources,” said Dr. Taniecea Mallery, UL Lafayette’s director of Equity, Diversity and Community Engagement.

An example: The University launched the Louisiana Educate Program this semester to help academically-gifted, lower-income students stay in college. Students accepted into the program receive financial assistance with tuition and fees, housing, and books and supplies. It is funded by private gifts and supplemental grants from the University, said Dr. DeWayne Bowie, vice president for Enrollment Management at UL Lafayette.

The Office for Campus Diversity also started a “Courageous Conversations” series. Mallery said the talks are intended to encourage discussions. “Faculty and staff members gather to share experiences and ideas to enhance diversity and inclusion,” she said.

She also cited University campus organizations such as the Black Faculty and Staff Association and Project ALLIES, an acronym for Alliance Linking Leaders in Education and Services. Project ALLIES is a network of students, faculty and staff members who work to foster a campus-wide culture of acceptance and respect for everyone, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity.

The University’s Office for Campus Diversity also hosts a range of programs geared toward promoting inclusion.

The annual Women’s Leadership Conference, for instance, brings together community leaders from education, business and nonprofits who direct workshops and breakout sessions that focus on topics such as empowerment, leadership and networking.

This isn’t the first time the University has been recognized for diversity efforts.

In a report released last year by the Brookings Institution, the University was named a national leader for providing access to higher education for lower-income students.

The nonprofit public policy organization based in Washington, D.C., ranked UL Lafayette No. 9 among four-year, public universities in the U.S. for promoting social mobility.

The Brookings Institution evaluated 342 schools with selective admissions for the report. It recognized those which “manage to simultaneously produce important research while extending social opportunity to students from underprivileged backgrounds.”

In December 2015, the Education Trust ranked UL Lafayette No. 26 in the U.S. – and first in Louisiana – for its progress in improving graduation rates for minority students.

Learn more about diversity and inclusion at the University.
00 2018-10-02
Lake Charles

McNeese works to prevent hazing


McNeese State University’s Greek Life recognized National Hazing Prevention Week Sept. 24- 28. Throughout the week, the university’s 13 fraternities and sororities hosted a number of informative and social activities to spotlight the issue of hazing.

Kedrick Nicholas, associate dean of students, said with confidence that McNeese has a historically low number of hazing incidents and the rarity is due to strong educational efforts for all involved.

Nicholas said the cases that the university has had to address in the past are normally “minor” incidents, such as requiring pledges to wear specific clothing or withholding certain privileges from pledges until they’re fully initiated. “Research shows us that a lot of students were hazed in high school,” he said, and often it’s not until they arrive at the collegiate level that they understand that certain “traditions” or “rites of passage” were actually hazing.

Greek life hazing can be defined as “anything that is not written into policies and procedures.” When fraternity or sorority members decide to engage in behavior that is not present in the bylaws to “develop a member” Nicholas said, likely, it’s hazing. “Anything that’s written in your policies and procedures has been vetted by the legal counsel for your organization which means it wouldn’t be written if it wasn’t something that was allowable to do.”

Austin Pottorff, Kappa Sigma member, said he believes fraternities and sororities that engage in hazing do so because of poor understanding of an organizations founding principles. The biggest way Greek organizations can ensure they aren’t engaging in hazing activity is to know their values, said Pottorff. “Leadership, scholarship, fellowship and service – we (Kappa Sigma) won’t do it unless it’s based on one of those pillars.”

Recounting the statistics and stories highlighted during National Hazing Week, he said, “They’re terrible to hear...Why would you want something like this to happen to someone you want to be a part of your organization?”

He also encouraged sororities and fraternities to know what outlets are available for reporting instances of hazing. McNeese offers an anonymous report form which Pottorff described as a strong deterrent for bad behavior and also a safe outlet for victims or witnesses.

The anonymous report form is available on multiple platforms for students to access and all reports are taken seriously, investigated fully and filed for future use if necessary, said Nicholas. For more information McNeese’s efforts to prevent hazing visit, www.mcneese.edu/studentlife/hazinged.
00 2018-10-02
Lake Charles

2018 College & Career Fair


LAKE CHARLES, LA (KPLC) - The Calcasieu Parish School Board is partnering with the Calcasieu Counselor’s Association as well as McNeese State

University to host their annual college and career fair.

More than forty colleges, universities, businesses and military branches will be participating in the fair.

The fair is open to students in grades 8 to 12 and will be held in the recreational complex at McNeese State University from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. this evening.

Students will have the opportunity to visit with representatives about employment potential, the secondary education process, and military service.

Admission is free for students.

Copyright 2018 KPLC. All rights reserved.
00 2018-10-02
Natchitoches

Porter Forum Oct. 25


Northwestern State University’s School of Business will host the 52nd annual J. Walter Porter Forum Thursday, Oct. 25. This year’s theme is “Leadership and Empowerment: Time’s Up,” centered on highlighting the importance of why all business professionals should lead in the fight against sexual harassment in the workplace.



The forum will take place from 9:40 a.m.-noon in Russell Hall Room 102. Speakers will be Julie Couret and Keith Poirrier.



Couret is founder and Chief Executive Coach of her management consulting firm, 7602 Business Performance. She has been training leaders and developing team communication and problem solving skills for more than 15 years. She helps leaders reach their most effective potential through focused and results driven one-on-one coaching and training. She utilizes a direct and solution-orientated approach with her clients as she swiftly and effectively identifies the opportunities, strengths and solutions for her clients’ personnel management situations. Couret is the trusted sounding board for senior leaders, leading and navigating sensitive and critical decisions.



Couret is a graduate of Leadership Jefferson, the youngest female president of the Greater New Orleans Executive Association and serves on the board of directors for both the Jefferson Chamber of Commerce and the Advisory Council of the New Orleans.



After obtaining his B.S. in Accounting from NSU in 1992, Poirrier founded Quicktax Financial Services, LLC (QFS). QFS began as a tax preparation business and now offers financial and business consulting services and serves as a business brokerage for capital growth funding, recapitalization and mergers and acquisitions. In 2000, he obtained his MBA from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, and shortly after, began his insurance career with Hub International, a “Top 10” national insurance brokerage.



While working for Hub, Poirrier was recognized as one of Hub’s top national producers, and awarded their Superior Sales Performance Award for three consecutive years. In 2011, he was awarded the “Power Broker of the Year” award in the Marine Industry by Risk & Insurance Magazine, a national publication. His credentials include Certified Insurance Counselor, assigned by “The National Alliance for Insurance Education & Research.”



In 2012, Berkley Oil and Gas, a global leader in the energy insurance sector, appointed him to its agency advisory board for a two year term. In 2015, he founded Poirrier Group, LLC, a specialty, high risk, commercial insurance agency, where he serves as president and CEO. At Poirrier Group, “Team Poirrier” focuses on writing complex commercial accounts and insuring the assets and liabilities of high net worth individuals; both requiring creative solutions to risk challenges. Poirrier’s vision for a dynamic team culture, strong customer service and exceptional integrity have set Poirrier Group apart from its competition and establishes “Team Poirrier” as a valued partner in managing commercial insurance programs and corporate risks.



The J. Walter Porter Forum is sponsored annually through NSU’s School of Business. The forum is made possible by the endowment established by the family and friends of the late J. Walter Porter in recognition of his interest in improving the image of business as a career field for college students and of his concern for moral and ethical standards as expressed in his philosophy of business. The forum is an effort to translate the textbook into practice by bringing capable, successful business executives to the campus to speak on selected topics in their area of expertise.



The Porter Forum is free and open to the public. For more Information, contact Dr. Margaret Kilcoyne, dean of the College of Business and Technology, at kilcoyne@nsula.edu.
00 2018-10-02
Shreveport

Schools give update at State of Education


By Stacey Tinsley, stinsley@bossierpress.com

Top educational leaders from around Bossier Parish and state gathered to paint a picture of the successes and challenges faced by educators.

The Bossier Chamber’s State of Education address was held Sept. 26 at the Bossier Parish School of Technology and Innovative Learning (BPSTIL) to discuss what is happening in Bossier Parish Schools.

The State of Education event aimed to keep attendees up-to-date on all the new developments in the Bossier Parish education system because a strong education system is crucial in developing and sustaining a quality workforce.

In that vein, Bossier Parish Schools Superintendent Scott Smith kicked off the event by introducing his “Launching Bossier Schools to the top” goals for Bossier students and teachers.

These included attracting and retaining top performing teachers, positioning students for success via technology, and that every child will learn and show growth.

Smith was outspoken on how his first goal can be achieved. He said Bossier is already losing some top performing teachers and the only way to attract and keep them is by increasing pay.

“The reality is we must address teacher pay in order to be competitive with these other districts. We are losing some of our best already. If we don’t narrow the gap, it will only get worse,” Smith said. “Let me just stress how important a teacher is. An effective educator is the most school- based determinant of a child’s educational outcome. So we owe it to our kids to compensate our teachers.”

The second speaker was Emily Bradley from the Louisiana Department of Education. Bradley presented the audience with the top accountability metrics for students.

Bradley said it is critical to ensure the “A” ranking in Louisiana’s letter grade system signals mastery of fundamental skills, while school rating calculations must be adjusted to reflect the progress of every individual child. She also spoke about expanding the school performance score formula to emphasize interests and opportunities for students.

“Now schools are getting scores for not only how kids are performing on the end of year assessment Leap Test, but also what progress are they making. — are students growing or making progress towards a target,” said Bradley.

The final speaker was President of the University of Louisiana System Dr. Jim Henderson. Dr. Henderson, former Bossier Parish Community College chancellor, discussed college readiness.

He also spoke about the UL Systems efforts to grow and impact the workforce with the students who are currently in college. He said his system seeks to increase value to students by recruiting, retaining and developing the highest quality faculty with focus in research and innovation.

“Our universities will maximize administrative efficiencies resulting in an increased investment in instruction and academic support,” Dr. Henderson said.

He also pointed out the UL System will produce 150,000 new graduates who are “prepared for life and career success.”

“I think it’s an incredible time to be an emerging generation going into the work force. If you like change, you have to love where we are. We have a new generation coming into the work force that is more prepared for work then every before. We’ve got to create a Louisiana that they want to be apart of, that they want to stay in,” said Dr. Henderson.
00 2018-10-01
Baton Rouge

Political Horizons: Common Core law hampers LSU Regents study on admissions standards


Four years ago, seething tea-partiers and their allies stormed the State Capitol to stop Louisiana from joining Common Core, an effort to raise academic standards in the nation’s schools.

Irate parents drove in from the Northshore and Acadiana to pack legislative hearing rooms. Many stood for hours waiting their turn to tell lawmakers how Education Superintendent John White had no children yet wanted to send theirs to perdition to satisfy some deep-state agenda.

Dozens of bills were debated. Only one truly succeeded: a measure by then-Rep. John Schroder, R-Covington, that criminalized sharing student data without parental permission.

Today, Common Core is the everyday curricula. White is a father. Schroder holds a statewide office.

And the Board of Regents is wondering how — with their hands tied by Schroder’s privacy law — their auditors can take a deep enough dive into college admission standards for an audit demanded after LSU administrators unilaterally changed theirs.

Who should get into Louisiana universities? Board of Regents to audit schools' admission standards
Who should get into Louisiana universities? Board of Regents to audit schools' admission standards
The policy-setting board for higher education Wednesday initiated an audit of university admission standards after LSU unilaterally lessened t…

Prior to their regular meeting last week, the 16-member board that decides policy for the state’s public colleges and universities squeezed into a conference room to talk specifics about the proposed First Time Admissions Audit. As regents heard the details, staffers stood around the room, blocking access to the fruit plates and coffee urns.

Regents wanted to know if the LSU applicants who failed to meet the admissions criteria performed well in college or if they slowed down other students. If some of those admitted by exception had lower grade-point averages because they took much harder courses, like calculus instead of general math. Or if there were extenuating circumstances in high school that account for lower ACT test scores.

Identifying the factors that predict how a student will do in college wasn’t part of the audit plan.

“Why aren’t we looking deeper?” asked Regent Edward D. Markle, a New Orleans attorney. “Clearly we need standards and we also need to know what happened in the past. ... Isn’t there information out there for us to grab that we would allow us a better understanding of performance?”

Well, no, replied Deputy Commissioner Larry Tremblay. In fact, the Regents had been specifically forbidden from accessing high school transcripts and student data by Schroder’s privacy law.

“It ties our hands in terms of being able to follow students through the process to see what course-taking patterns work best,” Tremblay said. “We would like the opportunity of using the high school transcript data to see patterns.”

He was drowned out by a din of all the regents speaking at once.

Chairman Robert W. Levy, a lawyer from Dubach, raised his voice. “We do have the authority to collect data to see if the universities are operating outside the lines,” he said.

Universities must flag incoming students admitted by exception. Auditors can look as those exceptions, grade-point averages, ACT scores. Eventually, they can see how well those students performed in their first year in college, and identify who needed remedial courses to get up to speed.

The data available is woefully short to test the presumptions on which college administrators rely when arguing they need to take a wider look at applicants, rather than summarily reject those who fail to meet set-in-stone test scores or grade-point averages.

One of the key reasons supporting the "holistic admissions" argument is that a student may have dealt with a family crisis, a divorce, or a death that may have affected grades. Access to family information is restricted by the law. And the college board tests — ACT and SAT — have been widely criticized for framing questions with a cultural perspective not shared by students who weren’t raised in the white middle class. Racial and religious information about the students also is not allowed.

In public and in private, LSU Board seemingly in support of new holistic admissions standards
In public and in private, LSU Board seemingly in support of new holistic admissions standards
Two members of the LSU Board of Supervisors voiced their support Friday for the administration’s decision to discount ACT scores and another f…

Almost from the minute Gov. Bobby Jindal signed the student privacy act in June 2014 and boarded a plane to give a speech about it in St. Louis, lawmakers realized some adjustments were necessary. For instance, the sacrosanct Taylor Opportunity Program for Students needed some way to determine which high schoolers reached the modest academic achievements necessary to have their college tuition paid for by TOPS grants.

Subsequent laws were passed to allow some agencies some access to lower school records.

Legislation passed earlier this year put the Board of Regents on that list. But only with considerable restrictions.

“We have the data in pieces and parts,” Tremblay said, adding that it was largely dependent on how many parents agreed to release the information. If too few agree, the findings would be skewed.

“Something needs to change for us to do our job,” Regent Markle said. “We’ve lost the big picture here.”
00 2018-10-01
Houma/Thibodaux

Nicholls installs sixth president


Nicholls State University officially installed its sixth president this afternoon.

Jay Clune was honored with an original poem, ceremonial medallion, kind words of praise by colleagues and friends, and a few jokes about the school’s newest mascot, Clune’s 6-year-old Boxer mix, Boots.

As professor Albert Davis said in his original poem, “family has returned to family ... bien revenu.”

Clune graduated from Nicholls in 1986 before joining the Peace Corps and beginning the 31-year journey that would bring him back to campus. He became president on Jan. 1.

“I’m humbled by your presence in this place I call home,” Clune said, thanking his wife Allison and daughters Caroline and Gabrielle for their support.

The old tradition of an investiture or installation ceremony was something he wanted to honor as a symbol of the monumental change of his coming from outside the university.

Various speakers paid tribute to Nicholls and Clune.

“Our university is the fabric of our community,” Thibodaux Mayor Tommy Eschete said.

Integrating the educational, cultural and social aspects of Nicholls makes Thibodaux the community it is, he said.

“The most important time for Nicholls is the future. We are prepared to entrust that future to Dr. Clune,” said Eschete, also a Nicholls graduate.

On behalf of the city, Eschete presented Clune with a proclamation, designating Sept. 28 as Dr. Jay Clune Day.

This time last year, Nicholls leaders and the state Board of Regents were just forming a search committee.

“Something really stood out to me with Dr. Clune and that was just this sense of approachability and genuineness,” Nicholls Faculty Senate President David Whitney said. “He seemed to immediately grasp what it means to be a faculty member at a university.”

Since then, Clune has strongly advocated at the state Legislature for higher education and TOPS tuition funding, instituted the first faculty and staff pay raise in 10 years, and pushed for new projects such as the renovation of the campus greenhouse. Student enrollment has increased as well as freshmen retention rates.

First-generation college students make up 67 percent of the student body, and they have an average ACT score of 22.4, Clune said.

He added that administrative staff are continuing to work to provide textbooks and other classroom materials to students through the library, reducing the costs of education.

“We are so excited about the renewed excitement,” said Meg Sanstrum, deputy commissioner for the Board of Regents. “Dr. Clune and Nicholls are truly reinvestment ready.”

Among students, there’s a renewed sense of optimism, vitality and promise, Student Government Association President Grant Henry said.

“We have not felt more complete since our native son returned home,” he said, calling Clune a “humble, decisive leader.”

That renewed sense of enthusiasm on campus was mentioned by many of today’s speakers, including the Nicholls Foundation President Chris Riviere.

“Over 70 years, Nicholls has transformed south Louisiana from agricultural and fishing to leaders of the world,” he said. “Clune’s vision, I know, will be instrumental in affecting change.”

In the coming months, Clune said he’s prepared to focus on renovating Peltier Hall, the student union and the interior of the library to create learning communities and a coffee shop in its lobby.

Other long-term goals include the renovations of Babington Hall, turning the former dormitory into a modern business incubator for locals to grow and innovate without having to turn to New Orleans and Lafayette, he said.

Clune said he also has a vision to expand Nicholls into a lifelong learning environment, all the way from children at the Little Colonels Academy to one day housing senior citizens on campus with both independent and assisted living.

“As goes Nicholls, so goes the bayou region,” Clune said. “One cannot succeed without the other.”
00 2018-10-01
Lafayette

Older students are the new normal at college. The reason? The recession and new technology


American universities are becoming less traditional — or at least their students are.

People over 25 or those with children are enrolling in college classes — so many that nearly 74 percent of American undergraduate students are "nontraditional." They're compelled by a recession that disproportionately impacted lesser-educated employees, the potential that advancing technology could leave them without a job and the wisdom that tends to come through life experience.

Nontraditional students now outnumber those who start as 18-year-old freshmen supported by their parents, according to data from National Public Radio and RTI International, a think tank in North Carolina.

Students older than 25 make up 28 percent of the University of Louisiana System's 90,000-plus students.

The average age of Louisiana community college students is 28. In the UL System, the average age is 23 for the UL System.

Kendrick Volter, 38, was in jail before he graduated high school. He got his GED and first taste of community college while behind bars for an armed robbery he committed at 17.

Released two years ago, he's pursuing a degree in construction management at Baton Rouge Community College to increase his earning power. He's balancing school with a full-time job and a wife.

Trish Wise, 32, waited until her last child started pre-K before she went back to college in Natchitoches. She has been a cosmetologist the past 12 years but considered nursing after a stay in the hospital.

Jeremy Gray, 36, is pursuing a certification in welding at Central Louisiana Technical Community College.
Jeremy Gray, 36, is pursuing a certification in welding at Central Louisiana Technical Community College. (Photo: Jeremy Gray)

Jeremy Gray, 36, served six years in the Navy after he graduated high school in Shreveport. Now he's studying welding at Central Louisiana Technical Community College and is a student representative on the system's board of directors.

Julie Chambers of Crowley hit 50 before school really clicked for her. She'd struggled with college at a young age and decided to go to work instead. But she wasn't satisfied.

After multiple attempts over several years, she finally finished her bachelor's online through the University of Louisiana at Lafayette this summer. Now she's going for a master's in counseling at 51.

READ MORE: What a pregnancy can mean when you're in college | How to pay for a college degree when you have bills, kids and a mortgage


How we got here
Universities in the U.S. saw a boost in enrollment following the Great Recession greater than growth following every recession since 1980, according to NPR. And the latest recession hit those with less education disproportionately hard.

Nearly four out of five jobs lost were held by those with no formal education beyond high school, while workers with a four-year college degree or higher were largely protected against job losses, according to a report from Georgetown University's Center on Education and the Workforce.

And the rise of automation and artificial intelligence is expected to continue to change or replace jobs that require less formal education. About 47 percent of total U.S. employment is at risk of being replaced by computers, predict Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael A. Osborne, two professors at Oxford University.

"The future of work demands a higher-educated workforce," said Jim Henderson, president and CEO of the UL System.

So adults are heading to back to college or enrolling for the first time, perhaps years after high school or completing an equivalency, to prepare for a different future.

For Volter, Wise, Gray and Chambers, the four Louisiana students, new degrees and certifications should translate into higher paychecks and different lifestyles for their families.

Gray and Volter would make more money in management positions with certifications, which is what pushed Gray into school in the first place. He had been frustrated making less money than certified welders with less experience than he had.

Wise might be a school nurse and Chambers a licensed counselor in a few years.

After finishing school, Chambers wants to open a private practice in Lafayette, and she hopes her college story inspires others to believe in themselves.

"What I really want to do is show people that's inside you," she said. "There's nothing special about me."

She's happier now in school than she was working.

"It really is amazing (how you feel) when you're doing purposeful stuff," she said.

Both Gray and Wise hope their children take note of their hard work. Gray had a 4.0 GPA his first semester of college, which was a first for him.

That shows his kids, "I got A's; you can get A's."

He wants them to overachieve now rather than later, like him. But better late than never.

Kendrick Volter, 38, is pursuing a degree in construction management at Baton Rouge Community College. He is pictured with his wife, Shakira.
Kendrick Volter, 38, is pursuing a degree in construction management at Baton Rouge Community College. He is pictured with his wife, Shakira. (Photo: Kendrick Volter)

A day in the life
Volter works 40 hours a week as a framer and does some remodeling part time, using the carpentry and masonry skills he gained during his time in jail.

Now he also has community college classes to fit into his schedule, so he has to prioritize.

"I make sure I'm here (at work) every day," he said. "And school is a priority because I've committed to it and I've paid."

He's been taking online courses but plans to take three or four classes on campus next semester. He's working toward a construction management position.

"Managers are making more money, running the business," he said. "That's why I'm doing this. I want to be the one who says what we need to do."

Wise is a mom of three. Her husband works out of town as a superintendent for a turnaround company, which means she operates like a single mother much of the school year.

Trish Wise, 32, is pursuing an associate's degree in nursing at Northwestern State University. She is pictured on the beach with husband Justin.
Trish Wise, 32, is pursuing an associate's degree in nursing at Northwestern State University. She is pictured on the beach with husband Justin. (Photo: Trish Wise)

Her day starts at 5:45 a.m. when she gets the kids dressed for school. They leave the house by 7 a.m.

She returns home, usually completing school from morning drop-off until 3 p.m., when she leaves to pick everyone up. Sometimes she fits in a few hair appointments that she does from home before or after picking up the kids.

"It gets stressful, overwhelming, especially when I walk by a pile of laundry or something," Wise said. "I physically can't take time away from my schoolwork."

She has one nursing class that's face-to-face an hour away in Shreveport. The rest of her 16 credit hours at Northwestern State University are online.

Her youngest is 4 and started preschool the same month she started college.

"I decided since he was going to school I was going to school," Wise said.

Gray's days are long, too. Together he and his wife have five children and a 1-year-old grandchild. His wife has to be at work early, so he gets the kids ready for school and on the bus in the mornings.

Then he heads to school, where he's "usually welding for hours on end," trying different techniques and completing hands-on coursework.

Jeremy Gray, 36, is pursuing a certification in welding at Central Louisiana Technical Community College. He and his wife have five children together.
Jeremy Gray, 36, is pursuing a certification in welding at Central Louisiana Technical Community College. He and his wife have five children together. (Photo: Jeremy Gray)

After school, he helps the kids with homework and they have dinner.

But the days Gray has meetings are a little different. He travels to Alexandria, Baton Rouge and New Orleans monthly for his job as a student representative on the LCTCS board of directors.

It can be difficult to balance everything.

"But it's the only way to a better life," he said. "I made this into an opportunity."

He'll make more money as a certified welder, but he probably won't stop there. After graduation next year, he likely will continue to a four-year university.

Chambers has a degenerative disease in her back and has had multiple surgeries on her neck and back over the years, which kept her from being able to go to college for years.

UL Lafayette's online counseling program allowed her to take classes and manage her pain level. She didn't have to navigate campus or carry loads of books.

MORE: These aren't your father's dorms. Living on campus has changed

She graduated with her bachelor's degree this summer and had a short break before graduate school began. It is a face-to-face program that takes about two-and-a-half years to complete.

She's not surrounded by 18-year-olds, but she's still the oldest in the grad program. She doesn't mind.

"I don't know why I have to be the one doing it at 51, but it feels right," Chambers said.

She said she approaches school differently as an older student, wanting all the information she can get. She doesn't have usual 21-year-old priorities like going out with friends to compete with classwork.

"What life outside of school? School's my focus," she said.

Second (or third) chances
It wasn't Chambers' first attempt at college, and that's true for many nontraditional students.

She had been discouraged about trying college, so she went straight into sales work after high school.

Julie Chambers, 51, holds her diploma for a bachelor's in counseling from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Now she is pursuing a master's.
Julie Chambers, 51, holds her diploma for a bachelor's in counseling from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Now she is pursuing a master's. (Photo: Courtesy of Julie Chambers)

"When I was younger I did not do well in school," she said. "I flunked out (of classes) maybe three times."

She was always looking for something else, but without an education there weren't opportunities, she said.

So Chambers went back to school, first at a community college. She would leave when her back got too bad and she needed surgery. She eventually moved back to Crowley where she had more family support and went to counseling.

Her counselor told her about UL Lafayette's online program. Chambers gave them a call, and a week later she was enrolled.

"I've kind of always wanted to do it," Chambers said.

The difference this time was that she believed she could. Her previous college experiences, her work in sales and coming back from surgery after surgery all showed her she was resilient.

"I didn't believe I could do well in school," she said. "I learned to compensate. I know that whatever comes I'll figure it out. Once you get that you can do anything."

Wise, too, tried a few semesters of college, majoring in psychology in 2009. She left to start a family and be a cosmetologist. Classes didn't fit into her schedule then.

She started staying at home during her last pregnancy, which was high-risk. In the meantime, she had some difficult hospital stays and saw firsthand the impact nurses have on patients.

"The nurses were amazing," she said.

That set her on a new career path. Wise wants to be a school nurse to interact with students and have the same schedule as her own children.

The associate's program at NSU takes about two and a half years to complete. She hopes to graduate in May 2021.

Going back to school in her 30s hasn't been easy.

MORE: La. commissioner of higher ed: 'Education is no longer a luxury. It is a necessity'

"It's a struggle," she said. "I've taken six classes. Chemistry and biology are my two toughest. I really bombed out on my biology test this morning, after days of studying."

But she keeps at it, doing extra research and finding a "kind of Chemistry for Dummies" video series on YouTube, where a guy simplifies the concepts she's tackling in class.

"I set out to do this, and I know I can do it," Wise said. "I don't want to give up. I don't want my kids to see that and think failure is an option."

Universities and their administration are taking note of the struggles of returning to school as an adult. Henderson said his system is working on ways to streamline the class delivery process — like online or hybrid courses, night classes and maybe shorter semesters.

Schools also are finding ways to meet needs outside of the classroom, like offering childcare on campus like Nicholls State or making the enrollment process less cumbersome, Henderson said.

In February the UL System will launch Compete Louisiana, which Henderson said is designed to meet the needs of adult students and "make returning to school as painless as possible."

Fast facts:
According to the National Center for Education Statistics:

1 in 5 of American undergrads is at least 30 years old
About half are financially independent from their parents
1 in 4 is caring for a child
47 percent go to school part time at some point
A quarter take a year off before starting school
2 out of 5 attend a two-year community college
44 percent have parents who never completed a bachelor's degree
00 2018-10-01
Lafayette

Drag Queen Story Time moved to larger venue to accommodate expected crowds


The Lafayette Public Library’s controversial “Drag Queen Story Time” event is being moved to a larger venue to accommodate an expected “overflow crowd and resulting safety concerns,” according to a library news release.

The event was scheduled to occur Oct. 6 at the main branch library, but is now to be held at the South Louisiana Community College. The event is scheduled from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.

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Lafayette in front lines of culture war as uproar continues over Drag Queen Story Time
Lafayette in front lines of culture war as uproar continues over Drag Queen Story Time
The rift among the factions on either side the Drag Queen Story Time controversy was laid bare this week, and it looks irreconcilable.

The event will feature male University of Louisiana-Lafayette students dressed as women reading to children between the ages of 3 and 6. Plans for the event, which the library advertised last month in a newsletter, have stirred passionate arguments among those who support and oppose it.

The reading selection of three books was compiled by librarians. The books are: Strictly No Elephants by Lisa Mantchev; From the Stars in the Sky to the Fish in the Sea by Kai Cheng Thom; and The Rainbow Fish by Marcus Pfister.
00 2018-10-01
Lafayette

Former UL softball players offer details about inequality complaints


On Sept. 12, nine former UL softball players filed gender discrimination complaints against the university to the Office of Civil Rights.

Two of them — DJ Sanders and Shae Schreckengost — said it didn’t take very long after leaving Lafayette for them to feel even more shortchanged during their tenure as a Ragin’ Cajuns.

“Honestly it (filing OCR complaint) had a lot to do with me being in Oregon and seeing the difference between the two programs,” Sanders said. “Seeing how much better the athletes were treated there. That made me realize that it was such a big problem.

More: Ex-Cajun players make civil rights claims against ULL

“It’s easy when you’ve only been at once place. How would you know? ...After going there and seeing the difference it kind of opened my eyes that it’s a big issue that needs to be fixed.”

In fact, Sanders said it took a transition period until she fully understood her place at Oregon.

“I just feel there, female athletes are equal or at least closer to being equal to male athletes,” Sanders said. “I was telling my teammates at Oregon, ‘Oh, can we have these things? Are they for us?’ They were like, ‘Yeah, they’re for all student athletes.’


UL interim chief communications officer Aimée Abshire and attorney Cearley W. Fontenot respond to the former softball coach's lawsuit. University of Louisiana at Lafayette

“At UL, they said the same things to us, but they were only for male student-athletes, so I felt like I needed to ask.”

Comment from UL officials concerning the accusations weren’t available, because the university isn’t allowed to address Title IX complaints until the case is closed.

For Schreckengost, her short time at Michigan State resulted in similar revelations.

More: Former softball coach Lotief sues UL over defamation, Title IX complaints

“Honestly, it’s been fantastic,” Schreckengost said. “Everybody’s been so welcoming. Everything here has been amazing, more than I would have ever thought.

“One thing, we have a really amazing athletic training staff. Everybody is just really, really attentive."

At UL, Schreckengost said, "We went through issues with that, especially last fall, when we didn’t have (a trainer). That’s probably the biggest point.”

shae schreckengost
Shae Schreckengost (Photo: Shae Noel F. Schreckengost)

In addition to the grievances about food and access to trainers, Miranda Grotenhuis said, there were other everyday issues of inequality.

“Our softball field not being taken care of as much as football, baseball or any other male sport,” she said. “We didn’t get clean water, we didn’t have a trainer for at least six months.

“Also in 2017, I suffered from a knee injury and was told by UL that they weren’t going to pay for my surgery, because I didn’t trust the doctor they had in their network. So they were going to make me (pay) out of pocket.”

More: Lotief on accusations of violent, vulgar behavior: Where are all the witnesses?

For Teryn Pritchett, it was even more personal.

“I did not receive proper physical therapy, help from the university with my learning disability, help with my mental health and I was forced to catch whenever I was not released to play,” she said.

All four former players said they weren’t manipulated or coerced to file the complaints.

UL Ragin' Cajuns play the Texas State Bobcats in theBuy Photo
UL Ragin' Cajuns play the Texas State Bobcats in the championship game of the 2018 Sun Belt Conference softball tournament at Lamson Park on Saturday May 12, 2018. (Photo: Buddy Delahoussaye/Special to the Advertiser)

Sanders further explained her motivation for following through with her charges against UL.

“That (training, field conditions) also the fueling stations for athletes, food-wise,” Sanders explained. “My sophomore years we had these issues and we brought them to coach Mike (Lotief) and tried to get him to do something about it.

“That was the first one that I saw — the fueling stations — that female athletes weren’t allowed to receive and what most sports weren’t allowed to receive.”

More: UL fires head softball coach Michael Lotief

Then when Lotief was placed on administrative leave and fired on Nov. 1 Sanders didn’t feel as if she could let the issue die.

“I felt forced to do it in the way that I went to coach Mike and then whenever he tried to do something about it, he got fired,” Sanders said.

“So I felt like it was my fault that he got fired because I brought things to him to begin with, so I felt like it was my responsibility to kind of stand up for him because he was addressing issues that players on his team felt were important.”

Michael Lotief speaks with media after being fired
Michael Lotief speaks with media after being fired as Head Coach of Louisianas Ragin Cajun Softball. Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2017. (Photo: SCOTT CLAUSE / USATODAY Network)

Schreckengost said she also doesn’t regret defending Lotief, who was fired for "violent, vulgar language and verbal and physical assault, creating a hostile learning and working environment,”

“Something that I really want people to understand is I was deemed a coach Mike supporter and I’d wave that flag to the highest altitudes of the world,” she said. “I’m a huge coach Mike supporter, because he’s done so much for that university and so much for his past teams.

“I just want people to realize how influential he was to a lot of people’s lives. I think a lot of people kind of discredited him after false news was brought against him. Us nine girls stood behind him because we believed in him and he believed in us.”

More: Lotief firing likely headed for lawsuit after documents allege 'brainwashed' culture

Schreckengost continues to refute the accusations the university made against Lotief.

“I find them to be completely without any backing,” she said. “There’s no basis to them. Coach Mike was a very upfront, blunt person. If he wanted you to know something, there would be no question. But it wasn’t in a harsh way.

“It was in a ‘I care about you and I want you to be better way.’"

Michael Lotief speaks with media after being fired
Michael Lotief speaks with media after being fired as Head Coach of Louisianas Ragin Cajun Softball. Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2017. (Seated at table L-R, Stefni Lotief, Attorney Glenn Edwards, and Michael Lotief) (Photo: SCOTT CLAUSE / USATODAY Network)

In fact, Sanders said UL’s investigation into the accusations against Lotief excluded the players still on the team last fall.

“That’s why we had such a big issue with him getting fired, as well,” Sanders said. “They got all of their information from girls who had graduated or outside sources that weren’t on the team.

“We were asking them to ask us, like come to the girls that were here and know what was going on. Ask us how we felt, but we never got that. I wish we would have gotten that.”

More: University of Louisiana softball players file federal discrimination complaints

Schreckengost and Grotenhius both said they wanted to stay at UL.

In December, Grotenhuis said, she was cut from the team.
“My scholarship was cut immediately and I didn’t know about that until one day I got an email that I no longer had a scholarship at that university,” she said.

Louisiana Ragin Cajuns softball take on Texas State.
Louisiana Ragin Cajuns softball take on Texas State. Sunday, April 15, 2018. (Photo: SCOTT CLAUSE/USA TODAY Network)

“I didn’t know what I was going to do. It was where I wanted to play since I was little. I was all for staying, but that obviously wasn’t an option anymore.”

All four said they genuinely hope the Title IX complaints against the university result in positive change for the benefit of future student-athletes at UL.

“I hope the university corrects these problems at hand and it does not happen again,” Pritchett said.

More: In the wake of Lotief firing: What is Title IX anyway?

“No female athlete should ever have to go through this,” Grotenhuis said. “It was hard, and it’s still hard. I want UL to stop. I want UL to stop doing what they’ve always been doing and that’s ignoring their problems and creating more.”

Sanders said the Title IX issues at UL are confined to one person or one group.

“I can’t pinpoint to put it on one person,” Sanders said. “I think as an athletic department, ideas, the way people know about doing things - all of it as a whole needs to be improved. Whoever is in charge of all of that.


What exactly is Title IX? Video by Jordan Fenster/lohud Wochit

“It trickles down. Mine started with the food, but it went all the way down to people not getting paid. So it’s not a one-person problem. It’s pretty much the entire athletic department that needs a remodeling, a fix.”

Sanders said she tried to think like a mother would.

“I was talking to my mom about this,” she said. “If I was a mother and my daughter was in the same position, I would want to see change, so whenever she goes through it that she doesn’t have to experience what I experienced.”

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00 2018-10-01
Lafayette

Think you won't get into LSU? You might be wrong. Admissions has changed


If you're considering Louisiana State University but think you won't get in, take another look, because that's what LSU is doing for students.

The university is "taking a second look" to see if students could be successful there, President F. King Alexander said.

It's called holistic review or holistic admission — looking at the whole high school experience rather than only an ACT score and GPA as determining factors, although those factors are still considered.

This is LSU's first freshman class chosen through this process, but holistic review is not a brand-new concept.

About 40 flagship universities across the country follow this model, and LSU's Faculty Senate approved using holistic review in 2006.

"We're really just catching up," Alexander said.

The reason it's taken so long to catch up, the president said, is the school didn't have the capacity to take such a deep dive into each student applying to attend LSU.

Since 2006, admissions personnel have been added and trained to take a better look at students "on the edge" of the school's minimum requirements. The school requires at least a 3.0 grade point average (B) and a 22 comprehensive score on the ACT.

MORE: Apollo 13 pilot speaks at UL Lafayette | Think community colleges don't have sports? Wrong

F. King Alexander., Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018.
F. King Alexander., Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018. (Photo: SCOTT CLAUSE/USA TODAY Network)

Holistic review means looking at other factors that data also say can predict success in the first year of college — like grit or resilience — and success in the first year tends to lead to more success, said Jason Droddy, interim vice president of Strategic Communications at LSU.

"Our admissions office does two reviews of every application," Droddy explained.

More than one person each is tasked with looking for different things in students' essays, recommendation letters and more in their application packet.

This is not "every kid gets in" or a lowering of standards, Droddy said, responding to what critics might say.

"The students are qualified," he said. "... LSU would be in a really bad position to drop its standards. We are trying to make the model more precise."

This process looks at the why behind what might have been a potential rejection, especially those outside of students' control.

Maybe the GPA dipped sophomore year after the 2016 flood and the student couldn't recover from that drop. Or perhaps a divorce or car accident impacted the family.

Or an out-of-state student might have had different core classes that were required. A student at a rural high school might not have had access to a computer applications or a Spanish teacher.

Droddy said these details might be gleaned from transcripts, essays or letters from the students' counselors.

MORE: LSU football: What you need to know

The university previously took this "second look" at a student when there was an appeal to a rejection letter. That put added responsibility on the student and family and at the back end of the process. Now it falls on the school and at the beginning, Alexander said.

The president said this is a way to give more students at more schools an opportunity to attend LSU and diversify the student population.

"It gives teachers a chance to put the spotlight on some students they really believe in that we might not have seen," Alexander said.
00 2018-10-01
Lake Charles

Rockets practice for week in new McNeese on-campus gym


LAKE CHARLES — A blast from a few Rockets helped McNeese State give a proper liftoff to it’s new basketball arena and era.

Officially it is known as Health and Human Performance Education Complex, but don’t kid yourself, this is a new on-campus gym that school officials hope jumpstarts a program that really needs one.

With all the pomp and circumstance that can be given such an event, McNeese opened up its new digs with the help of the Houston Rockets, runners-up in the Western Conference in 2017.


It was considered such a big event by some that even Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards stopped by Tuesday to say a few words, though to be fair he was in town for another event that day.

Still, everybody wanted to say something about the new home court for a McNeese team that has received little interest from the locals over the past few years. At old Burton Coliseum, or even in the Civic Center downtown, few fans showed up for Cowboys games.

Didn’t seem to matter much how the team was playing either. But now, with the help of the Rockets, at least the new gym got off with a bang.

“This is an exciting day for McNeese basketball,” said first-year head coach Heath Schroyer. “We are excited to have the Rockets here to help us open this up.”

Houston practiced for a week to start its training camp as the players spent their off time at the Golden Nugget, which is owned by Rockets owner Tillman Fertitta. The team was even given the key to the city at the official greeting ceremony.

“This is huge for us, to be able to showcase this arena with the help of the Rockets,” said McNeese Athletic Director Bruce Hemphill. “We could not have paid for better exposure. To have them here, for the nation to see what we have here, it is just huge for our school and our program.”

The entire building is still not complete but the Rockets were able to play on the practice courts that will one day also host McNeese volleyball games.


There was some question as to if the facilities would be ready in time for the Rockets to practice. When rumors of them coming started to pick up speed in June, the feeling was maybe not. Still, the team was committed.

“We always assumed it would be ready and everything fell into place,” Rockets general manager Daryl Morey said. “First we needed to make sure it was safe and that is not an issue. The place looks fantastic.”

For the Rockets it is a chance to get some team bonding before the long season.

“Players enjoy being able to get away from the grind and have some fun while they get their work in,” said Morey. “We think this is a perfect match, just two hours from Houston and with the casino and everything. It’s a great mix for us.”

There has been talk of a game next year between to Rockets and New Orleans Pelicans to kickoff the NBA’s preseason, but that has been said to be down the road some.

“We are floored by this beautiful facility,” Rockets CEO Tad Brown said. “We have been to a lot of places around the world and this is one of the nicest.

“Count on us being here for years to come.”


That is just what McNeese officials wanted to hear.

They were counting on the new arena to be a showcase for not only basketball recruits but students overall in the future.

“We always wanted this to be a place people in the community, especially McNeese students, can be proud of,” said Hemphill.

For university president Daryl Burckel, it is a time to savor the accomplishment.

“Fifteen years ago this was not in the realm of possibilities here,” said Burckel. “You would have never seen the Houston Rockets here, or this facility on this campus. Now it has come true.”

But will it lead to better basketball and bigger crowds, that won’t be known for a few more weeks. McNeese opened practice last Saturday.

Ironically, they were forced to practice in the old memorial gym, giving way to the Rockets.


Perhaps the last of the growing pains.
00 2018-10-01
Lake Charles

McNeese fans tailgate rain or shine


LAKE CHARLES, LA (KPLC) - During McNeese State University first home game of the season, we talked to some tailgaters who said they would be tailgating rain or shine. On Saturday, fans held true to their word.

“You know it’s Saturday and this is just what we do in Louisiana, we go to football games and we tailgate,” Lake Charles Toyota owner Philip Tarver said. “I think Louisiana taught the country how to tailgate.”

Even though Saturday’s forecast was 40-percent chance of rain, that didn’t stop Louisiana’s finest.

“Can’t stop us from coming out here, we got a lot of people that’s gonna come,” tailgater Matt Hardy said. “Fortunately they haven’t showed up yet, they’ll be here though. We got the phones blowing up, ‘Are y’all still there? Y’all still there?’ Yeah we’re here.”

Because if McNeese players can play in the rain, the fans can tailgate.

“The lightening tempered a little bit, but no lightening, just it’s just kinda drizzling a little bit,” Tarver said. “In the rain like playing in the rain when you were a kid. We are having a good time.”

Plus, fans don’t want to break the tradition.

"We’ve been tailgating since as long as I can remember, as far as I can remember at least 25 years,” Ashley Hughes said. “And we just love coming out here to support them love coming to the game, had the same seats for years and years. Just seeing everyone rooting on the Cowboys.”

“And every year they get better and better," Briley Hughes added.

This week the Cowboys are taking on the SFA lumberjacks, last season they beat SFA 35 to 0, and fans are pretty confident they will win again today.

“Our boys a playing really good, they are good kids, real good young men, they really are, I’ve been around them a bunch,” Tarver said. “We enjoy their company and they are good hard working young men. Got good leadership.”

Some have even decided to predict the score.

“I predict the Cowboys gone win 28-14,” Hardey said.

If you’re looking for a place to tailgate for next week’s home game. Try out Lake Charles Toyota and KPLC’s Gridiorn Grillin for some good Louisiana cooking.

“Depends on the weather, if its good and cold, cool front comes in we will probably get some gumbo, but otherwise red beans and rice,” Tarver said.

Last week they suffered a 30 to 3 loss against Brigham Young University. Now they are looking for a win today against the Lumberjacks to put them at 4 and 1.

To watch the game, visit the McNeese State University website.

Copyright 2018 KPLC. All rights reserved.
00 2018-10-01
Lake Charles

Cancer patient granted wish of meeting favorite NFL team


Chance Boudreaux, 19, has been an Indianapolis Colts fan for as long as he can remember. Now he’s in Indianapolis to meet his favorite NFL team.

The McNeese student boarded a flight Thursday morning at Lake Charles Regional Airport on the first leg of his journey to Indianapolis, Ind., with his mother, Deleen Boudreaux; his sister, Carley Boudreaux; and his cousin, Jacob Dugas, who is also a huge Colts fan.

The trip is being made possible by The Make-A-Wish Foundation, an organization that arranges experiences or “wishes” to children diagnosed with critical illnesses. Boudreaux has been in remission from large B-cell lymphoma since January. B cells are a type of white blood cell responsible for producing antibodies.

Boudreaux graduated from Barbe High School in May 2016, and was looking forward to his freshman year at McNeese State University. But in June of that year, at age 17, his plans were sidelined when he learned he had cancer.

Boudreaux went through treatment for the disease, which his aunt, Gwen Dugas, described as “grueling.” Things are looking up for Boudreaux now, though. He has been attending McNeese since the spring of 2017, majoring in finance and performing as a member of the drumline for the Pride of Mc-Neese Cowboy Marching Band.

Because he was not yet 18 when he was diagnosed with cancer and started his treatment, Boudreaux qualified for this Make-A-Wish trip.

Boudreaux said he is excited for the adventure.

“We’re going to meet the team and tour the city,” he said of the planned five-day trip.

“We’re going to take lots of pictures,” said mom Deleen.
00 2018-10-01
Monroe

Monroe aviator trying to break world record has landed in Alaska


Mason William Andrews, the Monroe teen working to break a world aviation record, is back in the U.S. as of early Friday.

He plans to be the youngest pilot to circumnavigate the globe, a title currently held by Lachlan Smart, an Australian. Smart was 18 years, 7 months and 21 days old when he completed his flight in 2016.

Andrews took off from Monroe Regional Airport on July 22 and estimated the trip would take about 40 days. From early September through Sept. 19, Mason William Andrews had to wait out monsoons in the Philippines.

On Friday morning, he posted that he had landed safely in Nome, Alaska.

"It seems fitting that the last international flight of my trip consisted of blue skies and grey ones, headwinds and tailwinds, snowy alpine mountains and endless river valleys, deserts and ice. All of this was topped off with a silent still view of the northern lights over the Bering Sea as I was greeted by Anchorage Center," he posted with photos from the flight.

Andrews, 18, a Louisiana Tech University student, already became the youngest pilot to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean after landing in Paris as part of the overall circumnavigation attempt.

Online

To follow the flight:

https://www.medcampsmission.org/
Mason’s MedCamps Mission
Flight tracker: https://bit.ly/2uTzlLr

Follow the story:

September: Mason Andrews is back in the air after round-the-world trip met delays
August: Attempt to break aviation world record meets weather delay
Record-breaking: La. teen pilot crosses Atlantic in quest to circle globe
Takeoff: Louisiana man plans to break world record with round-the-world flight
00 2018-10-01
Monroe

ULM MLS group attends meeting, expo


This summer, two University of Louisiana Monroe’s Medical Laboratory Science students attended the 86th meeting of the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science in Chicago.

The 2018 Annual Meeting featured knowledge and learning experiences that encompassed all parts of the laboratory profession.

This meeting is a premier event for all laboratory professionals and includes more than 15.5 hours of P.A.C.E.-approved education delivered by experts in the medical laboratory.

In addition to the educational sessions, the Clinical Lab Expo provides the medical laboratory professional hands-on experience with the latest in laboratory science and technology. ASCLS holds all of the society’s governance sessions during this meeting also.

Cheyenne Reyes and Natalie Foster, ULM MLS students, attended the meeting. ASCLS student members were provided an opportunity to apply for a grant to assist with travel expenses.

Thanks to the generosity of the ASCLS Student Forum, $1,500 was available for two students.

Reyes was one of the two recipients to receive the ASCLS Student Forum travel grant. She was elected as the Region VII Developing Professional Representative. ASCLS region VII encompasses Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, and Oklahoma.

“The Annual Meeting is planned in conjunction with the American Association of Clinical Chemistry to provide a clinical lab expo, which was one of the most exciting parts about the meeting,” Reyes said. “Being able to see all the new technologies that are up and coming, as well as the incredible scientific advancements all in one place was astounding. The ASCLS Annual Meeting is incredibly intriguing and fun, but also it is imperative to get involved with ASCLS as a student so we are fully aware of the issues facing our profession and can continue to spread awareness among our classmates and friends.”

Debbie Wisenor, MLS Program Director, said the MLS faculty were proud of their successful students.

“The ASCLS Annual Meeting provides the opportunity to expand knowledge through educational sessions and cutting edge technology demonstrations, to network and exchange ideas with medical laboratory science professionals and students, and to serve the profession through involvement in governance,” Wisenor said.
00 2018-10-01
Shreveport

'Riverdawgs' brave mighty Mississippi in summer adventure



00 2018-09-28
Associated Press

Board of Regents plans audit of Louisiana college admissions


Louisiana's top higher education board will audit university admissions across the state, to make sure campuses are following the required minimum standards.

Wednesday's announcement from the Board of Regents comes after Louisiana State University reworked its admissions approach, lessening its reliance on standardized test scores and grade point averages.

Regents staff expect to start their audit process in January and issue a report in the spring.

"Given the heightened interest in admissions standards and the role of the Board of Regents in enforcing standards and expectations, now is clearly the time to take a deep dive into our institutions' compliance," Regents Chairman Bob Levy said in a statement.

The admissions changes enacted by LSU have provoked complaints, including from Regents member Richard Lipsey, an LSU graduate who has helped raise millions for the university.

LSU is planning changes to its admissions process for fall 2019
LSU is planning changes to its admissions process for fall 2019

LSU applicants will have to submit a letter of recommendation from a counselor, teacher or advisor.


Until this year, the state's flagship university required potential incoming freshmen to have a 3.0 high school GPA and a 22 on the ACT college entrance exam to be considered for admission, with limited exceptions.

Now, instead of immediately rejecting an applicant who didn't achieve the minimum GPA and test scores, campus officials also are considering personal essays, outside activities, recommendation letters, and other selling points for students.


LSU President F. King Alexander has said the approach mirrors admissions policies at 80 percent of the nation's flagship universities. He said two data points alone don't necessarily show the likelihood of student success, and he noted the average ACT score this year for incoming freshmen remains 26 even with the changes.

Before de-emphasizing the reliance on GPA and ACT scores, LSU already had been using a different, stricter standard than required by Regents, which started using minimum admissions standards for the state's public four-year universities in 2005.

Under the Regents requirements, LSU's incoming freshmen must have a 3.0 high school GPA or a 25 ACT score, with up to 4 percent of the enrolling class allowed exceptions. Other Louisiana colleges have lower admissions standards and larger percentages of exceptions allowed.

Regents will be looking at the students admitted to campuses under the exception allowances, as part of its review.
00 2018-09-28
Baton Rouge

Board of Regents to audit admission standards at Louisiana colleges


BATON ROUGE, La. (LOCAL 33) (FOX 44) - The body that sets higher education policy in Louisiana will examine whether public four-year universities are following the state's minimum admission requirements.

The Board of Regents plans to start auditing admissions practices in January. The scrutiny comes as Louisiana State University softens its dependence on grade-point averages and test scores, in favor of personal essays, recommendations and extra-curricular achievements.

"Given the heightened interest in admissions standards and the role of the Board of Regents in enforcing standards and expectations, now is clearly the time to take a deep dive into our institutions' compliance," Regents Chairman Robert Levy said in a statement.

Regents staff crafted minimum admission standards in 2001 and enacted them in 2005.

Since 2010, schools have been free to admit a set percentage of students who do not meet GPA or ACT thresholds, but seem deserving of entry. (Regents allows LSU to admit 4 percent of its freshman class as exceptions; the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Louisiana Tech and the University of New Orleans may admit 6 percent of these students; regional schools including Southern University and Southeastern Louisiana University may admit 8 percent of these students.)

According to Regents officials, 1,062 of the 21,529 incoming college students were flagged as exceptions in the Fall 2017 semester. How successful those students — and ones like them — have been since they began school will remain central to the audit.

"Are they getting the support they need? Are they being able to step forward with their degrees? Are they completing their degrees? Are they moving into the workforce? Those are the kinds of questions we have to ask and answer in order to understand if the policy is working," Commissioner of Higher Education Kim Hunter Reed told BRProud.com.

As part of their shift toward "holistic admission," LSU admissions personnel no longer reject students for having lower than a 3.0 high school GPA and scoring below a 22 on the ACT college entrance exam. Critics claim the adjustment opens the state's flagship school to less distinguished students. LSU President F. King Alexander has argued that grades and scores are not the sole indicators of student merit.

Regents hopes to complete its college admissions audit by May or June. How the board would handle violations of standards remains unknown.
00 2018-09-28
Baton Rouge

Southeastern student dies after being hit by car days earlier near LSU, State Police says


A 19-year-old Southeastern Louisiana University student died Wednesday after he was struck by a car days earlier on Nicholson Drive near LSU, said State Police spokesman Sgt. Jared Sandifer.

Blake M. Cordes, of Mandeville, died of his injuries from the early Sunday crash, Sandifer said.

Officials had said Wednesday they suspected Cordes was intoxicated when he was hit by the car.

Cordes was walking on the shoulder of Nicholson Road just north of Ben Hur Road about 1 a.m. Sunday when, for unknown reasons, he stepped into the northbound lane of traffic, Sandifer said. Cordes was struck by a northbound 2015 Hyundai Tucson.

Cordes suffered serious injuries in the crash, Sandifer said, and had been transported to a hospital.

The driver of the Hyundai is not suspected to have been impaired, and her tests for intoxication came back negative. Cordes' toxicology results are pending, Sandifer said.

The crash remains under investigation.

Cordes had been studying kinesiology at Southeastern Louisiana University, said university spokeswoman Tonya Lowentritt. He had been enrolled for the fall 2017 semester at University of Louisiana at Lafayette, according to their registrar, but had never been an LSU student.
00 2018-09-28
Baton Rouge

Who should get into Louisiana universities? Board of Regents to audit schools' admission standards


The policy-setting board for higher education Wednesday initiated an audit of university admission standards after LSU unilaterally lessened the importance of college board tests like the ACT.

LSU’s change to stop automatically disqualifying applicants who didn’t score at least a 22 out of 36 on the ACT has proven controversial.

Critics say the move towards “holistic admissions” threatens to allow less qualified students into the state’s leading university. LSU counters that reviewing essays, recommendations and the student’s achievements provides better indicators of success than relying solely on a test score.

But the Board of Regents set the rules and they want to know how well the admission standards established more than a decade ago are being followed by the public universities.

F. King Alexander: LSU not lowering standards; new 'holistic' method the right choice
F. King Alexander: LSU not lowering standards; new 'holistic' method the right choice
LSU is preparing to announce its largest freshman class in history, and I want to celebrate this accomplishment with you, the Baton Rouge comm…

“We do have the authority to collect data to see if the universities are operating outside the lines,” said Regents Chairman Robert W. Levy. "Given the heightened interest in admissions standards and the role of the Board of Regents in enforcing standards and expectations, now is clearly the time to take a deep dive into our institutions' compliance.”

Just what the board can do about any infractions is still up in the air and will be discussed further once a firmer picture of what’s happening is established, Levy said. But, the Regents distribute the money to the individual schools, so at least one possibility is to withhold funding.

Commissioner of Higher Education Kim Hunter Reed said the Regents also need to analyze if the admission standards are helping identify students who finish their studies and graduate. “We need to know how these standards are working. Are the students successful?” she said.

Amid bumpy financing for Louisiana universities, enrollment rises at LSU, Southern
Amid bumpy financing for Louisiana universities, enrollment rises at LSU, Southern
Despite rocky finances for most of the past decade enrollment at LSU and Southern University is up slightly, according to preliminary figures …

Prior to convening their regular monthly meeting on Wednesday, the Regents shoehorned into a small conference room to hear Larry Tremblay, Regents Deputy Commissioner for Planning, Research & Academic Affairs, explain the specifics of how the audit would work.

For various reasons, the Regents have never looked at how the admissions standards interplayed with how well the students performed. “This is a brand, new procedure,” Tremblay said.

Regents staff will begin taking information from the universities in January. The report is expected to be completed by May or June.

The audit will look at students who were admitted but didn’t meet the institution’s minimum criteria as set by the Regents.

More than just good scores: Here's how LSU's new 'holistic admission' policy works
More than just good scores: Here's how LSU's new 'holistic admission' policy works
As the person most involved in carrying out LSU’s new admissions policy that discounts the importance of college board tests, like the ACT, Jo…

Regents gave, since 2010, the universities a little wiggle room by allowing admittance of a certain percentage of students thought worthy but who failed to meet the criteria.

For LSU, 4 percent of an entering freshman class can be admitted under the exceptions. Up to 6 percent of the students don’t have to meet the standards at statewide institutions, such as the University of Louisiana in Lafayette and the University of New Orleans, and 8 percent at the regional schools, such as Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond and Nicholls State University in Thibodaux.

For the 21,529 students entering college for the Fall 2017 semester, the latest numbers available, 1,062 students or 4.9 percent were flagged as exceptions, Tremblay said.

LSU flagged as “admit by exception” 248 students or 5.1 percent of the 4,883 admitted in 2017, which exceeds the Regents’ amount.

But Tremblay said the LSU situation is a little different because the university adopted admission standards – now a 3.0 grade point average and a 22 out of 36 ACT score – in the 1980s, long before the Regents set its criteria. Regents require a minimum ACT score or a minimum grade point average.

Mark Ballard: You know, this isn't first heated debate over 'holistic' admissions at LSU...
Mark Ballard: You know, this isn't first heated debate over 'holistic' admissions at LSU...
Sometime during the 14th straight day sandblasting rusting metal in the Gulf, I soured on offshore work.

Because Regents have an “or” standard, while LSU had an “and” standard, Tremblay said LSU could still be complying with the Regents.

LSU administrators quietly stopped disqualifying applicants solely because of poor ACT scores with the freshman class that began earlier this month. High school aspirants for LSU’s 2019 fall class, who already are putting together their applications, will have to submit essays and recommendations along with high school transcripts and college board test scores.

The LSU Board of Supervisors didn’t vote on the change in policy as it did in the 1980s when the criteria was established.

In public and in private, LSU Board seemingly in support of new holistic admissions standards
In public and in private, LSU Board seemingly in support of new holistic admissions standards
Two members of the LSU Board of Supervisors voiced their support Friday for the administration’s decision to discount ACT scores and another f…

LSU Board Chairman James M. Williams said the supervisors would release a statement on Sept. 11, but never did. Williams did not return calls seeking to learn why.

After the decision was publicly reported in The Advocate, critics argued that LSU had cheapened its elite flagship status by admitting less qualified students.

“The years and years and years of living by higher standards, and raising the standards,” said Regent Richard A. Lipsey, who has been one of the more vocal opponents, “and we have been successful every single year. Why are we going to this new method?”
00 2018-09-28
Hammond

Southeastern announces 2018 Homecoming queen and beau courts


Fourteen Southeastern Louisiana University students have been chosen as members of the 2018 Homecoming queen and beau courts.

The seven women and seven men will reign over Homecoming festivities Oct. 8-14.

Chosen as members of the queen court are seniors De’Kayta Alex, Natchitoches; Lyndsey Devaney, Hammond; Sydnie McClinton, New Orleans; Gillian Miculek, Gramercy; and Jill Munchausen, Ponchatoula; junior Da Jon Shauntreal Beard, New Orleans; and sophomore Victoria Alexius of Spanish Fort, Ala.

Members of the beau court are seniors Daniel Cuevas, Ponchatoula; Cedric Dent Jr., New Orleans; Claudio Franc, Baia Mare, Romania; Griffin Hakenjos, Covington; and Tyler Olivier, Mandeville; and juniors Bomani Brown Jr., New Orleans; and Matthew Matherne, Amite.

The 2018 queen and beau, the top junior or senior vote-getters in the recent online campus election, will be announced at halftime of the Homecoming football game when the Lions take on Houston Baptist on Homecoming Day, starting at 4 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 13, in Strawberry Stadium.

The court also will participate in Homecoming festivities such as Gumbo YaYa on Oct. 10, the bonfire and pep rally on Oct. 12, and the noon Homecoming Day parade.

The 2018 SLU Homecoming queen court

De’Kayta Alex

Alex is a kinesiology major. She is a member of the Southeastern track and field team, Gamma Beta Phi, Elite Women, Student Athlete Advisory Committee and NAACP.

She is the recipient of the 2017 Leading Lion Leadership Award, is the 600 meter school-record holder, and secretary of S.A.A.C.

Lyndsey Devaney

Devaney, an elementary education major, is a member of Alpha Omicron Pi sorority (where she serves as president), the Thirteen Club, the National Society of Collegiate Scholars and the National Society of Leadership and Success.

She is an Alpha Omicron Pi International Collegiate Woman of Leadership, was named the Division of Student Affairs Freshman Woman of the Year in 2015, and is part of the Southeastern Education Residency program.

Sydnie McClinton

McClinton majors in biological sciences. She is a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority, NAACP, Student Government Association, Elite Women, D.O.A. Honor Society, and Golden Girls.

McClinton is the founder of the Lion 2 Lion mentoring program and has served SGA as a senator and director of leadership development.

Gillian Miculek

Miculek, an accounting/pre-law major, is a member of Alpha Omicron Pi, a College of Business ambassador, vice-president of the Southeastern Diamond Girls, and is an intern to the director of Athletic Advancement for the LAA.

She has been named to the President’s List every semester of her college career and has been featured in the College of Business student spotlight.

Jill Munchausen

Munchausen is an accounting major. She is a member of Alpha Omicron Pi, a 2017 Orientation Leader, and a College of Business mentor and ambassador.

She is the recipient of the Green ‘S’ award, has been named to the Thirteen Club, and works as a manager at Chick fil-A.

Da Jon Shauntreal Beard

Beard, an early childhood education major, is a member of Delta Sigma Theta sorority, Gamma Beta Phi National Honor Society, Elite Women, Black Student Union, and Project PULL, where she is co-coordinator.

She has been named a Project PULL Rising Star, Unsung Hero and has been named to the President’s List.

Victoria Alexius

Alexius, an international management major, is a resident hall advisor and was a member of Project PULL in 2017.

She has been recognized with the Campus Activities Board Achievement Award, RHA Achievement Award, and was selected as an alternate Orientation Leader.

The 2018 SLU Homecoming beau court

Daniel Cuevas

Cuevas, an occupational safety, health and environment major, is a member of Delta Tau Delta fraternity, Catholic Student Association, SGA, and is a DSA Leadership Ambassador.

He has been named to both the President’s and Dean’s lists and is a recipient of the Green ‘S’ Award.

Cedric Dent Jr.

Dent is a social work major. He is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity, where he served as president in 2017 when the chapter was named Outstanding Pan-Hellenic Chapter of the Year. He has been named to the President’s or Dean’s lists each semester of his college career and is the recipient of the 2018 Dr. Lavanner S. Brown Role Model of the Year Award.

Dent will become a published author this fall when his book titled “Searching for Purpose & Understanding: Fulfilling Your Purpose in Life” is released.

Claudio Franc

Franc is a microbiology major. He is a member of Delta Tau Delta, where he serves as vice-president. He is the SGA director of public and governmental affairs, is the Evolve U chair for student presenters, and an Auxiliary Services board member.

He is also a three-time recipient of the Green ‘S’ Award, is a Phi Kappa Phi initiate and Atlantis Program Medical Fellow.

Griffin Hakenjos

Hakenjos is an accounting major. He is a member Delta Tau Delta and Beta Alpha Psi. He is beau of Alpha Omicron Pi sorority and has been named to the President’s List.

Tyler Olivier

Olivier, a marketing major, is a member of Kappa Alpha fraternity, where he served as president and treasurer. He is also a member of Ducks Unlimited and Gamma Beta Phi.

He has been named to the Thirteen Club, President’s List, and the 2015 Southland Conference Academic Honor Roll.

Bomani Brown Jr.

Brown is a business administration major. He is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha and NAACP. He is the former event coordinator for M.A.D.E. Men, a DSA ambassador, and a Project PULL mentor.

Brown is also part of the Intramural Men’s Football championship team.

Matthew Matherne

Matherne is an occupational safety, health and environment major. He is a member of Delta Tau Delta and is a DSA Leadership Ambassador. He has been named to both the President’s and Dean’s lists and was Sigma, Sigma, Sigma sorority’s Man of the Year.

For additional information about Southeastern Homecoming events, contact the Alumni Association at (985) 549-2150 or 1-800-SLU-ALUM or visit www.southeastern.edu/homecoming.
00 2018-09-28
Hammond

Southeastern’s University Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Lab Ensemble to present concert


The Southeastern Louisiana University Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Lab Ensemble will present its first concert of the fall 2018 semester at 7:30 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 1, in Pottle Music Building Recital Hall.

Under the direction of Michael Brothers, lecturer of percussion, and John Madere, lecturer of double bass, the University Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Lab Ensemble concert is free and open to the public.

The Jazz Lab Ensemble program will include “All Blues” by Miles Davis and “Work Song” by Nat Adderly.

The Jazz Ensemble program will include “April in Paris” by E.Y. Harburg and Vernon Duke, transcribed and recreated by Jeff Hest; “Are We There Yet?” by Lyle Mays, arranged by Bob Curnow; “Libertango” by Astor Piazzolla, arranged by Fred Sturm; “4:1,” composed and arranged by John Madere; “La Penultima,” composed and arranged by Ladd McIntosh; “Carmelo’s By The Freeway,” composed and arranged by Bob Florence.

Joining the Jazz Ensemble will be guest saxophone artist Brad Walker, one of the most active and sought-after performers in New Orleans. Walker led the horn section for Nashville mega-star Sturgill Simpson’s world tour of his Grammy-winning album “A Sailor’s Guide to Earth.”

In addition to extensive domestic and international touring, Walker performed with Simpson on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert,” “Conan O’Brien,” “The Daily Show,” “Late Night with Seth Meyers,” and was a featured soloist on “The Tonight Show,” “Saturday Night Live,” and the 2017 Grammy Award telecast.

For more information, contact the Department of Music and Performing Arts at 985-549-2184.
00 2018-09-28
Houma/Thibodaux

Nicholls gala kicks off university president’s investiture



Posted at 1:01 AM
An investiture gala for the Nicholls State University President Jay Clue raised money tonight for the the university’s Bridge to Independence program and greenhouse renovation project.

“A presidential investiture is often a week, and there’s often a gala, and we wanted that gala to be about something more than just that investiture,” Clune said. “We made it a fundraiser for Bridge to Independence, which educates our intellectually disadvantaged students and those who are on the autism spectrum.”

Sean Adams, a Bridge to Independence graduate and employee of the Lafourche Clerk of Court’s Office, spoke about his gratefulness for the program and the university.

“As a college student I was able to expand my mind,” said Adams. “I have grown as a speaker and improved my social and job-readiness skills.”

The gala charged $100 per ticket.

“Half of the proceeds are for the Bridge students and half is going to the greenhouse,” said Mary Breaud, assistant professor of education. “The students in Bridge are going to do internships in the greenhouse when the renovations are finished. We have been doing internships in the culinary industry, and the greenhouse will be an extension of that.”

Clune’s investiture ceremony will be held at 3 p.m. today in Peltier Auditorium, where Gov. John Bel Edwards and University of Louisiana System President Jim Henderson will speak.

Considered one of the oldest traditions in academia, an investiture is defined by the Merriam-Webster dictionary as “the act of establishing in office.” The ceremony is a symbol of passing on the official powers of the president’s office, as well as the responsibility, to the university’s new leader.

Clune became president of Nicholls State University on Jan. 1. Before he was named president, he served as the interim dean of the graduate school at the University of West Florida.

A Houma native, Clune graduated from Nicholls State University with a bachelor of science degree in marketing in 1986. In the fall of 1987, he entered the Peace Corps and spent two years in Guatemala. He received a master’s degree in Latin American studies, with concentrations in history and international business, from the University of Alabama in 1990.

In 1997, Clune obtained his doctorate in history from LSU, where he earned a Fulbright scholarship to study in Seville, Spain.

-- Scott McLendon cane be reached at 857-2204 or smclendon@houmatoday.com. Follow on Twitter @mclendon_b


00 2018-09-28
Lafayette

Celebrating the beauty of UL Alumni Art show


he University of Louisiana at Lafayette's College of the Arts turns out some of the best talent around.

Jader Bomb and Elizabeth Williams
Jader Bomb and Elizabeth Williams (Photo: Kris Wartelle)

You could see that at the recent exhibition showcasing the best works from well known local artists who have ties to the University.

Gary Castille, Melissa Bonin and Muriel Castille
Gary Castille, Melissa Bonin and Muriel Castille (Photo: Kris Wartelle)

The exhibit included artists from around the country and abroad who submitted paintings, photographs and mixed media pieces. A closing celebration for the event was held on Sept. 20 at Fletcher Hall and we could not have been more impressed.

Michael Eble, Chris Bennett and Steven Breaux
Michael Eble, Chris Bennett and Steven Breaux (Photo: Kris Wartelle)

If you have never toured the hall or been to one o their exhibitions, you should put that on your list. Any lover of visual arts is sure to be pleased.

Justin Martin, Ava Martin and Brittney Pelloquin
Justin Martin, Ava Martin and Brittney Pelloquin (Photo: Kris Wartelle)

Randall LaBry and Erin Broussard
Randall LaBry and Erin Broussard (Photo: Kris Wartelle)

Congratulations to all for the participants on a job well done and may you continue to create such delightful treats for the eye.
00 2018-09-28
Lafayette

Apollo 13 pilot speaks at UL Lafayette: Former NASA astronaut compares movie to facts


"Houston, we've had a problem."

It's one of the most quoted — and misquoted — movie lines, thanks to the 1995 film "Apollo 13."

Fred Haise Jr. was there to hear it for real. The former NASA astronaut was a lunar module pilot on Apollo 13, a space mission in April 1970. He logged 142 hours and 54 minutes in space.

Haise, now 84, spoke Wednesday to students of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette’s Department of Mechanical Engineering, most of whom were not alive for the mission. He wore a bright blue bomber jacket with NASA and mission patches.

"How many of you have seen the movie?" he asked an auditorium full of faculty and students, most of whom raised their hands.

Former NASA astronaut and Apollo 13 lunar module pilot speaks Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018, to students and faculty of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette Department of Mechanical Engineering.
Former NASA astronaut and Apollo 13 lunar module pilot speaks Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018, to students and faculty of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette Department of Mechanical Engineering. (Photo: University of Louisiana at Lafayette Office of Communications and Marketing)



Former NASA astronaut and Apollo 13 lunar module pilot Fred Haise Jr., 84, speaks to students and faculty of the University of Lafayette's Department of Mechanical Engineering on Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018.
Former NASA astronaut and Apollo 13 lunar module pilot Fred Haise Jr., 84, speaks to students and faculty of the University of Lafayette's Department of Mechanical Engineering on Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018. (Photo: Leigh Guidry/USA TODAY Network)

Haise, who was played by Bill Paxton in the flick, said Tom Hanks' now-famous line was the only one that was actually said on the mission.

"The rest was Hollywood script-writing," he said.

MORE: Has Lafayette's economy hit bottom? | Places to explore in South Louisiana

But he liked the movie, saying Ron Howard did a good job painting a picture of a crew in trouble — "which we were, deep trouble."

An explosion in one of the oxygen tanks caused severe damage to the spacecraft before it could complete its mission and land on the moon.

They had to power down "the mother ship," as Haise called it, which was meant to never be powered down.

"Initially, we weren't afraid," Haise said. "At the time of the explosion, we thought we had a second good tank."

Former NASA astronaut and Apollo 13 lunar module pilot Fred Haise Jr., 84, speaks to students and faculty of the University of Lafayette's Department of Mechanical Engineering on Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018.
Former NASA astronaut and Apollo 13 lunar module pilot Fred Haise Jr., 84, speaks to students